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Published by the Centennial College Student Association Inc.

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November 2013, VOL 18 ISSUE 16

#YUP FULL COVERAGE PAGES 10-11 12-13

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The CCSAI Board Profile gives you a chance to meet CCSAI Board Members. This month Rhonda Kirkland and Ryan Liu.

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Photos from all the exciting CCSAI events in October, including Red Room, Street Ball Kings and the Ashtonbee BBQ.

IRECTOR

5000 03 college.ca

P YOU GATING S,

MPUS

TUDENT

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October is the time of year when pumpkins are everywhere. Did you know they are also delicious and nutricious?

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It can be hard for students to find the time to workout and stay healthy. Here are some easy calisthenic tips to get you going.

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Centennial Soccer has seen a big change with the debut RCAF air gunner Albert Wallace tells Ted Barris the harrowing tale of being a of their home pitch. This is just one factor in the success prisoner of war during World War II. Little did he know, an escape plan was of the Men’s season. being hatched underneath the hut he called home.

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Get your quick fix CALENDAR PAGE 4

INFOGRAPHIC PAGE 5

HOW-TO

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Ever wanted to go to Advertising Week in New York City? The Courier follows some Centennial students as they do just that.

2013-08-29 12:29 PM

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The November Issue is here, and with it comes stories of remembrance, comfort food, summer sports winding down and school gearing up. As usual we also have photos from the exciting CCSAI events that happened between issues. October was a busy month with the end of welcome back events, the biggest Red Room we have hosted yet, the electrifying Street Ball Kings at the AWC and much more. If you didn’t get a chance to attend these events, look inside, on ccsai.ca and follow our Facebook and Twitter feeds to keep up-to-speed with upcoming CCSAI events. Don’t forget we are always loking for interesting stories, photos and content from around the College, so feel free to let us know if you have any ideas or would like to contribute to the CCSAI Courier. Geoffrey Mosher Communications CCSAI 416-289-5000 Ext. 8713 gmosher@centennialcollege.ca


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Rhonda Kirkland l l l

Hometown: Toronto, Ontario, Canada Program: Early Childhood Education Inspired By: One of my ECE teachers - she has always motivated me

to keep going. She is always telling my that I’ll do fine, not to give up on myself. If she didn’t motivate me, I probably wouldn’t be where I am right now in my life. She is also a mature student, currently taking online courses herself. l Trivia: I took my first trip on an airplane in October. l Office Hours: Wednesday 8:30am to 12:30pm, Thursday 8:30am to 12:30pm and 3:30pm to 4:30pm, Friday 1:30pm to 4:30pm.

416-289-5000 EXT. 6927

CONTACT

CAMPUS DIRECTOR 416-289-5000 ext. 3203 rliu@centennialcollege.ca

RLIU@CENTENNIALCOLLEGE.CA 416-289-5000 EXT. 3203

Ryan Liu l l l

From: Haparanda, Sweden Program: Broadcasting and Film Inspired By: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Kobe Bryant & Steve Jobs. All

three of them have indomitable will. They all achieved their success through hard work, passion, dedication, believing in themselves and not listening to other’s when they were told it couldn’t be done or that they wouldn’t succeed. l Trivia: I tried dog meat when I was in China (and don’t worry, I have a dog and I would never eat her). l Office Hours: Tuesday and Wednesday, 10:30am to 3:30pm pg 3

“CAN I HELP YOU WITH: NAVIGATING CCSAI SERVICES, EVENTS, CAMPUS ISSUES, CCC STUDENT CENTRE”

CONTACT

RKIRKLAND@CENTENNIALCOLLEGE.CA


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NOVEMBER... at a glance

NOV

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Western Garba AWC/ Main Events Hall, Free for Students

NOV GRADUATE PHOTO DATES Progress Campus

Student Centre, November 4-8 , 9am-6pm November 18-20 9am-6pm

Morningside Campus

Room 113, November 11-13, 9am-4pm

CCC

Room 113, November 14-15, 9am-4pm

Ashtonbee

Student Centre Boardroom, November 21-22, 9am-4pm

NOV

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Remembrance Day

NOV

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Diabetes Awareness Day

REMEMBER - AT CENTENNIAL, THE EVENTS ARE BIGGER! Ask us about the new AWC!

NOV

NOV

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Cetennial Men and Women @ La Cite 2pm

NOV

Social Justice Speaker Series Michelle Davis from METRAC speaks on ‘Violence against Women and Girls.’ Noon - 1:30pm, Fireside Gallery, Progress Library

NOV

DEC

07

Basketball Game

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Board Meeting

Breakfast with Santa

Centennial Men and Women @ Durham College 6pm

@ Progress

@ the AWC

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Basketball Game

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NOV

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Basketball Game Centennial Men and Women VS. Sir Sanford Fleming 8pm

Basketball Game

Centennial Men and Women @ St. Lawrence 1pm pg 4

ANY QUESTIONS? - JUST ASK!


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Graphic courtesy// César Augusto Ojeda All information courtesy// Mark Toljagic

There are over 180 hand dryers around the college that we use everyday, here are some of their specifications:

World Dryer Air Max

World Dryer SMARTdri

Dyson Airblade

$327.00

$414.00 $516.00

$1,199.00

H = 11.3” W= 9.6” D = 8.1”

H = 12.5” W= 9.3” D = 7.6”

H = 25.38” W= 12.20” D = 10”

8 lbs

11.6 lbs

22 lbs

15 sec

12 sec

12 sec

83 dB

73 dB*

84 dB

*Adjustable 2300 1600 1250

115

240

20

208

10

ts at w

ps

am

ts

l vo

ts at w

ps

am

ts

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ts at w

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October was a busy month for students and the CCSAI. Between the beautiful weather and the hot events it was hard not to be excited to be back at school. Christropher Martin (Right) was so excited about the AWC rock wall he just had to try it out before the Red Room.

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1: Lil Rick headlined the Oct. 4 Red Room. The capacity crowd was blown away.

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Photo courtesy// Nolan White

2: The fun wasn’t only in the AWC. DJs kept the crowd pumped up in the Main Events Hall.

for g n i p m s ju

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joy

Photo courtesy// Geoffrey Mosher

RED ROOM About 1700 students and guests filled the Main Events Hall and AWC to celebrate the fall semester with live music and DJs.

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Photo courtesy// Nolan White


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Stree

Photo courtesy// Jaime Munoz

t Ball

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Kings

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Photo courtesy// Geoffrey Mosher

Beer Fest

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4: Special thanks to EdwinAllen Productions for the music and karoake for the Welcome Back BBQ and BeerFest at CCC and Ashtonbee this year. Looks like they had a blast.

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Photo courtesy// Geoffrey Mosher

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3: The Street Ball Kings came to the AWC Oct. 16 to thrill Centennial students. They played a friendly game against Centennial Men’s Junior Varsity team. The event also featured a 3-point competition.

5: Tory Harris, one of the new Campus Directors at Ashtonbee, shows everyone his karoake skills at the Welcome Back BBQ and BeerFest.


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YELLOW UMBRELLA PROJECT Donston Wilson, Ryan Liu and Akeem Raphael help students and bring attention to student support and resources on campus. pg 8


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SCAN ME! Graphic courtesy// César Augusto Ojeda

Mental health has become a major issue on campus. YUP is a campaign by CSA and CCSAI to help students understand and change the way they think of mental health.

CENTENNIAL COUNSELLING SERVICES

By: Paul Hantiuk

www.centennialcollege.ca/ counselling 416-289-5000 Progress ext. 2627 Ashtonbee ext. 7252 CCC ext. 7252 Morningside ext. 8025

O

ctober is midterm season for students and stress is running high. The College Student Alliance decided it was just the time to put the spotlight on student mental health. “I just want to see people talk about it,” said Veronica Barahona, the communications manager at the CSA. Building on the #Blue2013 social media campaign from last January is the Yellow Umbrella Project (#YUP). It’s an effort to raise awareness and put a proactive and open spin on how we view issues of student mental health. This includes matters of stress, personal and academic issues and more severe symptoms such as depression. “You need to create a foundation on a campaign and have people actually know what it is that we’re doing in order for it to be a good social media campaign,” Barahona added. This time there was a “vendor fair” approach to spreading the word with a bright yellow marketing campaign. YUP was on campus from October 28 to November 1. Before the event Centennial’s Student Advocate Jemelia Hosannah-Grant spoke about bookending the campaign with a big presence. “We’re having our booths on the Monday and the Friday” she said, “we’re actually going to be doing a survey … basically it lets students evaluate themselves. Are you aware that there is help for you?”

safeTALK: Suicide Prevention Training: www.livingworks.net/programs/ safetalk/

Mental Health First Aid: Students pet the therapy dog that visited the CCC.

www.mentalhealthfirstaid.ca/EN/ Pages/default.aspx

And if you aren’t aware, Centennial Counselor Eric Dunn wants you to know that, “We have counseling offices at each campus. You can drop-in, phone us, email us and we’ll get back to you. We don’t want anyone struggling alone. We want to help, we’re here and we’re good at it.”

Join the Conversation: Follow #YUP on Twitter and Instagram pg 9


New Kitchen Item incl. tax

Cookies

chocolate chip, white chocolate macadamia nut and m&ms @ The Student Centre

pg 10


A legendary story that has unclear roots in the popular memory. Centennial Faculty Ted Barris explains it was actually an heroic act with Canadian origins.

THE

GREAT ESCAPE By: Ted Barris

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1: This photo is of the seating inside the theatre. Seat 13 had a lift-up seat and a trapdoor beneath it through which the tunnellers disposed of tons of excavated sand. 2: Dust Jacket of Ted Barris’ book, The Great Escape: A Canadian Story

On the night of March 24, 1944, 80 Commonwealth airmen crawled through a 400-foot-long oner-of-war compound near Sagan, Poland. The iconic Second World War event became know German, kriegies for short). But most don’t realize that The Great Escape was in many ways Story, author and Centennial College professor Ted Barris illustra

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id-upper gunner Albert Wallace arrived at the North Compound of Stalag Luft III mid-way through 1943. At 22, Wallace had enlisted in the RCAF, graduated as a gunner, become a pilot officer and completed 15 bombing operations with 419 Squadron in Bomber Command when he was shot down over Duisberg, Germany. But if he thought it was lonely spending the night in the mid-upper gun turret of a Halifax bomber on operations, Wallace discovered his life in the very room that housed the trapdoor to “Harry” was even worse. “I had no idea it was the tunnel room [for ‘Harry,’]” he said. “I didn’t know for weeks that goddamn tunnel was seven feet from my bunk bed.” Eventually, Wallace was transferred from the tunnel room in Hut 104. As winter approached he and his new roommates tried to keep warm behind the thin, poorly insulated, and under-heated barracks walls. Taking a page from the larger tunnelling efforts, Wallace and several of his roommates began a nightly ritual – sneaking out of their hut, breaking into the German kitchen facility inside the compound and filling their kitbags with coal briquettes. “We had so much coal in our room, but there was nowhere to hide it,” Wallace said. “We put it under our bunks. We put it in our Red Cross boxes to hide it. We’d be in our shirt sleeves, hotter than hell, and guys would come in muffed up to their necks with tuques on and we’d say, ‘Oh, it’s our new chimney.’” The supply of extra briquettes dried up when the Germans noticed the depletion at the kitchen and padlocked the coal bin. Wallace would soon find himself busy at another wintertime activity, in the ranks of the “penguins,” the sand-dispersal team. The greatest barrier to any progress

Canadian RAF pilot Tony Pengelly pg 12

I had n it was tunnel I didn’t for wee that go tunnel seven f from m bed. Albert air


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Photo courtesy// John Lightfoot

3: Cross-section of Tunnel Harry 4: On the right is a sketch of the North Compound theatre by RAF POW Ley Kenyon.

g tunnel, code-named “Harry,” and slipped beyond the wire of Stalag Luft III, a German priswn as “The Great Escape.” The breakout involved about 2,000 POWs, (“Kriegsgefangenen” in s “made-in-Canada.” In this edited excerpt from his new book, The Great Escape: A Canadian ates how Canadians contributed to this famous piece of history.

no idea the roo... t know eks oddamn was feet my bunk

Wallace RCAF -gunner

tunnelling was getting rid of the sand with snow all over the compound. Then the kriegies hit on an idea. They explored the space between the raked floor and the earthen foundation of the North Compound theatre. There they found enough space to handle as much sand as Tunnel “Harry” could deliver. Under cover of darkness, a steady line of sand dispersal men began moving between “Harry” and the theatre. When a penguin arrived at the mouth of the trapdoor in Hut 104, the trap man laid a kitbag or trouser pouches full of sand over his shoulder and when the security boss told him the way was clear, the penguin carried his load out of Hut 104 to the theatre. Since Canadian pilot Tony Pengelly was stage manager for the kriegie productions, the Germans weren’t suspicious of his late evening presence at the theatre. Pengelly worked with the stage carpenters to install a small trapdoor in the floor under a seat in the back row. “I remember going into the theatre one night with my [concealed trouser] bags full of sand,” Al Wallace said. “I was told where to sit because that’s where the trapdoor was. I sat in seat number 13, pulled my little tickies [strings] and out went the sand.” Then, beneath the floorboards of the theatre, six dispersal men worked feverishly moving the sand to the far reaches of the theatre’s crawl space. When each penguin unloaded his kitbag or trouser bag through the trapdoor, the theatre crew tamped the sand up tight to the floor between the joists and against the walls. No space was left empty. “One day, we estimated we got rid of a total of 12 tons of sand,” Pengelly said.

Canadian RCAF air gunner Albert Wallace pg 13


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Photo courtesy// Lauren LiBetti

ADVERTISING

WEEK

2013

Advertising professionals speak at one of the many seminars

Street performers entertain passers-by.

By: Naomi Grosman & Lauren LiBetti

C

entennial students headed to the Big Apple in September to get a taste of the advertising industry and a better understanding of how they can succeed in this competitive field. “When you’re in school, you don’t really get to see it; you’re just learning about it,” Montana Ferrill, an advertising student, said. “This is kind of cool to meet these people who are in it, who have succeeded, and you want to try to be like them.” Over 40 advertising students travelled on an overnight bus to New York City to attend Advertising Week, an annual event that features over 200 seminars with top speakers in the industry.

The students stayed in New York City for four days and chose which seminars they wished to attend. They also had the freedom to explore the city. “I like that you get to do whatever you want. You can go to whatever seminar you feel you want to go to,” student Kenny Hughes said. “You can take your day off and just hang out, go to a Yankees game. So I like that chill factor part of it.” Even though the atmosphere was relaxed, students did need to attend at least eight seminars, as well as other projects when they returned to Toronto. “They were required to do a social media assignment that included Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and possibly YouTube posts,” Dean

Cowell, advertising professor a n d program coordinator, said. “They would also post an interview they had done with a presenter or attendee while at Ad Week.” Students agreed that Ad Week was a great professional learning experience, and recommended the trip to all future advertising students. “I got some pretty good tips about the next time I do a radio ad so that’s going to have a direct and immediate impact on my work,” Emily Shelton said after a day of attending seminars. After an exciting, whirlwind of a week, students say they are anxious to apply the skills they learned back in the classroom. pg 14

Photo courtesy// Lauren LiBetti


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Says The best thing about Advertising Week from my perspective is the chance to be at the top level for a week. This is were you are immersed in the center of the largest city that is engulfed with ADs everyday, while being able to rub elbows with the industry’s finest. You are able to network with the best of the best.

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New York’s interesting architecture. This is the Flatiron building in Manhattan.

oto Ph

Terence Nelson

cou

Not many conferences are available to students where you are surrounded with the top name brands and the executives. You hear them first-hand talk about the innovation that their company is doing and what is in the works for their company’s future.

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/L sy/ rte au i ett LiB ren

Says

Felicia Pierskalla

Get to experience what it’s like to actually work in the business. Says it’s a way for students to see if advertising is the field they want to go into. NYC is an advertising hub with all the advertisements everywhere. First time she’s been out of Ontario on her own. Says it’s a little nerve-racking, but she’s made friends along the way. “It’s cool to see how Toronto and New York compare.”

Says Daniel Belo

“I’ve had a really great time…I’ve found some of these sessions extremely informative. And on top of that I’ve really enjoyed seeing industry leaders and what they have to say about the various issues.” Can see the comparison between Toronto and NYC.

Says Emily Shelton

“I have found it really fun and interesting so far…I got some pretty good tips about the next time I do a radio ad so that’s going to have a direct and immediate impact on my work and how I buy media and create it.” Neat to see massive outdoor advertising campaigns in Times Square.

Says

Kenny Hughes

How does it feel in NYC? “Everything is just so vibrant and moving and there’s videos all over and people are yelling at you. It’s cool when you actually see it on TV and then actually come and be immersed in it.” Recommend this trip to future advertising students? “Absolutely. I’d recommend this trip to everybody. I like that you get to do whatever you want. You can go to whatever seminar you feel you want to go to. You can take your day off and just hang out, go to a Yankees game. So I like that chill factor part of it.” pg 15


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Healthy fact list: l

Pancake Recipe 2 cups Bisquick 2 tbsp brown sugar 2 tsp cinnamon 2 eggs 1 can (12 oz.) evaporated milk 1/2 cups cooked mashed pumpkin 2 tbsp vegetable oil 1 tsp vanilla In a bowl, combine Bisquick, brown sugar and cinnamon. In another bowl, combine the eggs, milk, pumpkin, oil and vanilla. Stir into dry ingredients and mix well. Pour batter by 1/2 cupfuls onto a lightly greased hot griddle; turn when bubbles form on top of pancakes. Cook until second side is golden brown. Serve with butter and maple syrup.

Pumpkins are filled with vitamin A which aids and protects vision. l Pumpkins are a loaded with vitamin C l Pumpkins are rich in the vitamin B complex l Pumpkin seeds are rich in iron l Pumpkins are also rich in

fiber and low in calories helping weight loss Pumpkin seeds are rich in phytosterols which have been shown to reduce cholesterol and help the heart. l High in antioxidants including beta-carotene which may reduce the risk of cancer. l Solid source of carotenoids which are important to immune health, heart health, and protects the skin keeping your skin youthful. l

PUMPKINS One of the healthiest foods on Earth! By: Mark A. Cadiz

I

f you are on the look out for healthy eats this season, then think orange. The pumpkin is one of the healthiest foods you can add to your diet. Loaded with nutrients and vitamins, they are extremely versatile and can be added to many recipes such as muffins, pancakes, brownies and several dozen other baked goodies.

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“Pumpkins are known for being rich in beta-carotene and are super high in fiber,” said Chef Sam Glass the head of the Culinary Department at Centennial College. “They also have more potassium than bananas.” And aside from the baked goods its fairly common to make pumpkin soups, pumpkin salads, or even pumpkin ravioli! So the next time you see a pumpkin, think twice, because the good ol’ jack-o-lantern packs more of a nutritional punch than you may think.


CCSAI GOOD FOOD BOX Order yours from the CCSAI office today

ccsai.ca/goodfoodbox pg 17


Sponsored by

pg 18


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Calisthenics a workout for people (personal trainer) By: Hannah Richardson

Calisthenics: Calisthenics are a form of exercise that utilizes one’s body weight for resistance to most often increase strength, muscle endurance, muscle tone, and flexibility. Movements can include jumping, hanging, bending, twisting, etc. Since they are more simple and accessible, calisthenic exercises are often used to create home workout plans.

Home Workouts: On those days when it is not possible to venture into the gym, a well built home workout is what you will need. Calisthenic exercises, various household items and furniture and smaller fitness equipment such as: resistance bands, tubing, stability balls, steps, bosu balls, medicine balls, kettle bells, etc. are often used during home workouts. Home workouts can be done at virtually any time during your day at home, and provides individuals with the ability to gain the same benefits that being in a gym setting provides, without the big machines and extra bodies.

Tips to assist in balancing your study and workout schedules: Scheduling your workouts will help immensely, as you can then plan your day around it. This will not only assist with keeping your workouts regular, but will also allow you to add very important things as well, such as study times, meals, and meetings. This will ensure that you do not skip or forget any of the important components of your day. Exercising to music often helps increase the enjoyment and energy during your work out. It will also help you to focus on your workout, and nothing else. Take 15min-30min study breaks every couple of hours and squeeze in a few minutes of cardiovascular exercise, and some calisthenics exercises. This will not only help you to refocus, but will give you the build up of endorphins and energy that you may need to continue with the task at hand. Exercising is also accumulative. Therefore, every minute counts.

Don’t have equipment? That’s fine, because simple house hold items and furniture can be used to assist with exercises. For example: for a great cardiovascular break, complete a 30min step class with some up-tempo music. This can take place on a safe staircase in your house, apartment building, or neighborhood park. To increase the intensity of your squats why not hold a canned good (in place of a dumbbell) in each hand while completing the squat.

For a complete, well built personal fitness program, which includes a list of exercises and direction on when, where, and how to complete each exercise, please contact an AWC Personal Trainer.

Simple Beginners Exercises

Lunge

Star Jump pg 19

Pushup

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Photo courtesy// Nicholas Misketi

Soccer is the REASON Centennial College’s Men’s Soccer had a great season. The team battled hard this year to second-place in the East Division and a quarter-final appearance in the playoffs.

Photo courtesy// Paul Martin

Photo courtesy// Paul Martin

ADRIAN FIELD

MARK TARAZHI

Height: 5’11” l Position: Centre Mid-Fielder l Year: 3rd l Program: Health Informatics Technology l Hometown: Pickering, ON l Favourite Player: David Beckham l Favourite Team: Manchester United. l

l l l l l l l

Height: 5’8” Position: Right-Striker Year: 2nd Program: General Business Hometown: Detroit, MI Favourite Player: Ronaldo Favourite Team: Real Madrid

By: Nicholas Misketi

T

he road to this year’s men’s soccer provincial quarter-finals was paved with years of hard work. According to Centennial College sports information officer Paul Martin, who also serves on the team’s coaching staff, success this season was in the making for some time. With this season’s 5-1-2 record, the Centennial men’s soccer team finished the regular season second in the East Division. The result means the team will start the playoffs in the OCAA quarterfinal round. After a 1-7 record three seasons ago, the team’s performance has steadily improved. “It’s actually been a slow progression…it’s been building,” said Martin. Martin attributes this year’s success to initiatives carried out by the college, athletics department, coaching staff and players. These initiatives include a new facility, a new home field, year-round training, re-branding the team image and academic help for the players. Team co-captain Mark Tarazhi agrees. The team took a serious approach in preparationfor the most important game of their season, hosting Sheridan College in the quarter-final match. “This is a big game for us because they’re a very good team…We’re practicing all week long… we’ve done some scouting reports, we’re really studying what they do,” said Martin. Team co-captain Adrian Field believes the key to winning lies in the team’s game plan. “So long as we execute the plan, there should be no problem,” said Field. Centennial lost 3-1 to Sheridan in the quarter-final, but had a great season nonetheless. pg 20

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Photo courtesy// Geoffrey Mosher

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Horoscope Aquarius: Jan 21-Feb 19 With the frost in the air it is time to cozy up to someone. Someone has caught your eye and this is the time to act.

Pisces: Feb 20-Mar 20 Even though this isn’t an easy time of year to be healthy, this is your time to shine. Turnover that new leaf and start your healthy lifestyle.

Aries: Mar 21-Apr 19 You will receive some exciting financial news. After long hours of hard work and sacrifice things are final looking up, celebrate!

Taurus: Apr 20-May 20 You may have the sniffles or a sore throat, possibly necessitating taking time off from work. Try to keep occupied with easy activities.

Gemini: May 21-Jun 21 Lack of contact with a close friend makes you think they have forgetten about you. They haven’t they have just been busy, reach out!

Cancer: Jun 22-Jul 23 Upsets in your circle of friends could distract and stress you. Make an effort to balance it all and you’ll make it through the day.

Leo: Jul 24-Aug 23 Disappointing emails or calls could come your way today. Don’t let it get to you. Focus on the good things and ignore those you cant control.

Virgo: Aug 24-Sept 22

Party All The Time

A temporary separation from your partner could have you feeling a little blue. Keep yourself busy and don’t dwell on it, it will pass.

Ashtonbee hosted students at the CCSAI Welcome Back BBQ and BeerFest Sept. 26. Students enjoyed the beautiful weather and beer provided by Mill Street and Steam Whistle.

Libra: Sept 23-Oct 22

Number crunching puzzles EASY

MEDIUM

HARD

Money may be on your mind, and the need for it may have you brainstorming ways to increase your income. Don’t make any decisions now.

Scorpio: Oct 23-Nov 22 The special someone in your life might feel a little jealous of your friends now. It might be a good idea to spend more time with your partner.

Sagittarius: Nov 23-Dec 20 Money matters might be tangled today. There could be a delay in receiving funds. Don’t worry it’s temporary and will be settled soon.

Capricorn: Dec 21-Jan 20 You want to take a day off to take care of an unfinished creative project. Stay focused that’s the only way to get anything accomplished. pg 21


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ighting is the most essential part of a photo. Because of that, it’s simply not enough going outside in the Sun and assume you’ll take good pictures, there are very specific things to consider when it comes to light. Those things are quality, temperature, and direction.

Quality of light can be broken down into two categories: hard and soft. Hard light is produced on sunny days and is good for bringing out colour and contrast, but high noon should be avoided due to harsh shadows. Soft light is produced on cloudy days and is characterized by even lighting and minimal shadows, ideal for all shooting conditions. The downside is the lower contrast, and a less pleasing colour due to the temperature.

Photography

LIGHTING

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Tutorial

By: Dennis Gonzales

1: Hard directional lighting - Generally hard lighting isn’t good for portraiture, but if your purpose is to be dramatic, hard lighting is a must. This was taken during eviction night of Occupy Toronto.

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The last thing to consider regarding lighting characteristics is the direction of the light source, not only does it dictate where light falls, but also where shadows form. In practice, shoot in the early morning or late afternoon; the sun is lower in the sky, and you can take advantage of different light directions, as opposed to just one.

2: Temperature Original - Camera in auto white balance can make bad guesses with multiple light sources.

3 5

5: Soft lighting - Taken during the Toronto Zombie Car Wash. The rain clouds created a pleasant light to an ostensibly grisly scene.

4: Everything - An example of all principles in action, back lit sunset with very mild fill light (almost no specular highlights) while still maintaining proper skin tone and white balance. Temperature (or white balance) is a colour characteristic of the visible light spectrum, and it ranges from blue, like on a cloudy day; to yellow, like on a sunny day. Different colours create different tones, which can change how a picture feels. It’s also important to note that different lights (flash, incandescent, fluorescent, etc.) create different colours, because of that you should avoid multiple light sources to avoid colour mixing. pg 22

3: Temperature Corrected - Correcting the problem requires human intervention.


Photo courtesy// Nolan White

The Ultimate Red Room Christopher Martin thrilled Centennial Students at the CCSAI’s welcome back concert. He joined Wayne Wonder and Lil Rick Oct. 4 at the AWC. pg 23


STOP AND AD LISTEN. Look For #YUP Coverage Online on Facebook like CCSAI on Twitter @CCSAI thecourier.ca/yellow-umbrella-project Wear yellow to show your support for those living with mental health issues!

pg 24


November 2013