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Chester County Letters to Santa, Section C

Thursday

DECEMBER 20, 2012

Independent

148th YEAR - NO. 33

chestercountyindependent.com

$1.00

The end of the world?

Hysmith elected state Funeral Board president

By Marney E. Gilliam Staff Writer

You may not have known it, but some believe the world will end on Dec. 21. They base this belief on the end of the Mayan calendar. What is funny is the Mayans themselves do not believe that the world will end on this date. Instead they believe that it is a time of rebirth, a time of festivities. But how do I know this? Well, I first interviewed Dr. Greg Massey with the Freed-Hardeman history department. It also happened that this article was to be written after my vacation to Mexico. Since I was headed that direction anyway, I met up with Arturo Castandea Gutierrez who is of Mayan descent and who runs a tour of the Mayan ruins in Progreso, Mexico. He was happy to be interviewed regarding the “end of the world” and shared with me what would have occurred within the Mayan culture if this date had come about during their existence. So who were the Mayans? Dr. Massey starts us off with a concise picture of their culture and civilization: “Between A.D. 250 and 900, the Maya people had a sophisticated civilization in what is today Guatemala and the Yucatan region of Mexico. They were divided into rival citystates that fought wars, sometimes co-existed peacefully, and created art, architecture, writ-

ing, and calendars that fascinate us today. Maya intellectuals were excellent mathematicians who carefully observed the skies, leading to the development of their intricately detailed calendars. One calendar calculated Venus’s location in the night sky, another contained similar data on the cycle of the planet Mars.” So why do we put such emphasis on the calendar of a long desist population? Dr. Massey explains “The Maya correctly calculated that the solar year lasts 365 days. It’s not clear if they calculated leap years. To record important dates over a long span of time, they created what has been called the “Long Count” calendar, which lasted 5,126 years. The end date of this calendar is Dec. 21, 2012, leading some people to make doomsday predictions of the end of times. The reality is very different. This particular calendar was designed to calculate dates up to Dec. 21, 2012. There’s no evidence that the Maya were projecting that this date would mark the end of the world. Recent archaeological expeditions in Guatemala have discovered other Maya calendars that go far beyond Dec. 21. Instead of predicting the end of the world, the Maya actually were projecting

continuity. The Maya thought differently from us. We see time moving in a linear direction,

Mayans today have the most accurate calendar. They developed a really good calendar. …

TONY W. HYSMITH

The Mayan calendar which leads to our fascination with the end of time. The Maya viewed time cyclically. To them Dec. 21 would have been followed by the beginning of a new cycle. The cycles would continue beyond our ability to count.” Gutierrez broke it down simply as we were leaving the Mayan ruins: “As you know the

It’s a cycle. One calendar was made with 260 days and the other with 365.” The calendars overlap and the first day of the larger calendar lines up with the first day on the smaller calendar. Every 52 years the calendars match back up and the calendars See MAYAN, Page 13-A

Hit and run ends with injury A Henderson woman faces multiple charges following an alleged traffic incident at approximately 2:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 14. Angie Sikes, of Hwy 100 E.,

was arrested and charged with violation of a traffic control device, driving under the influence (DUI), leaving the scene of an accident, possession of a weapon, violation of the financial responsibility act, possession of schedule II, possession of schedule III, and possession of schedule IV. Sikes allegedly ran a red light at Main Street and N. Washington and struck a 1999 Toyota Corolla causing serious damage to both vehicles. The driver of the

Corolla was reportedly injured and transported by EMS to a hospital for treatment. When Sikes was pulled over by police near Snookum’s Beefhouse on East Main after the alleged hit and run, she was reportedly disoriented and her white Tahoe had sustained front end damage with radiator fluid and transmission fluid spraying out the front end and draining down the front bumper. She allegedly did not remember the accident. After being granted permission

to search, police reportedly found Sikes was carrying a 32 caliber handgun in her purse along with a Hydrocodone pill bottle that contained Alprazolam, 10 and one half Hydrocodone pills wrapped in a clear piece of plastic, 13 Hydrocodone pills in a zipper compartment in her wallet, a pill bottle that read Levothyroxine that contained one Adderall pill, and one Clonazepam pill in a zipper compartment in her wallet. Sikes was transported to the Chester County Jail.

Another wreck at C&R 2 Sections Life & Styles Opinion What’s Happening Obituaries Right to Know Sports Education Classifieds

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Tony W. Hysmith, manager of Shackelford Funeral Directors Casey Chapel, has been elected president of the State Board of Funeral Directors and Embalmers for 2013. The Board of Funeral Directors and Embalmers licenses and regulates funeral directors, embalmers and funeral establishments. Its mission is to protect the public health, safety and welfare by ensuring compliance with the statutes and rules governing the funeral industry. Hysmith was appointed to the board by Governor Bredesen in 2010. The board is composed of six funeral directors and embalmers from the three grand divisions of the state along with a consumer member. The board functions under the Department of Commerce and Insurance Division of Burial Services. Hysmith began his career in funeral services as a licensed funeral director and embalmer with Casey Funeral home in 1978, was designated a Certified Funeral Services Practitioner in 1997, and has served as manager of Shackelford Funeral Directors - Casey Chapel since 1991. Hysmith and his wife, Becky, reside in Henderson and are members of the Estes Church of Christ.

Drawings and letters can support Sandy Hook Elementary The atrocity that took place Friday at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut left many persons breathless and struggling to understand how someone could possibly want to harm innocent little children. Though the children and school workers, the families of those who were lost and the rescue workers who attended the scene need our prayers and thoughts, there is something more you can do. If you would like to put your thoughts into writing or would like to send a picture drawn by your child to the school to show your support, the address is: 12 Dickenson Drive, Sandy Hook, CT 06482.

Blood drive in Henderson Dec. 21

TODAY’S WEATHER

Photo by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

No one was seriously injured in a two-vehicle rear-end collision at 3:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10 at the intersection of State Route 100 and Clarks Creek Road in front of C&R Grocery. According to the Tennessee Highway Patrol, Misty Champluvier of Luray was attempting to turn left on to Clarks Creek Road when her vehicle was struck from behind by pickup truck driven by Cody Bailey. Bailey and Champluvier, and two juveniles in her vehicle, were each wearing seatbelts which, according to the THP, likely prevented injuries.

The Blood drive will be in Henderson Dec, 21 from noon to 5 p.m. at Beans, Greens and Taters Restaurant, 1314 Hwy 45 South Suite A. Blood types especially needed are O-negative, Opositive, B-negative and Anegative.


Page 2-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

Holiday Open House at HHR Salvation Army seeks holiday help An image as familiar as any of the holiday season is the red kettle and the bell ringer in front of department and grocery stores. They are the symbols of the Salvation Army as they seek donations for their charitable efforts which take place throughout the year. This year the bell ringers have been found in Henderson, but not as often as needed. Major Jayne Brewster, Commanding officer Jackson Corps, says the Salvation Army could use some extra help during the holidays. They need more support, not only in monetary donations but in volunteers to ring the familiar bells. They currently need ringers for the evenings and during the day, probably in front of Miller’s Big Star grocery. Funds collected here stays in the seven-county region of west Tennessee. In addition to assistance for the needy at Christmas, the funds stretch into the year with rent and utility assistance, as well as youth programs. Of the funds collected, the Salvation Army tries to keep at least 89 percent in the region where it is collected. Brewster says that most money collected in this county will eventually come back here. Currently the organization has four employees in Jackson, however Brewster is the only one that is full time, and she makes a diligent effort to keep overhead as low as possible.

Brewster is a fifth generation Salvation Army officer. She says she was “born into it.” “I really love what I do. It is very rewarding to help somebody,” she said. As an ordained ministry she preaches most Sundays, and says all they do is “motivated by our love for Jesus.” Brewster notes that when someone is hungry and needy it’s very difficult to feel the love of God, so they seek to meet the physical needs as well as the spiritual needs. The Salvation Army is a not for profit, 501(c)(3). With the poor economy, more and more people are in need, more that have never asked for assistance before. The organization was started in 1865 by London minister on the east side of London. There is no provision that those needed assistance come to church or be in a church, they just have to show a need. The Salvation Army is known as one of America’s favorite charities. Because they are so well known for the humanitarian mission they often get into some countries ahead of many other charities. However, their mission is often dangerous, and just four years ago one of their missionaries was killed in Asia. If you would like to volunteer with the Salvation Army, call 422-1290. There are few qualifications to be a bell ringer, mostly just a willing spirit. Whatever way you can offer them assistance is needed.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Henderson Health and Rehab hosted a Holiday Open House Wednesday, Dec. 12. Among those hosting and attending were, from left: Director of Nursing Kim Thompson, Administrator Dee Shires, grounds keeper and supply clerk Deena Azevedo, county commissioner Al McKinnon, Joy McKinnon and Ruby Nell Brewer.

Southwest Development asks you to be a blessing Southwest Tennessee Development District (SWTDD) Area Agency on Aging and Disability asks, “Be a blessing to those in need.” Their Public Guardianship for the Elderly Program seeks help. The Christmas season is in full swing and SWTDD’s Area Agency on Aging and Disability is seeking help to provide an extra blessing to each of its 15 clients who are in the Public Guardianship Program. District Public Conservator, Susan Unger, is their legal or court appointed advocate. She acts as a “granddaughter” to each client she takes them to the doctor, pays bills, purchases groceries, and helps out in other ways as needed. In short, Unger, through the statewide Public Guardianship Program, provides legal guardianship for persons 60 years of age and older who are unable to manage their

own affairs and who have no family member, friend, bank or corporation both willing and able to act on his or her behalf. It is at this time of year that SWTDD reaches out to individuals, businesses and churches in the area for help in making this Christmas memorable for its clients. Because these very special people have no one to buy Christmas gifts for them, the Public Guardianship Program would like to facilitate having at least one gift for each client. The majority of these disabled elderly clients receive no income other than their Social Security or Supplemental Security payments; most live in area nursing homes, but three of them are able to live in their own home or apartment. “I am happy to do the shopping, wrapping and delivery for anyone who would like to make a monetary donation toward purchasing gifts for our

clients,” says Susan Unger, Public Conservator. “Or, if a person or group would like to sponsor an individual, I am willing to provide information about an appropriate gift for that special client. Church or civic groups may choose to sponsor a client from their particular county or town.” Contact Unger at 6686405 or at sunger@ swtdd.org if you are inter-

ested in helping make Christmas a happier time for these individuals or if you are interested in hearing more about the Public Guardianship for the Elderly Program. Unger is available to speak to civic or church groups about the guardianship services available to Tennessee’s disabled elderly citizens through this program. For more information, visit www.swtdd.org.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

Grace Baptist breaks ground

Grace Baptist Church held a groundbreaking service Dec. 9 for the new church building to be located at the corner of Hwy 45 North and Southview Drive. Those taking part included, from left: Pastor Eric Martin, Jerry Bain, Ray Plunk, Bob Ivy, Anthony Bolton, Kenny Pusser, Thomas Leach, Brenda Copeland, Linda Essary, J.C. Emerson, Scott Laster, D.J. Neely and Claude Bailey.

Shiloh Battlefield to host birthday celebration Shiloh National Military Park will host a commemorative event on Thursday, Dec. 27, to observe the 118th anniversary of its establishment as a Civil War military park,” announced Superintendent John Bundy. The event will begin with a 30-minute interpretive program about the establishment of the park, and how the park has changed since its creation to present day. “Shiloh battlefield has seen notable changes in the past decade, such as the addition of the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center, new monuments on the battlefield, and hundreds of acres added to the park just to name a few. In the power-point presentation I will discuss the creation of the park, and some of the changes it has seen over the years,” stated Park Ranger Heather Smedley. Shiloh was established on Dec. 27, 1894, during a wave of nationalism and preservation in the United States. By the 1890s, many Americans had grown tired of the sectionalism which tore the country apart in the 1850s and 1860s, and the Reconstruction period that followed the war. In addition, many civilians and veterans wanted to pay tribute to the bravery of Civil War soldiers, both North and South alike. Shiloh was one of the first five military parks created, along with Chickamauga, Vicksburg, Antietam and Gettysburg. “Since its founding, not only has Shiloh Battlefield preserved the ground of the first major fight of the Civil War, it has also had far reaching effects on the local economy, providing numerous jobs, and as a mainstay of

Shiloh National Military Park will host a commemorative Dec. 27 event to observe the 118th anniversary of its establishment as a Civil War military park.

Radio station WFHU now available online FM91, WFHU, FreedHardeman University and Henderson community radio station is now available online, according to station manager Ron Means. The station has partnered with iHeart Radio to stream live programming 24 hours a day, seven days a week. “Everyone,” Means said, “can now hear the voice of Freed-Hardeman University and Henderson/Chester County live on their home or office computer.” An iHeart Radio app for FM91 is also available to stream directly to your smartphone. Listeners may tune in by going to the station webpage at fhu.edu/fm91 and clicking on the Listen Live with iHeart Radio link. The page also has a

link to download the app for the smartphone. In addition to a mix of adult contemporary music, the 10,000 watt non-commerical FM station offers coverage of selected Freed-Hardeman University and Chester County sports events. As the only radio station in Chester County, it also seeks to provide community coverage. The station, which trains students interested in communication, began broadcasting Aug. 23, 1967 with a 10-watt signal. In 1999, it began 24-hour operation at 10,500 watts. At that time, the station reached 11 counties in Southwest Tennessee and Northeast Mississippi. Now it can be heard virtually anywhere via traditional broadcasting, computer, or smartphone.

Did you know? Many Christmas traditions are older than some celebrants might think. The tradition of lighting up a Christmas tree, for example, dates back to the days before Christmas lights. Before electric-powered twinkle lights were invented and even before electricity was discovered, people used actual candles to adorn the Christmas tree. As one can imagine, having an open flame next to a dried-out tree was risky, so it was customary to keep a bucket of water next to the tree in the case of fire. As if fire wasn’t enough, the tinsel used to decorate trees was made from strips of silver and even lead.

Hardin County tourism,” stated Superintendent Bundy. The birthday event will begin with the power-point presentation at 1:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Shiloh Visitor Center. Following the program, Hardin County Visitor and Convention Bureau will present a birthday cake to the park for visitors to enjoy. This event is free and open to the public.

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Life & Style

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MR. AND MRS. STEVE CONNOR

Connor 50th anniversary Steve and Joye Connor will be celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary on Saturday, Dec. 22. They were married in Henderson on Dec. 22, 1962 with Bro. Vance Marberry officiating. They are members of Sanford Hill Baptist Church. They had four children, one daughter, Tammy (deceased); and three sons, Steve A. (Kathy) of Jackson, Chris (Marilyn) of Lebanon, and Shane (Stacy) of Henderson. They have six grandchildren, four step grandchildren, and four step great-grandchildren.

Merry Christmas everyone. Christmas is only one week away as I write this. I hope you have your Christmas shopping done, all your cards sent and your baking started. I’ve done it all except the baking. Not doing too much of that this year. Don’t need the extra pounds. Please continue to pray for our sick: Nella Rush, Tommy Landers, Winna Knipper, James Ballard, Carolyn Brasfield, and Edra and Benny Barnett. I wish all good health in 2013. Wish these folks a happy birthday this week: Ailene Cain, Chris Julian, Freddy Fish, Joliene Harris and Maria Enfinger on Dec. 19; Travis Roberts on Dec. 23; and on Christmas day, Buddy Collins and Jerry Howell. Life is a journey, so enjoy every mile. Happy birthday. The children’s play, “Just a Little Christmas” at Bethel Baptist Church Sunday night, was really special. The children were really sweet and did a good job. I really appreciate all the workers that put it together. I won’t name anyone for fear I’d leave someone out, but you did a great job with the children. “Christmas Bells” By Henry Wadsworth

Longfellow I heard the bells on Christmas Day Their old, familiar carols play, And wild and sweet The words repeat Of peace on earth, good-will to men! And thought how, as the day had come, The belfries of all Christendom Had rolled along The unbroken song Of peace on earth, good-will to men! Till, ringing, singing on its way The world revolved from night to day, A voice, a chime, A chant sublime Of peace on earth, good-will to men! Then from each black, accursed mouth The cannon thundered in the South, And with the sound The Carols drowned Of peace on earth, good-will to men! And in despair I bowed my head; ‘There is no peace on earth,’ I said; ‘For hate is strong, And mocks the song Of peace on earth, good-will to men!’ Then pealed the bells more loud and deep: ‘God is not dead; nor doth he sleep! The Wrong shall fail, The Right prevail, With peace on earth, good-will to men!’ [end of poem] I pray that every one in our community has a wonderful Christmas! Thank you God for the mercy you showed us when you sent your Son to earth. I am so grateful that your mercy will never be used up, that it will last forever. Amen.

Lifestyle Pricing The Chester County Independent charges $35 for engagement announcements with photo, wedding announcements with photo, anniversary announcements with photo, and miscellaneous lifestyle photos. There is no charge for birth announcements without photo, but $28 with photo, and $38 for color photo. For more information, call 731989-4624.

Our deepest sympathy goes to the family and friends of Allen Arnold Jr. Holly Springs Methodist Church had a Christmas program Saturday night and a Christmas meal followed. On our prayer list this week are Mike Ross, Laverne Lott, Pam Priddy, Adam Wise, Carroll Connor, Fred and Paul Tucker, Teresa Wright, LaVerne Austin, Larry, Jerry, and Minnie Austin, Charles and Wilma Cupples, Jean Latham, Joanne Sells, Randy Sells, Carolyn Potter, Gathel Latham, Randy Miller, Joanne Altier, Phillip Ross, Lisa Peddy, Frenzola Morris, Faye Tucker, Shirley Rietl, Dobber Dyer, Bobbie Nell Wells, Teresa Seaton, Clarence Cooper, their caregivers, and our military personnel and their families. Birthday greetings to Christy Cupples on Jan. 2; Cindy Jones on Jan. 3; Bro. Bill Evans on Jan. 4; Stacy Lee Holder on Jan. 5; Alexis Boggs on Jan. 6; and Nancy McCaskill on Jan. 7. We wish everyone a very Merry Christmas.

A new Montague Brad and Kristi Montague are proud to announce the birth of their first child, a son, born Dec.10, 2012 at Jackson Madison County General Hospital. He weighed 10 lbs. and 14 oz., and was 21 and one-half inches long. His name is Miles Henry Montague. Brad grew up in Somerville and was a 1999 graduate of Fayette Academy, and a 2003 graduate of FreedHardeman University in Henderson. Kristi is from Henderson and graduated from Chester County High School in 1999, and graduated from FreedHardeman in 2003. The couple married in 2003 and resides in Henderson. They are employed at FreedHardeman where Brad is the Director of Creative Media and GO! Camp and Kristi is the Creative Director of Marketing. Proud grandparents are Billy and Terresa Montague, Somerville, and David and Laurie Novak, Henderson. Great-grandparents are Anne Kitchens Payne of Somerville, Marlene Carman of Melbourne, Fla., and Richard and Ila Westfall, Daphne, Ala.

Jacks Creek Post Office in jeopardy!

Jacks Creek Post Office closed indefinitely! Doesn’t that sound shocking? How would you like to find that bulletin board nailed to Jacks Creek Post Office’s front door? Jacks Creek needs your help. It doesn’t matter if you have a Jacks Creek address or a Jacks Creek Post Office box, because many pass each morning or afternoon using the fast window service or convenient out-

door postal box. If Jacks Creek loses its post office our community loses its identity, and other people will lose convenient and fast services along with us. Customers received a letter Dec. 17 with a return survey in a postage-paid envelope due by Jan. 3, 2013. The letter contained four alternatives most preferred in the POST plan customer survey with a very important “Additional Comments” at the bottom of the page. The four alternatives are (1) Jacks Creek Post Office hours cut to four hours daily; (2) Roadside mailbox delivery only; (3) New location operated by

a contractor; and (4) Relocate P.O. box services to a nearby post office. Shouldn’t additional comments simply state that Jacks Creek Post Office should remain the same as they are at present? Those hours make it convenient for everyone. We want and need our post office open to serve its customers – those living in the area or those passing by each morning or afternoon. Who would desire to drive seven to nine miles to buy stamps or mail a package? Some folks have a post office box, so they’d have to drive those extra miles to receive or send mail or packages. Personally, we

live on a dangerous hill for the rural carrier to deliver mail, so we have a Post Office box. We feel blessed to live near Jacks Creek Post Office. We are pleased with the service and desire the post office to remain open with the present same hours. Isn’t the U.S. Postal Service placing the community of Jacks Creek officially at “Death’s door?” Could it be they are slowly trying to reduce hours which would disrupt service, and later cause it to fail? We have a voice. It is of importance that every citizen who loves Jacks Creek, and are able to, be See CREEK, Page 5-A

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Cash Clayton birthday party Cash Clayton, the son of Jamey and Lisa Clayton of Finger, celebrated his second birthday Dec. 6 with a Johnny Tractor birthday party. Also attending were his sister Annalise Clayton. His grandparents are Wayne and Sandra Clayton of Finger, and Dorothy Barnes and the late Ronnie Barnes.

Hello to everyone! Greetings from the City. “This is the day the Lord has made let us rejoice and be glad in it.” No matter what life brings us we always have something to be glad about. Do not worry about what we do not have, but be happy for what we do have. As you are reading this article, stop and take a moment of silent prayer for the families in the Connecticut school shootings. This week is a special week. It is the week that we will be celebrating the birth of Jesus. Let’s keep the love of Christ in our hearts and spread that love to others. Let us remember those hurting or less fortunate than we are, and reach out a kind helping hand to those in need. Sometimes all it takes is a kind word, a small gesture or a lovely smile to brighten someone’s day. So let us rejoice! On Dec. 5 there was a great celebration at Henderson Heath & Rehabilitation Center. A young man by the name of William Brown celebrated his 85th birthday!!! To help him celebrate this special occasion were his sisters, Ms. Nina Ross and Mazella Barnes, both of Henderson; his son Terry Brown, from Atlanta, Ga.; and also the staff and friends from the center. Mr. Brown, may the Lord keep blessing you and your family, and may you have many more special birthdays. This week at Southern Oaks Assisted Living, Santa’s little helpers, the residents, were busy wrapping gifts for the underprivileged of Henderson. Cherie Wallace of ‘Care All’ brought over 40 bags to be created for those less fortunate in Henderson. The residents were proud to be able to help contribute to these needy families. Saturday morning was the annual Christmas brunch for the residents, staff, family and friends. Lots of great food!! There was other activities this week included the monthly Spelling Bee. Mrs. Peggy Zollner was the champion and gets to keep the prized “Spelling Bee Trophy” until next month’s contest. The Bingo caller this week was Shannon Jones from Volunteer Home Care.

She brought some great prizes for the winners. The residents are always blessed by Janice Haithcoat who comes faithfully every week to play and sing. Another faithful weekly volunteer is Marty Wilkins, who does a weekly Bible Study. On Thursday, a wonderful group of dancers called the “Tip Top Tappers” came and performed for the residents. What a treat this was. The “Tip Top Tappers” were recently on the front page of the Memphis newspaper because they were asked to try out for “America’s Got Talent,” so we were very fortunate to have them dance for us. They range in age from 64 to 87. Tap dancing brought back many fine old memories of some famous tappers like Fred Astaire, Sammy Davis Jr., Rita Hayworth, and who can forget the lovable Shirley Temple. It is always good to reminisce of our younger years and share stories with this younger generation who missed these wonderful entertainers. Their resident writer, Mr. C.O. Hays, has once again had a few of his stories published in “Visions and Dreams - The Talent Among Us: Volume XII,” published yearly by Main Street Publishing Inc. The book is comprised of Poems, Stories and Art by Tennessee Writers and Young Artists each year. Mr. Hayes has two of his short stories in this edition: “Executive Decision” and “The Stretch Murder Case.” Congratulations to you Mr. Hays! On Sunday we had to say, “I will see you later,” to Frantrell McNeal, the son of Frankie and Suzanne McNeal. Our prayers go out to the family. May the Lord give you strength in this time of sorrow. On the birthday list this week is my daughter, Maria Holiday Dec. 22. On the prayer list this week are the McNeal family, the families in Connecticut and surrounding areas, our loved ones in the hospitals, the sick in their homes, our children, teachers, family, our country, all the soldiers, their families, and for our country. Remember to patronize our local businesses, let’s support our own as much as we can. If you live in the City of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, anniversary, announcements, and things happening in the City, I need to hear from you, call 989-1907 or e m a i l gloria_holiday@msn.com. HAVE A GREAT WEEK!


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

Page 5-A

Sweets and treats for the holidays and beyond ‘Tis the season for goodies and snacks. Sometimes with all the hussle and bustle of the holidays, the best therapy is staying home and baking some treats for family and friends. This year, I’ve made pralines and flourless peanut butter chocolate chip cookies to help with the holiday craziness. The cookies have been a pretty regular part of my baking repertoire, but pralines are a new addition this year. My husband loves peanut butter cookies, especially those with chocolate chips, so I’ve been trying out different versions for years. This is one of his favorites.

I decided to make pralines one day when I wanted a sweet holiday treat and couldn’t decide exactly what to bake. I started thumbing through recipes, and the thought of pralines sounded really delicious. I make these more like peanut brittle than the traditional round cookie form that are common in stores. By spreading the hot syrup and pecans out on a parchment paper covered baking sheet, you can break off any size piece

that you desire. I like walking by and breaking off a tiny corner or maybe picking out one pecan to nibble. Parchment paper makes all the difference when it comes to being able to peal the candy off of the baking sheet. None of the candy sticks to the paper, and you’re baking sheet is saved from becoming a sticky mess. It’s perfect. Enjoy these for the holidays – or any time you need a sweet treat!

Pecan Pralines

From Page 5-A

Creek present at 3 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, at the Jacks Creek Post Office. Your presence is your right to show support for a small post office trying to keep its door open for its customer’s convenience. As you noticed, the time announced of 3 p.m. is not convenient for the working class, so we need support. We are hoping a crowd will fill the lobby. Perhaps we could move the crowd to the fire department or school gym in case of bad weather? Additional and important show of support could be phone calls, emails or letters written to “Legislative” officials which are listed in the Chester County Independent. The holidays are coming up, so do not delay in your support. Legislative offices will be closed and phone lines have long waiting periods where we are put on hold. Most importantly, mark your social calendar for Jan. 17, 2013 and attend or do something. Manager Post Office Operations, Judy Tittle, will be present Jan. 17 to see the show of support and hear expressions of concern for the future of the Jacks Creek Post Office. The “Legislative Directory” is listed in the paper with mailing addresses. Please patiently contact all of them with your concerns. Will you help Jacks Creek Post Office – we are in jeopardy. We will have a petition on the community board soon for signatures and addresses to be presented to Ms. Tittle also. Also, Patrick Donahue is Post Master General

and CEO, Joseph Corbett is the CFO. Their address is 475 L’Enfantf Plaza, S.W., Washington, DC 20260. These are others you can contact – Governor Bill Haslam, (615) 4152001 or email bill.haslam@state.tn.us; Senator Dolores Gresham (615) 741-2368 or email sen.dolores.gresham@ca pitol.tn.gov; Rep. Steve McDaniel (615) 741-0750 or email rep.steve.mcdaniel@capit o l . t n . g o v ; Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn (202) 225-2811 or email https://blackburn.house.gov/contactform/default.aspx; Senator Lamar Alexander (202) 224-4944 or email senator_alexander@alenander,state.gov; and Senator Bob Corker (202) 224-3344 or email http://www.corker.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/c ontactme. Happy belated Dec. 15th birthday greetings to a smiling and proud lady who is now 98! She loves life and this beautiful earth. Mary Bullman (Bedford) Smith is proud to have lived this long with many blessings in her life. She lives at Chester County Healthcare and Rehab. I’m old and forgetful, but Mary isn’t! Also, we wish a happy 101st birthday to Mama Beck in heaven on Dec. 22. Regina Stone Brook’s friends gathered to celebrate holiday cheer Sunday afternoon. Finger foods, joke telling by Inez, and getting caught up on each others lives was a nice way to start celebrating the holiday. It was fun to see a picture displayed of this group which was made two years ago. It was amazing none of us had appeared to age in two years! Joining Regina

were Inez Liles Alexander, Janice Kelly Stone, Patsy Jones Denton, Deland Lott Pusser, Faye Lott Plunkett, Nancy Crowell Cates, Phyllis Cochran Knolton, Peggy Vestal King, Loyce Swope Smith, Sue Kearns, Ann Cothren Brown, Helen Morton Rogers, Wanda Young Wright, and Patsy Nobles Jones. Special guests were Foxy and Abby Brooks. Someone thoughtfully dropped two hungry canines at Amber and Darron “Bubba” Jones’ home! One is a black Lab mix and a puppy. Love, kindness, and plenty of food has made ready two gifts waiting to be wrapped in bows and ribbons. Does your child have a pet wish on their Christmas list? Call 6086169 or 608-2692. Saturday night little Allie West from Beech Bluff spotted Mrs. Claus at Bells Drive-in. She wanted a hug and was thoughtful enough to share her wish list with Mrs. Claus too. Mrs. Claus reminded Allie how Mr. Claus had recently

Ingredients: 1 ½ cups toasted pecans 1 ½ cups white sugar 3/8 cup butter ¾ cup brown sugar ½ cup milk 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Directions: Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In large saucepan over medium heat, combine pecans, sugar, butter, brown sugar, milk and vanilla. Heat to between 234 and 240 degrees F (112 to 116 degrees C), or until a small amount of syrup dropped into cold water forms a soft ball that flattens when removed from the water and placed on a flat surface. This can take between 5 and 10 minutes. Drop by spoonfuls onto prepared baking sheet or spread pecan and syrup mixture in a thin layer over parchment paper and allow to cool. Break into pieces similar to peanut brittle. Let cool completely.

mentioned Allie’s good behavior this year. She was a good little girl at age five. Those eyes suddenly became moon-pie size, and what a quiet little girl she became. Noticing that Mrs. Claus was sitting with a man, Mrs. Claus pointed out he was merely a reindeer feeder who was hungry himself, plus a list was being made of who was naughty and who was nice this year! A clever

Flourless peanut butter chocolate chip cookies Ingredients: 1 cup natural peanut butter 1 cup sugar 1 large egg, lightly beaten 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup chocolate chips Coarse sea salt, if desired Directions: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a medium bowl, mix the peanut butter, sugar, egg and vanilla until well combined. Stir in chocolate chips. Spoon 1 tablespoon of mixture about 1 inch apart onto ungreased baking sheets. Flatten the mounds with a fork, making a crosshatch pattern on the cookies. Sprinkle coarse salt on top of the cookies. Bake until golden around edges, about 10 minutes. Transfer to racks to cool. Repeat with any remaining dough.

mother (Anita) slipped a name and address to Mrs. Claus. Perhaps this newspaper clipping will be lovingly tucked behind a framed picture made by mother’s cell phone of Mrs. Claus and little Allie West. Yes, Allie (and Virginia), there is a Santa Claus! He lives in the hearts of young and old alike. He is the spirit of love. He has been taught it is more blessed to give

than to receive. Yeah, he lives and he lives forever. Beware of hungry reindeer – Blitzen, Comet, Cupid, Dasher, Donner, Dancer, Prancer, Vixon and Rudolf; do remember to leave a thoughtful snack for Santa, and if you don’t mind add a little something for Mrs. Clause too. Merry Christmas Allie and everyone. May the gift you give be greater than the gift you receive!


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

Only Yesterday “Dear Santa” up their overcoats” literally this week as temperatures plunged to a record low for December. Thermometers hovering just barely “Twin Calves Born To A Jersey above zero Wednesday morning, Cow” and several residents walked to Twin heifer calves were born work when their automobiles failed recently to a Jersey cow owned by to start. T. H. Tyson... A light snow which fell Monday Tyson owns his farm and keeps night left a few slick places on five cows, but he says this is the streets and highways Tuesday. first time such good fortune has Wednesday morning’s temperacome his way. “They are two of the ture was the lowest since last prettiest white-faced calves a perJanuary. son ever saw,” he added. “Streets Decorated For Keeping records on his herd Holidays” finds that this Jersey gives two galA Christmas spirit prevails lons of milk twice a day. He says throughout downtown Henderson. she is subject to registration. City employees decorated Main “Howard Malone Wins Fur Street early this week. New lights Prize” and garlands of Christmas greenery Howard Malone, well known were purchased this year, and trapper of Chester county, is a winstrung across the main thoroughner of a Daily Award for correct pelt fare. preparation in the Fourteenth Most stores have beautiful National Fur Show conducted by Christmas disthe Raw Fur plays in the winMarketing Service dows as well as of Sears Roebuck inside. and Co. City fathers are Malone’s careto be commended fully handled for purchasing and Muskrat pelt having the new brought him one of lights installed. the awards, as a They certainly add result of its being a lot to our comjudged the best munity at this seahandled skin son. among all pelts “Letters To received at Sears Santa Claus” Raw Fur Receiving Dear Santa, Station in I want a GI type Memphis...and in camp kit, 5.00; a addition, entitles lie detector game Malone to consid3.75; a boys 5 pc eration for one of Water, ink pen, the major awards, pencil pen, old including $1,000 coin design tie clip first prize, accorded 9.00; and two in the final judging boxes of chocolate to be held in April. Santas 48 for 3.90. “ We l c o m e I love you. Stranger” From Roger Mr. and Mrs. Chester County Independent archives, December 12, 1952 Summers Walter Massengill Dear Santa of this city are the proud parents of In conclusion Mayor Moffitt said, Clause, a girl, born Dec. 14, weighing 8 ¾ I want you to bring me a bicycle pounds, who has been named “It is no pleasure whatsoever for me to be forced to fine individuals. I and a 2 gun holster with cowboy hat Beverley Sue. hope all our drivers will conduct and red handkerchief for Christmas. “Letters To Santa Claus” themselves and their driving in Gary Massey Pinson, Tenn. such a manner as to eliminate the Dear Santa, “Dear Santa, I want an automobile, I want a We are two little boys, 5 and 7 necessity of arrests and to above years old. We want you to come out all, eliminate the possibility of camera and a radio and a watch. our way Christmas to see us. We do killing some child that suddenly Bring my mother a hair dryer. And I want a wagon at my grandmothers’ not ask you to bring us very much darts into the street.” house. so you can divide up your things “Letters To Santa” Dear Santa, Your girl friend, with all the good little boys and I have been a good little girl. I Pamela Ann Johnson girls. We would like a big red wagon December 14, 1972 and some good things to eat and would like for you to bring me a just anything you want to bring us house coat, slippers and a book will be alright. Please remember sack. I go to Unity School. Please “Rains, Floods Cause Heavy don’t forget my little sister and Crop Damage” mama and daddy and my teacher. A flooding rain over the weekGoodbye, for a big brother and also my mother and Christmas.” father. Wishing you a Merry end topped off with sleet and freezing rain Monday and Tuesday of this LEON AND JERRY BON Christmas. Love, week has caused most farmers in CARROLL Linda Buckley, Chester County to mark off 1972’s Huron, Tenn. crops as total or near-total losses. Dear Santa Claus, Despite efforts of many farmers I am a little girl 6 to provide tracks and slides for years old. I am in the combines the mud has just been too 1st grade. Mrs. Mary deep for farm machinery to operate Nell Abney is my and with less than 50 percent of the teacher. I like her cotton and bean crop gathered, very much. most farmers in this area are facing I didn’t get to see a bleak Christmas and an even you in the Christmas bleaker 1973 when they must try Parade but my moth- again to plant a crop they can harer is writing you a vest. letter for me to tell One farmer said he had nearly you what I want. $60,000 in beans rotting on the vine I want a big doll and cited several others who are in with natural hair so I the same fix. He estimated that can comb and brush nearly $2,000,000 in beans are yet it, a baton and a doc- to be harvested in the county, and tor’s set. after the freezing rain Sunday and Don’t forget my lit- Monday there is little hope that any tle brother, Jimmie of the unharvested beans can be Allen Melton. He is 2 gainfully harvested. He said the years old. He wants a heavy sleet on the bean plants tractor and train, one would mash them down so that Chester County Independent archives, December 11, 1942 that blows, lots of even if good weather should come nuts, fruit and candy. the plants would be mashed below December 12, 1952 We have been good children and combine level to be harvested. “Mayor Warns Citizens On Law I say my prayer each night and my Damage to crops here has been Violations Here” blessing each meal. so severe the United States Mayor Laurence Moffitt today We love you Santa Claus and will Department of Agriculture has issued the following statement go to bed early Christmas eve declared Chester a disaster area regarding traffic conditions in the night. God bless you dear Santa. thus permitting hard hit farmers to city of Henderson: Don’t forget all the other little borrow money from the FHA at one “Increased complaints received boys and girls. per cent interest rates. by the Mayor’s office force me to Your pals, But being able to borrow money make an appeal through this newsMargaret Ann Melton and at low interest rates is of little conpaper for slower and safer speeds Jimmie Allen Melton solation to a farmer who had what on the streets of Henderson. December 14, 1962 promised to be one of the finest “Increasing numbers of automo- “Low Temperatures Plague crops in recent years only to see it biles constantly increase the dan- Residents” ruined at harvest time by unceasing gers on our streets as well as on Citizens of Henderson “buttoned and unseasonable rains.

From the files of the Chester County Independent December 11, 1942

our highways. I am receiving an increasing number of calls from mothers and others relating to incidences of speeding automobiles endangering lives of both children and adults. Other complaints regard ‘jack-rabbit’ starting, intentional screeching of tires, fast approaches with sudden stopping, whipping around corners, speeding through school zones and unnecessary horn blowing. Mayor Moffitt continued by saying: “Sadly enough, not all these violations and lack of consideration for others are being committed by persons under 21 years of age. However, some reports have been received of ‘under-age’ boys and girls who do not hold drivers’ licenses, driving on the city streets. I am appealing to the parents of these children to stop this practice rather than have our patrolmen stop it.

Tips offered for parents of kids with big dreams If Sydney Rose, 20, could talk to the young contestants who wowing audiences on shows like “The Voice” and “The XFactor,” she’d tell them: Even if you don’t make it to the end of this contest, if you have a vision and a talent, don’t ever give up. The singer/songwriter whose debut pop single, “Breaking Rules,” hit No. 15 on the national radio Top 40 chart earlier this fall, says she tried to put her dream on hold – and couldn’t. “I’ve been in love with music all my life,” says Rose (www.sydneyrosemusic.com). “I’ve learned it’s an important part of who I am and you can’t ignore that, no matter what your age.” Rose says her parents and other adults in her life were instrumental in helping her develop her talents. Her father recognized her ear for music when she was just 2 and immediately recognized a classical composition as a song from “The Little Mermaid.” She started with singing, then learned guitar (“My first chord was D”) and, at age 13, took dance lessons. She overcame any lingering shyness about performing before audiences by joining two other girls in a pop/dance group called Rosemadayne. She put together her first album at 16, but it’s her newest album, “Rise,” an up-tempo celebration of life, that made the breakthrough on radio. It’s getting airplay on stations across the country, a development that never ceases to amaze and delight the rising star. Rose shares how the adults in her life that helped her nurture her potential and stay focused on her dream: • A strong support team: Rose had help from her parents, friends, teachers and a manager who encouraged and helped guide her. Coaches, mentors and instructors helped her polish her raw talent and develop new skills, such as dance. That required financial and logistical support from her parents, a sacrifice they happily made. “I started

voice lessons when I was a tween, and to this day I get intensive voice training,” Rose says. “But the more skills you have, the better, so I also started working on dance when I was 13 years old. No matter what type of creative talent your child has – singing, acting, writing or painting – if they want to become a professional, they need training.” The encouragement and support of friends, other family members and teachers also show a child that their dreams matter. • Set realistic goals: Your child may dream of being in the movies or on TV, but don’t expect to start there! “I happily performed at bar and bat mitzvahs (bonus! – I met my manager through those), book stores, Best Buy stores, and at my vocal school,” Rose says. “These were great opportunities to get used to being in front of live audiences and learning how to interact with the audience.” The smaller goals are steppingstones to the bigger goals – a point to occasionally remind your child of. • Even kids with big dreams get scared: Doing something for the first time can be frightening, and your child might get anxious and nervous. It doesn’t mean he or she has lost interest in her dream – in fact, even veteran performers admit to getting a case of the nerves. Encourage them to get out there and try! “From experience, I know that almost anything that seems scary the first time gets much easier, and less scary, every time you do it,” Rose says. “Help your child understand how important it is to face your fear so he can take the next step.” • Have fun! “With ‘Rise,’ I wrote songs that are fun and upbeat. I thought, ‘If I’m going to do this for the rest of my life, I have to have an amazing time. Right?’ Rose says. Part of what has helped the album’s success is that she was genuinely happy and having a good time when she recorded it. No matter what your child is doing, his true emotions will color his work – they’re hard to hide, so help your child work with them.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

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Fast Stop donates to area children Fast Stop No. 12, located in Henderson, has awarded a grant of $500 to Elks Lodge and $1,500 to the Carl Perkins Center through its parent company’s Highland Corporation Charitable Foundation. “This is our way of giving back to the communities in which we do business” stated Patty Reeves, Manager of Fast Stop No. 12. “We are proud to be a part of the Henderson community and are excited to be helping these charitable causes.”

Photos by Marney E. Gilliam, Independent

Pictured left to right: Stacy Hampton; Patty Reeves, manager; Clay Jordan representing the Carl Perkins Center; and Connie Perez and Marissa Carpenter.

Pictured left to right: Stacy Hampton; Patty Reeves, manager; Gene Shipp and Eddie Ellis representing the Elks Lodge; and Connie Perez and Marissa Carpenter.

Words for the Week: “they teach you …” By Junebug

Our children – they teach you how much you are needed AND how little you actually know! This photo with my first daughter was taken just after her grandmother in California had called to “hear her make some kind of sound!” Naturally, children do NOT perform on command - no matter what age they are. So, after trying everything I could think of to make her giggle, or coo, or SOMETHING, I relented and pinched her to make her cry. Her grandmother thought it was so cute to hear her cry – I, on the other hand, was full of compassion and feeling her pain worse than my daughter was I am sure! In this photo I am trying to comfort her from her ‘mean mama’s pinch,’ and she is already OVER it, trying to figure out what the camera is that is pointed at her. I, on the other hand, am still feeling extra guilty and wondering if she’ll forgive the fact she was unjustly pinched by me. Isn’t that the way children and mama’s are think about it? We know things are not always fair or just, even though we wish they were. When we, as grownups, experience unfairness and being treated unjustly, we may remember it for a long time – a small child however, unless it is a terribly traumatic experience, will forget and forgive almost immediately. They teach you to be more alert to what is going on around you, and to be more forgiving. Never take that for granted though, because there may be a time we THINK won’t be remembered, and actually it is, especially when they are very young, it could become their first memory. So now – take a minute, think back to when you were very young. Close your eyes and try to remember YOUR very first memory. Is it always the same one? Do you understand it, or is it just a snapshot, or fast video, taken by your mind, with all the details before and after lost to you forever? Granted, some people can recall events when they were babies, and others can’t recall anything until they were in school. Some people’s first memories are full of happiness and bright colors, some are in sepia; others first memories are full of sadness; and perhaps yours are like mine, a mystery that will never be resolved. Whatever your first memories are, if you can bring

it up from the deep recesses of your RNA, they teach you something about your childhood and likely also about who you are now. Perhaps you aren’t sure if your first memory is a real memory or is a story you’ve heard so many times you have assimilated it as a memory. What can it do for us though, if we meditate on that first memory, real or imagined? Believe it or not, it may affect how we treat our children, our grandchildren, and who we are now. Try it – see what you come up with. Look back at the photo above – look at the expression on my face, my eyes are focused on her expression, do you see my left arm drawing her closer to me, and my hand gently holding her head, my cheek is leaned softly into her forehead. What is this body language telling her? Isn’t it to let her know she is not alone, she is being protected and is loved – even though only moments before I had pinched her just enough to make her make a noise for her grandma. Let me tell you my first memory, and see if you think it had any bearing on what was happening in that photo. It was very dark and late at night; I was very young, standing in a crib, looking through the bars I am holding onto on the wide side of the crib. The crib is beside a window in what I think is a motel room, and there are no lights on. As cars drive by, their headlights shine through the window, making shadows of the bars of the crib, and me, move across the wall across from me, and I am staring at the shadows as they move … no one else is there, but I am not afraid, just curious about the shadows. Then, a couple walks through the front door into the room, closes the door, walks over to stand about six feet in front of me. They are looking at me. They didn’t turn on the light, so the car light shadows continue moving across the wall, and now them too. As the cars continue to pass by I look closer at them each time, trying to see if I know them. One is a thin young man wearing a hat, tie, and a dark trench coat over a suit; the other is a young woman, wearing a hat, a dress suit, she is carrying a purse and she is relaxed, holding it with both hands in front of her. But everything is shades of grey. I can’t make out their faces, but I feel no

fear. No one else is in the room. The two strangers begin slowly taking a step toward me, retaining the

same posture, not reaching out toward me, and I am backing up until my back is leaning on the bars on the other side of the crib and my arms are grabbing hold of the bars by my sides for support. I am still trying to see if I know them. And then, abruptly, the memory ends. That is my earliest memory. No words were ever spoken. As I said, it is a “mystery memory.” I have asked many in my family if they know anything about that memory, but none could ever define who, what, where or when that happened. So they all concluded it never happened. BUT I know it did; because I remember it vividly - as vividly as shades of grey can be. I have some ideas of what it could have been. Perhaps it was when my mother was struggling to support us and having a very hard time of it; if so, maybe it was her apartment instead of a motel, maybe it was her new husband-to-be with her? Perhaps it was when I was dropped off to live at an aunt’s house that I didn’t know who, after only a few days, took me to an orphanage? Perhaps it was in the orphanage, where I lived for three days at age three? Perhaps it was when my grandparents, I also did not know them, came to the orphanage to take me home with them? Point being, I will never know the “who, what, where and when.” But I firmly believe that memory actually molded my thinking, making me want to be sure MY children never felt alone, abandoned, or unloved. Look at the photo now – and with my

first memory fresh in your mind, do the actions portrayed in the photo mean more now, are they more easily discernable to you, do you think my “mystery memory” affected me as a parent? Try to capture YOUR first memory, discuss it with family and friends, and see if you can understand YOUR current actions and reactions a lit-

tle better? If your first memory is a “mystery memory,” maybe someone can explain it to you. I really do believe they teach you … our children, when very young, have a direct affect on us, possibly subconsciously remembering our own childhood experiences and reacting accordingly. As our newborns are handed to us for the first time, they engender in us

a type of love we have never before experienced; and as they grow into young children and young adults, we learn who WE really are! Email your ‘words for the week’ suggestion and/or opinion of this week’s article to jpatterson@chestercountyindependent.com. “Let’s keep life simple, real and fun.” - Junebug


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Opinion

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Reflections in the wake of Sandy Hook Often the first response after a tragedy like the Sandy Hook school shooting is to lash out. Some point their fingers at the media; some, at gun control laws; some, at parents; and yet others, at mental health care. Society wants a cause to pin the blame upon. We want something to blame so that we can attempt to understand the deaths of 20 innocent elementary school students and their teachers. Most frequently, the subject turns to guns. Many have stated that Adam Lanza legally obtained the weapons he used in the shooting, but more accurately, his mother legally obtained the guns. Lanza, as a 20year-old, could not legally purchase a pistol, so those weapons he used were, in effect, stolen from his mother. Lanza entered the school with stolen weapons, which negates the debate about whether or not his mental health condition should have prohibited him from purchasing a handgun. I don’t know how Ms. Lanza stored and secured her firearms, but gun shops and outdoor stores are not to blame for Lanza having access to the weapons. Ms. Lanza reportedly enjoyed target shooting, which when done properly is a recreational sport, much like archery or karate – sports that originated from means of protection but now are considered recreation. With or without access to his mother’s firearms, Lanza would have found a means to carry out his plan to harm people. The police have not yet speculated about why he targeted an elementary school, but domestic terrorists have done just as much damage with even less. Homemade bombs made from fertilizer or household chemicals, knives, and even baseball bats have cost countless lives and even brought down the Federal Building in Oklahoma City. Personally, I never held a gun until after I had been married for several years. I was raised with guns in plain sight, but I never fired one or even picked one up until 2009. As I was growing up, my mother kept an unloaded revolver in her nightstand drawer. I knew never to touch it. My grandfather, with whom I spent much of my time, had a gun case with a glass door. I never opened it. Often he kept a shotgun propped next to the back door in case “varmits” got after his cows. I went in and out of that door without so much as a second thought for the shotgun. The fact that it was there was as simple as the fact that we had steak knives in the kitchen drawer. They had a purpose, and we used them for what they were intended. My grandfather never taught me to shoot, and I would have gone through life having never fired a gun if it hadn’t been for my husband. He grew up hunting, spent years in the military and felt that gun safety should be a fact of life. He was shocked that a girl from rural West Tennessee had never been hunting or even learned basic target shooting. He encouraged me to take a handgun safety class, and therefore, I learned to shoot for the first time. Since the shooting at Sandy Hook, we have had several discussions about how the incident could have been prevented. On the extreme end, he argued that the teachers should have had the option to conceal carry. I countered that that was extremely unwise, especially for elementary school teachers with boisterous children in their classrooms. Most were probably like me and never had any desire or motivation to shoot or carry a gun, especially in their school. The vast majority of school shootings have occurred in high schools, so elementary school teachers should have felt safe and secure in their workplace. The best solution for the entire situation – and most school and workplace shootings – should be basic security. Like it or not, schools need a police officer or trained security person on the premises. Sandy Hook’s principal and school psychologist reportedly charged Lanza once he broke into the school, but neither was trained to take down an armed gunman. If security had been closer, perhaps more lives would have been saved. Lanza took his own life when he heard the police closing in on him. If one officer had been stationed at the school, how much less destruction might he have caused? Lanza allegedly shot his way into the school through a locked door, but other school shootings might be prevented with working metal detectors installed at the entrance. I’m not advocating an airport style full body Xray, backpack scan and pat down, but an ounce of prevention, the old saying states, goes along way. We don’t need armed guards stationed at each door on campus or bomb sniffing dogs patrolling the halls. What we need is back up for the principals and teachers who do their best to protect their students. A security guard and metal detector for each school might be pricey to cash-pinched school districts, but saving the lives of students should be worth it. We should never have to resort to violence, and weapons should only be needed to take down dinner, but that’s not the world we live in. It never has been. Since Biblical days, people have killed and harmed one another. We hope never to need to protect ourselves, but if we outlaw guns, those who are determined to have one will still manage to find a way to get their hands on what other citizens cannot. The blame must be placed with Lanza himself – not his parents, not the guns he used, not even the failed system that led him down the path he chose. We can debate the issues of gun laws, responsible ownership and even mental health care (or lack thereof), but the real issue lies in how we are able to respond to a situation, and Sandy Hook, like most other schools was ill prepared. Stricter laws for gun ownership probably won’t change much; criminals will always find a way to exact their plans, but we can learn to better protect ourselves, our children and our schools.

Mechanical Santa Claus really meant Christmas All the benefits of electricity, from powering labor saving devices and lighting homes to energizing new technologies for education and entertainment, in my memory take a backseat at this time of year to what those electrons flowing over miles of rural territory meant for the celebration of Christmas. I recall my grandparents’ Christmas tree – a spindly but spicy-smelling cedar, the plentiful and readily available evergreen common in southern Appalachia where my family’s roots went deep – decorated for the first time with colorful electric lights. In those days when old homes had to be retrofitted for receiving electricity, it was expedient to run the wiring across ceilings, down walls and over doorways. Electricity was still an unfamiliar source of energy, and you felt more comfortable with the insulated wiring on the outside instead of inside of walls. Also, light switches were for rich people. Chains or pull strings sufficed for farming folks. The fireplace crackled and threw dancing shadows across the room as someone fumbled with the power cord, finally plugging it into the room’s external wall socket. Not a word was spoken. Only sighs were heard at the beauty of the single strand of green, red and blue bulbs, each as large as a grown man’s thumb. The old farmhouse glowed as never before.

Although our decorations were chains of paper, bird nests, popcorn strings and tin foil stars, real electric Christmas lights made our humble tree a magical thing. More than 20 years later, after I had graduated from college, I came home to work at the local newspaper. My bride and I rented a cottage from the publisher, conveniently located next door to the post office, where I unloaded bundles of addressed newspapers at 2 a.m. for the rural route carriers, and one block from the downtown shopping district. This was where I learned that community newspapers and electric cooperatives are similar institutions. Both are service organizations looking out for the welfare of citizens and consumers. Both depend on the sense of ownership and loyalty engendered by reliability and constant presence. Both are intensely local. I learned about rural electrification by covering the local cooperative. In those days, I seldom remembered those colored lights on my grandparents’ cedar tree and didn’t have the perspective to connect the dots and see how, in a broader way, electricity changed the celebration of rural Christmas forever. It’s only today, when my wife and I reflect on the old mechanical Santa Claus in the display window of E.R. Roberts Store on Main Street, that I see the impact. The tradition started in the 1950s.

Every Friday after Thanksgiving, the lifesized Santa appeared, bedecked in a red silk suit with a shiny black leather belt. He twisted at the waist and waved his arms at passersby. On Christmas Eve at dusk, he mysteriously disappeared. Children were told that Santa’s exit was because he was delivering toys around the world. Even adults wanted to believe this because for almost five decades, until the local clothing store changed owners, nobody ever witnessed – or at least confessed they had – the transition from mechanical Santa to afterChristmas sale display. My wife and I – and later our sons – had a holiday tradition of strolling down Main Street late in the evening just to stop in front of E.R. Roberts to watch Santa doing his thing. It was mesmerizing, especially the way he batted ornaments hanging from the ribbons without breaking them. When discount retailers and other chain stores opened and the first shopping mall was built, the mom-and-pop stores

downtown smothered. E.R. Roberts hung on for a long time, but finally Thanksgiving came and went without the mechanical Santa making his appearance because the store had closed. The denouement of this narrative would be sad except for a man who grew up watching for Santa to appear and disappear in the store window. The original, although inoperable, Santa was searched for, found and acquired. Repairs and refurbishments were made. Today, in a much larger community, miles away from the small town’s quaint Main Street, the old animated Santa continues to twist and wave from an upstairs garage window at Christmas time. A new generation has come to appreciate his schedule. Always, the window is empty at nightfall on Christmas Eve. Folks drive long distances so their children can see what was once a marvel of electricity and mechanics in its time, but which represents something much more important in their memories.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

To the Editor: Thank you for the article “Hanukkah: A festival of lights and a celebration of freedom” appearing in your Dec. 13 edition. I would, however, like to offer two corrections: 1) Rabbi Parr of Reform Congregation B’nai Israel opined that the story of the miracle of the oil was a legend that was added to the story later rather than an actual event that occurred at the first Hanukkah. In fact the story of this miracle is related the Talmud, Tractate Shabbat page 21b, and was never contradicted by any Talmudic Sage, nor has its authenticity ever been questioned by any subsequent rabbinical authority. That being the case, we may safely assume that it did in fact happen and should not cast doubts on it. 2) The article also says that non-Jews may achieve righteousness before God simply by doing “good things” (the Ten Commandments are then cited). In fact the Ten Commandments, properly understood, apply to Jews only. NonJews are instead required to accept and observe the Seven Noahide Commandments, and to do so explicitly on the authority of God as revealed at Mt. Sinai, in order to achieve the main reward in the Messianic Era. For merely “doing good” one receives a lesser reward. There is a partial overlap between the Noahide Commandments and the Ten Commandments.

A most excellent source of information for non-Jews on their obligations under the Seven Noahide Commandments may be found online at asknoah.org/. While there is unfortunately much false information and confusion about these matters in the world

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today, this site is trustworthy and contains authentic information. Thank you again for the article. I hope in the future other Jewish holidays will be featured as well. Roy Neal Grissom Henderson

Telephone Pioneers Meeting Dec. 20 The Jackson Life Member Telephone Pioneers will meet at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 20 at Perkins Restaurant in Jackson. Please bring children’s school supplies to be donated to the Dream Center. All retired communications employees and their spouses are invited to attend. For additional information call 423-0944.

Blood drive in Henderson Dec. 21 The Blood drive will be in Henderson Dec, 21 from noon to 5 p.m. at Greens, Beans and Taters Restaurant, 1314 Hwy 45 South Suite A. Blood types especially needed are O-negative, O-positive, B-negative and A-negative.

Reagan Center Saturday Dance Dec. 22 Saturday, Dec. 22, the Community Center in Reagan will be hosting its regular Saturday night dance. The doors open at 6 p.m., and at 6:30 p.m. there will be free line dance lessons with Bobbie Keeton. Beginning at 7:30 p.m. there will be live music with “Bojack and Rockin’ Country.” This is an all ages show. Concessions will be available.

Country Dance in Mifflin Jan. 4 There will be a weekly country dance from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. at the Mifflin Mall every Friday night in January. Come out and join us and dance to live entertainment. [There are NO dances in December.]

Free arthritis foundation exercise classes begin Jan. 8 UT Extension in McNairy County will be offering a free Arthritis Foundation exercise class every Tuesday and Thursday for eight weeks starting Jan. 8. The class will be offered from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the Selmer Community Center. This class is being taught by a certified instructor and is for arthritis sufferers of all ages and mobility levels that can benefit from the low impact course. Extension educators design each class to meet the needs of all participants. For more information and to register, call UT Extension at 6453598.

2012-2013 Scholarship announcement The Chester County Republican Party announces the School Year 2012-2013 program to award a scholarship worth $500 each to two deserving Chester County High Schools seniors who are attending a public, private or home school and intend to pursue a post-high school course of study at either a college/university or other postsecondary educational institution. The process is open to all high school seniors regardless of his/her political views. Applicants must submit a written essay by March 31, 2013 on the following topic: “The Bill of Rights, Individual Liberty and Personal Freedom.” The first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution are collectively referred to as the Bill of Rights. Of the rights protected by these amendments, which do you believe offers the most important protection of individual liberty and personal freedom?” The essay must be between 500 and 750 words, typed,

double spaced, Arial font and 11point size, submitted either in Word (DOC or DOCX), plain text (TXT) or a Portable Document Format (PDF), and must be written in English. Submit the essay by mail to Scholarship Committee, Chester County Republican Party, Chester County Republican Party, P.O. Box 243, Henderson, TN 38340, or you may email it to dawn@Bramblettgrp.com. Scholarship packets may be obtained from the school guidance counselor or the Chester County Republican party.

Scholarships Available at the University of Memphis for 2013-14 Feb. 1 deadline Students who have applied for admission to the University of Memphis for the fall of 2013 are currently being evaluated for scholarship eligibility. A variety of scholarships are funded by the University and by private donors. In addition to academic scholarships, there are scholarships for adult students, community college graduates, transfer students, departmental scholarships, and scholarships for first-generation college students. Scholarships are awarded based on information submitted on the University of Memphis application for admission. A separate scholarship application is not required unless noted. The priority deadline for admitted students to the University of Memphis for scholarship consideration is Feb. 1. For more information about scholarships, go online to www.memphis.edu/scholarships or call 901-678-3213. More information about financial aid is available by phone at 901-678-4825 or online at www.memphis.edu/financialaid.

SWHRA Head Start accepting registrations The Southwest Human Resource Agency Head Start Program is now accepting applications for 4-yearolds to attend Head Start classes. Head Start serves children the year before they are eligible to attend Kindergarten. You may contact Family Case Manager, Sharla Franklin at 549-9413. Reagan Head Start Center is located at 5820 Hwy. 100, Reagan (next door to the post office). Information needed at this time includes the child’s name, birth date (please bring child’s birth certificate), child’s immunization form (shot record), to be obtained from the local Health Department or from the child’s physician, a copy of child’s TennCare card, Social Security Number for all family members, Food Stamp Case Numbers and Family Income Verification. Verification of income must be provided by individual Income Tax Form 1040, W-2 Forms, pay stubs, pay envelopes, Written Statements from employers or AFDC/Food stamp Determination Verification.

Jackson Rural Development meetings The Jackson Rural Development Area Office holds meetings from 9 11 a.m. the first and third Wednesday of each month in the conference room of Henderson City Hall, 121 Crook Ave. A rural development specialist will be available to assist with rural housing applications. To set up an appointment, call 668-2091.


Obituary/Religion Thursday, December 20, 2012

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James Christopher Moss

Obituaries Eddie Garner July 16, 1949 – Dec. 15, 2012 Edward Parker Garner Jr., 63, died Saturday afternoon, Dec. 15 at the emergency room of Jackson General Hospital. Funeral services were at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 19 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Michael Smalley officiating. Burial followed in Chapel Hill Cemetery in Henderson County. He was born in Jackson and reared near Pinson, the son of the late Edward Parker Garner Sr. and Elsie Evagene ‘Gene’ Brown Garner. He graduated from South Side High School and attended U. T. Martin and served in the U.S. Army in communications. He was a journeyman electrician, having worked for Casey Electric, TVA, and Conalco in Jackson. He was a member of the I.B.E.W. electrical union and the First Baptist Church of Pinson. He is survived by two uncles, James P. Brown Jr. of Finger and Robert L. Brown of Hernando, Miss.; and four aunts, Betty Stewart and Mary Ruth Garrett, both of Jackson, Carrie Alice Smalley of Hickory Valley and Nancy E. Taylor of Mifflin. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 20, 2012

Allen A. Arnold Nov. 11, 1923 – Dec. 16, 2012 Allen Anderson Arnold, 89, passed away Dec. 16, 2012 at the Jackson Madison County General Hospital. Funeral services were at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 19 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Ronnie Sells and Bobby Bray officiating. Burial followed in Friendship Cemetery. He was born and reared in the Friendship community of Chester County, the son of the late Allen A. and Edna Ross Bain Arnold. He attended school at New Friendship and graduated Pinson High School in 1940. He entered the U.S. Navy in 1944, and was in the Navy Air Corp., served in the South Pacific and returned in 1945. He was married to Minnie Latham in 1947 and they lived in the Beech Bluff community all their married life. He farmed for many years and drove the Pet Milk and Grade A Milk Route, for about 10 years. He also worked at the Chester County Highway Dept. and Quality Mfg. He worked as supervisor for Madison Mill Work from the early 70”s until 1984. He owned and operated the Hill Top Grocery for five years. He was a member of the VFW Post 4844, the American Legion Post 157 and a member of the Big Springs United Methodist Church. He is survived by a son, Allen L. Arnold of Beech Bluff; two daughters, Alice Kay Stewart of Bartlett and Susie Terry of Forney, Texas; six grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; and three sisters, Adelle Cooper of Henderson, Leander Martin of Jackson and Inez Palmer of Huntingdon. He was preceded in death by his wife, Alice Minnie Latham Arnold in 2010; a grandson, Cody Stewart in 2005; a son-in-law, Randy Stewart in 2006; and three sisters, Mozelle Jones, Louise Wilhite and Eva Rogers. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 20, 2012

Date of Death – Dec. 12, 2012 Chris Moss died Dec. 12, 2012 (12-12-12) at home surrounded by family and friends, Terry and Cheryl Cox. Chris leaves behind to cherish his memory his wife, Cindy and daughters, Kayla Jo Moss of Henderson and Angela King Harmon of Benton, Ky., his grand-kids, Libby Jo and Jakeb of Benton, Ky. his sisters, Karen Moss (Donny Joe Moody) of Henderson and Linda Duemler Stovall of Jackson and his brother, Joe Barton of Jackson. Chris leaves many friends that he considered family. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Misty Moss, his parents Gene and Martha Moss and a granddaughter, Lilly Ann Melton. Services were at First Baptist Church in Henderson at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 18, with Medina Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) Dec. 20, 2012

Taking applications for food boxes now The Henderson Church of God will continue taking applications until Christmas for food boxes, which include from $75 to $200 worth of food for a $10 per month donation. If you are on SSI, SSA, SS, Families First, or are elderly, call Sheila to sign up. For more information, call 983-0580. If no answer, leave a message.

Christmas Eve Communion Service Dec. 24 Henderson First United Methodist Church will hold their traditional Christmas Eve Communion Service at 7 p.m. Dec. 24. At 6:30 p.m. the Brass Choir will play. The church is located at 131 North Ave. on the hill. The community is invited to attend this meaningful and much-loved service. Like the angel who heralded glad tidings to the shepherds, we invite you to join us at 7 p.m. during this holy season to sing the joy of Jesus’ birth. In a very real sense it is also our own birth which we celebrate at Christmas - a spiritual birth of the Divine Presence made new in our lives. Join us for this service that captures the spirit of Christmas. Favorite carols, beautiful Christmas music, and lit candles help to tell again the ancient story of the birth of the Prince of Peace.

Christmas Musical at Forty Forks Baptist Church FFBC wishes to invite every one to their Christmas Musical at 6 p.m. Dec. 23. The Children’s and Adult Choir will be performing. Our special guest will be Larry and Peggy Cartwright. The Choir will be bringing a wonderful choral arrangement titled, “Beautiful Star of Bethlehem.” Come and expect a blessing! The church is located at 672 Ed Barham Rd., Bethel Springs. The pastor is Bro. Randy Smith. Musical Leaders are Lloyd and Brenda Watkins. For more information, or if you need a ride, call 610-1716 or 610-9652.

Pray the New Year in - Dec. 31 Come and join Old Path Baptist Church at 8 p.m. Monday, Dec. 31 for preaching, fellowship and special music as they pray in the “New Year” at midnight. The Glory Bound Gospel Quartet will provide special music. Join them at Old Path Baptist Church at Cabo for this event. For directions, call Paul Peterson at 688-0052 or 608-6942.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

Sweetlips Baptist Sweetlips Road

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Page 12-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT December 10, 2012 Copper and aluminum wiring and parts were reportedly stolen from a central unit at a White Ave. residence. According to the report, the theft occurred sometime between Dec. 1 and this date, and the unit had been taken apart, with all of the copper and aluminum removed. December 11, 2012 Yarnell Deniece Burton, 33, 926 Woodland Dr., was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license and violation of the vehicle financial responsibility act. She was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $300 bond. Franklin Daniel Cordero, 26, 740 E Fourth St., was arrested and charged with simple domestic assault. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $2,000 bond. December 13, 2012 A purse was reportedly stolen from a vehicle parked in front of an Inca Road residence around 5 p.m. on Dec. 12. The purse, yellow with brown straps, contained personal identification, paperwork and debit card. November 14, 2012 Angela Kay Sikes, 36, Jacks Creek, was arrested and charged with driving under the influence (DUI), failure to report accident, possession of handgun while under the influence, possession of a schedule II controlled substance, possession of a schedule III controlled substance and possession of a schedule IV controlled substance. She was released from the

Chester County Jail after posting a $5,000 bond. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT December 10, 2012 Shanqueta Rashea Croom, 21, Humboldt, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. She was released from the Chester County Jail on furlough. December 11, 2012 A report was taken of a Pitbull dog attacking another dog in the Tony Thomas Lane neighborhood. The owner of the pitbull was issued a citation for dog at large. Brandon Bailey Foster, 43, Lexington, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released from the Chester County jail after posting a $750 bond. Charlotte Rowland, 46, Hilllview Manor Apt 605, was arrested and charged with 70 counts of truancy. She was released from the Chester County Jail on her own recognizance. Terry Lee Rowland, 53, 595 Sanford Ave., was arrested and charged with 70 counts of truancy. He was released from the Chester County jail on his own recognizance. December 13, 2012 Brandon Durell Cooper, 41, Hermitage, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $75 cash bond. December 14, 2012 A plastic dog kennel was reportedly stolen from the back porch of a residence on US Hwy 45 South. The kennel was described as 27-inches

high by 31-inches by 24inches. It is valued at $80. A burglary was reported at a residence on Hwy 225. According to the report, the door was found pried open, and the home in disarray. Items known to be missing at the time of the report include a 52inch flat screen television valued at $1,300 and a Duck Unlimited shotgun, brown stock with blue barrel, with “Limited Edition” written on the side, valued at $600. A detailed list of missing items was expected to be submitted to the Sheriff’s Department at a later date. December 15, 2012 Jessica Nicole Maness, 25, Lexington, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked or suspended license. She was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $2,500 bond. Justin Dale Tidwell, Jr., was arrested and charged with violation of Community Corrections Felony. He is held in the Chester County Jail without bond. December 16, 2012 A break-in was reported at a residence on Roby Road. According to the report, a window was found to have been broken out, and several items were reported missing, including a wooden jewelry box, nail polish, a green glass Coke pitcher valued at $150, four electric wall heaters valued at $400, an air conditioner window unit valued at $400, a white refrigerator valued at $300, a large propane heater valued at $200 and a small propane heater valued at $100. December 17, 2012 Stephen Wesley Phillips, 35, 318 Sheila Dr., was arrested and charged

with three counts of obtaining drugs by fraud. He was released from the Chester County Jail to Williamson County, after posting a $500 bond. Timothy Wayne Smith, 37, Finger, was arrested and charged with aggravated assault. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $25,000 bond. Hunter Dewayne Williams, 22, Lexington, was arrested and charged with theft of property under $500. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $500 bond. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT November 22, 2012 3:40 p.m. - 485 Talley Store Road, grass fire, Station One Volunteer Fire Department responding. December 16, 2012 3:29 p.m. - 710 Rabbit Ranch Road, motor vehicle accident, Hilltop Volunteer Fire Department responding. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD December 17, 2012 The Chester County Rescue Squad responded to a one car motor vehicle accident with entrapment on Rabbit Ranch Road. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT Phillip Smith appeared in Chester County Circuit Court on Dec. 18. Motion for Bill of Particulars was filed. Appearance was reset for Feb. 21, with a potential trial date set for April 9.

U.S. Attorney’s office collects $7.6 million U.S. Attorney Edward L. Stanton III has announced that the Western District of Tennessee collected nearly $7.6 million related to criminal and civil actions in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012. Of this amount, more than $5.3 million was collected in criminal actions and more than $2.2 million was collected in civil actions. Additionally, the office collected $944,452.20 in criminal and civil forfeitures. “During this time of economic recovery, these collections are more important than ever,” said U.S. Attorney Edward L. Stanton III. “The U.S. Attorney’s Office is dedicated to protecting the public and recovering funds for the federal treasury and for victims of federal crime. We will continue to hold accountable those who seek to profit from their illegal activities.” In October 2011, the Western District of Tennessee recovered $1.37 million as part of the settlement with the DFine Corporation, which was an Affirmative Civil/Medical Device case. Nationwide, the U.S. Attorneys’ offices collected $13.1 billion in

criminal and civil actions during FY 2012, more than doubling the $6.5 billion collected in FY 2011. A portion of this amount, $5.3 billion, was collected in shared cases in which one or more U.S. Attorneys’ offices or department litigating divisions were also involved. The $13.1 billion represents more than six times the appropriated budget of the combined 94 offices for FY 2012. The U.S. Attorneys’ Offices, along with the department’s litigating divisions, are responsible for enforcing and collecting civil and criminal debts owed to the U.S. and criminal debts owed to federal crime victims. Statistics indicate that the total amount collected in criminal actions totaled $3.035 billion in restitution, criminal fines, and felony assessments. The law requires defendants to pay restitution to victims of certain federal crimes who have suffered a physical injury or financial loss. While restitution is paid directly to the victim, criminal fines and felony assessments are paid to the Department’s Crime Victims’ Fund,

which distributes the funds to state victim compensation and victim assistance programs. The statistics also indicate that $10.12 billion was collected by the U.S. Attorneys’ offices in individually and jointly handled civil actions. The largest civil collections were from affirmative civil enforcement cases, in which the United States recovered government money lost to fraud or other misconduct or collected fines imposed on individuals and/or corporations for violations of federal health, safety, civil rights or environmental laws. In addition, civil debts were collected on behalf of several federal agencies, including the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services, Internal Revenue Service, and Small Business

Administration. Additionally, the U.S. Attorneys’ offices, working with partner agencies and divisions, collected $4.389 billion in asset forfeiture actions in FY 2012. Forfeited assets are deposited into the Department of Justice Assets Forfeiture Fund and Department of Treasury Forfeiture Fund and are used to restore funds to crime victims and for a variety of law enforcement purposes. The $13.16 billion collected nationwide by the U.S. Attorneys’ offices for FY 2012 nearly matches the $13.18 billion collected in FY 2010 and FY 2011 combined. For further information, the United States Attorneys’ Annual Statistical Reports can be found on the internet at www.justice.gov/usao/re ading_room/foiamanuals.html.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012 start back over. “For the Mayans this represents the end and the beginning of the cycle” and this event was met with festivities and the erecting of bigger and better buildings. But the Mayans did not just have two calendars. Leaning over the seat of the tour bus, head in his hands Gutierrez declared dramatically “Dec. 21, 2012, the end of the world.” Laughing out loud he then emphasized that the Mayans did not believe that they would die when this date occurred. His face lit up as he went on “This Dec. [21st] is going to be great because it is a change of a big cycle. The Mayans believe also in a big calendar … that they call the ‘Long Count’. It’s a calendar [that] is 5,125 years. This calendar makes a complete cycle every 5,125 years.” He went on to explain that

much of the Mayan architecture features the carving of the year 3113 b.c. According to Gutierrez, if you add 2012 to 3113 you get 5,125. “It’s the end and the beginning of the new calendar. If the Mayans were still alive … if this civilization [were] still living like they were living in the past, then the next buildings … the next temples instead of 3113, since Dec. 22, all the carvings [would] be changed to 2012. It’s just the end of the era. The end of the cycle and we’re going to start again.” This is not the first time this has happened. Gutierrez points to murals found in Mayan ruins in which you can see the sun with three dots representing the planets, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Earth and Jupiter, aligning with the sun. This only happens every 5,125 years so these murals illustrate

A tall Mayan ruin.

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G utier rez ’s point that the Long Count calendar has ended before and the Mayan celebrated and moved forward with their lives. M a y a n descendents believe that “good times are coming.” According to Gutierrez the Mayans and many civilizations, including those of Jewish and Egyptian d e c e n t , believe the universe is like a circle Photo courtesy of Matthew Gilliam and “Our galaxy right Our tour guide, Arturo Castandea Gutierrez, is a descendent of the Mayans. now we are in the dark side, on the night side. Once we pass Dec. 21, we’re going to be in the morning ... the light side. … And it’s going to be great because good things are coming.” One of the Mayan prophecies state “We will come back.” Gutierrez believes this has happened. He asked the crowd how many people knew of the Mayans in the 1980’s. Not many. But today, everyone, all over the world know about the Mayans. “We have movies about the Mayans … we talk about the Mayan prophesies. Now everybody knows about the Mayans so this is a good way to come back because everybody is talking about the Mayans.” So when you wake up on Dec. 22, remember that today is a day to start anew, that it is a day to be thankful for what you have, change what you don’t like and rebuild your life to be anything you want it to be. It is not the end but only the beginning. The Mayans would have wanted it that way. Photo courtesy of Mary Freidel

What will I do if I get influenza or step on a rattlesnake? By W. Gifford-Jones MD. The Doctor Game

“Dr. Gifford-Jones, should I agree to a flu shot this year?” Fear of this vaccine has been triggered by recent newspaper accounts of impurities found in some products. Although they are unfounded, every year some people still refuse the shot. When that’s the case, they should learn how Dr. Frederick R. Klenner saved many patients from life-threatening viral infections, and the bite of a rattlesnake. Why Dr. Klenner was never given the Nobel Prize in Medicine is hard to understand. He was a family doctor in North Carolina. Unfortunately he wasn’t my doctor when I awakened one morning with the worst headache I’d ever experienced. I was in my final year at The Harvard Medical School

and later that day I couldn’t move my legs. The diagnosis was poliomyelitis. World esteemed professors were close and available to treat me. But there was a problem. The polio vaccine wasn’t invented at that time. All they could do was watch the paralysis increase. What Klenner would have prescribed will shock you. In 1949 he reported momentous news to a meeting of the American Medical Association. During an epidemic of polio the year before he had cured 60 out of 60 patients suffering from this disease by using massive amounts of vitamin C, in some cases 300,000 milligrams (mg) of C daily. None of these patients were left with paralysis. Today, the recommended daily allowance of vitamin C is a mere 90 mg! How a large group of

American doctors could ignore this outstanding achievement boggles the mind. What is more unbelievable is that decades later it is still collecting dust. This is in spite of the fact that this was only one of Klenner’s findings. In “The Clinical Guide to the use of vitamin C,” Dr. Lendon Smith details the experiences of Dr. Klenner. He reports that Dr. Klenner had cured case after case of viral disease by huge doses of C. For instance, 60 years ago a seven year old boy had been ill for six weeks due to recurring attacks of influenza. He had been treated with sulfa, penicillin and small amounts of vitamin C, but suddenly he slipped into coma. Dr. Klenner quickly gave him an intravenous injection of 6,000 mg of vitamin C. Five minutes later he was awake. He received further injections and fully

Deadline is Friday for NRCS conservation programs For agricultural land and non-industrial private forestland producers interested in applying for farm bill conservation program financial assistance in Fiscal Year 2013, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Tennessee has set Friday, Dec. 21 as the signup cutoff date for first evaluation funding consideration. Pending the availability of funds, additional evaluation periods may occur and cutoff dates will be posted on the Tennessee website at http://www.tn.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/. Conservation program financial assistance is contingent on passage of a new Farm Bill and ensuing Fiscal Year 2013 fund allocations to states. The application deadline applies to the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) and EQIP National Initiatives and the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP) and WHIP National Initiatives.

Eligible producers with a conservation plan for their operation receive priority for financial assistance. NRCS staff is available to help producers create conservation plans. Only projects that are “ready to implement” will be ranked for funding. Applications can be submitted throughout the year. NRCS's conservation programs address resource concerns such as soil erosion, soil health, irrigation efficiency, impaired water quality and fragmented wildlife habitat. EQIP, one of NRCS’s largest conservation programs, helps eligible producers plan and implement conservation practices that provide opportunities to improve soil, water, plant, animal, energy, air and related resources on agricultural land and non-industrial private forestland. More information on the programs can be found at www.tn.nrcs.usda.gov.

recovered in 24 hours. The patient was Dr. Klenner’s son. Klenner also reported, in the journal “Southern Medicine and Surgery,” that injections of vitamin C had cured 42 cases of viral pneumonia. Later, in the same journal he reported that vitamin C could cure measles and chicken pox in 24 hours. He also proved that patients suffering from acute and chronic hepatitis could have liver function tests return to normal after seven days of being treated with intravenous vitamin C. And for the bite of a rattlesnake 60,000 mg can save a life. This lack of recognition of new ideas is not new.

Semmelweiss was ridiculed when he told doctors in Vienna that simply washing hands would save pregnant women from dying of puerperal sepsis. Closed minds have caused countless deaths. Fortunately, by sheer luck, I was left with minimal loss of muscle function after months of therapy. I had no idea at that time that years later Drs. Linus Pauling and Bush would show that high doses of vitamin C and lysine could also prevent heart attack. This combination powder, called Medi-C Plus, is now available at Health Food Stores and could save thousands of lives. See

www.docgiff.com for more information. It’s tragic that since reporting the value of Medi-C Plus, not a single cardiologist has supported this natural treatment. But humans are rarely receptive to new ideas. I’ve had my flu shot because suffering from the flu is no fun. Influenza is like being hit by a ten-ton truck. It kills about 40,000 North Americans every year. But since a flu shot is not 100 percent effective, I won’t forget Dr. Klenner’s advice if I develop full-blown influenza, or happen to step on a rattlesnake. Find me on Twitter @GiffordJonesMD Web site www.docgiff.com


Page 14-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

UT Extension questions and answers: How in the world do you rid yourself of moles?

Who’s really in control? By Rita U. McCain

By Brian Signaigo

Getting it all together

UT Extension Agent III

Children (gotta lov’em), are our future. And right now, it’s not looking very bright. What happened? The majority of us, who were born before 1970, knew what it meant to get our butts beat. Not out in the streets, but at home, by those who loved and cared for us the most, our parents! Most of us were scared to get into trouble at school, or away from home, scared of whom- our parents! We were taught respect for our parents and the home they provided. Respect for our neighbors as well as ourselves. We were held accountable for our actions. If you grew up with hand-me-downs; you were glad when Easter or your birthday rolled around and allowed you to get something new to wear. If you had chores to do on Saturday morning, they were done; without question. It was done right the first time, because of the consequences to follow if they were not. If your parents asked you a question, you gave an answer, but, if you were being yelled at, you kept your mouth shut, because to talk back, was just not acceptable. So what happened? Why do you accept less from your own children??? For the most part, you turned out alright. It was not always easy for parents to maintain a little fear in our hearts, to keep us on the right path. Of course we kept them on their toes with a little mischief from time to time, but we knew how far to go. But for the most part, our parents held firm, did what they had to do, and then when we were ready, they set us free. Some of us had to stumble, slip, slide and roll, before we finally gained our footing and found our own paths. But during those times, we were constantly hearing those familiar voices in our ear- parents, teachers, church member, and neighbors, all who had a part in making us the people we are today. What do our children hear as they try to find their way from childhood to adulthood? Our parents did that best they could with the knowledge and skills they had to work with. Now since we know better, we can do better. Who knows better what awaits our kids in this cold cruel world than we do! Let’s keep it real. Most of us have been there, done that, and invented most of it! Tell your children what’s waiting for them out there, so when it comes to them (and it will)

Nearly everyone has heard of a sure-fire home remedy for controlling moles. Some suggest that putting objects in the mole run will do the trick. Such things as razor blades, broken glass, bleach, lye, chewing gum and even human hair is supposed to drive them away. Really? However, the reality is that they are a part of nature and we will not “rid” ourselves of them. A high population of moles is three to five per acre, but it sometimes seems that they are all in my back yard. Moles are pretty active this time of year and will remain active through February. They are six to seven inches long, weigh between three to four ounces and will have three to five younguns, mainly in March and April. They have only a few natural enemies because of their secluded lifestyle. Coyotes, dogs, badgers and skunks will dig out a few of them. And occasionally a cat, hawk or owl will surprise one above ground. Obviously, they prefer moist, relatively loose soil to “hunt” in. They have a voracious appetite and must eat often – it takes lots of energy to tunnel in the soil. The “runs” that we see near the surface of the soil are a result of

their search for food. They aren’t social creatures – maybe they don’t play well with others. They live in deep dens, that are located in higher locations to avoid floods. Those soil mounds are the result of making the den. So, what do they eat? Studies show that their diet is mostly made up of white grubs and beetles. Also, high on the list is beetle larvae and earthworms. Can you get rid of these food sources so the moles will go away? Not hardly – some have tried but Mother Nature is pretty resilient and replenishs these food sources over time. There are no effective repellents, frightening is ineffective and shooting is not practical. But there is hope – there is some relief, temporary as it may be. There are a couple of fumigants registered for mole control but trapping is by far the most effective control method. There are several mole traps on the market. One that is relatively effective is the spike trap. It looks like a really short, spring loaded frog gig. Place it over the active runs and when the

mole pushes up the soil, WHAMO! Also, there is a scissor jaw trap, similar in purpose to the spike trap and there is a “choker” type trap. One might even try to drown them out by putting a water hose in the run, with hopes it will reach the den. It’s worth a try – I think! But the most simple concept may be the most effective as well. Find the active runs, bury a large coffee can or similar container level with the bottom of run, mash down the run on either side of the trap and cover that part of the run with a board or something to keep all the light out. Mole comes along, falls in the trap and can’t get out. Check on it occasionally to see what you get. You might have to “experiment” to find the active runs. If all else fails, I have a dog that I will loan out. She loves to hunt moles and dig em up, which consequently makes a mess of my yard! Call UT Extension at 989-2103 for more informationsafety. Our office will be closed Dec. 24 – 28. We’ll be back on Dec. 31. Enjoy the holidays! Be safe!

Only Yesterday photo book now available The rich history of Chester County is chronicled in the Chester County Independent’s publication, “Only Yesterday, A Pictorial History of Chester County.” The book is now available for sale at the Independent’s offices at 218 S. Church Ave. The book will also be available at the Chester County High School Band Holiday Mart Dec. 1 at the Chester County Junior High School, and at LaVon’s Timeless Treasures on Front St. Our readers submitted more than 300 photos ranging back as far as 1854! There are school group photos from the 1930s through the ‘60s, early photos of Chickasaw State Park, downtown

Henderson, and store buildings both inside and out as far back as 1906, as well as athletic teams, community gatherings, churches, politicians, and too many others to mention. With more than 50 pages of photos, Only Yesterday is a keepsake for the ages. It makes a wonderful Christmas gift also. The book sells for $12.50 each plus sales tax, with quantity discounts of 10, 20, and 25 percent. For a nominal fee, we would also be glad to ship the books anywhere you desire. There will be a limited supply, so order yours today. For additional information, call our offices at 989-4624.

Did You Know? According to the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), no Christmas song was more played in 2008 than "Winter Wonderland," the popular tune first penned by Felix Bernard and Richard B. Smith in 1934. Mel Torme's "The Christmas Song" was the second most played holi-

day tune of a year ago, while Ralph Blane and Hugh Martin's timeless classic "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" rounded out the top three. Other notable songs in the top 10 included: 4. "Sleigh Ride" (written by Leroy Anderson and Mitchell Parish); 5. "Santa Claus is Coming to Town"

(Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie); 7. "White Christmas" (Irving Berlin); 8. "Jingle Bell Rock" (Joseph Carleton Beal, James Ross Boothe); 9. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" (Johnny Marks); and 10. "Little Drummer Boy" (Katherine K. Davis, Henry V. Onorati, Harry Simeone).

they will not be caught off guard. Children are never too young to learn life’s lessons. Life lessons come with age, just like school. The number one lesson, discipline, must begin in infancy. A screaming baby grows into a whining fussy infant. This infant grows into a temper tantrum throwing toddler who continues to grow into a defiant, spoiled adolescent, who over night grows into a rude and disrespectful teenager, and then becomes an out of control adult. When a person reaches the age of 18, they are legally considered an adult. Up to this point, if they are shown love, kept safe and provided with their basic needs, they will become an adult that loves themselves, is trustworthy and knows what is needed to survive. Show encouragement every chance you get, it builds self-esteem and self-worth. Kids should work for what they want; a child that learns how to work has a better chance of becoming an adult that knows how to work. If they are held accountable for their actions, they will learn consequences. Let them know the consequences at age 10 or 12 may be a simple punishment or a beating. But the consequences as they get older could mean jail or an unwanted pregnancy or worse. This will give them something to think about when it comes time to make hard choices Now will they always make the right choice? Did you? But they should be better armed than you were, and thus make better choices. Loving your children is more than just providing basic and material possessions. Talk to your children, and most important listen. Do not let them cut you out of their life, because you will catch hell trying to get back in. They learn more from your actions than your words. Set good examples. Now here’s the catch - You have 18 years to do it. When they get about 1415, it dawns on them that they will not have to do what you say for the rest of their life, just until they turn 18 or you kick them out, whichever comes first! Oh and the other catch - you have to wait until they reach that age, to find out if they were listening. You only have 18 years, because you cannot raise an adult! One of my favorite sayings to my kids: If I can’t teach it to you in 18 years, then the SCHOOL OF HARD KNOCKS is holding class every day, and they have room for you!

Holiday scams could spoil your holiday Bo Bradshaw Tennessee News Service

One sign the holiday season is here is the jingling of home phones. It's also the time of the year when scammers prey on older Tennesseans. Alan Marx, a consumer protection attorney, says last year thousands across the state fell victim to scams during this time of the year. “More than 25,500 older Americans reported sending $110 million to scammers posing as family members.” According to the Better Business Bureau of Nashville, more than 26,000 Tennesseans reported consumer fraud with losses totaling more than $24 million last year.

The Federal Trade Commission says fraud is up 19 percent over 2010 and more than 800 percent since 2000. Consumers reported losing more than $1.5 billion to scams. Marx says the economy may be struggling, but the fraud business is booming. The best way to protect yourself is to be skeptical, but he says that for older individuals that's hard to do. “People who are a bit older grew up in a time when it was considered rude or impolite to just refuse to answer the door or answer the phone, or hang up on somebody.” Marx says adult children and caregivers play an important role in helping older people avoid

scams. Often, seniors are lonely and appreciate having someone to talk with. Unfortunately, scammers know this and use it to prey on them. If you've been a victim of fraud or are concerned about a solicitation, there are places to turn for assistance. Marx says the Better Business Bureau is a great source for information, as is the Federal Trade Commission. And there's one resource he says many overlook. “Interestingly, the U.S. Postal Service: there's a group that doesn't get a lot of publicity, but there are postal enforcement agents. They bring actions pretty aggressively, kind of like the FBI, but focusing on mail fraud.”

If motivated, you can “age backwards” Bo Rob White Tennessee News Service

You’ve probably heard expressions like “60 is the new 40.” The truth is actually that anyone can be 68 going on 50. All you need is a motivational mindset. Then you, too, can start counting the calendar backwards at each birthday. Beyond good diet and exercise – which are critical for anyone at any age – getting motivated is the key to aging well. Here are five ways to adopt a motivational mindset, launch your own age rollback, and engage the world at any age: 1. Change your WOE to WOW ratio. There’s nothing more de-motivating than living in a world of

WOE (which is an acronym that stands for What On Earth). The world of WOE is dark and consists largely of finding fault and blame. WOE is like a leech that sucks the life spirit out of you. Its opposite, WOW (which means Wonderfully Obsessed with Winning) infuses every moment with excitement about the world. WOW is that frame of mind that motivates you to fully embrace whatever you’re doing. No, you can’t get rid of WOE—it’s part of the human condition. But you can choose to minimize the presence of WOE and focus on WOW; the key is to become more aware of WOE’s presence and to consciously opt for WOW. Try it. Keep a notebook of how much time

you spend in a WOE state versus a WOW state. Then set a goal to focus on WOW for 15 minutes as you start your day. Soon, it will become a habit, and you won’t even have to think about it. 2. Get curious. Many studies have shown that the more you flex your mind as you age, the healthier your mind will be. In addition to engaging in brain-cell building activities like puzzles, ask questions about how things work and why things are. Nothing motivates like a good question. Find a headline story each day that you want to learn more about. Find a topic each week that you want to research through books or using online resources. Adopt the curiosity of a

child. The more new things you learn, the more you’ll be motivated to discover new areas of interest. 3. Invest in the moment. It’s so easy to look back with regrets or nostalgia that we forget to see the joy of what’s happening in the present. Ditto for spending time gazing into the future with apprehension or fear. Try an experiment: every day, spend 5 minutes focusing on the here and now, and allow yourself to feel totally invested in whatever you’re doing, whether it’s work or play. Be conscious that you’re in the moment. When you get comfortable with that notion, expand the time you spend in the here and now each day. 4. Let go and take a

higher perspective. When you were younger, you were probably in the mode of striving for more - more money, more status, more security, or more attention. More anything. As you age, that pressure starts to diminish. But if you’re like most of us, you still likely cling to the notion that you’re in some kind of a race that you must win. Let it go! When you stop competing against others you’ll be motivated to appreciate those things that really matter and you probably already have. 5. Do things that put you in a good mood. Good moods don’t just happen. They come about from doing things that make us feel happy, things that we enjoy. When we were

younger, it was easy to feel good because we weren’t shy about letting our hair down and having fun. You can recapture that habit now. Incorporate at least one thing a day into your routine that puts you in a good mood whether it’s taking a walk, completing a puzzle, or pulling out a board game or a deck of cards with friends. When you’re feeling good, you’ll likely be more motivated to try new things. And you can almost hear the clock ticking backwards. Be aware that a motivational mindset doesn’t come overnight. But the more receptive you are to it, the more you’ll enjoy waking up every morning – and flipping another page back on your internal calendar!


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

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Page 16-A

CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

Lion’s Club names Lions of the Year, Melvin Jones Fellow The Chester County Lions Club met to honor and announce the Student of the Month. This month’s student is Tanner Croom. Tanner is the son of Stevie and Amber Croom. Tanner was chosen out of more than 700 students at Chester County Junior High for this honor. Tanner’s favorite subject is Math. His extracurricular activities include the Recycling Club, Yearbook Staff and the Courtesy Club. Tanner hopes to become a Chef one day. His Hobbies include playing video games, singing and cooking. Tanner was nominated for this award by his math teacher, Mrs. Daniel. She had this to say, “Tanner is a great kid. He has a great attitude, works hard, makes 100’s on pretty much everything, and is always willing to help me and other students. He is very deserving of this honor.” Great job, congratulations go to Tanner and his family. The club held its’ annual Christmas Party at the Henderson Church of Christ Activity Center. The club enjoyed the fellowship of its members and families. The club was

treated to a specially prepared meal of steak, pork chops, and chicken – especially prepared by Lion David Jackson. Lion Lorena Thomas wowed the crowd with some Christmas classics. Of course, she couldn’t have done it without the musical styling of her backup group, the Lionettes, and Lions Lynda Tacker, Courtney Bingham, Evelyn Blizzard and Donna Butler. The club enjoyed a Christmas trivia game – with the champion trivia players being Lion Neal Smith and guest Regina East. Instead of playing the traditional “dirty Santa” game, the Club opted to make contributions to the Exchange Club Carl Perkins Center for the Prevention of Child Abuse. Almost $400 was raised to help buy Christmas gifts for children served by the Center. The highlight of the evening came when the Club recognized the two top honors of the year, the 2012 Lion of the Year and the 2012 Melvin Jones Fellow. This year the club decided to make two presentations for Lion of the Year. The first award was in memory of Lion Gene

Lion Mark Barber and Lion Donna Butler present the Lion of the Year Award to Lion Anthony Buttrum.

Lions Ronald Johnson and Lion Tim Childers recognize Tanner Croom as the Student of the Month Hibbett. We lost this dedicated Lion during 2012. Lion Hibbett led the club in many activities throughout the years. We knew we could always count on Lion Hibbett to respond to the call for help. He was dedicated to serving those in need. Lion Hibbett lived his life as the embodiment of the Lion Motto … ‘WE SERVE.’ He leaves very large shoes to fill and the club will miss him for many, many years to come. Lion Hibbett’s family was honored as special guests to accept the Lion of the Year Award on his behalf. The second Lion of the Year plaque was presented to yet another outstanding Lion in 2012 – Lion Anthony Buttrum. Lion Buttrum has worked tirelessly with the club – pancake breakfast, implement sale, annual horse show, soccer league, and numerous extra committees. Additionally, Lion Buttrum serves in a leadership capacity in the Relay for Life (served as co-chair in 2012 and as chair in 2013). Lion Buttrum is also very active in youth and church activities. Lion Buttrum is truly an asset to the com-

Lion Mark Barber and Lion Donna Butler present the Lions of the Year Award to Jackie Hibbett and Lee Hibbett in honor of the late Lion Gene Hibbett.

munity as well as the Lion’s Club. The highest honor that can be bestowed on a Lion is inclusion in the Melvin Jones Fellowship. Only a Lion who has demonstrated exemplary service and dedication to their club, their community and to Lions overall are eligible.

Lion Anthony Buttrum and Lion Donna Butler presenting the Melvin Jones Fellowship Award to Lion Lane Mosley. Lions International recognizes outstanding individuals by bestowing on them an award that is named for its founder, Melvin Jones. This Fellowship Award is the highest form of recognition and embodies humanitarian ideas consistent with the nature and purpose of Lionism. This

year, the Chester County Club named Lion Lane Mosley as the 2012 Melvin Jones Fellowship recipient. Lane has been active in service with our school eye exams, the annual horse show, soccer concessions, pancake breakfast and all the activities of the Club.

Collins is Junior Miss Henderson

Courtesy photo

Madelyn Collins is the new Junior Miss Henderson following the pageant which took place Dec. 8. Members of the court include, from left: Anslee West – second maid; Kamirra Arnold – first maid; Collins; Abby Rees – third maid; and Grace Wray – fourth maid.


Sports Page 1-B

Thursday, December 20, 2012

FHU still No. 2 Following a perfect week to remain perfect on the season, the Freed-Hardeman University Lady Lions’ basketball team remained at No. 2 in the NAIA Top 25 Coaches Poll released on Tuesday, Dec. 11, by the national office. FHU (11-0) received one of 11 first-place votes to stay behind Lubbock Christian University in the second in-season poll. The top three, in fact, stayed the same with No. 3 Vanguard University holding its spot as well. There was very little movement in the poll overall, particularly in the top 20 where only one team had more than a two-spot change. Pre-season No. 2 Shawnee State fell from No. 12 to No. 15. Westmont and Westminster flipped spots to be ranked No. 4 and No. 5 respectively. TranSouth Conference member Bethel University moved up one spot to No. 12. The two ranked opponents that the Lady Lions played last week stayed in the top 25 with Auburn Montgomery holding its spot at No. 20 while Faulkner moved ahead one spot to No. 24.

Shumpert again is Player of Week After helping the No. 2 Freed-Hardeman University Lady Lions to three road wins, including two over ranked opponents, Natalie Shumpert was named the TranSouth Conference Women's Basketball Player NATALIE SHUMPERT of the Week for the week ending Dec. 9. It is the second time this season that Shumpert has received the award. Shumpert, a 5-4 senior guard from Paducah, Ky., led Freed-Hardeman to a 3-0 week as FHU improved to 110 on the year. For the week she averaged 19.3 points, 5.0 rebounds, 2.7 assists, and 2.0 steals per game. From the field she shot 48 percent (24-50) and from threepoint distance she shot 42 percent, eight of 19. She scored a season-high 33 points in a 75-49 win over No. 20 Auburn Montgomery, marking the seventh time in her career where she has scored 30 or more points. Shumpert did not have a hot hand the following day against No. 25 Faulkner, but her three-pointer with 2:42 left tied the game at 44-44 and triggered an 8-0 run that helped fuel an FHU win.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County players joyously enter the game through a gauntlet of players and CCJHS cheerleaders before their game with Northeast Middle School last Thursday in Henderson. (Additional photos page 3-B.)

Sims’ 20 lifts Eaglettes A pair of district victories has lifted the Chester County Eaglettes to a 3-0 record in District 14-AA girls’ basketball. And Monday at Eagle Gym, Eaglette Iesha Sims scored a career-high 20 points as CCHS avenged one of its two losses this season with a come-from-behind 39-33 win over Scotts Hill. Sims helped bring CCHS back from an 18-9 deficit after the first quarter improving the Eaglettes’ record to 7-2 and dropping SH to 11-2. Chester County’s defense was most responsible for the comeback. They limited Scotts Hill to only two points in the second quarter and four in the third. CCHS grabbed their first lead of the game with 7:40 on the clock on a basket by Sims. SHHS retook the lead at the other end, but Elantra Cox put Chester County back in the lead for good at 27-26 following her steal. A basket by Sims and two free throws by Adriana Amos upped the lead to five. With only 16 seconds remaining, the Eaglettes led only by two, but Sims calmly sank two free throws. A miss by the

visitors at the other end was followed by a rebound bucket by, you guessed it, Sims to account for the final margin. Chester County coach Lee Pipkin said they have developed a bit of a rivalry with Scotts Hill, and her team hates to lose to the Lady Lions. “Our defense was much better here,” said Pipkin. “I’m very impressed with Iesha. She wants to rush her stuff, but she’s starting to get more confidence. Her strength is her strength. She has improved on things that we’ve worked on in practice, and she’s hustling on defense.” Assistant coach John Pipkin noted the improved defense of the team overall, especially that of Amos. “We have a shutdown defender in Amos. She did a great job with Wyatt.” Tamacha Couch, CCHS’ leading scorer for the year, was limited to no field goals, but she hit four crucial free throws late in the game. The Eaglettes connected on only 11 of 21 charity tosses, but hit eight of 11 in the last period. At Somerville on Dec. 11, Darby See CCHS, Page 2-B

Race for Hope is Jan. 12 The community is invited to take part in the Race for Hope, a 5K, 10K, and one-mile walk/run in honor of Hope Shull, an avid runner, who is battling cancer. The event takes place at 11 a.m. Jan. 12 starting in front of Henderson Church of Christ at the corner of White Ave. and Second Street in Henderson. Proceeds to the HOPE Program, a program sponsored by the Henderson Church of Christ and Second Harvest Food Bank that sends food home weekly to elementary and middle school children. Awards will be given to the top three male and female participants in each age group along with several door prizes. Cost and registration in advance is $15 for the one

mile, $25 for 5K, and $30 for the 10K. On race day the 5K and 10K will increase by $5. Donations will be accepted. Parking is available in the front parking lots of Gardner Center and Brown Kopel Buildings at FreedHardeman University. Registration and more information is available at https://www.racesonline.c om/index.cfm?fuseaction=public.race_detail&r ace_id=14556, by email at raceforhope.henderson@hotmail.com, or by phone at 435-0187.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

HOPE SHULL

Chester County cheerleaders perform a “high-wire act” during a timeout of the basketball games Friday between CCHS and Lexington at Eagle Gym.


Page 2-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

Eagles drop pair of district games Chester County came out on the short end of the score in two District 14AA basketball games, losing 90-55 Dec. 11 at Fayette-Ware, and then came up short again Friday at Eagle Gym when Lexington won 88-56. Friday against Lexington, CCHS played one of its better halves of the season, trailing only 43-37 at intermission. The Eagles had several chances in the final minute of the first half to cut even further into the margin but could not convert. However, when the second half started, Lexington blitzed the Eagles with a 30-6 third period to pull away to the 88-56 victory. Konner Lindsey’s dozen points led CCHS with nine coming from Clay Hilton. Lexington put six players in double figures led by 21 and 20 respectively by Dillon Smith and Jacob Bolen. Monday of this week, also at Eagle Gym, CCHS took on a Scott Hill team they had beaten just 10 days before. After for three periods it appeared the Eagles would do the same in the return meeting when they led 59-55 at the end of three quarters. However, the visiting Lions put up 30 points on CCHS in the fourth quarter and pulled away to a 75-64 win. Zach Phillips led Chester County with 16 with a pair of threes. Lindsey hit all seven of his free throws to total 14. As a team CCHS hit 16 of 19 freebies. Stewart Milam

led Scotts Hill with 19, all coming in the second half and 11 in the fateful final period. On Dec. 11 at FayetteWare, the host Wildcats led by one, 22-21, after the first quarter but turned up the heat from there to run away from CCHS. All-Star Carlos Hart of FW burned the nets for seven threes and 25 points. CCHS was led by Lindsey with 15. CCHS plays next on Dec. 27 at the Dyersburg Invitational.

Makeup date announced Chester County’s scheduled game with Trinity Christian Academy on Dec. 4 was postponed due to illness. The TCA Lions and CCHS will make up the games at 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26. Dec. 11 at Somerville Chester Co. 21-14-13-7=55 Fayette-Ware 22-29-22-6=90 CC – Konner Lindsey 15, Holley 6, J. Phillips 5, Humphry 5, Hilton 5, Z. Phillips 4, Cobb 4, Clayton 3. FW – Hart 25, Cooper 15, Cooper 12, Miller 8, Lewis 8, Norment 7, T. Freeman 7, Freeman 4, Morgan 3, Rhodes 2, Green 2. Three-point shots: CC – J. Phillips, Clayton. FW – Hart 7, Cooper 2, Cooper, Norment. Records: CC – 2-5. FW – 6-4. Dec. 14 at Eagle Gym Lexington 15-28-30-15=88 Chester Co. 12-25- 6-13=56 Lx – Smith 21, Bolen 20, Belew 13, McNeal 11, Hall 11, Frasel 10, Jones 2. CC – Konner Lindsey 12, Hilton 9, Cobb 7, Scales 4, Z. Phillips 4, Burton 4, Hardee 3, McPherson 3, Holloway 3, J. Phillips 2, Clayton 2, Page 2, McNeal 1. Three-point shots: Lx – McNeal 3, Bolen 3, Hall. CC – Hardee, McPherson, Cobb.

Running Date Jan. 5 Jan. 12

Race Time Location Chickasaw Chase 10 miler 11:00 Chickasaw* Race for Hope 5-10K 11:00 Henderson# * Chickasaw State Park - State Parks Running Series #Henderson Church of Christ, White Ave.

Freed-Hardeman Women’s Basketball Date Dec. 19 Dec. 20 Jan. 3 Jan. 4 Jan. 8 Jan. 10 Jan. 12 Jan. 19 Jan. 24 Jan. 26 Jan. 31

Opponent Puerto Rico-Bayamon Puerto Rico-Rio Pedras College of the Ozarks Ecclesia Concordia Fisk Belhaven Martin Methodist Bethel Mid-Continent Blue Mountain

Time 11:00 11:00 7:00 3:30 5:30 6:00 2:00 2:00 6:00 2:00 6:00

Location Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Pt. L’out, Mo. Pt. L’out, Mo.

Selma, Ala. Nashville Jackson, Miss.

Pulaski Sports Ctr. Mayfield, Ky.

Sports Ctr.

Freed-Hardeman Men’s Basketball Date Jan. 4 Jan. 5 Jan. 10 Jan. 12 Jan. 19 Jan. 24 Jan. 26 Jan. 29 Jan. 31

Opponent Talladega Concordia Fisk Belhaven Martin Methodist Bethel Mid-Continent Lee Blue Mountain

Time 2:00 5:00 8:00 8:00 4:00 8:00 4:00 6:30 8:00

Location Talladega, Ala.

Selma, Ala. Nashville Jackson, Miss.

Pulaski Sports Ctr. Mayfield, Ky.

Sports Ctr. Sports Ctr.

Chester County High School Basketball Date Opponent Time Location Dyersburg Christmas Tournament, Dec. 27-29, TBA Dec. 27 Poplar Bluff, Mo. (girls) 4:00 Dyersburg Dyersburg (boys) 8:30 Dyersburg Jan. 4 Liberty Tech 6:00 Jackson Jan. 8 Bolivar Central 6:00 Eagle Gym Jan. 11 South Side 6:00 Eagle Gym Jan. 14 Hardin County 6:00 Savannah Jan. 15 Jackson-Central Merry 6:00 Jackson Jan. 18 Fayette-Ware 6:00 Eagle Gym Jan. 19 Madison Academic 6:00 Eagle Gym Jan. 22 Lexington 6:00 Lexington Jan. 25 McNairy Central 6:00 Selmer Jan. 26 Trinity Christian 3:00 Eagle Gym Jan. 29 Liberty Tech 6:00 Eagle Gym

Boys Junior Varsity Date Jan. 14 Jan. 15 Jan. 29

Opponent Hardin County Jackson-Central Merry Liberty Tech

Date Jan. 4 Jan. 8 Jan. 11 Jan. 19 Jan. 22 Jan. 25

Opponent Liberty Tech Bolivar Central South Side Madison Academic Lexington McNairy Central

Time 4:30 4:30 4:30

Location Savannah Jackson Eagle Gym

Girls Junior Varsity Time 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30 4:30

Location Jackson Eagle Gym Eagle Gym Eagle Gym Lexington Selmer

Chester County Junior High Basketball Date Jan. 7 Jan. 10 Jan. 14 Jan. 17

Opponent Decatur County Univ. School of Jackson Selmer Lexington

Time 6:00 6:00 6:00 6:00

Location Henderson Jackson Selmer Lexington

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Trannard “Tootie” Cobb of Chester County is surrounded by the Lexington defense as he goes to the basket, and later goes to the free throw line. Records: Lx – 5-4 (1-3). CC – 2-6 (0-3). Dec. 17 at Eagle Gym Scotts Hill 10-15-20-30=75 Chester Co. 13-18-18-15=64 SH – Milam 19, C. Hays 13, G. Hays 9, others 34. CC – Zach Phillips 16, Konner

Lindsey 14, J. Phillips 9, Cobb 8, Clayton 6, Hilton 4, McPherson 3, Scales 2, McNeal 2. Three-point shots: SH – C. Hays, Maners. CC – Z. Phillips 2, J. Phillips, Lindsey. Records: SH – 6-5. CC – 2-7.

From Page 1-B

Chester Co. 17-10-11-10=48 Lx – Caitlin McGill 14, Andrea Moffitt 11, Kalee Goff 9, Hale 6, Jones 2. CC – Tamacha Couch 12, Iesha Sims 12, Amos 9, Luttrell 5, Cox 4, CherryReed 3, Miskelly 3. Three-point shots: Lx – McGill 2, Moffitt. CC – Cherry-Reed, Miskelly. Records: Lx – 4-7 (1-3). CC – 6-2 (3-0). Dec. 17 at Eagle Gym Scotts Hill 18-2- 4- 9=33 Chester Co. 9-4-10- 16=39 SH – Delayne Gant 12, Wyatt 8, Roberts 6, Maness 3, Reeves 2, Rossan 2. CC – Iesha Sims 20, Cox 7, Amos 4, Couch 4, CherryReed 2, Miskelly 2. Three-point shots: SH – Gant 2, Maness, Roberts. CC – None. Records: SH – 11-2. CC – 7-2.

CCHS Miskelly and Madison Cherry-Reed each hit a pair of three-pointers and the Eaglettes trounced Fayette-Ware 62-33. Miskelly totaled 13 points in that game and Sims had a dozen from the post position. CCHS led by five after one period and pulled away with a 19-6 second quarter. The Eaglettes hit 12 of 16 free throws and were helped by the Lady Wildcats who connected on only three of 10 charity tosses. Friday at Eagle Gym, CCHS took on Lexington in another district matchup, winning 48-42. That contest was close throughout, and was tied early in the fourth period when Sims hit a driving layup, was fouled, and connected on the free pitch. After that, CCHS never relinquished the lead, hitting seven of nine free throws in the last period, including a perfect five-for-five by Sims. Sims and Couch took team honors with a dozen points each. Caitlin McGill of Lexington took game-high honors with 14, but the Lady Tigers were saddled with foul trouble throughout, with two players fouling-out of the contest. Chester County is now off until Dec. 27 when they travel to Dyersburg for a holiday tournament. Regular season action returns Jan. 4 at Liberty Tech, and next home contest is 6 p.m. Jan. 8 hosting Bolivar Central. Dec. 11 at Somerville Chester Co. 16-19-15-12=62 Fayette-Ware 11 – 6- 8- 8=33 CC – Darby Miskelly 13, Iesha Sims 12, Cox 8, Luttrell 8, Cherry-Reed 8, Couch 4, Amos 4, Witherspoon 4. FW – Neal 9, Tharpe 8, Springfield 6, Boling 4, Williams 2, Douglas 2, Henderson 2. Three-point shots: CC – Cherry-Reed 2, Miskelly 2. FW – Neal 2, Tharpe 2. Records: CC – 5-2 (2-0). FW – 3-7 (0-2). Dec. 14 at Eagle Gym Lexington 14- 8- 9-11=42

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Clay Hilton of Chester County eyes the basket during the Eagles’ battle with Lexington Friday at Eagle Gym.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County’s Iesha Sims is fouled as she tries to score for the Eaglettes in their district 14-AA victory Friday over Lexington at Eagle Gym.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

Page 3-B

Junior High game rescheduled Chester County Junior High and University School of Jackson have announced a makeup date for their basketball game which was postponed Dec. 3 due to the influenza outbreak. The game is now scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday, Jan. 22 at Chester County. A boys’ junior varsity contest is scheduled for 5 p.m.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Morgan Moore of Chester County Junior High eyes the basket from three-point range in Junior Eaglettes’ victory Thursday over Northeast Middle School of Jackson. The Chester County girls are now 8-1 on the season.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Chester County’s J.J. Dotson soars above the Northeast Middle defense in a junior high contest Thursday in Henderson.

Lions finish first half with win The Freed-Hardeman University Lions overcome a slow start and closed out the 2012 calendar with a 69-56 win at Auburn University Montgomery on Monday night. The Lions are now off until Jan. 4 when they travel to face Talladega College as the fourth of a seven-game road trip. The Lions (9-6) fell behind early, making two of their first 14 shots to allow AUM to build a 16-4 lead after eight minutes of play. But FHU slowly fought back, first with an 8-0 run to pull within four points and later - after the WarHawks had extended the lead back to 11 - with a 10-0 run to get within a point at the 2:50 mark of the half. A transition basket by Reginald Gilmore off a pass from Damion Wooten with three seconds remaining in the half tied the game at 30-30. Freed-Hardeman took its first lead 18 seconds into the second half on a layup by Michael Young,

and would not trail for the rest of the game. Orlando Bass, Mark Brown and Ben Meis all hit threepointers in a stretch t h a t saw the Lions'

lead grow from two points to 11 points (52-41) with 8:46 to play. After the WarHawks pulled back within four points a few moments later, Wooten connected on a threepointer and AUM did not make another run. Wooten's second three, with 3:07 left, finished off a 12-2 run that gave the Lions a 67-53 lead. Gilmore's 16 points led a quartet of Lions in double figures. Mann and Bass each scored 12 while Chandler Mack added 11.

FHU dominated on the glass to the tune of 47-30, and had 25 offensive rebounds. Wooten dished out a careerbest seven assists.

Missed free pitches Missed free throws in the final minutes of the game contributed to a scoring drought that ultimately resulted in a 66-59 loss for the FreedHardeman Lions on the road against No. 21 Faulkner University on Saturday afternoon in Montgomery, Ala. The loss snapped a four-game win streak for the Lions. Of Freed-

Hardeman's six losses this season, five have been by seven points or fewer. Three of those have been road losses against top 25 teams. Faulkner used an 18-2 run to close the first half, turning what was a 21-13 FHU lead into a 31-23 lead for the Eagles at the break. The Lions finally took the lead for the first time in the second half after a tradition threepoint play by Mark Brown put FHU ahead, 59-57, with 3:11 left. But FHU missed four straight free throws while Faulkner scored on its next three possessions, the final of which was a three-pointer by Jake Mitchell with 1:14 to play that proved to be final dagger. Gilmore and Brown each scored 16 points while Bass added 11. The Lions still had chances to win despite shooting 36.2 percent from the field and 19.1 percent from threepoint range.

Wetlands Reserve Program marks 20 years of conservation In its two decades of existence, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s federal Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) has restored more than 2.6 million acres of wetlands habitat across the U.S, creating prime wildlife habitat and helping the environment by holding and cleaning water. This includes 32,965 acres here in Tennessee. “The Wetlands Reserve Program is a great conservation tool, providing landowners a way to protect and restore wetland areas while making improvements to their properties—it is a win-win for the environment, the landowner and the community,” NRCS Acting Chief Jason Weller said. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) helps America’s farmers and ranchers conserve the Nation’s soil, water, air

and other natural resources. All programs are voluntary and offer sciencebased solutions that benefit both the landowner and the environment. NRCS provides technical and financial assistance to help landowners voluntarily restore and protect wetland ecosystems. Landowners may select either a permanent or 30year easement, retaining ownership of the land once the easement is in place. Wetlands slow and store water, lowering the risk of flooding for nearby communities during hurricanes and other severe weather events. The program is best suited for frequently flooded agriculture lands, where restoration will maximize habitat for migratory birds and other wildlife, and improve water quality. Wetlands are among the most biologically diverse ecosystems in the world.

Rare and endangered wildlife, such as the Louisiana black bear, whooping crane, wood stork, bog turtle and other species, are thriving on WRP easement lands. The Wetlands Reserve Program has enabled Tennessee farmers and landowners to provide cleaner water, aesthetic open spaces and increase wildlife habitat that everyone can enjoy,” In the 20-year history of the program, more than 11,000 landowners across the U.S. have participated in this voluntary program. Landowners can receive financial assistance to restore wetlands on the saturated and flooded portions of their property that are difficult to farm, focusing their agricultural efforts on more productive soils. In Tennessee, the program has acquired 199 easements that encompass 33,000 acres.

In the areas where easements are in place, the restoration practices have made a significant impact on erosion from the yearly flooding and the ecosystems are flourishing.

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Paige Pipkin is hacked across the “noggin’” as she drives to the basket for Chester County Thursday at Chester County Junior High.

Price wins at Winter Classic Michael Price, a junior at Chester County High School, won the boys’ 18 singles division tennis championship last weekend in the Eldon Roark Junior Winter Classic in Memphis. Price won the semifinals by a score of 6-0, 6-3, and the final with a score of 63, 6-1.

Chickasaw 10-miler is Jan. 5 The Chickasaw Chase 10-mile race is set for 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 5 at Chickasaw State Park. The annual event draws runners from across the state as part of the Tennessee State Parks Running Tour. Advance registration, through Dec. 29, is $20 and includes the race and long sleeve Running Tour Tshirt, or $6 for race fee only. Race day registration is $13 and does not include a shirt. Races are run rain or shine or snow. In rare cases, weather may dictate event changes. Deadline for race cancellation is 5 p.m. Friday before the event. For additional information, contact Todd Cotton with the Jackson Roadrunners at 989-4718, or email Toddcotton_1999@yahoo.com.

Did you know? As one of the oldest bowl games played in the United States, the Sun Bowl is traditionally played every year during the last week of December in El Paso, Texas. College teams face off for one last game of the year at Sun Bowl Stadium on the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso. The Sun Bowl was previously held at El Paso High School Stadium and Kidd Field. In addition to the game on the field each year, the Sun Court is an annual tradition as well. Rooted in tradition that has endured for 70 years, the Sun Court competition presents the titles of Sun Queen, a Sun Lady-in-Waiting and Sun Princesses to El Paso women who go on to promote their city and volunteer as community ambassadors.


Page 4-B

Education

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Chester County High named a top school for achievement

Photo courtesy Yearbook Staff

Chester County High School was last week named one of the top five percent of schools in the state for progress regarding student academic achievement. In recognition of the achievement, the Tennessee Department of Education presented the school with a banner which is currently being displayed at the school. Students in the 2011-12 Algebra One classes are shown with the banner including teachers Christy Miskelly, Claire Wilder and Jeff Lewis. Also, Darian Leath, Christie Pugh and Norma Tulley taught Algebra One labs last year to support the students’ classroom instruction. a safe and fun holiday celebration. Please keep your student reading and working on IXL math over the b r e a k . https://www.ixl.com/signi n/chestercounty is the web address. The fourth grade IXL honor roll for the past month is: first Tori Trice, second - Riley Haltom, third - Addison Summars, fourth - Melina Alexander, and fifth Missy Thomas. The fifth grade IXL honor roll for

the past month is: first Stacy Xiao, second - Chase Mickens, third - Kendyle Herron, fourth - Amarri Cathey, and fifth - Tyron Hall. Students may now have their first, middle, and/or last name screened or embroidered on the outBy Melissa side of their coats and Kinard jackets. Nicknames will not be allowed. Names Merry Christmas and must be one inch or smallHappy New Year from er in height, on the left everyone at Chester side, and under any manuCounty Middle School! We facturer’s logo. hope that each of you have The gifted students preThe results for the 2nd Thinklink Tests are back. Ask your sented the case child about individual scores, but the school wide scores are of Humpty below. Dumpty to Judge Fourth Grade 1st 2nd Goal McKenzie this Math Proficient & Advanced 45% 60% 65% past week. The Reading Proficient & Advanced 55% 58% 62% Prosecutors Fifth Grade 1st 2nd Goal were Ava Cox, Math Proficient & Advanced 77% 71% 73% A d d i s o n Reading Proficient & Advanced 62% 63% 64% Summars, Alex

Tucker, Mary Grace Shiers and Alayna Felker. The defense was portrayed by Sam White, Shelby Wilson, Jordayn White and Claire Maxon. Ryan Yarber acted as a witness while Riley Haltom, Sarah Porter, Lauren Talbott, Carmen Barham and Austin Vest served as jurors. The king’s men were found not guilty of any offense to Humpty Dumpty. Dates to remember: Jan 3 - School resumes Jan 7 - Pancake Ticket Sale Jan 8 - PTS Meeting Jan 10 - Report cards Jan 11 - Up N Jumpin Jan 21 - School holiday Jan 23 - Buddy Pictures Jan 28 - Book Fair begins Jan 26 - Pancake Breakfast.

rooms again on Thursday, Jan. 3. We hope each of you has a wonderful, safe and happy holiday season. Our basketball teams played last Thursday evening against Northeast Middle School. The girls’ team defeated the Northeast team; however, the boys’ team fell short. The next games will be on Monday, Jan. 7 against Decatur County at home, and Thursday, Jan. 10 against University School of Jackson played

Report Cards will go out on Thursday, Jan. 10. Ask your student to see their grades. Exam grades will be included on this report card. Yearbooks are on sale and can still be ordered by going to our Chester County Schools website, clicking the link for Junior High, and then the link for Yearbook. These are valued keepsakes that you will want to make sure you don’t miss out on! If you have any questions, contact Mrs. Marilyn Davis.

By Ally Rogers Exams are over with and students, faculty and staff are all enjoying a break for the next couple of weeks. We will enjoy seeing smiling faces in the hallways and class-

there. Please try to come and support our players, the coaches and the cheerleaders! All students took their second Constructive Response Writing Assessment before the break. Students will also begin Star testing again after we come back from the holidays. These important assessments will help students become more proficient in the math and language arts subject areas.

Local residents receive degrees from UT Martin Several Chester County residents were among students who received degrees from the University of Tennessee at Martin during the recent fall commencement held in the Kathleen and

Tom Elam Center on the UT Martin campus. The students receiving undergraduate degrees were: From Henderson – Crystal Jewel Clayton, Coleen June Hunt, Joshua

Paul Kennedy, Luke Albert Lemons, Robert Benson Rowsey and Donald Gary Young; One of the students receiving a graduate degree was: From Henderson – Alyssa

Freed-Hardeman University adds instructional technologist to staff Freed-Hardeman University has added an instructional technologist to the staff of the Center for Instructional Innovation. Holly Rowsey, Corinth, Miss., will help fulfill the requirements outlined in the university’s iLearn Quality Enhancement Plan. Rowsey served more than five years as the Director of eLearning at Northeast Mississippi Community College. She has also worked as a tech-

nology specialist and public relations liaison with the Alcorn Special School District. Rowsey received a

Bachelor of Science in special education from FHU in 2000 and a Master of Education in curriculum and instruction in 2003.

Marks Clark.

By Misty Hall West Chester parents enjoyed a great treat of festive Holiday music on Monday afternoon. We would like to thank Mr. Kyles for putting together our program and all of the families that were able to attend. The second nine-

weeks is officially over. We have all learned so much these last few weeks. Parents, remember to look for report cards after returning in January. Teachers, parents, and staff enjoyed wonderful breakfasts on Tuesday for our last day of school before Christmas break. Remember that school resumes for students on Thursday, Jan. 3rd. We look forward to all the new things we can learn in the New Year! Merry Christmas West Chester Family.

CCHS students attend RisingStar Summit at UTM

A group of Chester County High School students attended the RisingStar Leadership Summit held on Nov. 29-30 at the University of Tennessee at Martin. A total of 26 high school juniors and seniors from 13 counties attended the event, which taught students leadership skills through team-building exercises. The summit was sponsored by the WestStar Leadership Program, Ayers Foundation and UT Martin. Those attending included, from left: Rebecca Reddinger, Andrew Hardee and Darby Miskelly.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

Page 5-B

Anderson’s gifted class debates Humpty Dumpty’s demise at trial

Photos by Dawn and Jason Bramblett

This group of students participated in the mock trial held by the Chester County gifted program. General Sessions Judge Larry McKenzie presided over a different kind of trial last week - one involving 27 secondthrough fifth-graders. On Tuesday night, Dec. 11, Dr. Belinda Anderson’s gifted students from West Chester Elementary, East Chester Elementary and

members as they determined if Humpty Dumpty’s death was an accident. Anderson leads her students through a different trial and focus each year. This year while students completed a literature study on the Humpty Dumpty nursery rhyme

Judge McKenzie gives special instructions to the bailiff, Drew Bramblett. Chester County Middle School served as prosecution and defense attorneys, witnesses and jury

from August to December, they also focused on the art of debate. In describing the goals

of this learning experie n c e , Anderson said they were “to increase the students’ abilities to think logically by using the facts to draw conclusions, understand both Myles Shelton sides of a of Wiley Wolf, statement, trial. make a plan to find out facts about both sides and then make a decision based on what they know to be true and not opinion. It’s also a great opportunity for us to encourage the students to not fear failure but to embrace it and learn from it.” Several adults volunteered their time to make this learning experience a community effort. FreedHardeman professor Jason Shockley taught students about the criminal justice system; this is Shockley’s third year to assist with the gifted class’ trial. Brooke Wiley, a criminal justice major at FHU, assisted him. Of course, McKenzie’s role was primary to the academic program.

Retired Teachers host luncheon at FHU

Chester County Retired Teachers (TRTA) was luncheon guests of Freed Hardeman University on Dec. 12. Dr. Charles Vires, Vice president of Academics and Enrollment Management, welcomed 60 CCRTA guests. The Henderson Barbershop Quartet entertained the group with traditional Christmas songs. Following the entertainment and delicious meal, CCRTA President

Caroline Johnson conducted the business meeting. Don Bryant reported on the TRTA workshop that he, Jean Marilyn Hogan, June Smith and Caroline Johnson attended on Oct. 29. The workshop emphasized the value of Tennessee continuing with its current retirement plan for state employees and the need to keep Mike Barker, Tennessee Education Association’s representative, on the TCRS Board.

Virginia Webb gave a moving necrology for Janice Schmitt. Members were thanked for their volunteer work at the Henderson Holiday Mart a fund raiser for the Chester County Imagination Library. New CCRTA members, Beverly Rogers and Doyle Murphy, were recognized. The meeting closed with the awarding of five door prizes and the reminder of the next meeting in March 2013.

Additionally,

Chester County Sheriff C h i e f Deputy M a r k Griffin coordinated a tour and questiona n d answer session during a student field trip played the role to the a witness in the Chester County Justice Center. Students’ learning experiences were varied, from taking extensive notes from Shockley’s two-hour lecture to asking Griffin questions about life at the justice center. Anderson added, “Without the support of

the faculty and adminis- trial, in which the King’s trators from East Chester, Horsemen were found not West Chester and Chester guilty, fourth-grader Sarah C o u n t y M i d d l e School, the students would not have the time or resources to put into action what they have learned.” In order to obtain a part in the trial, each student was Prosecutor Alex Tucker questions a witasked to ness. audition for the part in some creative form that demonstrated why he or she deserved it. Auditions involved costumes, powerpoint presentation, raps, artwork and speeches. In reflecting on the

Porter thought about what she had learned. She wrote, “I learned that you don’t have to be shy; let your artistic abilities shine. Don’t be afraid to fail; know you will fail sometimes.”


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

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TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Set yourself apart and

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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

Public Notices NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE AND SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE Default having been made in the terms and conditions of payments, pursuant to a certain Deed of Trust executed by Clarence Pusser and Annie R. Pusser, to, Larry F. McKenzie, Trustee, dated the 16th day of July, 2003, and being of record in Book 237, page 490, Register’s Office for Chester County, Tennessee, referred to herein as the deed of trust, debts and obligations having been assigned by MERS as nominee for AmeriTrust Mortgage Company at Book 354, page 20, which conveyed certain real property, appurtenances, estate, title and interest therein in trust to secure the indebtedness described therein, which indebtedness is now due and unpaid and has been declared in default by the lawful owner thereof, HSBC Bank USA, N.A. Appointment of Substitute Trustee having been duly executed by the holder of the note and beneficiary of said Deed of Trust, and appointing William Timothy Hill as Substitute Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, I, William Timothy Hill, Trustee, pursuant to the said Deed of Trust, having been requested by the owner and holder of said indebtedness so to do, by virtue of the authority and power vested in me by said deed of trust and appointing of Substitute Trustee will on the 10th day of January, 2013, at 12:00 noon, on the front door of the Chester County Courthouse, 133 E. Main St, Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash (or credit upon the indebtedness secured, if the holder is the successful purchaser) the following described property located in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: Beginning at a nail & cap in the centerline of Pusser Road, the same being a common corner with the Edgar Estate; thence with road as follows: North 45 deg West 100 feet, North 31 deg 53’ West 100 feet, North 25 deg West 200 feet to a PK nail; thence North 64 deg 58’ 35.5” East, passing an iron pin at 25 feet, in all 255.34 feet to an iron pin; thence South 3 deg West with Edgar Estate’s west boundary line 445.5 feet to the beginning, containing 1.28 acres gross, subject to road easement. Said legal description is the same description as contained in the previous deed of record. BEING the same property conveyed to Clarence E. Pusser and wife Annie R. Pusser by Warranty Deed dated 9/12/89 of record in Book 86, page 277, in the Register’s Office for Chester County, Tennessee. This is improved property known as 1135 Pusser Road, Enville, Tennessee. Other interested parties: Beneficial Tennessee, Inc. If there is any discrepancy with the street address, the legal description will control. At the time of this publication, the § 35?5?117 notice of the right to foreclose was timely forwarded. The sale of the property described in said Deed of Trust shall be subject to any and all instrument of record, prior liens, encumbrances, deeds of trust, easements, restrictions, building lines, unpaid taxes, assessments, penalties and interest, if any. All right and equity of redemption, homestead, dower and all other exceptions are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the Substitute Trustee will convey and sell only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day or time certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time for the above. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. This 17th day of December, 2012. William Timothy Hill, Substitute Trustee

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms and conditions of a Deed of Trust dated January 3, 2007, executed by TRACY BROWDER AND PATRICIA BROWDER, conveying certain real property therein described to ROBERT M. WILSON, JR. as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, on January 22, 2007, as Instrument No. 28093, in Book 295, at Page 357; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-OA2 MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OA2, who is now the owner of said debt; and WHEREAS, Notice of the Right to Foreclose (“Notice”) was given in compliance with Tennessee law by the mailing a copy of the Notice to the parties at least sixty (60) days prior to the first publication of the Substitute Trustee’s Sale. WHEREAS, the undersigned, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., having been appointed by as Substitute Trustee by instrument filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been

declared due and payable, and that the undersigned, RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as Substitute Trustee or its duly appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute Trustee will, on January 3, 2013, 11:00 AM at the Chester County courthouse door where the foreclosure sales are customarily held At the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, TN, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: BEGINNING AT AN IRON PIN SET IN THE SOUTH MARGIN OF PLEASANT RIDGE ROAD WHICH POINT IS LOCATED THE FOLLOWING CALLS FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF DONLAD ROUSE AS RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 63, PAGE 692 REGISTERS OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY TENNESSEE SOUTH 76 DEG 19’26” EAST 824.05 FEET SOUTH 76 DEG 41’43” EAST 190.00 FEET THENCE FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND WITH THE SOUTH MARGIN OF PLEASANT RIDGE ROAD THE FOLLOWING CALLS SOUTH 76DEG 41’43” EAST 97.25 FEET SOUTH 74 DEG 52’09” EAST 92.79 FEET TO AN IRON PIN SET AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED TRACT THENCE SOUTH 03 DEG 40’55” WEST 210.00 FEET TO AN IRON PIN SET AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 4 THENCE WITH THE NORTH LINE OF LOT 4 NORTH 76 DEG. 14’ 58” WEST 189.74 FEET TO AN IRON PIN SET AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2 THENCE WITH THE EAST LINE OF LOT 2 NORTH 3 DEG 40’55” EAST 211.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.9 ACRES AS SURVEYED BY ADVANCED LAND SURVEYING INC R.L.S. #1999 ON JANUARY 24, 2005 AND BEING KNOWN AS LOT 1 CLAYTON HILLS ESTATES SECTION I. PARCEL NO.: 068 03101 000 PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of the property is believed to be 85 PLEASANT RIDGE RD, FINGER, TN 38334-1979. In the event of any discrepancy between this street address and the legal description of the property, the legal description shall control. CURRENT OWNER(S): TRACY BROWDER AKA TRACEY L BROWDER AKA TRACY LEE BROWDER and PATRICIA L BROWDER OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: n/a The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This property is being sold with the express reservation that it is subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where is, without representations or warranties of any kind, including fitness for a particular use or purpose. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., Substitute Trustee 2380 Performance Dr, TX2-984-0407 Richardson, TX 75082 Tel: (800) 281-8219 Fax: (866) 681-5002 Registered Agent: CT Corporation System 800 South Gay Street, Suite 2021 Knoxville, TN 37929 Tel: (865) 342-3522 TS#: 09-0151787 FEI#1006.73439

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated October 19, 2005, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded November 1, 2005, at Book 275, Page 582 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Troy Frye Amy Frye Troy Frye and Amy Frye, conveying certain property therein described to Robert M. Wilson, Jr. as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., a seperate corporation acting solely as nominee for Americas Wholesale Lender and Americas Wholesale Lender successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on January 3, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse,

Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Lying and being situated in the Eight Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron pin on the East margin of Silerton Road (25 feet at right angles from centerline) at the Southwest corner of Cliff Hannah as recorded in Record Book 184, Page 685 in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence with Hannah’s South line, South 37 degrees 33 minutes 49 seconds East a distance of 138.40 feet to an iron pin; thence south 18 degrees 47 minutes 05 seconds West a distance of 54.77 feet to a point; thence South 25 degrees 11 minutes 57 seconds West a distance of 112.20 feet to an iron pin; thence South 31 degrees 46 minutes 52 seconds West a distance of 129.07 feet to an iron pin; thence South 44 degrees 31 minutes 57 seconds West a distance of 62.25 feet to an iron pin; thence South 59 degrees 42 minutes 33 seconds West a distance of 56.72 feet to an iron pin on the East margin of Silerton Road; thence with the East margin of Silerton Road, North 20 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds East a distance of 63.11 feet to an iron pin; thence North 16 degrees 19 minutes 29 seconds East a distance of 113.33 feet to an iron pin; thence North 14 degrees 39 minutes 28 seconds East a distance of 101.18 feet to an iron pin; thence North 20 degrees 45 minutes 16 seconds East a distance of 107.89 feet to the point of beginning, containing 0.85 acres, as surveyed by David Hall Land Surveying Company, R.L.S. #943, on March 25, 2004. Legal Description revised according to Attorney’s Affidavit filed 8/29/2007 in Record Book 305, Page 394. ALSO KNOWN AS: 2295 Silerton Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Troy Frye; Amy Frye; Countrywide Home Loans, Inc.; Old Republic Insurance Co.; Troy Frye; Amy Frye The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 726122683 DATED November 30, 2012 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTN-Shellie_msherrod_121130_1358 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated July 6, 2004, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded July 12, 2004, at Book 254, Page 679 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by V. Ray Bishop and R. Ann Bishop, conveying certain property therein described to Robert M. Wilson, Jr. as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for America’s Wholesale Lender and America’s Wholesale Lender’s successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on January 3, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at an iron pin on the north margin of Jacks Creek Road (17 feet at right angles from centerline) at the Southwest corner of Mary Taylor as recorded in Deed Book 47, page 605 in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; thence with

the North margin of Jacks Creek Road South 76 degrees 04 minutes West a distance of 93.92 feet to a pipe at the Southeast corner of Chester County School property; thence with the East line of said school property North 14 degrees 47 minutes West a distance of 379.12 feet to a pipe at the Southwest corner of Reba Cupples; thence with Cupples’ South line North 83 degrees 00 minutes East a distance of 94.56 feet to an iron pin at the Northwest corner of Taylor; thence with Taylor’s West line South 14 degrees 49 minutes East a distance of 367.70 feet to the point of beginning. Containing 0.80 acres, as surveyed by David Hall Land Surveying Company, R.L.S. number 943, on January 11, 1995. ALSO KNOWN AS: 655 Jacks Creek Cove aka 655 Old Jacks Creek Road, Henderson, Tennessee 383405709 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: V. Ray Bishop; R. Ann Bishop; Union Planters Bank, NA; Heirs of R. Ann Bishop; Estate of R. Ann Bishop; Estate of V. Ray Bishop; Heir of V. Ray Bishop The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 726203158 DATED December 4, 2012 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTN-Shellie_msherrod_121204_1155 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated June 19, 2006, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded June 21, 2006, at Book 285, Page 767 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by James Earl Goff and Yonnie Goff, conveying certain property therein described to Holmes, Rich & Sigler, PC as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., a separate corporation acting solely as nominee for Community Bank and Community Bank’s successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on January 3, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a stake in the center of the Henderson-Jacks Creek black topped road, this point being the Southwest corner of a lot conveyed by the grantors herein to Ronnie Edward Hanna and wife, Elizabeth Ann Hanna by deed of general warranty dated May 14, 1976; runs thence North 3 degrees and 35 minutes West 655 feet to a stake in a wire fence; this point being in Segerson’s South boundary line; runs thence with wire fence, North 87 degrees and 15 minutes West 209 feet to a stake; runs thence South 3 degrees and 35 minutes East 763 feet to a stake in the center of the Henderson-Jacks Creek black topped road; runs thence with the center of said black topped road North 64 degrees and 20 minutes East, 225 feet to the point of beginning, containing 3.26 acres, more or less, after excluding 25 feet in width for black topped road right-ofway. (Legal description taken from prior deed). ALSO KNOWN AS: 3605 Old Jacks Creek Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 The HB 3588 letter was mailed to the borrower(s) pursuant to Tennessee Code Annotated 35-5117. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture fil-

ing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: James Earl Goff; Yonnie Goff The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 872228206 DATED December 6, 2012 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTNShellie_tcrow_121206_ 947 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE WHEREAS, on July 11, 2002, RICKY L. OSBORNE AND DONNA M. OSBORNE, by Deed of Trust of record in Record Book 218, at Page 215, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, conveyed the following described property in trust to secure the payment of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of Fifty Three Thousand One Hundred Twenty Five and 00/100 Dollars ($53,125.00), payable to Farm Credit Services of Mid-America, FLCA; and WHEREAS, on January 3, 2006, RICKY L. OSBORNE AND DONNA M. OSBORNE, by Deed of Trust of record in Record Book 278, at Page 288, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee, conveyed the following described property in trust to secure the payment of a Promissory Note in the original principal amount of Eighteen Thousand Five Hundred Fifty and 00/100 Dollars ($18,550.00), payable to Farm Credit Services of Mid-America, FLCA; and WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the legal owner and holder of the said Note, by appointments executed on October 30, 2012, and recorded in Record Book 367, at Page 420 and Page 421, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee; and WHEREAS, default has been made in the payment of said indebtedness and other provisions of the Deed of Trust have been violated, and FARM CREDIT SERVICES OF MID-AMERICA, FLCA, the lawful owner and holder of the said indebtedness, has declared the entire amount due and payable as provided by the Deed of Trust in accordance with the terms thereof, and instructed the undersigned to foreclose. NOW, THEREFORE, the public is hereby notified that the undersigned Substitute Trustee will sell the hereinafter described real estate at public auction, to the highest and best bidder, for cash in hand paid, at the south door of the Courthouse at Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee, on Wednesday, January 9, 2013, at 10:00 o’clock a.m., said property to be sold in bar of the equity of redemption and subject to the lien of all special assessments against it. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within a reasonable time to be announced at the sale, the next highest bidder will be deemed the successful bidder. Lying, and being situate in the 5th Civil District of Chester County, Tennessee, bounded and as described in a Warranty Deed from Merchants and Planters Bank, to Ricky L. Osborne and wife, Donna M. Osborne, dated July 11, 2002, and of record in Record Book 218, page 213, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Map 43, Parcel 18.01 The street address of the above described property is believed to be 1705 Sweetlips Road, Henderson, Tennessee 38340, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description herein shall control. This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior

Page 7-B

liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. Interested parties: None. Title to said property is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell as Substitute Trustee only and will assign to the purchaser all covenants of warranty contained in said Deed of Trust. A Notice of the Intent to Foreclosure, pursuant to T.C.A. 355-117 was given. The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. Said sale may be adjourned to another time or may be postponed to another date by public announcement at the appointed time of sale without readvertisement. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. WITNESS my signature, this the 13th day of December, 2012. KIZER, BONDS, HUGHES & BOWEN, LLC BY: STEPHEN L. HUGHES Substitute Trustee P. O. Box 320 Milan, Tennessee 38358 (731) 686-1198

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE Sale at public auction will be on January 15, 2013 at 10:00AM local time, at the south door, Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, conducted by Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee, pursuant to Deed of Trust executed by Franklin A. Doucette, Sr., and Annie C. Doucette, husband and wife, to Wesley D. Turner, Trustee, on February 27, 2001 at Record Book 194, Page 622; all of record in the Chester County Register’s Office. Owner of Debt: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company formerly known as Bankers Trust Company of California, N.A., as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2001-1 The following real estate located in Chester County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call bidder subject to all unpaid taxes, prior liens and encumbrances of record: Described property located in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described in deed of record in Record Book 194, Page 622; in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee Parcel Number: 064-003.00 Current Owner(s) of Property: Annie C. Doucette The street address of the above described property is believed to be 215 Rinks Lane, Enville, Tennessee 38332, but such address is not part of the legal description of the property sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the legal description referenced herein shall control. SALE IS SUBJECT TO TENANT(S) RIGHTS IN POSSESSION. If applicable, the notice requirements of T.C.A. 35-5-117 have been met. All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twenty-four (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. Shapiro & Kirsch, LLP Substitute Trustee www.kirschattorneys.com


Page 8-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, December 20, 2012

Xpress! Earn $800 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks 1888-407-5172 (TnScan)

STATEWIDES LIVE - WORK - PARTY PLAY Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York Hiring 18 - 24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Energetic & fun? Call 1-866-574-7454 (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $800 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks 1888-407-5172 (TnScan) OTR TEAM DRIVERS, DKMZ Trucking Inc. has openings for FedEx Olive Branch and Memphis hubs. Drivers average $1000+ week. 2012 plus Volvos. 731-885-6044 (TnScan) DRIVER. TANGO TRANSPORT NOW hiring Regional OTR Team. Top Pay Plenty of Miles Great Home Time. Family Medical/Dental. 401k. Paid Vacations. Call 877-826-4605 or w w w. d r i v e f o r t a n g o . c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS REGIONAL FLATBED HOME Every Weekend, 40-45 CPM, Class A CDL Required, Flatbed Load Training Available , 1st Seat Sign On Bonus 1-800-992-7863 e x t . 1 8 6 www.mcelroytrucklines.com (TnScan) COMPANY TEAMS. It’s All True!! GUARANTEED MILES DRIVING NEW EQUIPMENT!! Paid Holidays! Benefit Choices! Vacation! Incentive Package! Qualifications: 1 yr. OTR within last 3, Doubles Endorsement, Above average MVR. NO Felony convictions ever. No DUI/DWI in last 5 yrs. (1) lifetime. IT’S ALL HERE!! 877-349-9303 ext. 103 (TnScan) DRIVERS - HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED Tanker Drivers! Earn up to $.51 per Mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 w w w. O a k l e y Tr a n s p o r t . c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS OTR DRIVERS SIGN On Bonus $1,000 - $1,200 Up to 45 CPM Full-time Positions with Benefits! Pet Policy O/O’s Welcome! deBoer Transportation 8 0 0 - 8 2 5 - 8 5 1 1 www.deboertrans.com (TnScan) DRIVERS: CLASS A CDL Driver Training. $0 Training Cost with employment commitment if you enroll in the month of December! Central Refrigerated (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS CLASS A FLATBED Home Every Weekend! Pay 37¢/mi, Both ways, Full Benefits, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience. 800-572-5489 x227, Sunbelt Transport, Jacksonville, FL (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A STAR OF THE ROAD Tuition reimbursement up to $5000 New Student Pay & Lease Program Up To $5000 Sign On Bonus! 877-5215775 www.USATruck.jobs (TnScan) DRIVERS: CDL-A NO GIMMICKS! Just great pay, Miles, hometime & benefits 50¢/mile for Hazmat Teams Solos start at 36¢/mile 1yr. exp. req’d 800-942-

2104 Ext. 7308 or 7307 www.TotalMS.com (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED COMPANY Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVERS, ONLY 6-MONTHS EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Up to 38cpm. Pets Welcome. $250 Orientation Pay! OOs, LeasePurchase Drivers Also Wanted. CDL-A. OTR 48-states. 888.440.2465 (TnScan) KNIGHT REFRIGERATED CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed! Get Paid Daily or Weekly, Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive & Benefits! Become a KNIGHT of the Road. EOE. 855-876-6079 (TnScan) CRST OFFERS THE BEST Lease Purchase Program. Sign On Bonus. No Down Payment or Credit Check. Great Pay. Class-A CDL required. Owner Operators Welcome! Call: 866-538-9575 (TnScan) NEW & ABANDONED manufactured homes moved to your land. Easy terms. Phone 870-9351708. Apply by phone or set an appointment. (TnScan) ADOPT WE WILL PROVIDE a happy, loving home, beautiful life for your precious newborn baby. Expenses paid. Married couple Walt/Gina. Call for info: 1800-315-6957. (TnScan) Become a DIRECTV Dealer: Earn $500 per sale. Looking for Tennessee businesses to sell DIRECTV at events, D2D or retail. Contact: matt.pesler@perfect-10.tv for details. (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7 (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR pre-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK. *Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Set yourself apart and Rise to the Challenge! Job Training, Monthly Paycheck, Educational Benefits - The Time is NOW Contact a Recruiter at w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) LIVE - WORK - PARTY PLAY Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York Hiring 18 - 24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Energetic & fun? Call 1-866-574-7454 (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Learn to drive for US

OTR TEAM DRIVERS, DKMZ Trucking Inc. has openings for FedEx Olive Branch and Memphis hubs. Drivers average $1000+ week. 2012 plus Volvos. 731-885-6044 (TnScan) DRIVER. TANGO TRANSPORT NOW hiring Regional OTR Team. Top Pay Plenty of Miles Great Home Time. Family Medical/Dental. 401k. Paid Vacations. Call 877-826-4605 or w w w. d r i v e f o r t a n g o . c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS REGIONAL FLATBED HOME Every Weekend, 40-45 CPM, Class A CDL Required, Flatbed Load Training Available , 1st Seat Sign On Bonus 1-800-992-7863 e x t . 1 8 6 www.mcelroytrucklines.com (TnScan) COMPANY TEAMS. It’s All True!! GUARANTEED MILES DRIVING NEW EQUIPMENT!! Paid Holidays! Benefit Choices! Vacation! Incentive Package! Qualifications: 1 yr. OTR within last 3, Doubles Endorsement, Above average MVR. NO Felony convictions ever. No DUI/DWI in last 5 yrs. (1) lifetime. IT’S ALL HERE!! 877-349-9303 ext. 103 (TnScan) DRIVERS - HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED Tanker Drivers! Earn up to $.51 per Mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 w w w. O a k l e y Tr a n s p o r t . c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS OTR DRIVERS SIGN On Bonus $1,000 - $1,200 Up to 45 CPM Full-time Positions with Benefits! Pet Policy O/O’s Welcome! deBoer Transportation 8 0 0 - 8 2 5 - 8 5 1 1 www.deboertrans.com (TnScan) DRIVERS: CLASS A CDL Driver Training. $0 Training Cost with employment commitment if you enroll in the month of December! Central Refrigerated (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) DRIVERS CLASS A FLATBED Home Every Weekend! Pay 37¢/mi, Both ways, Full Benefits, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience. 800-572-5489 x227, Sunbelt Transport, Jacksonville, FL (TnScan) DRIVERS - CDL-A STAR OF THE ROAD Tuition reimbursement up to $5000 New Student Pay & Lease Program Up To $5000 Sign On Bonus! 877-5215775 www.USATruck.jobs (TnScan) DRIVERS: CDL-A NO GIMMICKS! Just great pay, Miles, hometime & benefits 50¢/mile for Hazmat Teams Solos start at 36¢/mile 1yr. exp. req’d 800-9422104 Ext. 7308 or 7307 www.TotalMS.com (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED COMPANY Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business. Call Today 800-2770212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVERS, ONLY 6-MONTHS EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Up to 38cpm. Pets Welcome. $250 Orientation Pay! OOs, LeasePurchase Drivers Also Wanted. CDL-A. OTR 48-states. 888.440.2465 (TnScan)

KNIGHT REFRIGERATED CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed! Get Paid Daily or Weekly, Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive & Benefits! Become a KNIGHT of the Road. EOE. 855-876-6079 (TnScan) CRST OFFERS THE BEST Lease Purchase Program. Sign On Bonus. No Down Payment or Credit Check. Great Pay. Class-A CDL required. Owner Operators Welcome! Call: 866-538-9575 (TnScan) NEW & ABANDONED manufactured homes moved to your land. Easy terms. Phone 870-9351708. Apply by phone or set an appointment. (TnScan) ADOPT WE WILL PROVIDE a happy, loving home, beautiful life for your precious newborn baby. Expenses paid. Married couple Walt/Gina. Call for info: 1800-315-6957. (TnScan) Become a DIRECTV Dealer: Earn $500 per sale. Looking for Tennessee businesses to sell DIRECTV at events, D2D or retail. Contact: matt.pesler@perfect-10.tv for details. (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1-888-7337165, 24/7 (TnScan) HEALTH INSURANCE FOR pre-existing Conditions / Affordable. *No Medical Questions. *All Pre-existing OK. *Hospitalization / Surgery *Doctor visits / Wellness / Dental / Vision / RX. Real Insurance Not a discount plan. Licensed Agent 00763829. Call 1-877-3230332. (TnScan) TENNESSEE NATIONAL GUARD Set yourself apart and Rise to the Challenge! Job Training, Monthly Paycheck, Educational Benefits - The Time is NOW Contact a Recruiter at w w w. N a t i o n a l G u a r d . c o m (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. DriveTrain 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or Drive-Train 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-423-2730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) LIVE - WORK - PARTY PLAY Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York Hiring 18 - 24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Energetic & fun? Call 1-866-574-7454 (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $800 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks 1888-407-5172 (TnScan) OTR TEAM DRIVERS, DKMZ Trucking Inc. has openings for FedEx Olive Branch and Memphis hubs. Drivers average $1000+ week. 2012 plus Volvos. 731-885-6044 (TnScan) DRIVER. TANGO TRANSPORT NOW hiring Regional OTR Team. Top Pay Plenty of Miles Great Home Time. Family Medical/Dental. 401k. Paid Vacations. Call 877-826-4605 or w w w. d r i v e f o r t a n g o . c o m (TnScan) DRIVERS REGIONAL FLATBED HOME Every Weekend, 40-45 CPM, Class A CDL Required, Flatbed Load Training Available , 1st Seat Sign

On Bonus 1-800-992-7863 e x t . 1 8 6 www.mcelroytrucklines.com (TnScan) COMPANY TEAMS. It’s All True!! GUARANTEED MILES DRIVING NEW EQUIPMENT!! Paid Holidays! Benefit Choices! Vacation! Incentive Package! Qualifications: 1 yr. OTR within last 3, Doubles Endorsement, Above average MVR. NO Felony convictions ever. No DUI/DWI in last 5 yrs. (1) lifetime. IT’S ALL HERE!! 877-349-9303 ext. 103 (TnScan) DRIVERS - HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED Tanker Drivers! Earn up to $.51 per Mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 w w w. O a k l e y Tr a n s p o r t . c o m (TnScan)

Chester County Independent 12-20-12  

Chester County Independent Newspaper Dated 12-20-12

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