Issuu on Google+

C HEL SEA KI L BURN Collected Works 2010-2014


Academic Work Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

Studio Work Watershed Observatory Beach Pavilion

Fall 2011 Fall 2011

Chicago Studio, Chicago, IL

Adaptive Reuse Uptown Market

Spring 2013

PBSA, Dusseldorf, Germany

Narrative + Place Egocentric House

Fall 2012


uXo Collective Installation Faculty Lecture Posters Space of Wonder Installation

Chicago Studio + Andrew Balster

Fall 2013 Fall 2013

Collaboration Methods Journal Co-Editor

Summer 2013

Personal Work Alternative Media Screen Printing Pottery Charcoal

Fall 2012 Fall 2013 Summer 2012


In a site that is so heavily bound to both human and natural history, resolving a conflict may be hiding a variation of beauty.


Watershed Observatory Bryson City, NC The watershed observatory is a small, but growing, organization arising in response to the multiplicity of issues that surround the conversation of water in the Blue Ridge region and beyond. An extension of dialogue between concerned citazens and scientists, public and private interests, and local authorities, the Watershed Observatory will enable the furthering of awareness of water issues in an active, participatory manner. Program: Library of Water: 3000 s.f. Water Room: 3000 s.f. -Indoor/outdoor rooms -Exhibition and gathering spaces Water Gardens: 3000 s.f. -Access and movement between building elements Fieldwork Support Spaces: 3000 s.f. -Map room -Ecological research support -Three apartments for visiting researchers -Fieldwork storage and cleaning Recreation Support Spaces: 3000 s.f. -Bathrooms and changing area -Summer event space


2 Water Rooms 3 Covered Truss/ Water Garden 4 Research Support 5 Reasearcher Housing 6 Office Space 7 Dock 8 Parking/ Access

8

N

1Tower: Library of Water


Appalachia exhibits characteristics of collage, seen in the settlement patterns of houses, fields, and roads. By meshing with modernity, an identity assembled from memories, images, traditions, and techniques must be produced.

i stand in good relation to the earth tsoai-talee: rock-tree-boy -n. scott momaday


Library of Water


The Library of Water serves as a man-made marker against the forested skyline. Instead of conjuring images of books, the Library is intended to serve as an inverted observatory where an individual can meditate his surroundings.

Tower: Library of Water 0

15

A-A

20’

N

A

A


Main Building


1   Entrance Main Mass: Water Rooms 2   Gallery/ Exhibition Space 0

15

20’

3   Gathering Space N

UP

4   Office Space 5   Access to Recreation

UP

6   Bathrooms/ Changing Areas

4

Main Mass: Water Rooms 20’

Main Mass: Water Rooms Upper 15

N

20’

UP

UP

UP

0

UP

4 2

N

1 UP

3

UP

UP

Upper Ground UP

4

UP

4

UP

UP

Upper 3

2

6

UP

1

5 6

Ground UP

UP

UP

Lower

3

6

UP

2

1

5 6

1   Entrance

Lower

Ground

2   Gallery/ Exhibition Space 6

3   Gathering Space

5 6

UP

UP

1

UP

15

UP

0

4   Office Space


Model of Main Building, Research Support, and Bridge Bass wood, plastic siding, corrugated paper


The two central buildings on this campus are connected with a covered truss bridge. The bridge acts as mediator between the environment and the built world, where an openness and vulnerability occurs: aquatic plants are allowed to flourish in the planter area, and then naturally return to the river when flooded.


By playing with the vernacular architecture of this beach town, a new typology is created. What was once pristine and ideal is uncovered; a reconstruction of form exposes irony.


Beach Pavilion Seaside, FL in collaboration with James Heard As a means to provide a portion of district power to the Seaside, Florida community and to rebuild one of the boardwalk structues which was destroyed by a recent hurricane, this competition proposes the design of a dune crossover structure that incorporates current photovoltaic technologies integrated with the architectural design. The project should include the following program: -A 150 foot long linear footbridge from the street to the beach crossing the fragile dune structure. The structure should be constructed with minimum earth impact on the beach and dune structure -A place for pause and reflection and beach overlook at an appropriate mid section of the crossover. This section shall be wheelchair accessible from the street. -A street side enclosed structure totaling 300-500 s.f. which will contain the following: -An information booth explaining the photovoltaic charging concept with two power converters and a meter on display -Public showers and bathrooms -Storage for beach chairs -A minimum of 15kW of photovoltaic panels integrated into the roof and shading canopies of the structures. -A concept for nighttime lighting of the walkover structure that can be adjusted to provide ambient light for beachgoers but not distract turtles during hatching season

Runner-up (out of 93)


Above: Module of covered walkway Opposite: Information booth, housing for showers Cast, single-pour Rockite, trace paper, bass wood, packing paper and screen printed acrylic sheet


A harsh environment sometimes calls for a harsh narrative-- when can a space act willingly without human presence?


Egocentric House Fuerteventura, Canary Islands Fall 2012 We expect architecture to assign to us interactions, offer support, and provide an environment for our being. We build relationships with our homes, which are beyond a functional or rational consideration. The home acts as a reflection of the inhabitant because it is not rigid, and because our consciousnessentrenched ideas from the surrounding space are projected onto architecture. The house is suffering from “histrionic personality disorder.” In order to react against the confinement produced by this “egocentric” desert dwelling, one must physically alter its structure, open its doors, and navigate its labyrinthine program.


Beginning the project led to a series of study models where each programmatic element was broken into a serparate form. From there, the plan emerged with a courtyard at the center. The entire building is oriented so as to emphasize the sky and ocean, the two most powerful forces at play in this extreme environment.


+1 floor +6.00 feet

ground floor +0.00

-1 floor -2.00 feet

N

-2 floor -4.00 feet

0123456789-

well threshold garden sleeping living eating pool reading hall washing


The surrounding images represent the various interior spaces in the body of the house. Clockwise from right, they are: the kitchen, entrance threshold, bathroom, bedroom, reading room, pool, and hearth. Each space is made to be a completely interior space with limiting views to the horizon, so as to allow for the inhabitant to focus on his or her thoughts. It is an interesting relationship, however, when the house coerces the inhabitant to act in a certain way. Is it actually that this control can be exerted by an architecture, or is it the inhabitant projecting onto the space?


Chicago Studio Uptown Market Spring 2013 in collaboration with James Heard Chicago Studio is an innovational learning environment for architecture and design that actively links education and practice. Students learn the art of building by personally witnessing the process and environment where architecture is created. It provides the opportunity to experience contemporary practice firsthand, with all of its complexity, beauty and inevitable shortcomings giving students the confidence, tools and inspiration to become future leaders in the profession. CHICAGO STUDIO should become a part of a greater movement in higher education that makes academic and professional methodology less divided and more aligned, which will create stronger fields collectively. Two entities that are inherently connected never benefit from a lack of dialogue or participation, and there is serious opportunity for the advancement of our profession through the creative exchange of ingenuity and experience. CHICAGO STUDIO provides this exchange in an extraordinary environment where students work next to innovative teams and visionary leaders. -Andrew Balster, director of Chicago Studio The focus of this year’s Chicago Studio was adaptive resuse, since it is a topic that is not normally discussed in the typical classroom setting. With the city of Chicago and its magnificent building history at our disposal, it seemed like a natural fit to take on one of the historic neighborhoods as a playground for exploring re-use and re-adaptation. Students were paired, and each given a site within the Uptown district. Programs were loosely provided, but each team had the opportunity to improvise and build upon what is an immensely rich community.


Sketches

180

The site at 1050 West Wilson Avenue was first used as a vaudeville theater in 1909, and was converted into a bank in 1919. The bank passed through several branch owners before closing its doors in 2011, leaving the one-hundredyear-old building empty and strewn with debris. In an effort to maintain the historical details of the building and to reference its past lives, we proposed a reinstallation of a balcony that would have once seated patrons. The atrium was to become a stage of sorts, inhabited by a company of constructs. In the back of house and in the lower level, auxillary functions would take place and enhance the experience of the main space.

Sketches

178

179

181


Above: Generating Images Left: Modeled sections from chipboard


1 Heritage Bike Shop 2 Photography Studio 3 Gallery Space 4 Balcony 5 Atrium Forum 6 Skywells 7 Office Space 8 Roaster Storage 9 Roaster 10 Bar 11 Kitchens 12 Restaurant 13 Liquor Sales

The storefronts, which would house small start-up or local businesses, were first conceived of as rectangular containers, just like shipping containers.From there, they developed into more ship-like follies, which would create whimsical, playful spaces for interaction with products in-the-round. Three “constructs� were designed to house accessories, clothing, and media material. Each construct is formed so as to display a large amount of products in various levels of section.

5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

6

4

3

7

2

8

1

9

13

12

11

10

Heritage Bike Sh Photography Stu Gallery Space Balcony Atrium Forum Skywells Office Space Roaster Storage Roaster Bar Kitchens Restaurant Liquor Sales


Renderings of Atrium Top: from front Bottom: from back


uXo Collaborative 2013 As a group of not only friends but young architects, we are concerned about the state of our field as we enter it. By operating as the uXo Collective, we are able to write and create pieces that express our opinions and communicate idea(l)s. uXo is comprised of Ashton Hamm, Daniel Hemmendinger, James Heard, Matthew Ridgeway, and myself. Our process of collaboration is rarely consistent, but is marked by an unyielding desire to realize spaces and objects. Our work takes disparate forms and mediums, from built models and assemblages, to screen prints, photographs, and sculture. This notion of parallel creation and process is essential to our work. Obviously we are unsure of where this collaboration will lead, but it has become an amazing way to explore while helping out with advertisements or announcements in the school or in the community.


Faculty Lecture Posters Fall 2013

Digi

Faculty Lecture Posters (Clockwise, from right) Keith + Marie Zawistowski: Building Architecture Humberto Rodriguez-Camilloni: Faculty Lecture Series Posters The Wonders of Machu Picchu Digital Media on Bristol & Museum Board Markus Breitschmidt: Architecture comes from Architecture Jim Jones: Influential Experiences Medhi Setareh: Concrete Construction + Research

Architecture in the Keith and Marie Zaw 10.03.13

Elizabeth Grant: The Thin Green Line Architecture in the Making Keith and Marie Zawistowski 10.03.13

Influential Experiences Jim Jones

Each of the10.10.13 images was meant to be a direct result of process. A theme of making pervaded the series, and we attempted to engage such thinking in this set of announcements.

Influential Experien Jim Jones 10.10.13


Faculty Lecture Series Posters Digital Media on Bristol

MARKUS

M E H D I _ S ETA R E H 2:00 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31 — HANCOCK

BREITSCHMID

The Majesty and Mystery of Machu Picchu 2:00 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 — HANCOCK Humberto Rodriguez-Camilloni 10.24.13

Architecture is Deri Markus Breitschmid 09.19.13

Architectural Structures, Research, and Teaching Mehdi Setareh 10.31.13

The Thin Green Line Elizabeth Grant 09.26.13


Thesis Exhibition Posters Fall 2013


Space of Wonder Installation Fall 2013

We have had some success working in installations, as it allows for an interaction of materials and space. The pictured installation, which took place in the lobby of Cowgill Hall, was paired with the creation of a poster to celebrate a lecture given by Manuel Aires Mateus. The two different forms worked in tandem to express an idea inherent in the work of the school and within the work of Aires Mateus’ office. Test compression cylinders were used to express an idea of permanence and disintegration via concrete. The pieces were arranged in a grid corresponding to the grid of the ceiling coffers, and in a way so that the pieces appeared to be lessening from one corner and radiating to the next.


Space of Wonder Installation Cowgill Plaza Fall 2010

Space of Wonder (Disintegrating Array) Concrete Test Cylinders 2011


Chicago Studio Co-Editor of Methods This selection of professional work features work done on the Chicago Studio’s publication featuring student work. Two of my colleagues and I spent six weeks editing and compiling written pieces, photographs, and project spreads to create a publication that showcased the range of work produced in the program.

Personal Work Screenprinting Pottery

One of the most exceptional features of Virginia Tech’s architecture program is its range of facilities. I became interested in a few different processes, and taught myself how to produce prints and throw pottery. Not only were these processes interesting, they provided a relaxing way to work creatively outside the immediate bounds of architecture. The following prints were directly inspired by Victorian artist Aubrey Beardsley’s work. Working solely in black and white has been a way to reduce the variables when screenprinting so as to focus on line and form. The two tones create sharp, dynamic images that can still incorporate intricate detail. As an architecture student, it is often difficult to realize projects fully. Pottery and ceramics allowed for the entire process of making to occur in a condensed scale. It is a beautiful thing to be able to design, create, and finish a product by the end of a semester. Although my work may not represent the most sophisticated handling of the material, my gain from working with clay was enormous.


Chicago Studio Journal With James Heard + Matthew Ridgway Summer 2013


Screenprints Fall 2012

Top:Image for paper on Aubrey Beardsley Bottom: Poster for Finals Week


Pottery Fall 2013


ceakilburn@gmail.com 864-993-8015


Chelsea Kilburn- Sample Works