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The question that New Afrikan Revolutionary Nationalists must address is that 33% of the approximately 2.5 million New Afrikan workers are in unions controlled by the labor aristocracy (bureaucrats) who don’t represent either the class or national interests of New Afrikan workers. It is necessary to organize a revolutionary New Afrikan caucus movement inside these unions to push these unions in a revolutionary direction, and also to form an organization, which represents the national, and class interests of the New Afrikan proletariat. This would link its common interests with the revolutionary sectors of the proletariat inside of the United States imperialist state, the Third World, and the international proletariat in general. Each has a different character and the forms of unity may come in various phases of development. As of 2008, there are 16.9 million members in all trade unions. Of these, 2.4 million are New Afrikan, 1.9 million Hispanic, and 657,000 are Asian American, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.10 The majority of New Afrikan workers are still not unionized, which is a question that the New Afrikan Revolutionary Nationalist movement must seriously address. At the same time, as unemployment is increasing, a sector of the New Afrikan proletariat has fallen victim to bourgeois cultural genocide and are becoming lumpenized. Important to every great national liberation movement is the political socialization of the youth. From 1970 to 1980, the great New Afrikan mass movement for self-determination lost momentum as the state regained the offensive through physical repression and through more subtle methods, including psychological warfare, media genocide, chemical warfare (drugs), and monetary co-opting. As a result, an entire generation of youth has emerged who are more politically backward than the last generation. This proves the point that critical revolutionary political consciousness does not remain intact or a dominant force within the New Afrikan com-munity unless it is institutionalized and transmitted to each forthcoming generation through mass struggle. Beginning in the early 1970s, particularly with the showings of Superfly and Coffy, the pimp, prostitute, and drug-pusher became the glorified hero/heroine of New Afrikan street culture in the inner cities. This psychological media genocide blitz of Black-exploitation films coincided with the state’s flooding of drugs into the inner cities, building the “black mafia” in conjunction with the “white mafia” and the CIA. This altered the images of the New Afrikan liberation fighter who had been the hero/heroine for New Afrikan youth in the late 1960s and early 1970s. They were replaced with the “romanticized” lumpen. Published estimates state that one-third of all New Afrikan men in America are narcotics users. Approximately one million New Afrikan youth between the ages of 11 and 19 make a living from their participation in the drug traffic and are not in the labor market. Approximately three million New Afrikans are part of the drug traffic (selling drugs). Black-on-black crime is the highest ever in the history of the New Afrikan nationality, which says something about their subjective condition. The present situation is a result of the New Afrikan community’s struggle to desegregate public facilities in the South, breaking down the legal barriers that kept them from upward mobility within the capitalist system. As long as segregation existed in the superstructure, New Afrikans, regardless of class mentality or class status within the larger class structure of American society, identified collectively with New Afrikans. What the Black Liberation Movement did not take into consideration is that New Afrikans had been imbued with the same individualistic go-for-self mentality as the white community was imbued with. As the economy expanded in the sixties, and racial discrimination in the superstructure was setback; the class contradictions within the New Afrikan community began to emerge full bloom. 10. www.bls.gov.

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By Any Means Necessary  

Congratulations on reading the first edition of the BAMN News Journal (volumes 1 and 2). This journal will be delivered to you each quarter...

By Any Means Necessary  

Congratulations on reading the first edition of the BAMN News Journal (volumes 1 and 2). This journal will be delivered to you each quarter...

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