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christoph portfolio | selected works


00.contents The following collection of work represents a sample from the first 1.5 years of Christoph Eckrich’s study at Carnegie Mellon University. He is pursuing a b.arch degree with a minor in Intelligent Environments slated for 2021. This portfolio is meant to demonstrate proficiency in thought, illustration, and fabrication. It does not convey a particular narrative or chronology. Christoph is interested in pursuing new technologies in building and design, but is deeply rooted in the long standing discourses that have shaped architecture as a discipline. All work is original content unless noted otherwise.

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01.resumĂŠ / CV

A short synopsis of skills and experiences

02.s.g.u.p.c.

An urban agriculture center in Homewood, PA Sankofa Gardens Urban Permaculture Center

03.drawing/performance A transfer of ideas from object to paper to intangible to object

04.afterglow

A frozen sunrise creating a public space for relaxation and community

05.watson‘17 SHIFT

An identity and branding strategy for an established art festival

06.moment

A hoop house with a unique interaction

07.hive

A parasitic intervention into Hunt Library

08.wean stairwell A colorful installation in a 1971 Brutalist building

09.saco lake cascades A bathhouse situated in the stunning White Mountains

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01.resumĂŠ / CV Contact ceckrich@andrew.cmu.edu 309-319-8582

Education

Carnegie Mellon University Bachelor of Architecture Pittsburgh, PA | 2016 - 2021 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy College Preparatory Secondary Degree Aurora, IL | 2013 - 2016

Honors

Dean’s List, College Honors Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017 IMAGINE: Top 60 at 60 American Institute of Architecture Students Named one of the top 60 architecture students in the country; qualified to work with Disney Imagineers in Summer 2017

Service Experience Apprentice Eckrich Cabinetry | Bloomington, IL | 2013 - 2016 Volunteer / Small Group Leader Habitat for Humanity | Bloomington, IL | 2013 - 2016

Leadership Experience Freedom By Design Project Manager AIAS Carnegie Mellon Chapter | Pittsburgh, PA | Spring 2018 Present Founding member; directed development and planned distribution of winterizing kits to the Pittsburgh community Secretary AIAS Carnegie Mellon University Chapter| Pittsburgh, PA | Spring 2017 - Present Took meeting notes; corresponded with members; organized chapter communications; developed new newsletter platform Student Advisory Council CMU School of Architecture| Pittsburgh, PA | Fall 2017 Present Serves as one of three liaisons between faculty, staff, and students Social Entrepreneurship Chair Leadership Education and Development | Aurora, IL | 2014 - 2016 Developed and taught a social entrepreneurship curriculum to a group of 160 high school students; managed a team of facilitators; networked and hosted events with 30+ professional guests Community Developer Residence Hall 1507 | Aurora, IL | 2014 - 2016 Managed a team of Resident Assistants; planned and facilitated student life programs; lead hall to win 1st place in campuswide competition two years in a row Director of Activism, Vice President Junior Statesmen of America | Aurora, IL | 2014 - 2015 Organized fund-raisers and charity drives for social good; planned events to spread awareness of social issues

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Skills

Work Experience

Software Proficiencies Rhino Grasshopper Python Processing Arduino DIVA T-Splines V-Ray Photoshop Illustrator InDesign Premiere Muse AutoCAD

wats:ON? Festival Across the Arts Director of Promotions | Pittsburgh, PA | Spring 2017 - Present Create visual identity and develop festival brand; design and deploy posters and marketing materials

Fabrication Wood working Model making Digital photography Laser cutting 3D printing CNC Milling Robotic fabrication

Languages English Native / Bilingual German Native / Bilingual French Limited working

Regina Gouger Miller Contemporary Art Gallery Gallery Assistant | Pittsburgh, PA | Fall 2016 - Present Assist with set up/tear down of exhibits; guard works; explain artworks AB Tech Sound Technician | Pittsburgh, PA | Fall 2016 - Present Assist with set up/tear down of shows; mix live audio; analyze acoustics School of Architecture Assistant Videographer | Pittsburgh, PA | Fall 2016 - Present Capture and edit video footage in SoA, mainly of the guest lecture series Teaching Assistant | Pittsburgh, PA | Fall 2017 - Present TA for Introduction to Digital Media, Design Chief for Virtual TA Team Interpunct Editorial Board | Pittsburgh, PA | Fall 2017 - Present Manage and curate website content, assist with writing and laying out various publications CMU Summer Pre-College Architecture Program Teaching Assistant | Pittsburgh, PA | Summer 2017 Taught digital, analogue, and hybrid media courses; organized trips and documented student work Ultra Low Res Studio Intern | Pittsburgh, PA | Summer - Fall 2017 Worked on several installations, assisting in design and fabrication STUDIOGRUBER Intern | Pittsburgh, PA | Spring 2018 Brought on to work on TBD Riverlife project, built presentation models

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02.s.g.u.p.c.

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02.s.g.u.p.c.

“An urban agriculture center in Homewood, PASankofa Gardens Urban Permaculture Center” Pittsburgh, PA Joshua Bard, Tonya Markiewicz Fall 2017

This project embodies two key philosophies. The first is centered around the Twi or Akan word Sankofa that roughly translates to “return and retrieve it”. As an idea it is often associated with the proverb of the same culture: “Se wo were fi na wosankofa a yenkyi,” which translates as “It is not wrong to go back for that which you have forgotten”. The other ideology is permaculture, a way of living in which we understand our systemic relationship to the world around us; it is an approach to finding sustainability in all things around us. This center will combine these two philosophies. Sankofa provides the cautious and wise understanding of our agricultural history, and permaculture provides the way forward. It will serve as a location for the dissemination of this knowledge, the gathering and strengthening of the Homewood community, and a showcase of the many techniques involved in sustainable urban agriculture. Formally the project draws inspiration from the Sankofa Heart, embodying one half in formal built environment, the other incomplete half in landscaped terrain, symbolizing the connection between human and nature.

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previous page • rendered plan with permaculture diagrams current page • top to bottom: circulation, site, and planning diagrams

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current page top • summer render, view from SE entrance current page bottom • longitudinal section

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current page top • winter render, view from NE street corner current page bottom • latitudinal section

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center • summer render, view from SE entrance arranged around • images of the Permaculture Pr


rimer I developed to accompany this project

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top • demonstrating the model’s sectional features; entire site perspective bottom left • aerial view of plan elevation bottom right • aerial view of plan section; cut at 3 ft

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top • detail showing fruit and retaining walls, elevational changes, and scale bottom • detail of winter garden and lattice

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03.drawing/performance

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03.drawing/performance “A transfer of ideas from object to paper to intangible to object” Pittsburgh, PA Kai Gutschow, Nida Rehman Spring 2016 In collaboration with Arula Ratnakar This project was purchased by Dan Martin, dean of the College of Fine Arts, and is currently on display in his office.

Entitled Pascarré, this project was an exercise in process, although what is depicted on the following pages is only the final product. We started out drafting tools, then drafting their motions, then combining this motion with another tool and transferring these twodimensional ideas into three-dimensional space. A full set of construction drawings was created with particular emphasis placed on the tectonics. The joinery in this project uses nearly no glue, instead using several different friction lap joints. The form began with an antique insecticide sprayer and a tool for removing carpentry nails. The linear motion from the first and the rotational motion from the second, as well as a tension over one particular spot present in both movements, are clearly articulated in the final design.

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previous page top • latitudinal view previous page bottom • situated in Dean Martin’s office current page top • longitudinal view current page bottom • stepped ‘wing’ detail

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04.afterglow

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04.afterglow

“A frozen sunrise creating a public space for relaxation and community” Pittsburgh, PA Stefan Gruber - STUDIOGRUBER Spring 2018 In collaboration with Nickie Cheung, Tamara Cartwright, Rebecca Lefkowitz This project won first place in the TBD Riverlife competition put on by Pittsburgh Riverlife.

From the STUDIOGRUBER presentation: “Afterglow will transform the riverfront under Fort Duquesne bridge into a unique public space for relaxing and community events on the water, just steps away from downtown Pittsburgh. The installation captures the motion of a setting sun as it dips into the water of the Allegheny, and creates a series of micro-public spaces along the linear path of the promenade. Brightening-up the highway underpass, the suns provide programmatic differentiation within a unifying and evocative atmosphere.” The project won the TBD Riverlife competition, and will be built in Summer 2018. Key to the project are the planned series of events that will engage the community and help activate the space. The interesting part about the site is how close to downtown it is, and yet how secluded it remains. My responsibilities in the project were final model fabrication, digital modeling, and minor design involvement.

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current page • renders of final proposal following page top • final presentation model following page bottom • diagrams of space defining intervention pieces

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05.watson‘17 SHIFT

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05.watson‘17

SHIFT

“An identity and branding strategy for an established art festival” Pittsburgh, PA Spike Wolff, Eddy Man Kim Fall 2017

The series posters were mailed to art museums and schools nationwide. More info online at watsonfestival.org

The 2017 wats:ON? Festival Across the Arts featured two keystone pieces: one by Hadi Tabatabai, an Iranian-born artist now based in San Francisco, and the other by the team of musician Chris Carlson and local artist Jake Marsico. Both works use the viewer and their perception as part of the piece, an element the poster design reflects as well. “SHIFT challenges realms of phenomenal perception, dislocating conditioned ways of seeing to affect a sense of indeterminacy between physical and perceptual space. The experience of these works allows for a transience of fixed perception and the fluid interplay between the rational and the visceral, revealing the exquisite ambiguity of the sublime.”

This excerpt from the festival reader gives an overview of the theme. The design for this year’s identity uses this as its main inspiration, and opts for a logo that functions differently based on one’s proximity and angle of view. The subtle shifts in size and color are imperceptible in places, obvious in others.

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current page • event poster for ‘Transitional Spaces’

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current page • event poster for ‘Body Drift’

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06.moment

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06.moment

“A hoop house with a unique interaction” Pittsburgh, PA Joshua Bard, Tonya Markiewicz Fall 2017 In collaboration with: Gil Jang, Daniel Noh, Cathy Dong, Angelina Shi, and Owen Haft This project is currently installed in the Phipps Conservatory, providing growing space for their edible garden. It will later be transferred to the University of Pittsburgh Community Garden.

Our design is driven by the demands of accessibility with careful consideration of the specific site conditions that influence growth. The primary purpose is to extend the growing season of the plants inside, but how do we best do this? One factor is, of course, the passive regulation of the environment, but perhaps the more pivotal factor in terms of the plant’s well-being is its maintenance and care. Having a dedicated caretaker for our plants is invaluable to each plant’s growth. This moment of gardener/hoop-house/plant interaction is the most important for the life of our plants and we found it key to make it the most beautiful aspect of the project. Whether that be through an innovative mechanism, an interesting hinge structure, or a striking opening movement, this moment will be the center of our design. MOMENT is the expression of an event that takes place between garden and gardener. This juncture acts not only as protection, but also as presentation. Not a tedium, but an occasion.

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Pre

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Oct ob 14 er th Oct ob 15 er th Oct ob 16 er th

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Moment

B2

Grow Collective

3’ 1”

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

Grow Collective

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

Grow Collective

2’ 4”

Closed Scale: 1’= 1’’

10.9.17

Southeast Elevation

B1

10.9.17

10.9.17 1’ = 1” 1’ = 1/2”

48”

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

Moment

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

Moment 38”

x 8’

34”

Axon. Drawings & Operation

4’

Primary Opening Scale: 1’= 1/2’’

A2

48”

Site Plan | Multiple Scales

ipps Ph

10.9.17

A1

Project Timeline

Oct ob 13 er th

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oin

1’ = 1”

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

Grow Collective

Oct ob 12 er th

ts

en

n po

rgh bu

en le Gard Edib

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

Moment ab -F

r be th te 18

te

Oct ob 11 er th

Pa

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

te

a ric

Grow Collective

rc

Pu

Sep

Oct ob 10 er th

rts

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

s ha

em

Not a tedium, but an occasion.

Pit ts

ate

eM

s As

MOMENT is the expression of an event that takes place between garden and gardener. This juncture acts not only as protection but also as presentation.

Ca rne

Oct ob er 9th

ls

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Sep

Sep

Of course we also cannot ignore the prevailing environmental factors. We must be cognizant of the path of the sun, creating a design that takes advantage of the already excellent exposure on the site. We must understand the varying climates that our design will be utilized in, creating methods for adaptation to the external temperature and conditions. Our forms will follow the constraints of the steel conduit and the effect of heat shrink plastic.

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10.9.17

A0

Table of Contents

This moment of gardener/hoop-house/plant interaction is the most important for the life of our plants, we find it key to make it the most beautiful aspect of the project. Whether that be through an innovative mechanism, an interesting hinge structure, or a striking opening movement, this moment will be the center of our design.

r be th 25

m

te

Sep

r be th 29

m

te

Sep

Our design is driven by the demands of accessibility, with careful consideration of the specific site conditions that influence growth. The primary purpose is to extend the growing season of the plants inside, but how do we best do this? One factor is, of course, the passive regulation of the environment, but perhaps the more pivotal factor in terms of the plant’s well-being is its maintenance and care. Having a dedicated caretaker for our plants is invaluable to the plant’s growth.

er ob h Oct 9t

er ob h Oct 6t

1’ 1”

1’ 2” 6”

Southeast

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

Moment

MOMENT

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

MOMENT

er ob h Oct 4t er ob d Oct 2n

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft 10.9.17

B5 Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

8’ 4’

Grow Collective

Southwest

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

7”

Grow Collective

Northeast

Exploded Axonometric

1’ = 1”

6”

Grow Collective

6”

1’ = 1”

Plan

2”

10.9.17

B3

4”

1’ 1”

1’ 2”

Moment

10.9.17

4”

1’ = 1”

3’ 1” 2’ 6”

2’ 4” 2’

SW and NE Elevations

4’

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

Moment

4”

B4

Moment

Secondary Opening Scale: 1’= 1/2’’

1”

7”

1:1.61 is the golden ratio (φ)

4G

4H

4C

1’ 1”

1’ 1”

2’1”

4F

Spacers

6”

4B

10’ 1F

3’6”

Module 2

2B

9’ 9-3/4” 2C 2B

2D 2A

2A

2C

6’ 2 -1/2”

1’ 1”

2D

1’ 1”

2A

4E

6’ 2 -1/2”

2’ 9 -3/4”

1B

Southeast Elevation

29 current and following page • construction drawings

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

Grow Collective

1’8 1/2”

1C

1B

1F

1H 1D

1E

1A

Used Conduit Leftover Conduit

Conduit Cut Labeled Modules

Dimensions 1’ = 1”

3’5”

1B

1D

6’ 2 -1/2”

1B 1G

1A

1C

6’ 2 -1/2”

2’ 4’

C1

3B

9’ 9-3/4”

2A

Placement

Conduit Cut Sheet

3A

9’ 9-3/4”

Key

10.9.17

1E

3’6”

1’ = 1”

3D

1’ 1”

3D

3’5” 1A

1G

7’ 1”

1’ 1”

1H

1’ 1”

1A

4F

7’ 1”

2’ 9 -3/4”

Grow Collective

B7

3C

1’ 1” 3B

3A

1’ = 1” 2’ = 1”

B6

3C

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

10.9.17

Support Interaction 2’ = 1”

Support Details

10.9.17 Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

Grow Collective

5

1’ 8 1/2”

10’

Module 1

1

4D

2’1” 4A

4H

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

4B

4D

Ratio Diagram

1

4E

4A

1’ = 1”

φ (1.61)

4G

4C

Module 3

1

Southwest Elevation

Spacers

Module 4

Moment

Moment

b

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

φ

Moment

a

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

5

φ (1.61) a+b = b

a


Plan

2A 2A

Module 2

Camera

Assembly

Material Storage

Tools

Allotted 4C

2B

4G

2D

Modules 1/2 4H

2’6”

6’8”

Modules 3/4

4E

4G

1H

1A

1A 1C 4D

4A

4D

1E

4F

4G 4F 3C

3A 3B

3D

1F 4B

2A 2C 2B 2D

1B 1G

1F 1B

1D 1H

1A

1C

3B

3A

Module 3

4E

4F

4A 4D

2’6”

6’8”

90° Cut Fold

4B 4H

Drawings

Cut Conduit

1

1E 3

2

Plastic Cut Labeled Modules

C A A

C A B

3A

Washer

A

A A

B

3B

Hinge Section

3 1/2” 1/8”

Nut

C

1A

71 15 ° 1°

7’’

6-1/2’’

3’ 10-1/2’’

Plastic Cut Scale: 1’= 1/3’’

A

A A

1/16”

Bolt Type B

A

A

A A

4A

1B

164°

163° 3’

164°

2 4’

1

5’

4’

°

178°

178°

4’ 4’ 4-1/2’’

C C A C C C

A A

C

B A

C

C A

2A

Bolt Type A

C

C A

A

B

C

C C C

B C

2B

Cut Conduit 2A

2B

4H 1 1/2” 1/4”

Total Cost: 3”

Material Description Amount Price Per Cost

Conduit Plastic Sheet Bolt Type A Bolt Type B Nut Washers PVC Tape

10’ Length 3-1/2” Length 1-1/2“ Length 1/16” Thickness 10’ Length Double-Sided

13 tubes 266 sq ft. 4 40 44 24 1 tube 1 roll

$2.61 per 10’ $0.10 per sq ft. $1.19 per bolt $8.24 per 50 $5.50 per 25 $2.68 per 25 $2.17 per 10’ $19.97 per roll

$33.93 $26.60 $4.76 $8.24 $11.00 $2.68 $2.17 $19.97

$109.35

164°

139°

4’

1 5’

A A A

C

A

C A

A

A A

A B

C C A A

Spacing Elements

Washer

Nut 1B 4A

1A

3B

4B

3-3/8’’

10.9.17

C4

4’ 4-1/2’’

Plastic Cut Sheet

4’ 4-1/2’’

1’ =1/2’’

2’

3-3/8’’

10 108° 5°

3

1’ = 1/3”

10.9.17

3’

8-3/8’’

163°

8”

8”

73/

8”

73/

8”

73/

73/

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

Moment

1'-8 13/16"

1'-9 1/16”

1’ 91/2”

1’ 91/2”

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

Moment

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

Moment

3’

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

3’

8-3/8’’

10 108° 5°

18’ 11‘’

Bend Sheet

C3

4’

Grow Collective

1’ = 3/4”

10.9.17

164°

°

C7

4C

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

139

141

A A

10.9.17

4E

4’ 4-1/2’’

A A

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

90°

4’ 4-1/2’’

1’ = 1”

4C

4A

Grow Collective

90°

°

Moment

4’-4 1/4”

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

125°

2

141

Joint Typologies

3B

8”

90°

163°

C10

2D

2'-7 7/16" 73/

2'-8 1/2"

10.9.17

4A

8”

90°

1'-5 7/16"

3’

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

1D 3D

4B

4D

4

2’ 6’’ 11-7/8’’

15

7/8

1’ 1-

’’

2’ 10-1/2

Grow Collective

1C 4’-3 1/2” 8 1/4"

3’

188°

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

2A

2'-7 3/8" 73/

90°

10 5/8"

10.9.17

2B 4F

Moment

1B 8”

2'-7" 73/

90°

140°

C6

2C

3A

1'-11 1/4"

3

4’ 4-1/2’’

D3

1H

3D

8”

90° 1’1”

4’1 1/4”

188°

1’ = 6” 1’ = 1’

Module 1 1E

3C 3D 4G 4H

14’ 5-1/4’’ ’’

Hinge Detail

3C

4’2”

1G 1H 2C 2D

2B

2’ 10-1/2

10.9.17

1A

1G

1'-4 3/8"

90°

°

55

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

1F 1F 4’’

Grow Collective

1A 140°

4’2”

1’ = 1”

3C

90°

8 1/16"

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

1G 2'-5 5/8"

2A

125°

Moment

Conduit

1D 4C

Materials List & Costs

Plastic Drill Hole at Apex of Bend 73/

C2

Conduit Drill Sheet

5

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

Corner Joint Type C 3A

160°

Grow Collective

1D Plastic-Conduit Connection 2B

3A

4’3 1/2”

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

Drill Hole at Apex of Bend

1B

2'- 7 1/16"

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

Plastic-Conduit Connection Double ConduitSided Tape 3A

Moment

2B

10.9.17

Plastic

Joint Type A

C9

Double Sided Tape 2D

90°

90°

1’ = 2”

1B 1'-5 1/2"

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

1B Joint Type A 2'-7"

90°

Moment

1C

3B

Grow Collective

2D

90° 1'-10 7/8"

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

Conduit

Conduit

Moment

1A

1A 3D

10.9.17

Joint Type B Conduit

4’-1 1/4”

140°

D2

Joint Type B PVC Pipe Conduit Bolt Type B

1’ = 1”

3D

125°

4E

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

Nut Bolt Type B

1’ = 1”

160°

3'-8"

Grow Collective

PVC Pipe

Nut

Frame Modules

Nut

4’-4 1/4”

11 3/4"

Clearances

1A

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

2B

Grow Collective

Nut

Bracket

Moment

2B

90°

2’

Component Location

Bracket

90° 3'-8 3/8"

°

1A

1E

1A

2'-7 7/8"

7’’

Bolt Type B 10 3/8"

140°

1° 71 15

1E

160°

1E

3'-8 1/16"

2C 4F 10"

3'-7 11/16"

Section Certain holes are only drilled after the piece is bent. The hole is drilled at the apex of the bend, no matter the piece.

10.9.17

1’ 6”

Joinery

1’ 6”

1A

1F

C5

1A

Bent Drilling

1’ = 1”

1D

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

1F

Grow Collective

1’ 6”

C8

1’ 6”

1B

D1

1E

10.9.17

1C

1D

1’ = 2”

1B

Drills at the end of each piece are measured 1/2” from the end.

10.9.17

Drill Marker

3’ = 1”

1H

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

1’ 6”

Grow Collective

2A

1’ 6”

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

2D

Moment

3D

1'-2 9/16"

8° 10 105°

1G

10.9.17

1’ 6”

Joinery

1’ 6”

1’ 6”

C5

1’ 6”

3B

4E

1’ = 1”

4D

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

3A

Grow Collective

1’ 6”

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

1’ 6”

Moment

1’ 6”

2A

Frame Modules

1’ 6”

3’ 6”

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

3’ 6”

3’ 6” 4'-7 13/16"

8° 10 105°

1E

2B

Grow Collective

3’ 6”

1’ 6”

1C

°

2C

125° ’’

3C

2'-3 9/16"

55

4E

7/8

1’ 6”

4B

Christoph Eckrich Cathy Dong Gil Jang Angelina Shi Daniel Noh Owen Haft

4C

3'-6 3/8"

Moment

4D

5° 15

4A

Studio Set-Up

4H

1’ 1-

4F

Hoop House Design/Build Phipps Conservatory Edible Garden

4C

3'-5 5/8"

Grow Collective

4G

4

’’

163°

3’

4’ 4-1/2’’

4’ 4-1/2’’

4

Cut & Fold Scale: 1’= 1/2’’ 4’

Bolt Type B 3A

3A

A C A

2A

A

Corner Joint Type C

4A

3A

4B

Module 4

Cut PVC

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31 current and following page • photographs of final installation


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07.hive

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07.hive

“A parasitic intervention into Hunt Library” Pittsburgh, PA Kai Gutschow, Kent Suhrbier Spring 2016 This project received top commendations from the studio coordinator and won two studio awards.

Although it is a key and frequently used building on Carnegie Mellon’s campus, Hunt Library is an old building with limited potential for minor renovation and rejuvenation. Improvements have been made, but none fully address the problems of limited study space, limited exposure to the environment, and painful circulation. We were tasked with designing a parasitic insert to address these key problems and further the discourse of what a modern library should be. The resultant project utilizes the existing formal system of sticks and planes to create a porch-like structure that bridges several floors and entails study spaces for groups of varying sizes. It provides natural light and ventilated spaces for reading and studying; creates new circulation routes between key areas; and adds an outdoor extension to the existing cafe area. The form and theory behind the design were inspired by stream of consciousness writings about the future of the library typology. These writings ultimately resulted in the development of a theoretical structure based on the workings of hives in the natural world.

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current page • axonometric section, looking N to S following page • exploded axonometric

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36


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current page top • view from ground floor interior current page bottom • view of lower study room looking upward


current page top • view from fourth floor entrance current page bottom • view from third floor entrance

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current page top • experiential collage

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fifth floor plan

third floor plan

fourth floor plan

second floor plan


current page • various views of models upper photos: intervention-only model lower photos: context-inclusive model

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08.wean stairwell

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08.wean stairwell

“A colorful installation in a 1971 Brutalist building” Pittsburgh, PA Jakob Marsico - Ultra Low Res Studio Summer/Fall 2017 In collaboration with Alvin Wong

An immersive installation done for Carnegie Mellon University’s UPLift Challenge, aiming to activate and enlighten one of the more depressing spaces on campus. Three panels, each consisting of 30 custombuilt acrylic light tubes which bisect a floating plane at a fixed angles with varying amounts of rotation. The panels were developed in unison to create a cohesive motion across all three sections, relating to the forces of an electromagnetic field. Color is a primary driver of the installation; existing light fixtures are gelled rose and amber, and the tubes cycle through warm and cool colors throughout the day. I was an intern on this project under Jake Marsico’s Ultra Low Res Studio. My involvements consisted of scripting in grasshopper, laying out the final design, and fabricating the frames and light tubes.

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previous page top • variations in time of day previous page bottom • close-up of light poles

current page top • close-up of light poles current page bottom • final panel layout

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09.saco lake cascades

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09.saco lake cascades “A bathhouse situated in the stunning White Mountains� Pittsburgh, PA Jeremy Ficca, Jeffrey King Spring 2018

Situated atop a rocky forested outcropping overlooking Saco Lake in rural New Hampshire, this bathhouse provides a surprising and well deserved repose for passing hikers as well as creating a destination for explicit travelers. The process of arriving at the final design was lengthy; beginning with understanding the material attributes of wood, concrete, and water, developing this understanding further into form based around the natural containment of water in basins, and ending with a discovery of a precise relationship with the site. There is an intensional stark divide between outside the bathhouse and in. The long abstract volume of the structural retaining wall accentuates this contrast, as well as creating anticipation by elongating the entry sequence. The pools are stepped and irregular, creating an environment that must be explored and discovered, where the visitor is constantly in some body of water.

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current page • board one; section perspective, lattitudinal sections, exploded axonometric


following page • board two; approach render (top), interior render (bottom), hallway render (right)

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SACO LAKE CASCADES

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The project draws heavily upon several precedents, ranging from remarkable environmental conditions to thermal dynamics. Despite this, the focus remains on the experience of the actor visiting the baths. The approach is strongly choreographed, while leaving the experience inside open for visitors to meander through and discover on their own. Upon approach all one sees is an alien object embedded in the landscape; a pure, abstract volume manifested as a long wall. Entering through what is realized to be two walls piercing the landscape, one retaining one filtering, a visitor walks off of the natural topography straight into a vestibule with options to store their baggage and change their clothes. Before entering the bathhouse one must walk through a cleansing shower, beginning the process of separation from the outside world and in. The main circulation through the bathhouse happens between the filtration wall and the retaining wall, visitors will continually pass back and forth through the filtration wall, each time catching a glimpse of the magnificent view framed at the end of the passage. The perforations on the filtration wall are created as an extension of the structural logic of the envelope. These provide openings not only for circulation, but for light, views, and escaping steam from the saunas below. Nearly every surface in the bathhouse is covered in some amount of water, varying in depth and temperature throughout. The pools are arranged in a terraced fashion, inspired by the healing hot springs of Pamukkale. As one meanders throughout, exploring and discovering the different sized and heated pools, spaces, rooms, and views reveal themselves to the visitor. The water is filtered through from the top of the space, flowing downwards over the edges of the pools, following gravity and seeking its level as water loves to do. Because of this design choice, the general trend of pools is warmer the higher up or closer to the back of the structure you are, again following the natural thermal conditions of heat rising. The structure is diagrammatically a retaining wall with a half arch resting against it. The one large thick wall does most of the structural work, with the rest of the building being anchored to the ground, and the beams supporting only the envelope. The project is sited in such a way as to cut into the hillside above the lake, providing a dynamic view across the valley, and allowing for an interplay of the natural topography with the intervention.


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top • early formal studies

bottom left • site model, entire view bottom right • site model, close-up view previous page • board three, longitudinal section, plan, site plan

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top • sectional model, frontal view bottom left • sectional model, interior view bottom right • sectional model, rear view

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appendix.biography

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appendix.biography “Talk to me about music�

Chicago, IL | Schifferstadt, GER Franz and Lucille Eckrich Summer 1998

Christoph Eckrich is foremost a student, immersing himself in learning and the university environment when possible. He is pursuing a b.arch degree at Carnegie Mellon University, but has many side interests including, but not limited to: emergent technologies; media art and architecture; music appreciation; and travel. He is the head of promotions for the wats:ON? art festival; videographer for Carnegie Mellon’s School of Architecture; and a teaching assistant. He works for the campus tech crew, doing work with sound mixing and calibration for visiting artists, as well as at the Miller Gallery in Pittsburgh, PA. During whatever free time that falls in his lap, he reads, bikes, listens, plays, and makes lots of coffee. His work has a lot of room for developing interests, but is headed towards a particular emphasis on activating neglected spaces and communities, challenging theoretical norms, and integrating emerging technologies.

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christoph ceckrich@andrew.cmu.edu | 309-319-8582

Portfolio v.1  

A sample of work from my first 1.5 years of study at Carnegie Mellon University's School of Architecture.

Portfolio v.1  

A sample of work from my first 1.5 years of study at Carnegie Mellon University's School of Architecture.

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