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Chester County Eaglettes are No. 3, Page 1-B B

Thursday

MAY 30, 2013

Independent

149th YEAR - NO. 4

chestercountyindependent.com

$1.00

Alderman Faulkner passes away Sun. Timothy Garland Faulkner, 47, died Sunday evening, May 26, 2013 of respiratory failure at Jackson General Hospital after a long illness. Faulkner had served as an alderman for the City of Henderson since 2002. He was also a former dispatcher for the Chester County Sheriff ’s Department, and a former Henderson police officer. Faulkner was involved in many community activities including the Chester County Lions Club and a past member of the Chester County Senior Citizens board. Funeral services were 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 29 at Shackelford Funeral

Photos by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

Members of the Tennessee Army National Guard post the colors during Monday’s Memorial Day service.

Fallen veterans remembered at Memorial Day service By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

Henderson and Chester County remembered the nation’s fallen veterans on Memorial Day, Monday, May 27. The program was organized by Chester County Veterans’ Services Director Russell Clayton in conjunction with American Legion Post 157 and held in the council chamber at Henderson City Hall. In is opening remarks, Chester County Mayor Dwain Seaton quoted the often-cited words of President John F. Kennedy: “Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.” He stated the on Memorial Day, those words ring especially true as those who are remembered each year paid the ultimate sacrifice for their country. Raleigh Jernigan, who is

TIMOTHY FAULKNER Directors – Casey Chapel with Ben Flatt and John Paul Robertson officiating. Burial followed at Chester County Memory Gardens. (For complete obituary, see Page 10-A.)

Henderson man survives near drowning Monday A possible medical condition led to a near drowning Monday at a residence on Old Friendship Road. However, quick action by friends on the scene possibly saved the man’s life. According to the Chester County Sherriff ’s office, a call came in at 3:26 p.m. Monday of a drowning at 460 Old Friendship Road. Daryl Lynn McCaskill had been found at the bottom of a swimming pool. He was administered CPR on the scene, and later, after emergency personnel arrived, McCaskill was reportedly sitting up and responsive in the ambulance. McCaskill was taken by helicopter to Jackson-Madison County General Hospital where he was listed in fair condition Tuesday afternoon.

Raleigh Jernigan, retired U.S. Army and Tennessee Army National Guard, was the guest speaker during the Memorial Day ceremony. retired from the Tennessee Army National Guard and the U.S. Army, was the guest speaker. He served two tours in Vietnam in various command and staff positions in the U.S.A. Military Assistance Command before joining

See MEMORIAL, Page 2-A

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Daryl Lynn McCaskill is loaded into a helicopter following his near drowning at an Old Friendship Road residence Monday.

TODAY’S WEATHER

2 Sections Life & Styles Opinion What’s Happening Obituaries Right to Know Sports Education Classifieds

the TNARNG. Jernigan and Clayton worked together in the formation of the Personnel Service Center in Tennessee, and he currently resides in Manchester.

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Will you be going out of town for a vacation this summer?


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

Bader Gym demolition making way for campus plan Bader Gymnasium on the FreedHardeman University campus has seen its final days. As part of a master plan for the campus which was approved by the FHU Board of Trustees, Bader will be demolished beginning this week. Currently, furnishings and other equipment are gone from the building, much of the gym flooring has been removed, and the swimming pool drained. The area

where Bader is currently located is to be left open with walks and landscaping but no planned building in the area. The university has plans for an eventual replacement for Bader, including a pool, but no immediate plans for its construction. In 1962, FreedHardeman began raising money to build a multi-purpose building that would include a gymnasium, classrooms and a swimming pool.

The pool at Bader Gym, at one time one of the finest in west Tennessee, is now outdated and held its last classes earlier this year.

Administrators anticipated needing $150,000, a figure that would increase to approximately $200,000 by the time of construction. Wayne Poucher, a well known speaker and producer of the radio and television program “Lifeline,” spoke at a benefit dinner Dec. 3. A total of 263 people attended at $100 a plate. Including donations, $56,000 was a raised that night. After numerous other attempts to raise money, two weeks before construction was scheduled to begin, fundraising was still incomplete. FHC President H.A. Dixon became aware of a couple in Southeast Missouri who might be able to help with the funds. He arranged a meeting with J.W. and Miriam Bader of New Madrid County, Mo. Despite the fact that neither had ever been on the FHC campus, the Baders were

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Memorial Speaking on the significance of Memorial Day as a day to honor fallen veterans, Jernigan stated that for many, Memorial Day simply signifies the start of summer and the excuse for a three-day weekend. In the aftermath of the Civil War, Decoration Day began as a day to honor the soliders on both sides who lost their lives in war. It was originally observed on May 30, but in 1968, the date was changed to the last Monday in May to create a three-day weekend. Jernigan stated the the creation of the three-day Memorial Day weekend had, in his opinion, undermined the true meaning of the day. He also spoke about the history and legacy of Arlington National Cemetery, which has averaged eight veteran burials per day. Henderson Mayor Bobby King reinforced the significance of Memorial Day and added, “This is one thing we really enjoy using this building [City Hall] for.” Heather Brown sang the National Anthem, “America the Beautiful” and “Amazing Grace.” She

Raliegh Jernigan and Russell Clayton served together in the formation of the Personnel Service Center for Tennessee. Clayton is the Chester County Veterans Service Officer and interim commander of American Legion Post 157. also shared touching memories of her grandfather who served in WWII and was awarded several Bronze Stars for heroic and meritorious service. Austin Bentley played “Taps” to conclude the ceremony, and Melvin White, chaplain of American Legion Post 157 led the prayer and benediction. The Veterans Service Office of Chester County has compiled a slideshow of local veterans that played throughout the ceremony. Clayton said that he is “trying desperately to enhance this slideshow” to include all Chester County veterans past and present. Anyone with a photo of themselves or a loved one can bring

For those who have loved ones who have served in the military, Memorial Day holds special significance. Heather Brown spoke about her grandfather’s service and his impact on her life. the photo and information by the Veteran’s Service Office at 126 Crook Ave (in the Public Safety Building), or call 9890795 for more information.

Photos by James A. Webb, Independent

Demolition of Bader Gymnasium is scheduled to begin this week following a 50-year run on the FreedHardeman University campus. approached about giving the needed $50,000. Mr. Bader died Dec. 28, 1962, and Mrs. Bader agreed to give the money in memory of her husband. Groundbreaking ceremonies were held May 14, 1963. Approximately $60,000 was still needed for the project since estimated costs had increased. The building was finished in the fall of 1963, but not by the beginning of the semester as had been hoped. Bader Gym opened Nov. 27, 1963, with the Freed-Hardeman College Lions beating the David Lipscomb junior varsity basketball team 84-73. Unfortunately, neither of the Baders were present at the dedication. Mr. Bader had died in 1962 and Mrs. Bader died shortly See BADER, Page 16-A


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

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The Chester County Emergency Medical Service and Air Evac Fourth Installment in the Heroes of Chester County Series by Marney E. Gilliam Staff Writer

When you’ve been injured and need immediate assistance, you know you can rely on the Chester County Emergency Medical Service (EMS) to respond. This highlytrained team of men and women provide life saving care in an emergency. But what happens when you’re hurt out in the middle of nowhere? Maybe you’re out in a field and no ambulance can get to you. What if your injuries are so acute that a traditional over the road ambulance can’t get you to the hospital fast enough. That’s when the men and women of Air Evac take flight. Over the following pages these heroes share what they love about their job, the frustrations they face and their advice to others thinking about working in the field.

The Chester County Emergency Medical Service Kevin King Kevin King, 38, has

been with EMS 17 years. He is currently a paramedic who describes his job as “help[ing] the sick and injured in any way I

rid of it.” When asked whether he has a favorite memory, he became very serious, but didn’t hesitate “No,

“The most important part of the job to Cox is “being willing to serve. In the snow and in the rain. Just being willing to serve.” Michele Cox can.” He was an Emergency Medical Technician for a year before becoming a paramedic. There are some things that you can do as a paramedic that you can’t do as an EMT such as “advanced airways stuff, there’s drugs that we can give that EMTs can’t give, just the assessment of the patient. It’s more advanced.” In the past King has worked part-time in Hardeman and Henderson counties. He always had a desire to become an EMT. “I always wanted to do it from a child.” because, he laughs, “it was exciting. You just watch it on TV when you’re young and you see it when you’re driving around town and it’s just something about it. It gets in your blood and you can’t get

I try to forget all of it. Really. When I go home I try to forget every bit of it. I couldn’t tell you what I did last week at work. I could tell you what I did at home but not at work.” While King enjoys “the hours and the people. We work 24 hours a day, and then we get a lot of time off,” there is a grime side to it in “the stuff we have to look at.” Over the years the job has become “a lot busier” according to King. The reasons for this are many. “You can just take your pick. It could be anything from the younger generation not being willing to help themselves to the older folks getting older. And you add all that together and it gets worse.” Michelle Cox Michelle Cox, 50, has

Tim Weis continually checks his chopper throughout the day to ensure his team’s safety.

been with EMS 10 years. She is currently an EMT IV. As such she “assists the paramedic ... start IVs … help with the ill and injured.” Before that she was an office manager. In 1998 she decided to make a career change and went back to school. Paramedics who attended her mother inspired her to choose the profession. “[My mother] had cancer and when they came and got her to carry her to be pronounced, their compassion just showed.” When considering her favorite memories, she said “I don’t guess one thing sticks out. There’s just a multitude of things that we do. Just helping the elderly up off the floor. They just call for help. … I guess in our profession, a lot goes unseen that we do.” Cox appreciates “the opportunity to work in this community and help the people. I like my coworkers. We work in some really tough situations and they’re like a second family here. You have to become close. You have to trust the people you work with that when it gets bad, they’ve got your back.” Solemnly, Cox confides that the hardest part of the job is “death. And it doesn’t matter what age. It’s somebody’s family. It’s somebody’s mom, dad, uncle. So I mean, it does not matter. That’s somebody’s loved one and especially when there’s nothing you can do. You know, you walk into a room and you know, and you know they know, but there’s nothing you can do for them. And that’s when the handholding comes in. You pat backs, you hug and you hold hands.” She imparted some hard earned wisdom to those entering the field. “Just make sure you know that you want to do this. This job is not for everybody. And I didn’t think it was for me. I

Michelle Cox and Scott Baker of Chester County EMS inventory their supplies between runs. backed out of school three times before I finally decided to do this. It’s not that you have to have a strong stomach or anything else. You just have to be willing for the hours and for the calls. And holidays and weekends, when a call comes in, we have to go. It doesn’t matter.” Billy Warren Billy Warren, 45, has

delivering medical equipment for a company in Jackson and it just sort of grew into that. In that line you’re helping people by getting them supplies that they need or maybe a hospital bed or something like that. But this right here, it’s just a more personal avenue to do that.” The abuse of the system by those who don’t truly need it

“There’s a lot of people who go to work every day and they’re there for the check and they’re there because they have to be. … I come to work because this is something I love to do. It doesn’t get old to me. I mean I love flying. I love taking care of people.” Scott Summars

been with EMS 22 years. He came to Chester County around Easter of 2012. Before that he worked in Madison County. He is a paramedic and explained, “It’s about along the same lines as a Registered Nurse. You assess your patient and just treat accordingly. We have protocols to go by of things we do for certain situations. We can do basically more than a RN can do without a doctor standing over you. We go out and assess them and anything that needs treating before they get to the hospital, we take care of it to a certain extent.” Warren was drawn to the profession from an early age. “I started out after high school ...

upsets Warren. “TennCare came in 20 years ago I think. I can remember when it came in … they were more liberal in what they paid. If I remember correctly when it was set up, if you went to your doctor you had to pay a $5 copay but if you went to the emergency room you didn’t have to pay anything. So the way I see it, it was set up backwards to begin with, and it’s gone downhill from there. Now we have to justify everything we do for Medicare because they have been taken advantage of for so long. I think it’s just catching back up with us.” But Warren sees that over his years of service there have been See HEROES, Page 14-A


Life & Style

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Chester County Independent archives, March 19, 1987

A grand opening for the Wright Shoes was held March 13, 1987. In 1996, the business moved to 1212-C Hwy 45 N, and a retirement reception is being held for Eva Mae Sells Wright Jones who is handing the keys over to new owners.

Retirement reception scheduled Friday for Eva Mae Wright Jones A retirement reception is scheduled at the Wright Shoes, 1212 C Hwy 45 N., from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. Friday, May 31, for Eva Mae Sells Wright Jones. Jones is retiring and turning the business over to new owners, and all her customers and friends are invited to come by and show their appreciation for her many years in business. Jones will also introduce the new owners at that time. Jones began her working career in 1953 at H&M Pharmacy (Mosiers) while still in

The Montezuma Center will have their regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Monday, June 3. Mrs. Marcie Moore enjoyed a wonderful birthday dinner celebrating her 80th birthday in the home of her granddaughter, Dusty Moody. Close family attended. Keep making those wonderful cakes and pies Mrs. Moore, we love them all. Sounds like Relay turned out good; we are waiting to see how much was raised.

We have been having some beautiful weather. Hope the farmers can get some hay cut and harvested, their gardens planted and corn and beans planted. We are blessed, as some states have had some severe weather. Jerry King (our son) and Lisa Dunivan had a beauti-

high school, and also sold Avon products. She lived away from Chester County for 20 years while her husband Larry Wright was in the Air Force. They returned to Henderson in 1977, and Eva Mae again worked briefly at Mosiers Pharmacy. For a couple of years she and Larry ran Hilltop Grocery, followed by six years for Eva at The Out of Towne Shop. On March 13, 1987, the Wright Shoes opened downtown on E. Main Street. The business prospered,

but on March 5, 1996, an adjacent downtown building collapsed, and the entire block of buildings was condemned. Facing an emergency situation, many friends pitched in to help move the merchandise and furnishings, and within four days the Wright Shoes re-opened at its present location. Larry Wright passed away in 2009, and Eva married Alvin Jones of Beech Bluff in 2011. On Friday Eva Jones completes and celebrates 26 years in the same business as owner or co-owner.

Our granddaughter, Kate Murley, had her kindergarten graduation Friday night at Jackson Christian School. The Junior Kindergarten graduated 32 little grads. Heatha Wells and a group of young ladies have been enjoying a bachelorette getaway in Destin, Fla. The girls are friends of the bride to be, Megan Hunt. Congrats go to Max and Vadeen Redding in their celebration of 70 years of marriage. The appropriate place to be having the celebration is the old Reddin Electric Building. The building is beautiful, and looks quite different now. Grace Baptist Campsite won first place at Relay, the committee people were so happy.

The previous activity the church group participated in was obtaining yarn for the ‘Head Huggers.’ So many contributed to that project for it was such a good cause. We never know when someday we might need a ‘hugger’ for ourselves or for a loved one. Remember Judy Clayton in the loss of her son, Brandon. Remember Roy and Billene Hemby and Peggy and Larry Lard. I hope you had a safe holiday and remembered the true meaning of Memorial Day. Each one of us has lost someone, in war or prison camps, that were loved so much for their true sacrifice. Remember to call with your news – Wanda Cook 989-37824 or Celia Murley 989-5300.

ful wedding on Friday night at Cave Springs Church and Bro. Geary performed a great ceremony. On our prayer list this week are LaVerne Lott, Adam Wise, Paul Garrison, Tommy Connor, Joanne Sells, Pam Priddy, Lisa Peddy, Jean Latham, Fred and Paul Tucker, Charles Cupples, Randy Miller, Gayle and Rachel Ellington, Mike Ross, Laverne Austin, Larry, Jerry and Minnie Austin, Josephine Hinson, Carroll Williams, Randy Sells, Carolyn Potter, Joanne Altier, Sammy Ross, Lee Nell

King, Frenzola Morris, Faye Tucker, Shirley Rietl, Dobber Dyer, Bobbie Nell Willis, Teresa Seaton, Phillip Ross, their caregivers, our military personnel and their families. Happy Anniversary to John David and Joanne Sells June 6. Birthday greetings to Vick Carson, June 3; Nicky Bridges and Joe David Sells, June 4; April Stewart, June 5; and Tyler Jones, Zettie Mae Dickey and Brandon Huff, June 6. Have a Happy Week! Please call 9894875 with your news in this area.

I hope everyone had a great Memorial Day weekend. The weather was just perfect. We spent some time at the river with some good friends. With everyone usually so busy it was great to get away and have some relaxing time. The pontoon boat rides were great. Thanks John and Judi. We had a good service Sunday at Bethel Baptist Church honoring our soldiers that died in the line of duty and our men that served in the armed forces that attend our church. We have several. Thank you for your service to our country. Happy birthday wishes this week go to Sharon Mays on May 29; June Davis on June 1; and Megan Landers on June 2. “Just remember, once you’re over the hill you begin to pick up speed.” ~ Charles Schultz Please remember these in your prayers Nella Rush, Tommy Landers, Sandra Landers, Winna Knipper, Sandra Dees, Norma Tully, Legina Henson, Edra and Benny Barnett, and Nancy and Billy Murphy. “Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint.” ~Mark Twain Bethel Baptist Church Homecoming is Sunday, June 1. Please come help us celebrate 166 years serving the Lord. Coney Island reopened this weekend, after the devastating hurricane Sandy, and I found this article and thought it was interesting “Dreamland was an ambitious amusement park at Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York City from 1904 to 1911. It contained primarily freak shows. “Created by a Tammany Hall-connected businessman William H. Reynolds, Dreamland was supposed to be (relatively) high-class entertainment, with elegant architecture, pristine white towers and some educational exhibits along with the rides and thrills. It was reputed to have one million electric light bulbs illuminating and outlining its buildings—quite a novelty at the time. “ A m o n g Dreamland’s attractions were a railway that ran through a Swiss alpine landscape, imitation Venetian canals with gondolas, a “Lilliputian Village” with three hundred dwarf inhabitants, and a demonstration of firefighting in which two thousand people pretended to put out a blazing six-story building. The side shows were owned by the Dicker family (they also owned the hotel next to the park, which burned down in the blaze reported below).

There was also a display of baby incubators, where premature babies were cared for and exhibited. The story of the first premature triplet infants is very interesting. The triplets were the members of the Dicker family. The doctors advised them of the new invention, but they could not use it because incubators were not approved for use in hospitals. So the triplets were placed in the side show, which was allowed. Two survived. They lived on to have full lives until their passing. In a bid for publicity, the park put famous Broadway actress Marie Dressler in charge of the peanutand-popcorn stands, with young boys dressed as imps in red flannel acting as salesmen. Dressler was said to be in love with Dreamland’s dashing, handlebar-mustachioed, one-armed lion tamer who went by the name of Captain Bonavita. “In spite of its many draws, Dreamland struggled to compete with nearby Luna Park, which was better managed. In preparation for its 1911 season, many changes were made. Samuel W. Gumpertz (later director of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus) was put in the park’s top executive post. The buildings, once all painted white in a bid for elegance, were redone in bright colors. On the night before opening day, a concession called Hell Gate, in which visitors took a boat ride on rushing waters through dim caverns, was undergoing lastminute repairs by a roofing company owned by Samuel Engelstein. A leak had to be caulked with tar. During these repairs, at about 1:30 in the morning on Saturday, May 27, 1911, the light bulbs that illuminated the operations began to explode, perhaps because of an electrical malfunction. In the darkness, a worker kicked over a bucket of hot pitch, and soon Hell Gate was in flames. “The fire quickly spread throughout the park. The buildings were made of frames of lath (thin strips of wood) covered with staff (a moldable mixture of plaster of Paris and hemp fiber). Both

Thursday, May 30, 2013 materials were highly flammable, and as they were common in the Coney Island amusement parks, fires were a persistent problem there. Because of this, a new high-pressure water pumping station had been constructed at Twelfth Street and Neptune Avenue a few years earlier. But on this night it failed. Water was available, but not enough to contain the fire before it enveloped Dreamland. “Chaos broke loose as the park burned. As the one-armed Captain Bonavita strove to save his big cats with only the swiftly encroaching flames for illumination, some of the terrified animals escaped. A lion named Black Prince rushed into the streets, among crowds of onlookers, and was shot by police. By morning, the fire was out, and Dreamland was reduced to a soggy, smoldering mess. “Early editions of The New York Times claimed the incubator babies had perished in the flames, but later the paper corrected this and reported that they had all been saved. “Though other Coney Island parks were rebuilt after major fires, some multiple times, Dreamland was abandoned after the fire of 1911. “Dreamland was located between Surf Avenue and the Atlantic Ocean at West Eighth Street opposite Culver Depot, the terminal of New York City Subway’s Brighton and Culver Lines. The site is now the location of the New York Aquarium and the West Eighth Street station.” Copyright (C) 2013 http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Dream land+(amusement+park) References: Webster, Sarah (2008-02-01). “Circus Coming To Town” Asbury Park Press. Retrieved 2008-02-02. McCullough, Edo (2000). “Good Old Coney Island” Fordham University Press, New York. (Originally published by Scribner, New York, 1957.) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation;

Have a great week! Attend our community club meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 4. To report news call 879-9777.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

Hello to everyone! It is me again. Greetings from the City. For this is the day the Lord has made, let us rejoice and be glad in it. I am so glad to be an American; to have the freedom we have. In some countries people can not even confess to being a Christian. Before we get started let’s remember the families and loved ones in Oklahoma and Texas where the tornados hit; let’s continue to pray for them and help any way we can. I hope everyone had a wonderful week. I hope everyone had a wonderful Memorial Day. On Saturday, May 25 the Chester County VFW’s first pancake breakfast was a success! The members worked very hard. The VFW’s new 2013-2014 officers are Bill Jewell - Commander, Greg Blankenship - Senior Vice Commander, Donald Rouse Adjutant, Gloria Holiday Q u a r t e r m a s t e r, George Bishop – Chaplain, and Curtis Allen and Frank Holiday – Members. A very special “Thank You” goes out to Marie Bishop, wife of George Bishop, who was there volunteering and helping with the breakfast. We, the members, do appreciate you. We would also like to thank all of you that purchased the tickets and came out to eat. Senator Dolores Gresham and her husband came by and had breakfast also. The residents at Southern Oaks were so glad to have the rain last week because their vegetables are growing quickly and they are ready to eat them. Their taste buds are already salivating just thinking of all those delicious veggies they will soon get to devour. The residents knew the day to win back the trophy from the Seniors Citizen was approaching fast, so they got their practice in, hoping to win the trophy back. Thursday morning the seniors from the Senior Citizens Center came for the monthly bowling challenge. For the last four or five months they have held the title of “Wii Bowling Champions,” and have had the prized trophy displayed at the Senior Citizens Center - but not this month. The Southern Oaks residents won the trophy back, and are proudly displaying it in their dining room for all to see. Scores were high for everyone, but Southern Oaks’ scores were just a bit higher than the seniors from the center. In the first game Mr. Jerry Cook bowled a 176, Mr. J.D. King 146, Mr. Ed Cherry 154 and Ms. Dorothy Massey a 159. In the second game Ms. Martha Jones bowled a 149, Ms. Polly

Proffitt scored the highest of anyone with a 214, Ms. Robbie Stanfill rolled a 158 and Activities Director Nancy Connell, bowled a 189. All in all it was a fun time, and they hope to keep the trophy for quite a while! Marty Wilkins came for her weekly Bible Study, moving from Leviticus into Psalms. The book of Psalms is so comforting and uplifting. Samantha Brasher from Westwood Health Care and Rehabilitation located in Decaturville came to call Bingo. She brought some great prizes with her and gave them all away! Tuesday afternoon one of the residents, Mr. C.O. Hays, 93, had some special visitors who drove all the way here from Paducah, Ky. Mrs. Judy Clayton and her husband, Johnny Clayton, hand delivered a newly published book to Mr. Hays. Mrs. Clayton, when gathering information for the book, had previously visited Mr. Hays to interview him. The Department of Energy had authorized Mrs. Clayton and others to interview exemployee’s about the history of the Paducah Atomic Energy Plant. The plant was constructed from 1951 to 1956 as part of a United States Government program to produce highly enriched uranium to fuel military reactors and produce nuclear weapons. Mr. Hays was an employee with the company from 1951 until his retirement in early 1985. During this time he watched the plant being built from the ground up. Mr. Hays is referenced in this book several times. One of the references has him quoted as saying, “I was the first C-300 operator at the Plant. C-300 was still under construction and so was mostly empty, but there was a wooden desk and a crank telephone with an overhead wire in the power pit. That was the contact with the C-532 Relay House. My job was to contact the Relay House every half hour. They had a printout of how much power we were taking and I started a log on how much power we were using every half hour.” The C-300 Central Control Facility was one of the most sophisticated See CITY, Page 7-A

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Stuffed rib roast gives everyday dinners a special touch of class Stuffed pork rib roast

I don’t normally think of stuffing pork chops. I guess I’ve grown accustomed to the standard grilled or breaded and fried chops, but stuffing and roasting a pork rib roast is a wonderful new take on an old standard. My husband, who happens to be an excellent cook, surprised me with this recipe one day after work. As fancy as it sounds, it really doesn’t require too much extra work to achieve a special anytime meal. This dish is so versital it can range from weeknight to company, and no one will know that you didn’t spend all day in the kitchen. The most difficult part is cutting the slit for the stuffing. You need to be sure that you have a very sharp knife. It should be thin but not so thin that it is flimsy. Cut your opening about threeinches in diameter, and if necessary you can cut from both ends and meet in the middle. In fact, it’s probably easier that way to ensure that you have a straight cut. Once the cut goes through the entire roast, use a wooden spoon to widen the opening enough that the stuffing will fit.You can pack the stuffing into the roast with a spoon, but don’t be afraid to get your hands a little messy. The stuffing should fill the entire cavity evenly, and the more packed it is, the better it will hold together during cooking and serving. Once the roast has finished cooking and has rested for the full 10 minutes, slice the roast into 6 chops. The stuffing will show in the middle and make a great presentation. Serve with your favorite vegetables, such as asparagus or broccoli.

Ingredients: 6 tablespoons apple cider vinegar or hard cider 1/3 cups pomegranate “seeds” ¼ cup pecan halves, toasted and chopped 2 green onions 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 1 teaspoon fennel seeds, toasted and crushed ½ teaspoon kosher salt, plus additional for seasoning Freshly ground black pepper 1 (6-rib) center-cut pork roast ribs, Frenched (about 4 pounds) 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 cup sour cream ½ cup Dijon mustard Directions: Heat the cider in a small saucepan. Add pomegranates and set aside for about 10 minutes. In a food processor, pulse fruit and liquid with pecans, green onions, butter, fennel seeds, ½ teaspoon salt and pepper to taste – until fruit and nuts are coarsely chopped. You may use a fine wire strainer to remove excess liquid after processing. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. With a sharp, thin knife, make a cut about three-inches across in the center of one end of the roast. Gently push the knife straight through the roast to the other end.

If the knife isn’t long enough, make a cut at either end and work toward the center, making sure cuts meet. Insert the narrow end of a wooden spoon into the opening to widen all the way through. Push stuffing into the opening, working for both ends to ensure that the filling is evenly packed and distributed throughout the “pocket” in the roast. Pat the roast dry and season with salt and pepper. Heat oil in a large ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Add roast, holding the bones up so the botton gets thoroughly browned, the turn to brown the meatly side. Brown for about 6 minutes total. Transfer skillet to the oven and cook, meat side down for 30 minutes. Turn roast over so it sits on the bones and cook about 1 hour more, or until a meat thermometer reaches 155 degrees. Transfer roast to a carving board, tent loosely with foil and allow to rest for 10 minutes before carving. While meat is resting, whisk together sour cream and mustard in a small bowl and season with salt and pepper to taste. Slice roast between the bones to make individual chops and arrange on a platter. Serve with mustard sauce on the side.


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

Only Yesterday “Plans for Hwy. 100 by-pass under discussion” Red Cross Medical Supply Officer at Louisville, Ky. “Kent Has Flying Squirrel” There were The men’s dormitory of 100,200 bandages Murray State College is getting a in the shipment. good start toward being a pet shop. Infor mation Cecil Kent of Henderson has one from Jackson is in the form of a flying squirrel. that the Red The squirrel was given to Cross workers of “Slim” by one of his girl friends, that city [...] have with detailed instructions to take shipped 82,000. In good care of it. this smaller comThis squirrel has taken up the munity [...] a Chester County Independent archives May 24, 1963 habit of night roving as some of much larger PRINCIPALS MAKE PLANS – Mrs. Ed Morris (left) of First the dormitory men can testify. number of fin- Methodist Church, Mrs. R. L. Wilson (center) of First Baptist Something will wake them up ished dressings and Eric Bell of First Pentecostal discuss the Vacation Bible in the “wee hours of the night” by was shipped, as Schools being held in local churches this week. running across their face and compared to arms. Jackson where a larger number any of you back there, I have an Of course the first thing that were engaged three months opening over here. Hoping to be seeing you in the will be thought of is bears and longer. Hats off to the Red Cross near future, and until then, Mr. wild cats, but turning on the light workers of Chester County! Johnston, good luck to you and they find the monsters to be Kent’s “Letters To The Editor” Mrs. Johnston, and the good old flying squirrel. Dear Mr. Johnston: May 28, 1943 I want to take time and Chester County Independent. Sincerely yours, pleasure to thank you for STAFF SGT. THOMAS CARyour kind service in sendROLL (somewhere in the ing all us boys the homeSouthwest Pacific) town newspaper, and I May 29, 1953 want you to know I enjoy “Strict Anti-Rabies Law every word in it. I also wish to say hello Effective In State At Present” The State anti-rabies law to mother, for this is Mother’s Day, and I don’t recently enacted in Nashville is suppose there is a boy in one of the tightest ever passed. The act is set up to protect the the services today that isn’t thinking about public from rabies infection and mother and home, even by regulating the owning of dogs, though we can’t be there making the vaccination of them a with her in person. We must in all counties goes a bit furhope and pray by this ther than any such law in the past time another year, we can has done. [...] One section of the new bill all be back there and make Mother’s Day a hap- makes it mandatory that every dog owner attach a metal tag or pier one for all. I want to express my other evidence of vaccination to appreciation to the people the collar of the dog. [...] The owner of each dog is of Chester County for all the war drives they have held responsible to keep his or her put over. That is the only dog from running at large and any way we can overcome this public health officer or peace offigreat war. All must work cer is at liberty to take up loose together; alone we can’t dogs and to notify owners that a win. We need the help of pound fee of $1.50 must be paid to the folks back home in redeem the dog. If dogs are taken up without owners’ tags they may Chester County Independent archives May 28, 1943 every possible way. I realize it is pretty be destroyed within two days, “Stores Here To Close At Noon tough to go without things we unless legally claimed by the Wednesdays” have always had, but it is the only owner. The Health Department may Employees of most of the city’s way during these times. If you retail stores will receive a half-hol- folks back there think you have it designate the length of time any iday on Wednesdays, beginning on tough, you should just place your- dog is to be kept under observaJune 2. The dry goods, hardware, selves in our shoes for 24 hours. tion once it has bitten a person or furniture, grocery stores, bank, You would then think you were in is otherwise suspected of being barber shops and several others heaven back there, compared to rabid. County grand juries are given business houses have agreed to here. close at noon on Wednesdays, Just to give you a hint, I am sit- inquisitorial powers to investigate beginning next week and continu- ting in water up to my shoe tops as violations of the act and under the ing until the first of September. I write these lines. I have not seen law it is their duty to so act. Store owners and employees a sidewalk or hard road in more “Births” Steadman-Guy Clinic will use the extra time to work in than seven months. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Cothren their Victory Gardens and several I have even received letters sayhave made arrangements to assist ing only three pair of shoes could announce the arrival of a son, with farm work. be bought in a year! You folks Michael Ray, on May 19. Mr. and Mrs. George Boyd are “Welcome Stranger” come and live with me: I cannot Mr. and Mrs. Buster Graves are even buy a 5 cent soda pop. But I the parents of a daughter born May 21. She has been named Linda the proud parents of a baby girl, am happy! born May 23, weighing 7 ½ It takes all this to win wars, and Charlene. Mr. and Mrs. Coenraad Steyn pounds; their first child. I am willing to do anything to help announce the arrival of a daugh“15 Pressure Cookers” bring it to a victorious end. Chester County has been allotI suppose you all read about the ter, Irma, on May 22. Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Taylor of ted a quota of 15 pressure cookers sinking of the President Coolidge. which are to be rationed to farm That was the ship I came over on, Medon are the parents of a son families who are eligible. The and I went down with it; lost born May 24. He has been named cookers will be rationed by a com- everything I had. But today I have Anthony Leroy. mittee of five women in the coun- my feet on land – even though it is May 24, 1963 ty [...]. Applications will be “damp” – and I am feeling fine. So, “Preliminary Work Started To approved on the basis of the why shouldn’t I be happy? Obtain By-Pass On State amount of foodstuffs canned and I do not get blue; I’m too busy Highway 100” the number of families who will planning the things I’ll do when I Mayor Burkhead announced use the cooker. get back home. That is the one this week he and Col. Kenneth “Red Cross Ships 100,200 thing we all are looking forward Woods were in Nashville last week Bandages” met with Highway to: is to make that last and final and Mrs. Leonard Cherry, chairman beach head in old San Francisco! Commissioner David Pack, to disof Red Cross work, states that the So, with all your help and sacri- cuss the construction of a highfirst shipment of surgical dress- fices, we will meet you all again way by-pass on 100 around ings was made this week to the some day. If it gets too tough for Henderson [...]. Mr. C. S. Harmon (Engineer Director) came to Henderson later in the week [...] and discussed the work that was involved in determining the need for a by-pass [...]. Mr. Harmon suggested his Department would probably be ready to commence their study in early 1964 as he felt it would take that long for the Planning Commission to get their information. Mayor Burkhead stated he was pleased with the meetings on the by-pass and felt much had been accomplished since the preliminary steps had been taken to start the program and felt sure it would go through on schedule [...]. “Births” Mr. and Mrs. Larry Gilliam are receiving congratulations upon the arrival of a daughter, Kimberly Ann, on May 14. The proud grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Harrod Gilliam of Henderson and Mrs. Elizabeth Underwood of Clinton. Henderson Clinic Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gann of Finger, are the parents of a daughter, Myna Lee, who was born May Chester County Independent archives May 25, 1933 18.

From the files of the Chester County Independent May 25, 1933

Hope everyone enjoyed Memorial Day and hopefully everyone took the time to remember those who have died in service to our nation, and also remembered our soldiers who are serving today. Monday was a beautiful day, our company have all gone home, we decided to leave for the day and attended the Memorial Day Services at Shiloh National Park which was held in the cemetery by the big flag pole. It was a very touching ceremony, ending with the firing of the military salute by Veterans of Foreign Wars, followed by TAPS. Following is a poem that was on the back of the program that I would like to share: We walked among the crosses where our fallen soldiers lay, and listened to the bugle as TAPS began to play. The Chaplin led a prayer we stood with heads bowed low, and I thought of fallen comrades I had known so long ago. They came from every city across the fertile land, that we might live in freedom they lie here ‘neath the sand. I felt a little guilty my sacrifice was small. I only lost a little time but these men lost their all. Now their services are over for this Memorial Day. To the names upon these crosses, I just want to say, Thanks for what you’ve given, no one could ask for more. May you rest with God in Heaven from now through evermore.

-C.W. Johnson We also saw the new movie they are showing about the Civil War. My mother’s grandfather, Marcus Lafayette Cherry, was a Confederate soldier in the Civil War. He served as Lt. in Co. H, 21 Wilson’s TM CAV. of Gen. Bedford Forrest Corps, Army of Mississippi. He was wounded at the Battle of Harrisburg, Miss., July 13-15, 1864. He fought in the battle of Jacks Creek, Memphis and Hooker’s Bend on the Tennessee River. He was born Aug. 5, 1834 in Tennessee and died Oct. 9, 1893 and is buried in Boyd, Texas. The Homecoming at the Center will be Saturday, June 15 beginning with an 11 a.m. flag raising followed by the Sparky Sparks band and special guest Stacy Clayton and sister Kim Hearn. There will be grilled burgers and hot dog plates with all the trimmings and dessert table. Also around 1 p.m. a silent auction and cakewalk begins. Once again, all members are asked to help. Tickets will be sold on a $100 shopping spree and are $1 each. You don’t have to be present to win. Members will be given tickets to sell. Please put the donor’s name and phone number on back of the tickets and return all tickets sold and unsold and money collected to the Center at 6:30 p.m. on Friday June 14, or return it all on the day of Homecoming June 15. Also you can help by baking two cakes, one for the cake walk and one for the dessert table and donating items for the silent auction. Officers elected for the new year at the Center are: President-Amy Frye Vice PresidentVickie Beshires See HICKORY, Page 15-A


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

Sunday night falling asleep, I thought about the men who walked from New York to Texas carrying the American flag. I thought of their sacrifice with others joining in as a joint effort. They want attention directed to Memorial Day as a day that should be remembered with more respect. It is a day to honor those who died fighting for a cause called “Freedom”. Sadly it is a day now used as a longer weekend vacation, mall sale, getting caught up on projects, sleeping late, etc. Times are still changing.

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City buildings of its kind during that era. Around the clock, C300 operators (such as Mr. C.O. Hays) monitored and controlled conditions in all of the process buildings. Mr. Hays felt honored to have Mrs. Clayton hand deliver a copy of the book, “The Story of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Megawatts to Megatons to Megawatts.” Stop by sometime and visit with Mr. Hays, he would be happy to share with you his days at the plant, or other fascinating facts about his very interesting life. He also writes short stories. He is currently working on a new story, “Planes, Bicycles and Dog Houses.” Stop by if you want to hear more. Penny Huggins stopped by from Savannah to play the piano and sing. She brought a friend with her, Mr. Gary Stanfield, who brought his guitar and played. The residents even joined in singing with the old gospel songs. Then after lunch, Virgil Hooks came with his guitar and sang. We have some of the best talent in the State of Tennessee coming through the doors of Southern Oaks. Friday the residents had their Resident Council Meeting, and in the afternoon they played Bingo with Michelle White, the Chester County Administrator of Elections. This was her first visit with them and they hope to see her again soon. She brought her 11-yearold son Samuel White; husband, Phillip White; and mother-inlaw, Doris White with her to help. Along with the great prizes she brought were some patriotic decorations and hats to remind us of Memorial Day. Saturday was their Family Day and Movie Day, and Sunday afternoon Estes Church of Christ came for services. There were two birthdays this past week there and both are employees. Happy

But wherever you were Monday I’m sure you saw “Old Glory” flying somewhere proudly, or prayerfully “Old Glory” waved in your own yard. This beautiful flag flies wherever Americans gave their lives to preserve freedom. It drapes caskets as a final show of love or it is folded neatly inside the casket near the solider. “Old Glory” is saluted because it symbolizes importance of God, country, freedom, valor and sacrifices of countless heroes. Entering Henderson City Hall a quick count showed about 70 present for the Memorial Day service. Most important were our aging veterans who were either seated or about to be seated. Some were not present this year who attended last year - a sign perhaps they were not physically able or they were resting in peace

with our heavenly Father. Either way they were remembered with personal mention of name to nearby friends, or they were remembered with respect and love by those present. Humble words by Bill Jewell, Bobby King, Dwain Seaton, Melvin White and Raleigh Jernigan (guest speaker from Manchester) inspired respect for veterans. Taps was played by Austin Bentley. Doesn’t that music squeeze your heart? Those popular words are, “Day is done, gone the sun, from the lake, from the hill, from the sky, all is well, safely rest, God is nigh.” The slide show was nice. Thank you for attending and showing respect. We saw pictures of young men who entered a war to serve their country. Some returned home, but others paid the ultimate price. In lov-

birthday wishes go to Donna Herndon and Milton Trice. We the people, and Southern Oaks, are saddened by the devastation caused from the tornados in Oklahoma and Texas. The families affected by this terrible disaster are in our thoughts and prayers. On our prayer request list this week are Larry (Henry) Brown and Sam Robinson. Continue to pray for the families in Oklahoma and Texas, for the people that are in the hospitals, the ones that are sick in their homes, our children, teachers, family, the men and women that are serving our

country, and also the incarcerated. Remember to patronize our local businesses. Let’s support our own as much as we can. Chester County Head Start is still accepting applications for 3- and 4-yearolds. For more information, call 989-2561 or 989-5111. If you live in the City of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, a n n i v e r s a r y, announcements, and things happening in the city, please call 9891907 or send an email t o gloria__holiday@msn. com. HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

ing memory, those Chester County soldiers’ names are carved in granite. Pause at this monument on the front lawn of our court house. Read those names with respect. A wreath is donated each year by Liz Kinchen. She cares; she remembers; and she honors those fallen soldiers. Soldiers whose names are carved in granite are: (WWI) Monty Allen, Joshua Buckingham, Earl Cooper, Hampton Cooper, Curry C. Cupples, Charley Davis, H. Dolphus Deming, Dennis E. Fields, Joe L. Findley, James R. Gaddy, Amos B. Haltom, Isaac M. Massengill, J. Scott Robinson and Fred H. Rowland; (Korean) M. Eugene Cox, Ray F. Dunn and Harold L. Rhodes; (WWII) Bennett Allen, Joseph Anderson, John Arnold, Thomas Barber, Hughie Bishop, Isaac Brown, J.T. Cawthon, W.C. Christopher, Gordon Cox, John Griffin, Edgar Holder, Robert M. Holder, William Holmes, John Hubbard, William Kinchen, Wade King,

C.B. Latham, James Lee, Floyd Lindsey, K.D. Lowrance, Jr., Hobert Maness, Edison Marsh, Kenneth McCanless, Willie Morris, Kirk Mount, Don O’Neal, James Priddy, John Ramer, Neal Ratliff, Hubert Rhodes, Herman Scott, J.L. Smith, Roy Smith, Floyd Snider, Elmo Tarpley, George Wallace, Floyd Wilson, Lloyd Wilson, T. Oliver Wilson, Jr., D. Woodrow Wood and Robert B. Woods, Jr,; (Vietnam) Charles Crowe, Dale M. Hollowell, Dannie D. Jacobs and Dennis W. Taylor; (Career Service) Frankie Lee Naylor, Gene Parrish and J.T. Peddy; (Gulf War) Dustin M. Adkins and Judson E. Mount and (Training See CREEK, Page 15-A

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Opinion

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Treasury announces $347.8 million increase in small business lending The U.S. Department of the Treasury has released a new report showing that Tennessee institutions receiving capital through the Small Business Lending Fund (SBLF) continue to increase their small business lending, in total by more than $347.8 million over their baselines. This Use of Funds report shows that participants receiving capital through the SBLF boosted lending for the seventh straight quarter. In total, SBLF participants have increased small business lending by about $8.9 billion since the depths of the recession in 2009. This increased lending represents an estimated 38,000 additional small business loans over baseline levels. To view this information graphically, as well as detail on the increased lending across all regions, visit http://www.treasury.gov/connect/blog/Documents/20130402_SBLF.pdf. “In every region of the country, the Obama Administration’s Small Business Lending Fund is supporting small and family-owned businesses with the funds they need to create jobs and grow,” said Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Neal Wolin. “This quarter’s report shows that SBLF participants are continuing to help thousands of small businesses invest, hire and expand in their local communities.” The report also shows that SBLF participants increased their lending by $1.5 billion more than the prior quarter, representing the second highest increase since the start of the program. Community banks participating in SBLF have increased business lending by 38 percent, a substantially greater amount than a peer group of similar banks across median measures of size, geography and loan type. Small businesses play a critical role in the U.S. economy and are central to growth and job creation. In the aftermath of the recession and credit crisis, small business owners faced disproportionate challenges, including difficulty accessing capital. The SBLF, established as part of the Small Business Jobs Act that President Obama signed into law in 2010, encourages community banks to increase their lending to small businesses, helping those companies expand their operations and create new jobs. Treasury invested more than $4 billion in 332 institutions through the SBLF. Collectively, these institutions operate in more than 3,000 locations across 48 states. This report includes information on the 320 institutions that continue to participate in the program as of March 15, 2013, including 270 community banks and 50 community development loan funds. SBLF encourages lending to small businesses by providing capital to community banks and CDLFs with less than $10 billion in assets. The dividend or interest rate a community bank pays on SBLF funding is reduced as the bank increases its lending to small businesses – providing a strong incentive for new lending to small businesses so that these firms can expand and create jobs. As of December 31, 2012, the average rate paid by community banks on SBLF capital was 1.8 percent. Individual community banks can reduce the rate they pay to one percent if they increase qualified small business lending by 10 percent over their baseline. To view the report, including a list of the change in lending at banks receiving SBLF capital, visit http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/sb-programs/Pages/sblf_transactions.aspx. The SBLF is one part of the Obama Administration’s comprehensive agenda to help small businesses access the capital they need to invest and hire. Treasury also administers the State Small Business Credit Initiative (SSBCI), which allocates $1.5 billion to state programs designed to leverage private financing to spur $15 billion in new lending to small businesses and small manufacturers. For more information on the Obama Administration’s small business initiatives, visit www.sba.gov. For more information on SBLF, visit www.treasury.gov/sblf.

Capitol Hill Review A weekly wrap-up of legislative news From Rep. Steve McDaniel Tennessee Pension Reform Plan Becomes Law Legislation proposed earlier this year to reform the state’s pension plan, the Tennessee Consolidated Retirement System (TCRS), passed the full House of Representatives in Nashville during this legislative session. The reform represents a proactive approach by State Treasurer David H. Lillard, Jr. and House leaders to ensure the security of pension benefits for current employees, retirees, as well as future employees that will be hired in years to come. The changes, which will only affect new employees hired on or after July 1 of 2014, will change the current defined-benefits system to a hybrid plan that includes elements of defined-benefits and defined-contribution programs. A defined-benefit plan guarantees retirees a fixed pension benefit based on their years of service and earnings, while defined-contribution plans do not have guaranteed payment levels but rather specified contribution levels by the employer. The pension changes will not affect anyone that is currently a state employee, a teacher, a higher education employee, or an employee of a local government participating in the Tennessee Consolidated Retirement System. Lawmakers Score Victory With Bill To Reform Tennessee Asset Forfeiture Law Legislation designed to curb abuse of a Tennessee law that allows government agencies to take cash off drivers without a warrant unanimously passed the House of Representatives this year with a 95-0 vote. The bill will reform the practice known as asset forfeiture—the ability of law enforcement officers to take people’s personal property without charging them with a crime. As passed, the bill ensures a fair hearing to any person suspect-

ed of being in possession of property subject to asset forfeiture. Specifically, the legislation spells out that such person is entitled to appear in court at a stated date and time to contest the issuance of a forfeiture warrant by a law enforcement officer. Currently, Tennessee law requires such a hearing to take place without the person whose assets are being seized in attendance. It is not uncommon for some asset forfeiture cases to take months to settle. When House legislators sat down and really started studying the issue of asset forfeiture, it was obvious that people are not being given the opportunity to be heard by a real judge in a reasonable amount of time. A prime example, they cite, is the New Jersey man who had $22,000 in cash taken from him during a traffic stop and was not immediately given a hearing to get his money back. The story referred to by lawmakers occurred in 2012, when an officer took George Reby’s money based on the suspicion it might be drug money, even though Reby stated he was in the process of buying a new vehicle through the popular auction website, eBay. Once the case went to court, the police officer who had seized the money had a judge sign off on the seizure in a secret hearing, but never told the judge about Mr. Reby’s side of the story. Legislation To Better Protect Student Athletes Easily Passes House Legislation designed to protect student athletes who suffer concussions from risking further medical complications passed the House this year with full support from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. As passed, House Bill 867 ensures guidelines are in place to help coaches, youth athletic instructors, and parents recognize a concussion and its symptoms in order to keep an injured player

from risking their health by returning to competition too soon. In addition, the legislation requires that schools and organizations develop a policy of removing youth from sports activity who show signs of concussion until they receive a medical evaluation from a licensed doctor stating they are clear to return to play. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) reports that from 2001 to 2009, concussions among youth increased 60 percent, leading the agency to label concussion frequency as reaching “epidemic” proportions. Statewide Partnership Addresses Human Trafficking in Tennessee House lawmakers joined law enforcement officials from across the state this year to address the issue of human trafficking in Tennessee. In 2010, the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation conducted a study regarding human sex trafficking in the state. The

results of the study found trafficking and sex slavery in Tennessee is more common than previously known. The report cited that one in four children who run away from home are approached for commercial sexual exploitation within 48 hours of running away. In addition, the average age of a sex trafficking victim is 13, according to the study. Building on the success lawmakers had during the 2011-2012 legislative session to cut down on crimes such as this across the state, lawmakers introduced a crime prevention package this year to address issues related to crimes against children, criminal gang offenses, and human organ trafficking. In total, 15 bills were filed, including: House Bill 520, which changes the offense of promoting prostitution of a minor from a Class E felony to a Class A felony – a move which See HILL, Page 9-A


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

From Page 8-A

Hill will greatly increase the punishment for such crimes; House Bill 131, which increases penalties for gang members who commit trafficking for commercial sex acts; And House Bill 357, which adds to the law books a new offense for the trafficking of human organs. Lawmakers hope they will be able to shine a spotlight on the disturbing crime trend of sex slavery and human trafficking in Tennessee. Ignition Interlock Legislation Scores Legislative Victory In a unanimous vote of the House and Senate, landmark legislation that will strengthen Tennessee’s DUI laws was passed by the Tennessee Legislature this year and was signed into law by Governor Bill Haslam. As adopted, House Bill 353 requires that interlock devices be installed in the vehicles of all drunk drivers convicted with a blood alcohol rate of .08% or higher. Interlock devices are small pieces of equipment attached to the steering wheel of a car with a tube that the driver must breathe into in order to allow the ignition to start. The legislation is backed by numerous local and nationwide safety agencies, including Mothers Against Drunk Driv-

ing, AAA, the Tennessee Sheriff ’s Association, the National Transportation Safety Board, Direct General Corporation, the Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, and the Tennessee Association of Police Chiefs. Tennessee becomes the 18th state to enact

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interlock requirements for all convicted drunk drivers. Studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show requiring interlock devices for convicted drunk drivers is effective in reducing drunk driving recidivism by 67 percent.

Chester County – Henderson Southwest Human Resource Agency to distribute commodities May 30 From 8 am until noon Thursday, May 30, Southwest Human Resource Agency will distribute commodities at the National Guard Armory in Henderson. New certificates are issued at the Southwest Community Service Center, 269 N. Church St. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. No new certificates will be issued on the day of distribution. No person shall on the grounds of race, color, or national origin be excluded from participation or be denied benefits, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.

Chester County Historical Society Meeting June 3 The Chester County Historical Society will meet at 7 p.m. Monday, June 3 at the Senior Citizens Center. A PowerPoint presentation, “Considerations for Dating Photographs,” will be presented by Lenore Neff and Evelyn Grissom Keele.

Henderson - Artifacts needed for CC Museum Leadership Chester County Class of 2011 is still accepting artifacts for the Chester County Museum that will be housed in the Tennessee Room of the Chester County Library. Categories for items that will be accepted are Native Americans, Civil War, farming, industry, education, the Henderson Centennial, or other pieces of history that are prior to 1980. Items donated must be particular to Chester County. For information, contact the library at 989-4673 or check out the museum page on Facebook.

Henderson - SWHRA Head Start accepting registrations The Southwest Human Resource Agency Head Start Program is now accepting applications for 4year-olds to attend Head Start classes. Head Start serves children the year before they are eligible to attend Kindergarten. You may contact Family Case Manager, Sharla Franklin at 549-9413. Reagan Head Start Center is located at 5820 Hwy. 100, Reagan (next door to the post office). Information needed at this time includes the child’s name, birth date (please bring child’s birth certificate), child’s immunization form (shot record), to be obtained from the local Health Department or from the child’s physician, a copy of child’s TennCare card, Social Security Number for all family members, Food Stamp Case Numbers and Family Income Verification. Verification of income must be provided by individual Income Tax Form 1040, W-2 Forms, pay stubs, pay envelopes, Written Statements from employers or AFDC/Food stamp Determination Verification.

All Areas Chester County Senior Citizen Center NEW Trip available Chester County Senior Citizen Center announces a NEW trip going to Cape Cod and Plymouth. This is a 9-day, 8-night, trip for only $759 per person with double occupancy. Check with Joanne Osborne at 989-1570 or 989-7434 for more details about the trip.

Chester County – Finger Finger country dance June 1 Every Friday night, 7:30-10:30, come and enjoy the New Outlaws band. Admission is $5, with 4-year-

olds and under free.

Chester County – Mifflin Mifflin Family Dance May 30 - 31 Don’t forget to join us every Thursday and Friday night at 7:30 at the Mifflin family dance. Various bands will be playing, Tim Young with “The Good Time Band,” “Double Take,” Sparky, Dave and Stacy with “The ThreeLegged Horse,” Even if you don’t dance, come out and enjoy the music and visiting with neighbors and friends. Concessions and game room are available. Bring your whole family. For more information, call 9895867 or 989-4460.

Madison County – Pinson Ruritan’s Barbeque at Old Pinson School May 31 Enjoy whole hog barbeque from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, May 31 at the Pinson Old School. Join your friends and pig out. Plate tickets may be purchased from Liz and Ike at Liz’s Barbeque, or any Ruritan member. The proceeds will help finish the restoration of the school. For more information, call 983-0400.

Chester County – Enville Roby Community Volunteer Fire Dept June 8 The Roby Community Volunteer Fire Department, 5050 Roby Road, Enville, will have their Spring Fundraise Saturday, June 8. Beginning at 10 a.m. barbequed chicken, hamburgers and hot dogs will be available. Come on out and enjoy the food and the fun. Donations are welcome!

Madison County – Jackson Shannon St. Music Festival May 31 – June 1 The 22nd Annual Shannon St. MusicFest is fast approaching and Jackson Downtown Development Corporation wants you to be a part of this great community event. There are still spaces available for sponsorship opportunities, merchandise/game vendors, and businesses. To reserve your spot at the Shannon St. MusicFest, or to become a sponsor, contact Caroline Wells at cwells@cityofjackson.net or call 427-7573. Four city blocks will be blocked off during the day and evening. Times for the festival are from 5-11 p.m. Friday, May 31 and from 5 -11 p.m. Saturday, June 1.

Henderson County – Reagan Regular Saturday Night Dance June 1 Reagan Community Center) will be hosting its regular Saturday dance, June 1. This is an all ages show with free dance lessons starting at 6:30 and live music from 7:3010:30. No charge for 11 years old and younger when accompanied by an adult.

Hardeman County – Bolivar “On Golden Pond” May 31, June 1, 2 “On Golden Pond” is a celebration of life, a study in mortality, and a window into the different types of love that changes lives forever. Tickets will be available to members at the ticket office starting May 20, and to the public starting May 27, Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tickets may also be purchased by calling 658-2787 during ticket office hours.


Obituary/Religion Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Obituaries Agnes Sanderson Harwell Oct. 23, 1921 – May 24, 2013 Helen Agnes Sanderson Harwell, 91, passed away May 24, 2013 at the McNairy Regional Hospital. Funeral services were Sunday, May 26 at the Milledgeville Methodist Church with Roger Henson and Lloyd Blankenship officiating. Burial followed in the Milledgeville Cemetery. Arrangements were handled by Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel. She was born and reared at Milledgeville, the daughter of the late Euliss L. (E.L.) and Eloda Beatrice Ellis Sanderson. She attended schools at Milledgeville and Morris Chapel, graduating at Morris Chapel High School in 1939. In 1947 she was married to W.F. Harwell. They made their home in Milledgeville all their married life. She worked at Salant & Salant Mfg. in Henderson, Leapwood Mfg. and different garment factories at Milledgeville and retired in 1983. Mrs. Harwell was a member of the Milledgeville Methodist Church. She is survived by a son, Tommy Neil Harwell (Rae) of Enville; a grandson, Shane Harwell (Tanya); two great-grandchildren, Hunter and Lexi Harwell; a brother, Roy Sanderson of Rainesville, Ala.; and a sister, McNeva Hill of Milledgeville. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, W.F. ‘Fay’ Harwell in 2003; a grandson, Shannon Harwell in 2006; and a sister, Gladys Kennedy. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 30, 2013

Timothy “Timmy” Faulkner Oct. 4, 1965 – May 26, 2013 Timothy Garland Faulkner, 47, died Sunday evening, May 26, 2013 of respiratory failure at Jackson General Hospital after a long illness. Funeral services were 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 29 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Ben Flatt and John Paul Robertson officiating. Burial followed at Chester County Memory Gardens. Tim was born in Henderson, the son of Billy Wayne and Wanda Mayfield Faulkner. He attended Chester County schools and vocational technical school at Crump. Tim married Tommie Jean Hysmith, Jan. 1, 1993 and they made their home in Henderson. He worked as a dispatcher for the Chester County Sheriff Dept. and was a police officer for the Henderson Police Dept. He worked as service manager at Lofton Chevrolet, Golden Circle Ford, and Bolton Ford. He later worked in sales at Radio Shack in Henderson and The Electric Outlet in Jackson. He was a frequent visitor at Robertson Pawn Shop and Firearms in Henderson, alongside his close friend John P. Robertson, where Tim enjoyed meeting and visiting with customers. He was a member of the Chester County Lions Club, past member of the Chester County Senior Citizens board, lifetime member of the NRA, an active participant in the annual Relay For Life, a past member of the Fraternal Order of Police, and the Henderson Masonic Lodge. He had served as an alderman for the City of Henderson since 2002. He was a member of the Church of Christ. He is survived his wife, Tommie Jean Hysmith Faulkner; parents, Billy Wayne and Wanda Mayfield Faulkner; stepson, Brian Archer (Vickie); two stepdaughters, Teresa Miller (Henry) and Amanda Koronka (James); a brother Scotty Faulkner (Lesa); a sister, Kim White (Wayne) all of Henderson; seven step-grandchildren, James Miller, Maley McColloum, J. D. Archer, Treyton Archer, Mollie Russell, Christopher Russell and Katelyn Phillips; two nieces, Madison Adams and Chassity Faulkner; a nephew, Derrick Faulkner; a great-niece, Paisley Faulkner; and a step-great-granddaughter, Stella Russell. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 30, 2013

Area Decoration Days Courtesy of Patsy Jones

First Sunday in June – Bethel, Jacks Creek Apostolic and Palestine Second Sunday in June – Bailey, Hare, Holly Springs and Montezuma Third Sunday in June – none reported Fourth Sunday in June – Stone Hill Last Sunday in June - Mt. Pleasant

Albert Lynn “Buddy Joe” Parker April 13, 1952 – May 21, 2013 Albert Lynn “Buddy Joe” Parker, 61, passed away Tuesday, May 21, 2013. Funeral services were at the Highlands Church Friday, May 24 with Bro. W.D. McMullen and Bro. Andy Morris officiating. Burial followed in Pisgah Cemetery at Henderson. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 30, 2013

More Than We Can Stand Ronnie McBrayer Keeping the Faith

In the previous generation there were at least three great Southern-born prophets: Martin Luther King, Jr., Clarence Jordan, and Will Campbell. Campbell is the only one still living. He is nearing his 90th year, and is a self-proclaimed prickly, “bootleg preacher” from Mississippi with a Baptist ordination, a foul four-letter-word dropping mouth, and a love for Bourbon and country music that is just short of his love for Jesus. Educated at Wake Forest, Tulane and Yale, he has been a pastor, chaplain, an executive with the National Council of Churches, and a writer. But he is most respected for his tireless work toward racial equality in the civil rights South, and his no-compromise, no pulled-punches attitude when it comes to the message of reconciliation.

“God is ready to forgive and restore all who will come,” he has preached for decades now. When asked how he would summarize his theology and his work, in Campbell’s iconoclastic style he answered, “We are all bastards; but God loves us anyway.” This belief was put to the test during the racial violence and upheaval of the 1960s. One of Will’s best friends, a seminary student and Civil Rights worker named Jonathan Daniels, was shot and killed by an Alabama sheriff. The sheriff was acquitted by “a jury of his peers.” Will retreated to Fairhope, Ala., to grieve and rage, taking refuge at the home of friend P.D. East. East was an agnostic newspaper editor who wanted racial equality as well, but he was not an adherent to the Christian gospel. So while Will stalked

Montezuma United Methodist Church Homecoming June 9 Pastor Rev. Jim Osborne announces that Montezuma United Methodist Church Homecoming will begin at 11 a.m. Sunday, June 9, with guest speaker Rev. Harold Montgomery and special music by Kaye Springfield. There will be a potluck meal at noon. Everyone is invited to attend.

around the house, angrily grieving Daniel’s death and the uncorrected injustice against him, P.D. confronted Campbell directly: “Come on, Brother,” P.D. said. “Let’s talk about your definition of the gospel. Was Jonathan a bastard?” Will responded that he was sure that everyone is a sinner in one way or another, but that Jonathan was one of the sweetest, gentlest guys he had ever known. P.D. persisted: “But was he a bastard? Now, that’s your word, not mine. That’s a pretty tough word. I know, ‘cause I am one; a real one. My mama wasn’t married to my daddy. Now, by God, you tell me right now, yes or no: Was Jonathan Daniel a bastard?” Will finally said, “Yes, Daniel was.” P.D. East pulled his chair close to Will and just above a whisper asked, “Which one of those two bastards do you think God loves the most – Jonathan or that sheriff ? Now, you’re the one who always told me about how simple the gospel is. Just answer the question: Which one of those two does God love the most?” Here are Will Campbell’s words of response: “Suddenly, everything became clear. Everything. It was a revelation. I walked across the room and opened the blind, staring directly into the glare of the street light. And I began to whimper. But the crying was interspersed with laughter. It was a strange experience. I remember trying to sort out the sadness and the joy. “Just what was I crying for, and what was I laughing for? Then this, too, became clear. I was laughing at myself, at 20 years of a ministry which had become, without my realizing it…an attempted negation of Jesus…a theology of law and order and of

denying the faith I professed to hold. That sheriff was indeed as loved by God as Jonathan Daniel. And if loved, forgiven. And if forgiven, reconciled. “P.D. came and stood beside me, handing me his half-empty beer. The lesson was over. Class dismissed. But I had one last thing I had to say to the teacher: ‘P.D…[ ] if you ain’t made a Christian out of me. And I’m not sure I can stand it.’” This is the categoryexploding, boundarybreaking, worldupturning gospel: God’s grace trumps everything. God’s love welcomes all who will come. God’s forgiveness is no “respecter of persons,” even those persons for whom we ourselves have little mercy. Yes, this is sometimes more than we can stand, but it is the no-compromise, no pulled-punches message of reconciliation. Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, speaker, and author of multiple books. You can read more and receive regular e-columns in your inbox at www.ronniemcbrayer.me.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

Cool Springs Baptist Church 306 Harmon Street 989-7489

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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT May 20, 2013 A truck was reportedly stolen from the lot in front of A-1 Pools. The truck was a 1972 model white Chevy pick-up short wheel base in excellent condition with white lettered tires and aluminum wheels with five holes and a sliding back glass. The truck also had a seat from a 1996 Chevy Silverado. The vehicle identification number is cce142s152030. The registration number on the truck is 11237AA. It is an antique registration. May 23, 2013 Jeremy D. Moten, 25, was arrested and charged with public intoxication. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $250 bond. Michael Earl Pierce, 62, was arrested and charged with theft of property $1,000-$9,999 and filing a false report. He was

released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $10,000 bond. Officers responded to a call on North Franklin regarding an argument and possible gun shot. Clyde Leonard Davis was issued a citation for discharging a firearm in the city limits. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT May 19, 2013 9:27 p.m. 151 E. Main - duct detector malfunction. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT May 20, 2013 Cari Ann Heaton, 38, was arrested and charged with failure to appear. She was released from the Chester County Jail on her own recognizance. Melvin Leon Thomas, 49, was arrested and charged with contempt of court. He was released from the Chester County Jail after pay-

ing $206. May 21, 2013 Randy L. Mchaney, 49, was arrested and charged with violation of community corrections-misdemeanor and failure to appear. He is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $3,400 bond. Brian Lee Riemer, 51, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked/suspended license. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $300 bond. May 23, 2013 Harlee Rose Swezea, 18, was arrested and charged with vandalism. She is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $2,000 bond. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT May 21, 2013 11:22 a.m. - 835 Center Pt. Road - Roby Fire Department responded to smoke (lightning) 8:23 p.m. - 1095 Smith Road - Jacks Creek Fire Department responded to a hay-

bale (lightning). May 22, 2013 1:12 a.m. - 4620 Hwy. 22 Roby Fire Department responded to an electric pole (lightning). May 24, 2013 12:42 p.m. - 20 Worsham Road Masseyville responded to a vacant house. May 26, 2013 6:05 p.m. - Hwy 200 Hilltop Fire Department responded to a house fire. 3:06 p.m. - 125 Murdough Ln. Deanburg responded to a brush fire. May 27, 2013 3:37 p.m. - 460 Old Friendship Road Station One responded to back up EMS. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports. CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT No reports.

Dyer County man gets 300 months for electronic enticement of a minor United States Attorney Edward L. Stanton III has announced that on Monday, May 20, Chief United States District Judge Jon P. McCalla sentenced Derick Shane Hundley, 30, to 300 months incarceration, followed by lifetime supervised

release. There is no parole in the federal system. On Aug. 28, 2012, a federal grand jury returned a two-count indictment against Hundley. Count one charged enticement of a minor through electronic means in violation of 18 U.S.C.

Section 2422(b). Count two charged possession of child pornography in violation of 18 U.S.C. Section 2252(a)(4)(B). On Jan. 24, 2013, Hundley pleaded guilty to enticement of a minor through electronic means. The case was investi-

gated by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and the Federal Bureau of Investigation Memphis Crimes Against Children Task Force. The case was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Dan Newsom on behalf of the government.

Property transfers

Fin. – $38,438 Clifton Reaves to Jess Feyrer – $124,000 Andrew L. Rowsey to Isaac M. Bourne – $89,900 Doris Sanders to Gary Allen Beshires – $4,000 Marcus and Stacey Skildum to Garrett and Crystal Snyder – $25,000 David and Joan Stoltzfus to William Muetze Revoc. Liv. Trust – $222,600 Marty W. Taylor to Delia Martinez and Luis Gonzalez – $23,000 Charles A. Yoest to Melvin and Teresea Crosby – $16,900

$2,722 Jennifer Melson to Heights Finance – $4,783 Sarah Moore to Midland Funding, LLC – $988 Sarah Moore to Midland Funding, LLC – $1,133 Monty Patterson to Heights Finance – $4,004 Melony A. Phelps to TD Auto Finance – $4,707 Steven Phelps to TD Auto Finance – $4,707 Wanda L. Pickett to Lakewood Capital, LLC – $8,983 Matthew Presnull to LVNV Funding, LLC – $5,325 Brandon Lee Smith to LVNV Funding, LLC – $2,602 David Swafford to Heights Finance – $1,143 Katrina Taylor to Heights Finance – $5,319 Harold Douglas Thomas to Shoreline Funding – $1,014 Jack W. Thompson to Capital One Bank – $1,018 Lucy E. Thompson to Barclays Bank – $4,648 Tony Thompson to Chester County Bank – $2,466

Haltom to Lady Lyn Erenie Calderon James Hubert Hatchett to Betty Jo Hatchett Jerry Lloyd King to Lisa Ann Dunivan Drew Anderson Lewis to Sierra S. Dove Charles Daniel Malone to Ruby Sue Harrington Bryan Frances Mooney to Valerie Alice Gautherdt Henry Wayne Perrigo to Erin Nicole Robertson Cameron Shawn Preslar to Crystal Davon Julian Michael Adam Shackelford to Emily Fallon Duncan Jeffrey Darin Smith to Amanda Bell Moody Jerod Andrew Stafford to Kendyl Lee Bingham Dan Lewis Taylor to Lisa Renee Perrigo Kevin Lynn Westmoreland to Keli Renee Tripp Brandon Allen Yelverton to Jennifer L. Laborde

Willie M. Adkins, et al to Justin Baine – $53,600 David and Kathie Balding to Richard and Alice Davis – $460,000 Denise Bearden to Michael Lowe and Zach Hannis – $75,000 Donald Britt to Earl and Doris Pusser – $4,502 City of Henderson to WU Henderson Properties – $100,000 Ovid Conder Irrevocable Tr to David F. Blake Trust – $37,500 Cool Springs Properties, LLC to Shaw Concrete, Inc – $67,500 George S. Donaldson to Kimberly A. McFarland – $128,000 Paul and Amy Eads to David and Victoria Falkenheim – $230,000 Richard and Shelley Emison to Paul and Amy Eads – $31,000 Bobby and Judith Grooms to Gordon and Melanie Brewer – $69,200 Rickey and Dana Hopper Jr. to Raymond James Trust, et al – $127,700 Todd and Brittany Lewis to Ella Mae Flatt – $110,000 Michael Brandon Lowe to Denise Bearden – $119,900 David and Tracy Nelson to Bobby and Audrey Brawley – $40,000 Jerry and Christie Newsom to Daniel and Liberty Defilippo – $128,500 Robert Nunes to Justin Howell – $164,900 Christina Parrott, et al to Michael and Dia Cole – $97,000 Joseph and Ann Pusser to William and Cindy Kemp – $72,000 Paul D. Ragan Jr. to Vanderbilt Mortgage &

Civil judgements Whitney Buckley to Heights Finance – $4,022 Anthony Massie to Heights Finance – $4,022 Gary Burlison to Dorothy Grimes – $1,328 Chasity Burlison to Dorothy Grimes – $1,328 Wesley Collins to Heights Finance – $2,859 Lori Collins to Heights Finance – $2,859 Jeff Conner to Heights Finance – $5,045 Ronald T. Darcy to The Cash & Smoke Shop – $270 David Hampton to Heights Finance – $1,100 Daryl Hart to Midland Funding, LLC – $1,159 Jaime L. Jones to Soaring Capital, LLC – $1,379 Tammy Jones to Discover Bank – $17,940 Rachel Malone to Jerry and Sheila Cloud – $3,535 Frankie McSwain to Heights Finance –

Marriage licenses Hal Dave Armstrong III to Sarah Bianca Boleyb Adam Tyler Clayton to Kelly Nicole Stanfield Ryan David Coleraine to Lauren Nicole Broc Clinton Ray Connor to Amy Diane Swafford Malcolm Thomas Cupples to Whitney Renee Frix Mathew Aaron Esposito to Stephanie L. Hyatt Joshua Adam

Divorces granted Clarisa Gail Arnold from Harold Lamont Arnold Steven Anthony Johnson from Lessie Bullman Johnson Kira Leann Lewis from Joseph Michael Pickens Angela Dawn Morris from Larry Wayne Morris John Milton Respress Jr. from Maggie Perry Respress Gladys Demetra Rogers from William Larry Rogers

Federal tax liens filed Tricky Air & Billet, Inc – $10,062


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

Gone before arrival

Photo by James A. Webb, Independent

Firefighters sift through the remains of a house at 20 Worshem Road which burned to the ground Friday. The structure was unoccupied, and was a total loss by the time fire trucks arrived. Units from Finger Fire Department, as well as the Chester County Fire Department, responded to the blaze. The cause is still under investigation.

Television Listings, May 30-June 5

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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

From Page 3-A

Heroes changes for the better as well, including “new medicines and new techniques. There’s always the next best thing right around the corner.”

Air Evac Scott Summars, Eric Leath, and Tim Weis are a three-man crew that fly aboard the Air Evac helicopter out of Jackson. Air Evac started in the 1980’s, and the base in Jackson started in 1998. The bases were constructed in rural areas in order for heli-

as if remembering those who have been lost. But there are great moments too like when they “have a patient outcome that is good. Here recently, actually me and him [indicating Leath] we flew a kid that had been … electrocuted, got burnt all the way around his neck, burnt his hands … and we flew him to Le Bonheur. And actually we met up with him the other day. They had a benefit with him and a favorite memory of mine you could say was after we’d got out and him coming and hugging our neck and

“If you want a job that’s going to give you a sense of fulfillment, then this could possibly be it.” Billy Warren [pictured above] copters to be able to land and quickly transport those in critical need of emergency care like heart patients or those critically wounded. So what drew these three men into this profession? It is not something one would think of as commonplace, yet these men are a proud part of what is a highly stressful but also highly rewarding career. These are their stories: Scott Summars Scott Summars, 38, has been a flight nurse with Air Evac for three years. Before that he worked at the Med as a nurse in Trauma ICU. According to Summars, to be a flight nurse you have to have at least three years of critical care experience or emergency room experience. “You go through a lot of training to get to this point. Even when you get hired by the company, it’s a rigorous amount of tests and classes that you have to take to get here.” Before joining Air Evac Summars worked with Emergency Medical Services and rode on ambulances, but was drawn to the allure of flying. “When you call for a helicopter you just see how cool it is when they come and they land at the scene. You really look up to them and that’s what you want to do. You want to increase your knowledge, you want to increase your schooling if you will and get to that point.” He has children of his own and believes that the situations he has come upon that include children are the ones he’ll never forget. “We’ve had kids that die.” Summars and Leath both looked down for a few seconds

thanking us for it. That’s a favorite memory.” Eric Leath Eric Leath, 44, is the flight paramedic for Air Evac and has been with the company for about nine years. He explained the set up of the helicopter and the responsibilities of the team. “Basically it’s we two crew members in the back, [the] nurse [and the] medic. If you’re in a hospital setting there’s a difference between a RN and a paramedic but in our company when they come on board they’re sent through the same training.” Leath states that most of the paramedics have a “prehospital” EMS background riding on ambulances while the nurses in the company generally have an emergency room background. The paramedics do the intubations that the nurses may not be familiar with while the nurses bring in the critical care part of it through experience they have gained in the ICU and ER. “It’s what makes the team bond. We have experience from both fields.” Leath began his medical career in Haywood County working on the ambulances there for about six years. He’s been a medic 21 years. He had wanted to fly since he finished paramedic school. After watching the Wings team flying while he worked in Haywood County, his goal became to be a part of a flight team. Even with all his experience, it took him six years to be hired for Air Evac. He proudly shared one of his favorite memories “Two years

ago ... I got my thousand flight wings which is a pretty good milestone.” He remembers fondly the “people that I’ve met in this career that have just touched my life in some form or fashion, that have become great friends. The thing is just knowing you’ve made a difference.” The best part of the job, beyond the flying for Leath, is having the opportunity to do a job that involves helping people in a way that few others will ever get to do. The men are aware of the turnover rate in their profession. Usually what forces people out are the demands and pressures of the job. It takes a toll on their body and their health because of lack of time to eat and rest, but they both emphasize that they must keep their skill set up and remain proficient in order to save lives. They want the public to know that they aren’t just out flying around. When they are called to the scene it’s critical and they are performing life saving work. Tim Weis Tim Weis, 63, is a pilot for Air Evac. He has been with them for eight years. Before that he taught school for 13 years but before taking on the classroom, he was a Navy helicopter pilot for 21 years. As the pilot he not only flies the team in but “I need to make sure the helicopter is safe. The mechanic does all the work on the helicopter but I’m responsible for checking the paperwork and going back and double checking everything.” He ticks off his responsibilities. “One, make sure the helicopter is safe. Two, make sure the weather is acceptable for flying and then three, … get in the helicopter and go. I’m the bus driver.” he said laughing. He has worked at 47 Air Evac bases including all of the Tennessee bases as well as everything from East Liverpool, Ohio, to Woodward, Okla., down to Brunswick, Ga. “So I’ve been around,” he adds smiling Weis is an accomplished story teller and easily draws you in with his exuberance as he shares his tales of tough flights he’s made in the past. “Oh, I’ve got lots of great memo-

Tim Weis sums up the feelings of this Air Evac team “For me, this is the best job there is.” ries.” He shared one of his best. “I would say it was flying in East Tennessee, up against the Carolina mountains and there’s a little landing zone cut out in the side of this mountain called The Fish Hatchery, and none of our guys had been there before, so I get the call to go in there and it was one of those landings you really had to work to get in and out of.” They ended up closing it down. “Nobody else

crew has been together on a couple that were just heart-wrenching. You just do everything you possibly can. I get them there as fast as I can. They do the very best medical procedures that can be done and then especially if it’s a kid. That part’s hard.” Though Weis emphasizes that the medical team is “tough” when they get back from one of those calls many times they will turn to him and

part of his job is coming home safe. “One of my worst fears is if I were to do something wrong and I crash and live through the crash and find out my buddies are dead. That would be real bad.” he said quietly. “So I work real hard on the safety. I don’t come out here and socialize except for when the weather gets real nice because I want to make sure when the call comes in, I already know what the weather is. I’ve

Trent Harris is part of the Chester County EMS, working around the clock to ensure help to those in their time of need. can go in there. That was a pretty exciting trip.” The best part of the job for Weis “is walking through (a store) and having someone walk up with tears in their eyes and say ‘my dad’s alive, my sister’s OK because of you guys.” … but there are situations “when you get somebody who doesn’t make it. This

tell him they are done for the night. “But the good news is, that doesn’t happen very often.” His advice for those who want to fly medical teams: “Work real hard on your skills. When the rain starts moving in, the fog starts moving in, it gets dark, you’ve got to be at the top of your game.” The most important

already been out to the aircraft three or four times today. I just want to make sure when the phone rings that we’re ready.” “This is the best job in the world. I loved teaching school. I loved it. It had an impact on those kid’s lives, but for me, this is the best job there is.” Tim Weis

Scott Summars, Tim Weis and Eric Leath are a three-man crew that fly aboard the Air Evac helicopter out of Jackson.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

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Stroke and osteoporosis screenings coming June 12 Residents living in and around the Henderson community can be screened to reduce their risk of having a stroke or bone fracture. First United Methodist Church, 1312 North Ave., will host Life Line Screening on June 12. Mary Davis of Oliver Springs, attended a Life Line Screening and said, “I want to thank you very much because this screening saved my life.” Four key points every person needs to know: • Stroke is the third

leading cause of death and a leading cause of permanent disability • Eighty percent of stroke victims had no apparent warning signs prior to their stroke • Preventive ultrasound screenings can help you avoid a stroke • Screenings are fast, noninvasive, painless, affordable and convenient Screenings identify potential cardiovascular conditions such as blocked arteries and irregular heart rhythm, abdominal

aortic aneurysms, and hardening of the arteries in the legs, which is a strong predictor of heart disease. A bone density screening to assess osteoporosis risk is also offered and is appropriate for both men and women. Packages start at $159. All five screenings take 60-90 minutes to complete. For more information regarding the screenings or to schedule an appointment, call 1-877-2371287 or visit our website at www.lifelinescreening.com. Preregistration is required.

Horse show to benefit Therapy, Learning Center The Therapy and Learning Benefit Horse Show will be held at the Chester County Equine Saddleclub, located at 575 N. Fourth St. in Henderson on Sunday, June 2. The show includes 29 different

classes with the entry fee set at $7 per class or $60 to show in unlimited classes. Judging begins at 2 p.m. sharp. The event will include a silent auction and concessions. All proceeds benefit the Therapy and

Learning Center, which serves 2,500 children and adults each year through therapy, education, and supervised care. To learn more about the event, contact Heather Kopulos at 664-3677.

Deadline is June 10 for Wildlife Program The USDA Natural R e s o u r c e s Conservation Service (NRCS) in Tennessee has been allocated more than $1 million dollars for the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP). Owners and operators

of agricultural land and (non-industrial) private forestland who are interested in applying for WHIP should apply on or before Monday, June 10, which is the sign-up cutoff date for funding consideration. Applications

are received year round but cutoff dates are set to rank applications for funding. For program information, contact John Rissler at (615) 277-2576 or AnnSue Wattenbarger at (615) 277-2570.

Land Between the Lakes, Pickwick hosting National Trails Day activities Grab your bike and hiking boots for a day on the trails at Land Between The Lakes National Recreation Area for the official opening of the Central Hardwoods Scenic Trail June 1 as part of the 21st Annual National Trails Day. Join the celebration by biking or hiking a section of the 11-mile Central Hardwoods Scenic Trail that runs east to west across Land Between The Lakes. Trail staff will be available at the Golden Pond Visitor Center from 8 a.m. to noon to introduce all

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Hickory Secretary-Judy Cranford T reasurer-Phillip Cranford 1-year trustee-Joe Holmes 2-year-trusteeLarry Beshires 3-year trustee-Troy

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Creek exercise) Dan Cole. Please inform me if I omitted a name 9897485. Russell Clayton desires photos and information of Chester County soldiers for adding to this slideshow. It is never too late to submit a picture with information. Talk to Don Rouse or Bill Jewell - they can guide you. Take time to add a photo to this slide show. Old soldiers fade away, but these pictures will become a part of history that

On Monday, May 20, and again on Tuesday, May 21, your Roving Reporter asked several folks, “If you could talk to anyone that has ever lived, who would you pick?” Who would you pick? Who do you think MOST will pick? Jot it here and then read on. The first person I asked had just graduated from Chester County High School last week, and supplied a totally surprising answer. After only a few seconds of thinking time she said, “Rosa Parks.” When I inquired about the reason she had chosen Rosa Parks, she said, “To understand how she had the courage to do what she did.” This was an especially interesting reply when you realize she is not of African-American descent. Good answer Madison! I also asked a young woman who was visiting Henderson from New York City, and her answer was one that I have never thought about! “I’d want to talk to Eve – I’d like to know what a perfect woman really looks like.” Interesting, answer, huh? She didn’t say what she’d like to talk with her about – I think we’d ALL like to know a few things about Eve! Nathan Foster, a

the new trailheads along this route and answer questions. Visitors can also join Woodland’s Nature Station staff for a half-mile bird walk around Empire Point in the new Woodlands Nature Watch Area. The Homeplace will host Children’s Day on the farm so kids can experience what chores were like in the 1850s. Come outside and play at Land Between The Lakes National Recreation Area. Managed by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of

Agriculture, Land Between The Lakes provides outdoor recreation, lake access and environmental education for the public to enjoy. National Trails Day is sponsored by the American Hiking Society. Other activities June 1 include a one to two-hour hike down the Island Loop Trail at Pickwick Landing State Park. The hike begins at 9 a.m., and begins in the cabin area near Cabin 9. For information on this hike, call 731-6893129.

Frye Alternate trusteeJames Patterson Daniel and Autumn Rowland Raper of Hickory Corner had a revealing party at their home on Sunday, May 27. Family and friends attended and they surprised everyone when they opened up boxes of pink helium balloons and let them

go. “It’s a Girl!” Ellie and Randi Burkhead celebrated their first birthday May 24 with a big party with family and friends. They are the twin daughters of Clint and Tambry Burkhead. Tambry’s Birthday was May 25. As always remember in prayer the sick, our military and leaders of our nation.

Everett Sheffield is home from the hospital, recovering from surgery and other heath issues. Keep him in your prayers and also his sister, Loraine and family needs prayers. The community extends sympathy to the family and friends of Tim Faulkner. Call 989-3315 if you have news to share.

will not fade away. I volunteer to distribute Memorial Day programs to veterans at the nursing home, but this year Mayor Bobby King did this act of respect. I’d like to tenderly dedicate this column to all veterans with Bill Jewell’s poem, “I Am a Veteran” : I am a veteran. At Concord’s Bridge I fired the shot heard ‘round the world. Across the Delaware, I pulled a muffled oar. I saw Washington receive Cornwallis’s sword. I am a veteran. At New Orleans, I lay behind the cotton bale. I fired my musket, and I made the British fall to

prove that America was free once and for all. I am a veteran. In the war, between the states I saw both sides. I was Jonny Reb and also Billy Blue. We showed there’s a unity in one and not in two. I am a veteran. I fought through the forest of Argonne. Chateau Thierry crumbled to my cannonade, beneath the arch of victory I marched in parade. I am a veteran. My blood flowed red on the beach at Normandy. The break through at St. Lo was all within my stride. I raised our banner high in Okinawan skies. I am a veteran. On

the 38th parallel I made my stand. I flew mig alley, high up in the sky. At Inchon, at last, I felt my heart fill with pride. I am a veteran. In Vietnam I fought to keep people free and sometimes, at home I fought an army I couldn’t see. In later years at Desert Storm, I heard the call again and tasted bitter victory with our blood in desert sands. I am a veteran. So every time you see Old Glory fly in peaceful skies or see our little children laughing with no fear in their eyes, look over your shoulder ... I am still there ... remember me ... I am a veteran.

Freed-Hardeman student majoring in History answered he would most like to talk with Abe Lincoln. When I asked what he’d like to ask him he said, “I’d just like to sit down and talk with him – nothing in particular.” Trandon, a young man, thought for a good while, and then said, “If I could talk to anyone it would be either Martin Luther King or Malcolm X … I’d like to ask Mr. King how he got his ideas, and how hard was it to get so many people to listen to him.” Keri said, “I think President John F. Kennedy, because he was really for social integration, equality for all. It was really hard for him to do that, and I’d like to talk with him about that.” [Interestingly, she is not African-American either.] Rita replied, “I’d like to talk with my mother … it’s been almost 11 years, and I miss her very much.” Her daughter Hailey said, “My grandma ... the same person as my mom.” Imogene Naylor said without any hesitancy, “My dad ... he’s gone, and I miss him.” An anonymous response was, “… Ask anybody? … Hmmm … Jesus! … There are so

many things you COULD ask him … I’d ask him, ‘What is heaven like? – Is it individualized according to how people lived on earth, or is it one big general-like paradise?’ … That would be interesting to know before you get there.” Honestly, living here in the Bible belt, I had expected at least every other person to give a religious answer, and most often to choose Jesus. So I almost didn’t pick this question. But it seems today, being such a stormy day, and the major tornados yesterday in Oklahoma, that family members were brought to mind first, then famous people that tried very hard to help mankind. Who did you pick??? What would you have asked? Did anyone listed here agree with you? If you have a question you would like the “Roving Reporter” to ask Chester Countians, email it to JPatterson@ChesterCounty Independent.com. Next week’s Roving Reporter question is “If you learned you won the big lottery – would you tell anyone?” Think about it – and check back next week to see what fellow Chester Countians have to say.

Haslam vetoes Ag Gag bill Governor Bill Haslam announced last week that he would veto SB1248/HB1191 – known in some quarters as the “Ag Gag” bill. Haslam cited the threat to the Tennessee Shield Law as one of several reasons he asked the General Assembly to reconsider its action. “Agriculture is the

No. 1 industry in Tennessee. Farmers play a vital role in our state’s economy, heritage and history. I understand their concerns about large scale attacks on their livelihoods. I also appreciate that the types of recordings this bill targets may be obtained at times under false pretenses, which I think is wrong,” Haslam said. “Our office has spent a great deal of time considering this legislation. We’ve had a lot of input from people on all sides of the issue. After careful consideration, I am going to veto the legislation. Some vetoes are made solely on policy grounds. Other

vetoes may be the result of wanting the General Assembly to reconsider the legislation for a number of reasons. My veto here is more along the lines of the latter. I have a number of concerns. “First, the Attorney General says the law is constitutionally suspect. Second, it appears to repeal parts of Tennessee’s Shield Law without saying so. If that is the case, it should say so. Third, there are concerns from some district attorneys that the act actually makes it more difficult to prosecute animal cruelty cases, which would be an unintended consequence.


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

Jackson 10 71 Conrad Drive Jackson, TN 664-5678 Starting Fri May 31 AFTER EARTH (PG13) Running Time 1:40 Fri-Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm NOW YOU SEE ME (PG13) Running Time 1:56 Fri-Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm

Now Showing EPIC (3D)(PG) Running Time 1:42 Fri-Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm FAST & FURIOUS (PG13) Running Time 2:10 Fri-Sun 2pm 3pm 4:30pm 5:30pm 7pm 8pm 9:30pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 6:05pm 7pm GREAT GATSBY (3D)(PG13) Running Time 2:22 Fri-Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm HANGOVER III (R) Running Time 1:40 Fri-Sun 2pm 3pm 4:30pm 5:30pm 7pm 8pm 9:30pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 6:05pm 7pm IRON MAN 3 (3D)(PG13) Running Time 2:10 Fri-Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm STAR TREK Into Darkness (3D)(PG13) Running Time 2:12 Fri-Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm

Hollywood 16 575 Vann Drive Jackson, TN 422-3456 Starting Fri May 31 AFTER EARTH (PG13) Running Time 1:40 Fri-Thurs 12pm 1pm 2:10pm 3:10pm 4:20pm 5:20pm 6:30pm 7:30pm 8:40pm 9:40pm NOW YOU SEE ME (PG13) Running Time 1:56 Fri-Thurs 12:00pm 2:30pm 5pm 7:30pm 10pm

Now Showing

GREAT GATSBY (PG13) Running Time 2:22 Fri-Thurs 1pm 4pm 7pm 9:45pm HANGOVER III (R) Running Time 1:40 Fri-Thurs 12pm 1pm 2:15pm 3:15pm 4:30pm 5:30pm 7pm 8pm 9:15pm 10pm IRON MAN 3 2D (PG13) Running Time 2:10 Fri-Thurs 12:30pm 1:15pm 3:15pm 4:15pm 6:05pm 7:10pm 8:45pm 9:15pm PEEPLES (PG13) Running Time 1:35 Fri-Thurs 12pm 2:05pm 9:40pm MUD (PG13) Running Time 2:10 Fri-Thurs 4:15pm 7pm STAR TREK Into Darkness (2D)(PG13) Running Time 2:12 Fri-Thurs 12:45pm 1:30pm 3:30pm 4:15pm 6:15pm 7pm 9pm 9:45pm

Cinema Planet 10 231 Kenworth Blvd Jackson, TN 427-7000 Starting Fri May 31 AFTER EARTH (PG13) Running Time 1:40 Fri-Sun 12:30pm 2:40pm 4:30pm 7:15pm 9:25pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7:15pm NOW YOU SEE ME (PG13) Running Time 1:56 Fri-Sun 12:10pm 2:35pm 5pm 7:25pm 9:50pm Mon-Thurs 5pm 7:25pm

Now Showing EPIC (2D)(PG) Running Time 1:42 Fri-Sun 12:10pm 2:20pm 4:30pm 7:10pm 9:25pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7:10pm FAST & FURIOUS (PG13) Running Time 2:10 Fri-Sun 12pm 1pm 2:40pm 4:15pm 5:20pm 7pm 8pm 9:35pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 5:20pm 7pm GREAT GATSBY (2D)(PG13) Running Time 2:22 Fri-Sun 1:15pm 4:15pm 7pm 9:45pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7:15pm HANGOVER III (R) Running Time 1:56 Fri-Sun 12pm 1pm 2pm 3pm 4pm 5pm 6:05pm 7pm 8pm 9pm 10pm Mon-Thurs 5pm 6:05pm 7pm

EPIC 3D (PG) Running Time 1:42 Fri-Thurs 12pm 1pm 2:10pm 3:10pm 4:20pm 5:20pm 6:30pm 7:30pm 8:40pm 9:40pm

IRON MAN 3 (2D)(PG13) Running Time 2:15 Fri-Sun 12:45pm 4:30pm 7:05pm 9:40pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7:05pm

FAST & FURIOUS (PG13) Running Time 2:10 Fri-Thurs 12pm 12:45pm 1:30pm 2:40pm 3:25pm 4:15pm 5:20pm 6:10pm 7pm 8pm 8:55pm 9:40pm

STAR TREK Into Darkness (2D)(PG13) Running Time 2:12 Fri-Sun 12pm 2:30pm 5pm 7:30pm 10pm Mon-Thurs 5pm 7:30pm

The hardwood floor at Bader Gym, where many an exciting moment in FHU history has played out, is being taken up, concluding 50 years of service to the university.

From Page 2-A

Bader after making her gift to the project. They were represented at the ceremonies by a nephew. The pool was not ready for use until January of 1964. However, Sylvia Harris, who taught swimming classes at FHU for 44 years, said she taught swimming strokes in the gym in the fall of ’63. “I have so many good memories of Bader Gym and the pool,” said Harris. “It has benefitted the college and community in so many ways. But

it’s just one of those changes that need to be made.” According to Harris, when it was opened the pool was one of the finest in west Tennessee outside of Memphis. However, she notes it had become out-dated, and parts for the filtration system were no longer available. After FreedHardeman advanced from a junior college to a four-year university in the 1970s, Bader became too small for the burgeoning crowds wanting to see nationally-ranked FHU basketball teams, and the facility was eventually replaced as

a basketball arena by the sparkling Brewer

Sports Center which opened in 1990s.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013


SSppoorrttss Thursday, May 30, 2013

Page 1-B

Third place in state for Eaglettes After winning their first two games at the state tournament last week in Murfreesboro, a state championship was on the minds of the Chester County Eaglettes. However, a perennial state power slowed the CCHS march, and a long-time rival ended the parade. Chester County did come home with a third place finish, their best showing since a runner-up finish in 1982. CCHS ended the year with a record of 30-14, also ending the career of four senior starters who had taken their team to the state tournament three times.

Chester County 12 – East Hamilton 6 In Chester County’s tournament opener, May 21, the Eaglettes broke open a close game with two runs in the fifth and four more in the sixth to defeat East Hamilton 12-6. CCHS pounded out 16 hits including home runs by Presley Robinson and Sammie Jo Ivy. The Eaglettes also were aided by seven East Hamilton fielding errors. Ivy gave up a lead-off hit in the top of the

first but retired the next seven hitters she faced. Ivy reached base herself leading off the bottom of the second, and later scored on a double by Cynthia Beene. East Hamilton took the lead with three runs in the third on three hits including a home run. Chester County took the lead for good with a five run fourth. With one out, Madison Cherry-Reed, Beene, Robinson, Madison McCaskill and Elantra Cox strung hits in succession. Beth Blackstock reached on a two-out error and Jana Frye followed with a double. East Hamilton was in position to retake the lead in the top of the fifth. They put up five hits in the frame and scored twice, but stranded two and had another runner cut down on the bases, leaving CCHS up 6-5. Ivy fanned a dozen, the most whiffs by any East Hamilton opposing pitcher this season.

Chester County 4 – Gibbs 3 In round two, the Eaglettes knocked off the defending state

Photo by Tammy Lott, Independent

Presley Robinson trots around the bases after hitting a home run for Chester County in a first round TSSAA state tournament game against East Hamilton on May 21 at Murfreesboro.

CCI Trophy, who will it be? The winner of the annual Chester County Independent trophy, emblematic of the top senior athlete at Chester County High School, will be announced here next week.

Photosby Tammy Lott, Independent

Chester County’s Elantra Cox and the fans in the stands watch as the ball flies over the fence for a home run for CCHS against Goodpasture. champions, Knoxville Gibbs, with a 4-3 victory. Madison McCaskill did the damage offensively with a three-run home run in the bottom of the fifth. Gibbs got on the board first following a double, walk, and RBI single in the third inning. CCHS tied the contest in the bottom of the fourth. Blackstock led off with a single, but was replaced on the bases by Frye on a fielder’s choice. Ivy then reached on an error which brought home Frye. Beene’s single began the fun in the fifth for CCHS and Brooklyn Davidson come on as a pinchrunner. Robinson followed with another hit, and McCaskill hit a towering shot over the fence for a 4-1 Eaglette lead. Gibbs scored single runs in the sixth and seventh, but Ivy stranded Gibbs runners on the bases in the sixth and one more in the seventh. Ivy gave up seven hits, walked two and struck out six. Her counterpart, Rachel Farmer, surrendered eight CCHS hits, walked one and struck out only one. Chester County committed two errors and Gibbs one.

Chester County 3, Goodpasture 6 With the state finals almost in hand, the Eaglettes could not

Photo by Tammy Lott, Independent

Beth Blackstock runs across the bag to retire a Gibbs batter/runner close the deal, falling in the winners’ bracket final 6-3 to Goodpasture. Perhaps as a prediction of things to come, Cox led off the game with single, but was called out for leaving first base too early on a

steal attempt. However, Ivy allowed only a two-out walk in the bottom of the inning. In the second, CCHS had a good chance to break out on top. Hits by Ivy and Beene put two on with two outs

but they were stranded. Goodpasture took advantage in the bottom of the frame with one run on one hit. However, the Eaglettes took the lead in the third frame. With one out, Cox See CCHS, Page 2-B

CCHS schedules softball tryouts Chester County High School will hold softball tryouts at 5 p.m. on June 6 and June 11 at Eaglette Field.


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

Freed-Hardeman schedules summer sports camps Each year, Freed-Hardeman University offers a wide assortment of summer camps for interested parties who wish to challenge and extend their abilities to a new level of competition. Cub Camps are for campers entering kindergarten through third grade. The volleyball day camp is for third through sixth grade. The boys’ basketball camp is for players entering fourth through twelfth grade. Camps for this summer are as follows: • Baseball Cub Camp May 20-23 • Basketball Cub Camp May 28-31 • Volleyball Day Camp June 17-19 • Volleyball Boarding June 19-22 • Girls’ Basketball Camp June 23-27 • Girls’ Soccer Camp June 23-27 • Boys’ Soccer Camp June 23-27 • Soccer Cub Camp June 24-27 • Boys’ Basketball Camp July 14-18 • Baseball Advanced Camp July 22-25 • Girls’ Post Camp July 26-27

From Page 1-B

CCHS homered to centerfield, and Blackstock followed with groundrule double. Frye singled, a two-out single by Faulkner scored Blackstock for a 2-1 CCHS advantage. It stayed 2-1 until the fifth when the Eaglettes upped their lead on a home run by

Ivy to left center. Yet Goodpasture came right back to knot the score with two runs on three hits, and took the lead with a three-run sixth on four hits, and two Eaglettes miscues. CCHS went quickly in the seventh with only a lead-off walk to McCaskill. The win put Goodpasture in the title game for the second straight year.

Chester County 3, Lexington 10

Chester County and Lexington had faced each other seven times this season, with Chester County winning only once. However, that game was an 11-0 CC blowout with Katelyn Faulkner on the mound for the Eaglettes. A three-run first inning for Chester County gave further hope to the CCHS faithful. However, Lexington came right back with three of their own in the bot-

tom of the first, and took over the game with a four-run fifth in which Chester County committed three errors. All told, Chester County committed four errors and only five of Lexington’s runs were earned. Faulkner had a home run for CCHS, a three-run shot in the first inning. Cox added a double. Robinson had two of the Eaglettes six hits.

Future Choices Golf scheduled May 30 The sixth annual Future Choices Charity Golf Tournament is scheduled for May 30 at Pickwick Landing State Park Golf Course.

UTM softball hosting camp The University of Tennessee at Martin is hosting a softball camp at 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. June 18-19, and is designed for players age 14 through graduating high school seniors. Cost is $125. For more information on the softball camps, call 881-7162.

Registration deadline approaching for Senior Olympics open state events Seniors have until May 31 to register for the 2013 Tennessee Senior Olympics open events at this year’s final games, to be held June 21-27, 2013 in Williamson County. Open events include: archery, 5K and 10K road races, the 5K cycling time trial, the 20K cycling road race and golf. Senior athletes 50 and older are welcome to register to compete in the open events. Participants who are 49 years old are eligible to compete as long as they turn 50 before the end of 2013. The deadline for open event registration is May 31. To obtain an entry form, contact the state office at (615) 200-8760, email info@tnseniorolympics.com, or download the information at www.tnseniorolympics.com.

Free Fishing Day/Week scheduled June 8-14 Saturday, June 8, is Free Fishing Day in Tennessee and anyone (resident or non-resident) of any age may fish free without a license in Tennessee’s public waters! Even better, if you are 15 years old or younger, you may fish free the entire week, beginning on Free Fishing Day, June 8, and running through the following Friday, June 14. This day and week are annual events in Tennessee and are great opportunities to introduce children to the joys and excitement of a day on the water catching fish! Not only is fishing a great family activity, it helps make us more aware of our natural environment. Finding a place to fish is easier than ever. Starting in late spring, all you need to do is go to www.tnwildlife.org to view the 2013 Kid’s Fishing Events. There you will find a variety of activities planned across the state with details as to event locations and times. You can also contact your regional TWRA office to find out what’s going on in your area or let them know you are interested in sponsoring or volunteering to help with an event. Anglers and would-be anglers should check the events list often since more fishing rodeos are frequently added. Whatever you do, don’t miss the fun! Free Fishing Day and Week apply to Tennessee’s public waters, Agency owned and operated lakes, and state park facilities. Some privately owned pay lakes continue to charge during this special day and week. Please consult with lake operators if you have any questions about the status of a particular facility.

Photo by Tammy Lott, Independent

Chester County fans react with excitement to the Eaglettes’ victory over Gibbs in the state tournament last week in Murfreesboro.


Education

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Thursday, May 30, 2013

Russell receives FFA State Degree

FFA member Dalton Russell from Chester County representing the Chester County Chapter received his State Farmer Degree during the state convention in March. Tim Williams, right, of Farm Credit Mid-America in Somerville, made the presentation. The 85th annual Tennessee State FFA Convention, held in Gatlinburg March 2427, attracted more than 2,000 FFA members from across the state. The convention offered various activities, including Career Development Event

contests, motivational speakers, business sessions and opportunities for fellowship with other FFA members. A highlight of the event was the presentation of over 500 State FFA Degrees. The State FFA Degree is

awarded to students who demonstrate success in their extracurricular activities, agricultural experiences and classroom programs. FFA member Dalton Russell from Chester County representing the Chester County Chapter was among the group recognized. On hand to present these awards were representatives from Farm Credit MidAmerica, a perennial sponsor of the State FFA Degree program. “These students possess a level of skill and passion that is just remarkable to see,” said Tim Williams, regional vice president with Farm Credit in Somerville. “A huge part of our mission is developing the future of agriculture and I can’t think of any better way to demonstrate that commitment than supporting the State FFA Degree program.”

Union University announces local spring Grads A record-high 647 students received degrees from Union University May 18 during the 188th annual spring commencement ceremony on the university’s Great Lawn. That is the largest number of spring graduates in Union’s history. About 7,500 people attended the service. Congratulations to our local students who graduated. Graduates from Henderson are Jamie Blurton, Bachelor of Social Work, Social Work ; David Chilcutt,

Bachelor of Science in Organizational L e a d e r s h i p , Organizational Leadership, Project Management; and Trent Harris, Bachelor of Science in Organizational L e a d e r s h i p , Organizational Leadership, Project Management. Graduates from Pinson are Brian Foster, Doctor of Nursing Practice, Nursing Practice; and Stephen Foster, Education Specialist in Curriculum and Supervision, Ed

Leadership in Curr & Superv. Graduating from Reagan is Nicholas Peterson, Bachelor of Science in Organizational L e a d e r s h i p , Organizational Leadership, Health Management. Located in Jackson, Tenn., Union University is a liberal arts-based university affiliated with the Tennessee Baptist Convention. Founded in 1823, Union is the oldest institution affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention.

Nicholas Moody named to Southeast Missouri Dean’s List Nicholas Moody has been named to the Dean’s List for academic achievement during the spring 2013 session at Southeast

Missouri State University (SMSU). To qualify for the dean’s list, an undergraduate student must earn a term

grade point average of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, and complete at least 12 degree credit hours during the session.

FHU names local students to President’s, Dean’s Lists Freed-Hardeman University has released names of local students on the President’s List and Dean’s List for the spring 2013 semester. The President’s List requires a grade point average of 4.0 and fulltime status. To be named to the Dean’s List, a student must earn a minimum GPA of 3.40 while taking at least 12 credit hours. Those named to the President’s List include the following: Hannah Adams, sophomore English major; Lauren Akin, senior mathematics major; Katelyn Ashton, senior criminal justice major; Carrie Blackley, senior nursing major; Jessie Fant, senior psychology major; Staci Irwin, senior kinesiology major; Kelsey Kidwell, senior child and family studies major; Mary

Beth Morris, junior English major; Kelsey Pittman, junior criminal justice major; Kathy Redmond, senior social work major; Wayne Specie, senior English major; and Jessica Steele, senior arts and humanities major. Students making the Dean’s List were: Trent Adams, sophomore Bible major; Nse Akpan, senior social work major; Maddie Alden, sophomore theatre major; James Barnette, senior Bible major; Lauren Beene, sophomore social work major; Molly Carter, senior criminal justice major; Brandon England, sophomore biochemistry major; Katie England, junior art major; Luke Fader, senior computing sciences; Fernanda Ferreira, senior management major; Kathryne Gordon, sen-

ior social work major; Katie Hall, junior biology major; Wes Hall, senior criminal justice major; Joel Harper, senior Bible/missions major; Jessica Johnson, senior music major; Taylor Johnson, senior criminal justice major; and Chris Kidwell, senior music major. Other local students named to the Dean’s List were: Hannah Lee, junior social work major; Shallon Lyles, senior accounting major; Jared McLeod, senior Bible major; Sandy MelcherBidman, senior social work major; Caleb Purvis, sophomore exercise science major; Jacob Robertson, sophomore biochemistry major; Katy Scott, freshman arts and humanities; and Anna Catherine Steele, senior art major.

Photo by Chad Smith, Tennessee News Service

Making the transition into a summer child care program can be more fun and less stressful if parents know how to prepare their kids.

Students are ready for summer, but are parents prepared? By John Michaelson Tennessee News Service

Children across the state are now on summer vacation. For the younger ones, that means a transition into a new child care or camp program or attending day care for the first time. To make that change go smoothly, preparation is the key to success, according to Karen Fogolin, associate director, Child Care Aware of Minnesota. “The children are going to come across new people, new rules and perhaps even a bus for the first time, so helping them to adapt and thrive in the new situation is important,” Fogolin said. P r e p a r a t i o n includes establishing a routine, as well as

familiarizing children with how each day will go, she added. “Let them know what they might be excited about; perhaps draw some pictures. Visit with the people and the program prior to starting. Also, really show that you as the adult are very comfortable with the program. Children are really quick to pick up on our anxieties,” she said. In addition to finding a program they feel comfortable with, Fogolin noted that parents also want one that is right for the age and mental development of their children. “It must be appropriate in terms of what the children are interested in,” she advised.

“We don’t want to put our children in experiences that are just going to frustrate them. Really knowing your child and choosing the right program is important.” Another tip for the transition is to have the child bring along a favorite toy or other reminder of home, although parents should check with the care provider before doing so. More tips on a successful transition into care this summer are at the Child Care Aware website, h t t p : / / w w w. c h i l d c a r e aw a r e m n . o r g . Additional information is available at www.childcareaware.o rg.


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

FOR SALE FOR SALE ~ New lots in Sweetlips on Stewart Rd. From 1.5 to 35 acres. As low as $150 down & $150 / month. Some have running creek water. 901-8268978 (local) or 731-989-4859. No restrictions & NO CREDIT CHECK. 7 days a week. (TFC) FOR SALE ~ 5 Acre Lots. Owner Financing. $500 Down. $200 / Month. Call 731-879-9215. (4P) LAND FOR SALE ~ 0.75 Acre on Duberry Road, Septic and Well Included. $5,000. Call 731439-0644 or 662-614-2899. (4P) FOR SALE ~ Motorcycle Trailer. Will Haul 3 Full Dressed Bikes. $1,200 OBO. Call 989-0620. (4P) FOR SALE ~ 1995 Manta Ray Ski Boat, All New Interior. $8,500. 2012 Flagstaff Camper, 30 Ft. $26,000. Call 731-3431159 for more information. (4P) FOR SALE ~ 3 Bedroom Home on One Acre Lot in Finger, TN. Call 731-879-9215. (4P)

MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE NEED A FRESH START? We Have Multiple 3, 4, & 5 BR Homes. All Types of Financing Available. Clayton Homes of Lexington, TN 731-968-4937. (4C) MIDNIGHT MADNESS Huge Lot Model Sale and Party! Saturday, June 1, Noon to Midnight, Special Preview Friday May 31, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. New Mobile Homes – Great Savings! Extra Giveaways on Every Home These Two Days Only!! Hurry & Don’t Miss Out! Clayton of Jackson, 1156 S. Highland Ave., 731-427-3387. (4C) CLOSE-OUT HOME. 4 BR, 2 BA. Reduced - $8,000. Call 731968-4937. (4C) SALE – SALE – SALE! Model Displays Must Go ~ New Spacious 4 Bedroom 2 Bath Homes Starting at $43,500 ~ Single Sections Start at $29,500. CLAYTON HOMES ~ Hwy 72 West, Corinth, MS ~ ¼ Mile Past Magnolia Hospital. (7C) BANK REPO on Land Available State-Wide. 3 & 4 Bedrooms. 731-968-4937. (4C)

FOR RENT FOR RENT – 1 BR Apartment. Assistance Animals Only. $350 / Month and 50% Deposit. Call 879-9119. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $390 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC) FOR RENT – Mobile Homes in Jacks Creek Area, Nice Community. No Pets. Senior Discount. Call 989-4227. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom brick house, carport, new CHA. 927 Woodland. $675 / month. 983RENT. (TFC) FOR RENT – Commercial build-

ing. 3900 sq. ft. plus basement. Will divide. 117 W. Main. Grantham Properties. 983-RENT. (TFC) FOR RENT – Retail / office space. 1250 sq. ft. $500; 1950 sq. ft. $800. 865 Hwy. 45. 983RENT. (TFC) FOR RENT – 125 Newsom Ave. 2 BR. $400 / Month. $100 Deposit. Call 989-5524 or 6081953. (4P) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom house, carport, appliances. $625 / month. 730 Mifflin Ext. 983-RENT. (TFC)

MISCELLANEOUS JIM’S TRASH SERVICE ~ $16 / Month. $13 / Month for Senior Citizens. Call 731-989-5732 or 731-879-0662. (4P) CHILDCARE ~ Mature, Qualified Woman will Babysit Your Child in My Home. Second and Third Shift, Weekends and Holidays. References Provided. Located in Town. Call 435-0028. (4P)

HELP WANTED LOCAL TRUCKING COMPANY Looking for Owner / Operators. Great Pay & Company Provides Fuel Card & Cargo Insurance. Call 731-608-5083 and Ask for Brandon. (4P) HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED ~ Minimum of 3 Years Recent Experience. Apply in Person at Americana Inn, 550 Sanford St., Henderson, TN from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. PLEASE DO NOT CALL. (4C) NEEDED ~ Experienced Handyman, Part-Time. Apply at Americana Inn from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (4C) DRIVERS ~ Home Every 5 - 7 Days. 2800 - 3200 Miles Weekly. Start at 35 cpm (3 cpm monthly bonus also available). Must have a Class A CDL, be at least 23 yrs. old, have 18 mo. trac / trlr exp. and meet all DOT requirements. Wiseway Transportation Services Call 800-876-1660 ext. 177 or apply online at www.wiseway.com (4P)

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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

Public Notices NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated August 19, 1999, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded September 2, 1999, at Book 177, Page 299 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by William Garrison and Amanda Garrison, conveying certain property therein described to Arnold M.Weiss, Attorney as Trustee for America’s Wholesale Lender; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on June 20, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning on an iron rod in the Western margin of Garland Road and being 30 feet from the center of said road and also being in the East line of the original 3/4 acre of John W. Clayton and Wife, Louise N. Clayton and being in the West line of property formerly owned by Nobles; thence the West line of Nobles South 0 degrees 19 minutes 10 seconds East a distance of 119.02 feet to an iron post; thence with a severance line through other property of Louise Clayton South 81 degrees 06 minutes 09 seconds West passing through a cedar tree a total distance of 221.61 feet to an iron post in the East line of Nash; thence with the line of Nash North 0 degrees 48 minutes 16 seconds West passing through a large Beech Tree a total distance of 162.86 feet to an iron post; thence with a severance line through the original 3/4 acre of John and Louise Clayton South 87 degrees 31 minutes 11 seconds East a distance of 220.77 feet to the point of beginning. This being the same property conveyed to William Garrison and Wife, Amanda Garrison by Quit Claim Deed of Louise Clayton, dated December 22, 1998 and of record in record Book 169, Page 515, Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Easement: A 35 feet wide access easement crosses this property as follows: Beginning on an iron rod being the Northeast corner of the above described Lot; thence South 0 degrees 19 minutes 10 seconds East a distance of 119.02 feet to an iron post; thence South 81 degrees 06 minutes 09 seconds West a distance of 35.4 feet to a point; thence North 90 degrees 19 minutes 10 seconds West a distance of 126.01 feet to a point; thence South 87 degrees 31 minutes 11 seconds East a distance of 35.04 feet to the point of beginning. Easement: An access easement serves this property as followed: Beginning on an iron rod in the Northeast corner of the above described Lot; thence with the North line of same North 87 degrees 31 minutes 11 seconds West a distance of 35.04 feet to a point; thence North 0 degrees 19 minutes 10 seconds West a distance of 94.12 feet to a point in the West margin of Garland Road; thence with the margin of said road and with the curve thereof a distance of 102.13 feet to the point of beginning. Survey performed on June 2, 1999 by C.E. Lewis, Registered Land Surveyor, Tennessee, Cert. Number 1380, Jackson, Tennessee. ALSO KNOWN AS: 3225 Garland Road, Pinson, Tennessee 38366 This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: William Garrison; Amanda Garrison; Chester County Bank The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 93190697 DATED May 20, 2013 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness and obligations secured by a certain Deed of Trust on property currently owned by ANDY BLACKWELL and wife, CINDY BLACKWELL, and which Deed of Trust was executed by Andy Blackwell and wife, Cindy Blackwell, to Matt Wilkinson, Trustee for The Peoples Bank and is recorded in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee in Record Book 338, page 542. WHEREAS, the undersigned was appointed Substitute Trustee by instrument recorded in Trust Deed Book 374, page 111, in said Register’s Office. WHEREAS, the owner of the indebtedness has declared the total amount due and has directed the undersigned to advertise and sell the property described by said Deed of Trust; THEREFORE, this is to give notice that I will on June 21, 2013, commencing at 11:15 a.m., at the Front Door of the Courthouse in Henderson, Chester County, Tennessee cause to be offered for sale and will cause to be sold at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property located in Chester County, Tennessee, and more particularly described as follows, to wit: Said property is known as 260 Bray Lane, Henderson, Tennessee. For a more complete description of said property see Trust Deed recorded in Record Book 338, Page 542, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. Map 11, Group —, Parcel 6.26. Interested parties include the following: 1) Simmons Lumber Company, pursuant to Liens recorded in Record Book 345, Page 428, and Record Book 355, Page 333, in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. 2) Southern Concrete Products, Inc., pursuant to Lien recorded in Record Book 364, Page 303, in said Register’s Office. 3) American Express Bank, FSB, pursuant to Lien recorded in Record Book 364, Page 657, in said Register’s Office. All right of equity of redemption, statutory and otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. If the highest bidder cannot pay the bid within twenty-four (24) hours of the sale, the next highest bidder, at their highest bid, will be deemed the successful bidder. This property is being sold with the express reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. This office is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. R. Bradley Sigler Substitute Trustee 218 West Main Street Jackson, TN 38301

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of: Opal King Notice is hereby given that on the 15th day of May, 2013 Letters of Testamentary in respect the Estate of Opal King who died June 5, 2012, were issued to the undersigned by the Probate Court of Chester County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident, having claims, matured or unmatured, against the estate are required to file the same with the clerk of the above named court on or before the earlier of the dates prescribed in (1) or (2) otherwise their claims will be forever barred. (1) (A) Four (4) months from the date of the first publication (or posting, as the case may be) of this notice if the creditor received an actual copy of this notice to creditors at least sixty (60) days before the date that is four (4) months from the date of the first publication (or posting); or (B) Sixty (60) days from the date the creditor received an actual copy of the notice to creditors if the creditor received the copy of the notice less than sixty (60) days prior to the date that is four (4) months from the date of the first publication (or posting) as described in (1)(A); or (2) Twelve (12) months from the decedent’s date of death. This 15th day of May, 2013. Glenda Jean Holder Executor Cornelia Hall Clerk and Master

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE`S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms and conditions of a Deed of Trust dated June 30, 2008, executed by BILLY L HOPPER, TINA J HOPPER, MARY JOANN ROSS AKA JOANN ROSS, conveying certain real property therein described to ROBERT M. WILSON, JR., as Trustee, as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee recorded July 11, 2008, in Deed Book 317, Page 603-613; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVIC-

ING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP who is now the owner of said debt; and WHEREAS, Notice of the Right to Foreclose, if required pursuant to T.C.A. § 35-5-117, was given in accordance with Tennessee law; and WHEREAS, the undersigned,Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, having been appointed as Substitute Trustee by instrument to be filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable, and that the undersigned, Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, as Substitute Trustee or his duly appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute Trustee will, on June 27, 2013 at 11:00 AM at the CHESTER County Courthouse door where the foreclosure sales are customarily held at the CHESTER Courthouse, located in Henderson Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash or certified funds ONLY, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: BEGINNING AT AN IRON PIN FOUND IN THE SOUTH MARGIN OF OLD FINGER ROAD, WHICH POINT IS THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF BOBBY WEAVER(RECORD BOOK 132, PAGE 698) AND THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE HEREIN DESCRIBED TRACT; THENCE, FROM POINT OF BEGINNING, AND WITH THE SOUTH MARGIN OF OLD FINGER ROAD THE FOLLOWING CALLS: SOUTH 68 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 367.97 FEET, SOUTH 69 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 372.64 FEET TO AN IRON PIN SET IN THE CENTERLINE OF A DITCH, THENCE, WITH THE CENTERLINE OF SAID DITCH THE FOLLOWING CALLS: SOUTH 65 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 56.22 FEET, SOUTH 72 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 296.23 FEET, SOUTH 74 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 164.10 FEET, SOUTH 64 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 146.46 FEET TO AN IRON PIN SET AT THE INTERSECTION OF TWO DITCHES, THENCE, WITH THE CENTERLINE OF A SMALLER DITCH, NORTH 49 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 221.32 FEET TO AN IRON PIN FOUND ON THE NORTH BANK OF SAID DITCH, THENCE, NORTH 59 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 41.33 FEET TO AN IRON PIN FOUND IN THE CENTERLINE OF A DITCH, THENCE, WITH THE CENTERLINE OF SAID DITCH, NORTH 50 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 3 1 SECONDS WEST 83.61 FEET TO AN IRON PIN SET AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF WEAVER AND HYSMITH PROPERTIES, THENCE WITH THE EAST LINE OF WEAVER AND HYSMITH PROPERTIES, THEN BOBBY WEAVER, NORTH 36 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 335.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 4.9 ACRES, 213471.7 SQUARE FEET AS SURVEYED BY ADVANCED LAND SURVEYING, INC. ON MARCH 8,2001. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO BILLY L. HOPPER AND WIFE, TINA J. HOPPER AND JO ANN ROSS, A SINGLE PERSON BY WARRANTY DEED FROM MICHAEL E. STIVALA AND NANCY L. STIVALA DATED MARCH 20, 2001 AND RECORDED MARCH 23, 2001 OF RECORD IN BOOK 195, PAGE 300, REGISTER`S OFFICE FOR CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE. Parcel ID: 055-021.15 PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of the property is believed to be 430 OLD FINGER ROAD, HENDERSON, TN 38340. In the event of any discrepancy between this street address and the legal description of the property, the legal description shall control. CURRENT OWNER(S): BILLY L HOPPER, TINA J HOPPER, MARY JOANN ROSS AKA JOANN ROSS OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This property is being sold with the express reservation that it is subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where is, without representations or warranties of any kind, including fitness for a particular use or purpose. THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, Substitute Trustee 119 S. Main Street, Suite 500 Memphis, TN 38103 www.rubinlublin.com/propertylistings.php Tel: (877) 813-0992 Fax: (404) 601-5846

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated August 23, 2007,

and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded August 30, 2007, at Book 305, Page 478 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Mary T. Wilson and Shane Turner, conveying certain property therein described to Carter, Stanfill & Associates, PLLC as Trustee for Chase Bank USA, N.A.; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on June 20, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: First Tract: beginning at a stake on the West side of the Lexington and Purdy Road, now Highway Number 22, the same being the Southeast corner of the Old Dr. R.L. Vaughn Lot, now owned by J.E. Grissom; thence West with said Vaughn Lot to the Old Jacks Creek; runs thence Southward to the levee, now State Highway Number 22, an agreed line between W.H. Pierce and E.G. Farrow; thence in an Eastern direction with Highway Number 22 about 62 feet to the corner of J.H. Smith mule Lot, the Southwest corner of said Lot; thence in a Northern direction 78 feet to a stake; thence in a Northern direction 78 feet to a stake; thence in a Northeast direction 78 feet to a stake; thence in a Northeast direction 79 feet to a bank lot line; thence in a Northern direction 27 feet to H.O. McCall line; thence East with said McCall line 75 feet to State Highway Number 22; thence North with said Highway 90 feet to the point of beginning, containing 21/2 acres, more or less. Second Tract: Beginning at the Southwest corner in center of Henderson Jacks Creek Old Gravel Road just East of the bridge, over the Jacks Creek old run; thence runs North about 72 feet to an iron stake in Sid Homes South boundary line, now owned by J.T. Blakenship; runs thence East with said line about 100 feet to a corner of Jacks Creek Bank Lot at the Northwest corner; runs thence South with said Jacks Creek Bank Lot, about 50 feet to the center of Road; thence West with said road to the point of beginning, 110 feet. Third Tract: Beginning at the Northeast corner of the Jacks Creek Bank Lot, Lexington and Purdy Road, West side; runs thence North 21 feet to an iron stake; thence West 75 feet to a stake, thence South 21 feet to the Northwest corner of said Bank Lot; thence East with the North line of said Bank Lot 75 feet to the point of beginning. ALSO KNOWN AS: 180 State Route 22A South, Jacks Creek, Tennessee 38347 This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Mary T. Wilson; Shane Turner; Donald G. Lynch; Donna S. Lynch The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 700140231 DATED May 14, 2013 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTNShellie_asims_130514_1356 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE`S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms and conditions of a Deed of Trust dated February 28, 2005, executed by John M. Morris, Tanya D. Morris, conveying certain real property therein described to Arnold M. Weiss, Attorney, as Trustee, as same appears of record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee recorded March 2, 2005, in Deed Book 264, Page 576; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to Nationstar Mortgage LLC who is now the owner of said debt; and WHEREAS, Notice of the Right to Foreclose, if required pursuant to T.C.A. § 35-5-117, was given in accordance with Tennessee law; and WHEREAS, the undersigned,Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, having been appointed as Substitute Trustee by instrument to be filed for record in the Register’s Office of Chester County, Tennessee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable, and that the undersigned, Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, as Substitute Trustee or his duly

appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute Trustee will, on June 20, 2013 at 11:00 AM at the CHESTER County Courthouse door where the foreclosure sales are customarily held at the CHESTER Courthouse, located in Henderson Tennessee, proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash or certified funds ONLY, the following described property situated in Chester County, Tennessee, to wit: BEGINNING AT AN IRON PIN ON THE SOUTHWEST MARGIN OF TALLEY STORE ROAD (25 FEET AT RIGHT ANGLES FROM CENTERLINE) AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF JOE TALLEY AS RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 63, PAGE 362, IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE; THENCE WITH THE SOUTHWEST MARGIN OF TALLEY STORE ROAD THE FOLLOWING CALLS: SOUTH 42 DEGREES 03` EAST A DISTANCE OF 96.72 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 45 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 119.80 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 07` EAST A DISTANCE OF 96.57 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 66 DEGREES 24` EAST A DISTANCE OF 132.78 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 68 DEGREES 06` EAST A DISTANCE OF 174.35 FEET TO AN IRON PIN; THENCE WITH A NEW LINE SOUTH 49 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 513.81 FEET TO AN IRON PIN ON THE EAST LINE OF JOE TALLEY; THENCE WITH TALLEY`S EAST LINE NORTH 10 DEGREE 43 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 669.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 3 ACRES, AS SURVEYED BY DAVID HALL LAND SURVEYING COMPANY, R.L.S. NO. 943, ON OCTOBER 3, 1997. THIS IS THE IDENTICAL REAL ESTATE CONVEYED TO JOHN MARK MORRIS FROM JOE NEAL COX AND WIFE, JEAN COX BY WARRANTY DEED DATED FEBRUARY 28, 2005, OF RECORD IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE OF CHESTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE, IN RECORD BOOK 264, PAGE 574. Parcel ID: 056 01203 000 PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of the property is believed to be 3230 Talley Store Road, Henderson, TN 38340. In the event of any discrepancy between this street address and the legal description of the property, the legal description shall control. CURRENT OWNER(S): John M. Morris, Tanya D. Morris OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: Capital One Bank (USA), N.A. The sale of the above-described property shall be subject to all matters shown on any recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. This property is being sold with the express reservation that it is subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. All right and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where is, without representations or warranties of any kind, including fitness for a particular use or purpose. THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, Substitute Trustee 119 S. Main Street, Suite 500 Memphis, TN 38103 www.rubinlublin.com/propertylistings.php Tel: (877) 813-0992 Fax: (404) 601-5846

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated September 2, 2009, and the Deed of Trust of even

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date securing the same, recorded September 4, 2009, at Book 332, Page 45 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Robyn Hart, conveying certain property therein described to Williams, McDaniel & Wolfe as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Delta Trust Mortgage Corporation, its successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on June 6, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at an iron pin set in the south right of way of East Haven Drive, which point is the northeast corner of lot 3, and the northwest corner of the herein described tract; thence, from the point of beginning and with the south right of way of East Haven Drive, the following calls; south 76 degrees 00 minutes 22 seconds east 76.97 feet; south 82 degrees 37 minutes 14 seconds east 113.66 feet; south 88 degrees 02 minutes 20 seconds east 50.98 feet; thence with the west line of lot 5, south 01 degrees 57 minutes 40 seconds west 186.33 feet to an iron pin set in the north line of Section 1; thence with the north line of Section 1, the following calls; north 84 degrees 10 minutes 44 seconds west 91.20 feet to an iron pin set; south 83 degrees 11 minutes 40 seconds west 140.07 feet to an iron pin set at the southeast corner of lot 3; thence with the east line of lot 3, north 00 degrees 32 minutes 21 seconds west 228.53 feet to the point of beginning, containing 1.06 acres as surveyed by Advanced Land Surveying, Inc. R.L.S. #1999. Being known as Lot 4 Eastview Subdivision. ALSO KNOWN AS: 70 East Haven Lane, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Robyn Hart The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 700222251 DATED May 9, 2013 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee DSaleNoticeTNShellie_asims_130509_ 659 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM


Page 6-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 30, 2013

Chester County Independent 05-30-13  

Chester County Independent Newspaper Dated 05-30-13

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