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Chester County Nurses Week Pages 18A, 19A

MAY 9, 2013

Independent

149th YEAR - NO. 1

chestercountyindependent.com

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Graduation ceremonies scheduled

School board to hold special called meeting Chester County Board of Education will meet at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 9, for a special called meeting. The board will review bids for the East Chester Elementary expansion project and Chester County Junior High School roof. The meeting is open to the public and everyone is invited to attend.

CCHS, JCAS, FHU to hold commencements

City board to amend travel and sick leave policies The City of Henderson Board of Mayor and Aldermen will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 9, in the council chamber of City Hall. On the agenda for the meeting is consideration of ordinances amending the city’s travel and sick leave policies. Board members will also consider authorizing Mayor Bobby King and Utility Director Elkins to accept the best responsible bidder for the aerators for the East Lagoon that are due on May 15. The project is being funded by FEMA grant funds. Also on the agenda is approval of acceptance of a short extension of a water main that is going to be made by the Chester County School System for East Chester Elementary Addition fire protection. In other business, the board will set a date and time for the Utility Budget Meeting. The meeting is open to the public and everyone is encouraged to attend.

Thursday

National Day of Prayer Photo by Mary Mount Dunbar, Independent

Many local residents participated in the National Day of Prayer on the Courthouse lawn on Thursday, May 2. Pastors from several local churches led the group in praying for the community, schools, the nation and its leaders, the armed forces, healing, spiritual awakening and the economy. Chester County Mayor Dwain Seaton officiated the event and read from a proclaimation that detailed the significance of the National Day of Prayer. This is an annual event that takes place across the country on the first Thursday of May.

Graduation ceremonies are scheduled over the next week at three local educational institutions. At 7 p.m. Thursday, May 9, Jacks Creek Apostolic School on McAdams Loop will conduct its graduation ceremonies. Freed-Hardeman University will award degrees at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 11, at Loyd Auditorium. Chester County High School will also hold graduation ceremonies at Loyd Auditorium beginning at 7 p.m. Monday, May 13. For more information on graduates from Chester County High School and Jacks Creek Apostolic School, see the Chester County Independent’s special section included with this edition. Bill Mulligan, vice president of development, facili-

BILL MULLIGAN ties and environmental compliance of Pilot Travel Centers LLC, will address the graduates and their friends and families at the Freed-Hardeman commencement. Mulligan earned a degree in engineering technology from Texas A&M and served four years as an officer in the U.S. Navy. He joined the Pilot Corporation in 1994 See GRAD, Page 2-A

Duck Commander speaks to record crowd

Photo by René Webb, Independent

Phil Robertson raises his bible in exclamation to a point he made during his speech at Freed-Hardeman University Saturday.

States. He described current society as “heartless, faithless, senseless and ruthless.” “We ought to be a religious and moral people. We ought to love God and love each other,” he said. Robertson began by quoting several of the country’s founding fathers, noting the emphasis they put on Christianity. He contrasted that with the country’s moral decline. Decrying the removal of the Ten Commandments from courthouses, he pointed out that one who violates the commandments will likely find himself in the courthouse. Alan Robertson, the beardless son who has not appeared in “Duck Dynasty,” introduced his father. A gospel preacher for more than 20 See DUCK, Page 2-A

TODAY’S WEATHER

2 Sections Life & Styles Opinion What’s Happening Obituaries Right to Know Sports Education Classifieds

Phil Robertson, the Duck Commander of A&E cable network’s “Duck Dynasty,” spoke to a record crowd Saturday evening, May 4, at Freed-Hardeman University’s Sports Advisory Council benefit. “Before this event,” Mike McCutchen, FHU athletic director, said, “the most we had had in attendance at a SAC event was about 500.” Robertson brought in approximately 5,000 for the two sessions held Saturday. According to McCutchen the event raised nearly $194,000 which does not include the funds brought in during the year from the LionBacker memberships. Part comedian, part old-time evangelist, Robertson spoke of declining values and morals in the United

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What is the best Mother’s Day gift you ever received?


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

School board raises out-of-county tuition By Mary Mount Dunbar Staff Writer

Chester County School Board met in regular session on Thursday, May 2. Board members voted to raise tuition for outof-county students in order to keep pace with the recent Chester County tax increases to ensure that local families are not footing the bill for out of county students. Superintendent Cherrie Pipkin stated that tuition has not been increased during the past two property tax increases, and it has been stagnant at

$400 for one student or $650 per family. Pipkin added that enrollment has increased every year since 2007. The board elected to set tuition at $550 for one student and $800 per family for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. At the moment, the school system enrolls approximately 2,769 students, and out-of-county families continue to petition to attend Chester County school even though slots are limited. Chester County ranks fourth from the bottom in expenditures per students, but

the school system has managed its funds in a way that continues to attract families in a growing, vibrant manner. The board also approved the first draft of the 2013-2014 budget, which will include a 1.5 percent raise for professional employees and a $400 bonus for all others. As of May 2, Tennessee schools had not been notified of how the state plans to proceed with Obamacare and requirement to provide insurance for all employees. “We have had no

direction from the state at this time,” Pipkin told the board. She added that the school system could potentially be responsible to pay $400 to $500 per employee each month to cover insurance. She stated that the schools may face cuts in budges and possible staff cuts and loss of hours. “This will be very expensive,” she said. Before Obamacare, the school system wasn’t required to provide benefits for classified employees. “That’s a biggie that’s been added to the budget.”

From Page 1-A

Duck years, Alan Robertson called himself “Jacob in a family of Esaus” in a reference to his beardless state. After poking some gentle fun at the rest of the family, he quoted Psalm 128:1-4. “We’re a family that fears the Lord and has been blessed,” he said. “Miss Kay,” wife of the Duck Commander and mother of the clan, also attended the event. Her son commended her for “holding the family together during the difficult times.” “Duck Dynasty” has completed its third season on A&E. An estimated 9.6 million households watched the finale, setting a record for the cable network. Quite an accomplishment for “a bunch of bearded, redneck Christians,” as Alan Robertson called them. Production for season four will begin soon. McCutchen stated that with the huge interest in the Robertsons this year’s event was a major undertaking. “It was a campuswide undertaking and we had a lot of help

Photo courtesy Freed-Hardeman University

Phil Robertson and his wife “Miss Kay” from the hit television show “Duck Dynasty” were at Freed-Hardeman University Saturday as part of FHU’s Sports Advisory Benefit Dinner. from many offices and individuals across the campus,” he said. “Our student-athletes did a great job in dealing with the challenges we never had with our SAC Benefit in the past. They were involved in every aspect of the event which included parking, serving meals, taking tickets and ushering, and working the

photo line.” As far as the Robertsons are concerned, McCutchen stated he could not have asked for better people to work with. “They are genuine and they truly practice what they preach. I was a big ‘Duck Dynasty’ fan before, but I’m even a bigger fan after meeting them.”

Photo courtesy Freed-Hardeman University

Alan Robertson, the eldest son of Phil and Kay Robertson, introduced his parents before Freed-Hardeman University’s Sports Advisory Benefit Dinner that raised almost $200,000 for Lion athletics.

Crime Stoppers offering reward for recovery of four-wheeler Crime Stoppers is offering a cash reward for information leading to the recovery of a stolen four-wheeler, and the conviction of the person(s) responsible. On April 26, at approximately 9:30 p.m. a Honda four-wheeler was reported to be missing from a trailer. A witness later stated they saw a man and woman beside a pickup

From Page 1-A

Grad and in 2005 became vice president of development. Facility maintenance and environmental compliance

truck and a four-wheeler on Hwy 22 A south. The pickup is described as a black Ford F150 extended cab with the tag in the back glass. The four-wheeler is a 2009 Honda 500 Fourman Camo with a snorkel pipe. If you have information about this crime, you are asked to call Crime Stoppers at 989-2449, ext. 111.

were added to his responsibilities in 2007. A total of 263 students are scheduled to receive degrees including 218 baccalaureate degrees and 45 graduate degrees at the cere-

monies. Mulligan is also a member of the FHU Board of Trustees. He and his wife Debbi live in Knoxville. Their two children, Colton and Casey, attended Freed-Hardeman.

The board will meet again to determine how to proceed once the state makes its own decision for the schools. Pipkin asked that K3 principals be placed on an 11-month contract, rather than their previous 10-month contract, due to the amount of work and meetings they must attend during the summer months. The middle school principal

already had an 11month contract and junior high and high school principals are on yearlong contracts. The board voted in favor of adding an extra month to the K-3 principals contact. The board will hold a special-called meeting on Thursday, May 9, to discuss special projects and review the bids on the upcoming projects (see notice on page 1-A).

Keller critical

Mildred Keller remains in critical condition in the Med in Memphis following a two-vehicle accident April 27 in Henderson. Keller was original taken to Jackson-Madison County General Hospital, and then transferred the same day to the Med. In an unrelated incident, a spokesman for the Med stated Jerry Hemby had been discharged from that facility. No other information was available. Hemby was critically injured March 20 in a pickup truck, 18-wheeler collision at the intersection of N. Church Ave. and U.S. Hwy 45 North.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

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Molly Ramone returns to Arts in the Alley next week

Total loss Photo courtesy Chester County Fire Department

Station One of the Chester County Fire Department responded to a call about a car fire at 8:16 a.m. April 24 at 235 Clayton Road. There were no injuries but the automobile was obviously a total loss.

Area residents will celebrate the end of the school year at the Henderson Arts Commission's Arts in the Alley on Thursday, May 16. Beginning at 6 p.m., the May AitA will be in Henderson's Downtown Park on Main Street, utilizing the alleys beside it. Molly Ramone, popular Nashville Celtic rock band with singer/songwriter Mark Harriman and Joe Khoury, will return to Henderson for the May event. Originally from

2013 Relay Roster Community blood drive May 10 and 17 The community blood drives in Henderson will be held from 2 to 6 p.m. Friday, May 10 at First Baptist Church, and from 6 to 11 p.m. Friday, May 17 at Chester County High School. This is a Relay for Life event.

Gene Hibbett Memorial Pancake Breakfast will be May 19

The Lions Club will hold their annual pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. until 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 11, at the Chester County Senior Center with proceeds going toward Relay for Life. Lion Gene Hibbett was always the top salesman until his death in 2012. Lion Hibbett was a strong supporter of all thing “Lions.” Because of his faithfulness to the club and support of all activities – the club voted to rename the annual pancake breakfast to the Gene Hibbett Memorial Pancake Breakfast. Tickets are $5 each. See any Lion member for tickets.

T-Shirt Fundraiser City of Henderson Fire Department is selling T-shirts to benefit Relay For Life. Shirts are $20 each, and they will be available until all are sold. To purchase a T-shirt, contact the Fire Department at 989-5667. They may be picked up at the Fire Station at 505 Sanford St.

Recycle For a Cure Chester County Solid Waste and Recycling Department will be holding “Recycle for a Cure.” The Solid Waste and Recycling Department will donate 100 percent of profits from all recycled clothing dropped off from January to May. Clothing can be dropped off at any of the four convenience centers in the county or at the recycling drop off on Talley Store Rd. All money from recycled clothing benefits Relay.

Noodling for a Cure Schedule to have 24 brightly colored foam noodles adorn your friend's (or business) yard by

making a $25 donation. A $10 insurance policy is available to prevent noodling or the return of the noodles! For further information, contact Teresa at 695-2100.

Luminaria bags available for purchase

Remember loved ones lost to cancer and honor those battling the disease by dedicating a luminaria bag. The bags will light the walking track on Relay night. Contact a team member, committee member or call Michelle at 608-1391 and make at least a $10 donation per bag.

Relay Night activities planned

“Calling All Campers” - Pack a sleeping bag, pillow and tent! Spend the night at Relay For Life! Activities will be available throughout the night. A campsite will be set up for families, friends, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, etc. For more information, contact Allison at 435-0329. “Bark for Life Dog Show” – Beginning at 6:15 p.m. on Friday, May 17, dogs can be registered in one of three categories: Small (up to 10 pounds), Medium (11-30 pounds) or Large (31+ pounds). First, second and third place prizes will be awarded in each category. A prize will be awarded for the “BEST OF THE BEST.” Entry fee is $5, and from 5 – 6 p.m. registration will be open. Contact Tami at 695-3636 or tamicasey1@hotmail.com for pre-registration or for more information. “Kids Parade” – 6 p.m. Friday, May 17. Children may ride bikes, ride-on toys or pull wagons. Feel free to decorate the “vehicle” in your favorite Relay theme! The parade will meet and begin at Clayton Bank & Trust’s campsite. “Hoop Shoot Contest” – There will be a “Hoop Shoot” Contest at 7:30 p.m. at Relay for Life in the middle of the high school Parking Lot. This will be for ages 7 and up. There will be a total of 20 free throws per person. Medals will be awarded to first, second and third places in each age group. There will be a fee of $3 to enter. Like Chester County Relay For Life on Facebook at www.facebook.com/chestercountyrelay.

Byrd, Mason charged in Memory Garden thefts Two McNairy County men were arrested last week in connection with thefts which allegedly occurred at Memory Gardens cemetery just south of Henderson. Christopher Tyler Mason, of Ramer, and Justin Lee Byrd, of Selmer, are charged with vandalism, desecration of a venerated object, and theft of property $1,000 to $9,999. On May 1 a Chester County deputy spoke to someone at the cemetery in relation to the alleged thefts. Eight vases were allegedly missing from several different gravestones, with a total value of approximately $1,600. On May 2, Mason and Byrd reportedly sold several vases to a metal company in Selmer. On May 3, the two allegedly returned to

the metal company with more vases. The Chester County Sheriff ’s Department was alerted and the

two suspects were arrested with assistance from the McNairy County Sheriff ’s Department.

Mason was later released on $20,000 bond. Byrd is still held in the Chester County jail.

Leiceister, England, Harriman came to America in 1995 when he signed to Gravelsauce Records. Since then he has established himself as an integral part of the Nashville music scene. Khoury plays lead guitar and mandolin and sings backing vocals. He is a prominent session player and music producer in Nashville. A clip from last year's AitA performance can be seen on YouTube by searching for “Molly Ramone at Arts in the Alley 5/17/12.” This year's Arts in the Alley events will feature an after-party, beginning around 8 p.m. to offer an openmic setting for bands to perform, individuals to read poetry, etc. In May, rock band Beyond Blame will also perform. At each Arts in the Alley, vendors sell work that includes items such as sewn crafts, paintings, wreaths, wood cuttings, altered art crafts, handmade soaps and photography. The requirement for a having a booth is selling something handmade. Booth

spaces are $15 for nonmembers and $10 for Henderson Arts Commission members. (Membership is $25 annually and may be paid at the event.) Vendors who paid to exhibit in April will receive a complimentary booth in May, since rain brought an early end to the April event. Those interested in hosting a booth may post on the event page to reserve a space. They are encouraged to share links to pages and photos that showcase their work. There will be hot dogs and hamburgers for guests to purchase. Food sales help offset the costs of each Arts in the Alley. Celebrity grillers in May will be Chester County Mayor Dwain Seaton, county commissioners and staff. The Henderson Arts Commission exists to recognize, educate, enrich and entertain through the arts in Henderson, Chester County and the surrounding area. Arts in the Alley events are planned for third Thursdays from March through September.


Life & Style

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Thursday, May 9, 2013

Fifth Generation

Samantha Camille Hodges Samantha Camille Hodges was born at Jackson-General at 9:27 a.m. on April 22 to parents Phillip and Jennifer Hodges. The baby weighed eight pounds 12 ounces and was 19 inches long.

LISA BROCK DUNIVAN JERRY LLOYD KING

Dunivan – King engagement The families of Lisa Brock Dunivan, of Lexington and Jerry Lloyd King, of Henderson, would like to announce their forthcoming marriage on Friday, May 24, 2013 at Cave Springs Independent Missionary Baptist Church in Henderson. The music will begin at 6 p.m. and at 6:30 the wedding ceremony will begin. Lisa is the daughter of Mary Brock Autry, of Lexington and Robert and Judy Brock of Houston, Texas. She has one son, Joe Tyler Dunivan. She is a 1980 graduate of Lexington High School. She received an Associate of Science in Nursing in 2000 from Jackson State Community College and a Bachelor of Science degree in 2006 from Union University. She is a registered nurse employed with the Henderson County School System as the School Nurse Supervisor, and also works part-time at Henderson County Community Hospital. Jerry is the son of Lloyd and Lee Nell King, of Henderson. He has two sons, Lane and Adam Wise. He is a 1976 graduate of Chester County High School and is employed with the Chester County Highway Department as the Road Supervisor. All friends and family are invited to share this special day with Jerry and Lisa. The couple will make their home in Henderson.

Hello to everyone! Greetings from the City. “This is the day the Lord has made, let us rejoice and be glad in it.” No matter what life brings us, we always have something to be glad about. Talking about being glad, and all of the other mixed feeling that comes along with life, on May 13 the Class of 2012-2013 will graduate, a group of young adults who have their whole life in front of them. Some thought this day would never come, but it did. Now the question is what are you going to do? Some will go off to college, some will get a job, and some will stay home and live off of mom and dad as long as they let them. Parents, remember your baby eagle, it is time for them to fly and hunt for themselves. They are taught by observing their parents - have you been a good example? The City would like to say congratulations to all of the graduates and fly high like an eagle. On May 2 - 3 three of the classrooms at the Chester County Head Start had their “End of the Year Celebration.” On May 2 it was Ms. Linda Swafford’s and Ms. Wanda Martin’s classroom; on May 3 it was Ms. Liberty Defilippo’s class. The

teachers have done a wonderful job with these little 3- and 4year-olds. Some of them will be returning back next year, and our 4-year-olds will continue on to kindergarten. Congratulations to all of you. The residents at Southern Oaks are excited about all of the beautiful flowers and plants that are blooming in the flower garden, especially the red, white and pink azalea’s that are starting to bloom, and the rose bushes are even starting to grow. They can’t wait to plant their vegetable garden. What were you doing when the power went out Monday morning? The residents at Southern Oaks ate by candlelight and good old fashioned “sunlight.” It did not disrupt their lunch at all. Thank God for the gas stove! Michelle Gatley fried chicken, cooked broccoli, au gratin potatoes, rolls and chess pie, which were enjoyed by all. According to the residents she is the absolute best cook in Chester County. Keep up the great work Michelle! After that great meal it was time to go shopping at the monthly “Country Store,” where the residents can purchase a variety of unique and useful items. During the week Marty Wilkins held her weekly Bible Study, Janice Haithcoat played the piano while the residents and staff sang along to tunes like “Let Me Call You Sweetheart,” “In the Good Old

Five generations of this family recently gathered. They are Edward Bethune, Maxine Bethune, Case and Kenzie Alexander, Bobby Bethune and Kelly Alexander.

Ingleside-Pentagon Club celebrates local businesses Junie Gilliam welcomed members of the Ingleside-Pentagon Club as they gathered in her home for their May 2013 meeting. After a business meeting conducted by President Regina West, co-hostess Laurel Sewell introduced her guest, Jennifer Bingham. Bingham spoke about a new business in Henderson, The Southern Chic Spatique, which opened in January in the former Reddin Electric building on Hwy 100 West. Their customers will find gift items, a boutique with clothing and jewelry, and a spa featuring a hair salon, massage therapy, nails and facials. Bingham, who previously lived in Las Vegas, and has worked with Sesame Street, brought her massage chair and treated several grateful club members to a brief massage. Following her presentation, club members chatted with one another and enjoyed a delicious dessert served by the hostesses. Summertime” and” Side By Side.” Terry Hearn came with lots and lots of money for prizes when he called Bingo. They really enjoy it when Terry comes. It’s his fun way of joking with the residents when he calls the numbers. Of course, they also like his pockets being so full of quarters that he gives away too! Nancy Canada from Chester County Library came this week to read to the residents. Thursday was the “National Day of Prayer,” so the residents gathered around with Activities Director Nancy to pray for our President, country, military personal, and many others. They enjoyed knowing that there were people all over the country also praying on this special day. Nancy explained how the National Day of Prayer became an annual day of observance designated by the United States Congress, when people were asked “to turn to God in prayer and meditation.” Each year since its inception, the president has signed a proclamation, encouraging all Americans to pray on this day. The modern law formalizing its annual observance was enacted in 1952. We need to continue to pray for the leaders of our country, state and county, asking that our leaders would make wise, godly decisions that would benefit the people. May they have a passion for people, for truth and for righteousness! The residents made

cards for some of the seniors from Freed Hardeman who come faithfully every week to visit and hold Bible Study. These seniors will be graduating soon, and they want to wish them well in their lives. Joanna Cox, the fulltime staff nurse, held a little party Friday when they came, to thank them for volunteering their time, and the residents gave them the cards they had made. This will be the last time we will see some of them, as they will be venturing out into the world and leaving this chapter of their lives. We will surely miss them and we want to wish them a blessed, prosperous and happy future. Friday, Cherie Wallace from Care-All came to call Bingo and brought some great prizes, as she always does. Saturday morning, the Praise Kids from First Baptist Church came to sing. They have a beautiful choir with some much anointed voices. The residents love kids, so bring your children anytime for a visit. Saturday afternoon is “Family and Movie Day,” and they have been watching some of the old classics while eating some freshly popped popcorn. Won’t you stop by and join them sometime? Happy birthday to Natalie Lyda-Mae Caron on April 5, she is 1-year old. She is the daughter of Nathan and Rachel Caron. The grandparents are Tommy Mitchell, Sherry Mitchell and Kevin and Cathy See CITY, Page 5-A

Our deepest sympathy goes to the family and friends of Edward Pitts. On our prayer list this week are Paul Garrison, Laverne Lott, Adam Wise, Joanne Sells, Pam Priddy, Lisa Peddy, Jean Latham, Fred and Paul Tucker, Charles Cupples, Randy Miller, Gayle and Rachel Ellington, Mike Ross, LaVerne Austin, Larry, Jerry, and Minnie Austin, Josephine Hinson, Carroll Williams, Randy Sells, Carolyn Potter, Joanne Altier, Sammy Ross, Lee Nell King, Frenzola Morris, Faye Tucker, Shirley Rietl,

Dobber Dyer, Bobbie Nell Wells, Teresa Seaton, Phillip Ross, their caregivers, and our military personnel and their families. Happy anniversary goes to Dennis and Elaine Parker on May 13, and Steve and Jan Priddy on May 14. Birthday greetings go to Darlene Bridges on May 10; Charles Cupples on May 11; Fred Tucker and Dyke Sells on May 13; Shannon Butler on May 14; Chris McCaskill and Sara McLemore on May 15; and Brooke Viser on May 16. Homecoming was a real nice day for Friendship Church. There was a great crowd and some good singing. The cemetery looked real good with all the beautiful flowers. Please call me at 9894875 with your news in this area. Have a happy week!

My goodness! What is with this weather? We’ve been having a cold spell the last several days and also rain. Old-timers in the south know this weather as Blackberry Winter, since the Dogwoods have bloomed already. The blackberries usually bloom about mid-May, and we always have some cooler weather around this time of the year. The homecoming at the Hickory Corner Center has been rescheduled for Saturday, June 15. I’ll have more information on this later. All members are encouraged to attend the very important meeting at the Center at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 23. Officers will be elected for the year 2013 – your voice and vote determine how the Center is operated. It’s also time again to renew your membership. We want all our members back, and welcome new members as well. Cave Springs Baptist Church will celebrate Homecoming on Sunday, May 12. Cave Springs began having homecoming in May, 1908. Since that year, the second Sunday in May has been reserved for the celebration. I’ve been told the name “Cave Springs” came about from a nearby cave that housed a natural spring. Decoration Day is a time to gather with family and friends, and see people you

haven’t seen in years. The graves are decorated with beautiful flowers and it’s a time to visit the gravesites of loved ones and show respect for those who have died. Following the morning service, dinner will be enjoyed on the grounds. While many churches today eat in the comfort of the fellowship halls, a few, like Cave Springs, spread dinner on the tables under the shade trees. Caves Springs has continued this tradition of dinner on the grounds that dates back to the 1890s. Also, Homecoming at Palestine and Little Hatchie Church will be Sunday, May 12. If you would like to share information about the history of your church please call me at 9893315. May birthdays are here already for these people: William Maness on May 1; Sam Howell on May 3; Vickie Beshires on May 4; Donna Maness on May 5; Riley Hathcock on May 7; Erma McNeil on May 9; Charles Stout, Elsie Shores, Grant Beshires and Jesse Lee Rowland on May 10; Clint Burkhead on May 11; Christy Clayton on May 12; Richard Leath on May 14; Ken Whitehead on May 16; Joann Clayton and Celeste Moore on May 17; and Kristy Blackstock on May 19. Happy anniversary wishes go to Stan and Kim Clayton on May 19. Belated anniversary wishes to Phillip and Judy Cranford on May 1. On our prayer list are Everett Sheffield, Emma McNeil, Larry Lard, Janice Lynch, Larry Whittman, Raymond and Sue See CORNER, Page 5-A


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013 flea market at Crump. You could also see Granddaddy with Amber’s big boxer sitting in the back of the truck wherever Granddaddy went. I hope that I can be the kind of grandparent to my grandkids like Mr. Pitts was to Amber and my grandson, Riley. I hope one day my grandkids can say, “My grandmother was good, sweet and thoughtful; and I will truly miss her.” Mr. Pitts’ house doesn’t look like Mr. Pitts’ place anymore. Everything was scrapped and sold off. All we have are memories of the trinkets and deals that were made. Also remember the Gerald Bishop family in their loss. Remember to report your news to Mrs. Wanda Cook at 9893724 or Celia Murley at 989-5300.

So, I finally found a new twist on croquets and a great substitute for ketchup

There are no miracles for those who doubt their possibility! But for those who believe ALL is POSSIBLE! Recently I stopped by the Chester County Independent and picked up the “Only Yesterday” book. While looking at the pictures and reading about the history, I was surprised to see my mom, Jewel Cherry Greene in the photo with Grandpa Jones and Patsy Nobles on page 52, and also on page 37 was my mom as a little girl, with her sister Callie. We aren’t sure if the third person is her sister Lulu or her brother Rene. Seeing my mom made the book more special to me. I was thinking, why not make a book similar for all our veterans, wouldn’t that be great? Happy Mother’s Day to all mothers.

When I was growing up, salmon croquets were a special treat for dinner. We had them semi-regularly, and everyone loved them. As a kid, I doused them in ketchup, and thought it was a gourmet treat. My tastes have developed a bit more sophistication since I was an 8-year-old, but I still love croquets, and I appreciate ketchup a lot more than my husband, the food purist, thinks I should. Fortunately, we found a way to compromise while experimenting with the ingredients that go into a croquet. Sometimes, we don’t have canned salmon in the pantry, but we usually have chicken in the freezer. For me, it’s nice to use fresh, organic chicken that doesn’t contain all the preservatives that typically go into canned meat. With the help of a food processor, a chicken breast rapidly takes on the minced consistency necessary for croquets. Unlike the salmon croquets from my childhood, these chicken croquets have a bit of a “kick.” If you wanted to replace the chili powder, garlic, Old Bay and pepper, 1 teaspoon of Cajun seasoning would be perfect for this recipe – or if you like more spice, season to taste. Use your favorite seasonings and spices, and it’s difficult to go wrong when you’re cooking with the flavors you love. Instead of ketchup, this recipe has the sophisticated addition of horseradish aioli. It is cool, crisp and zesty,

Azbill. Robert and Dorothy Prather celebrated their birthdays and anniversary on April 29. May the Lord bless you with many more. Shirley Wilson would like to say happy belated birthday to her sister Lodean Williams. Lodean celebrated her 50th birthday on April 5. On the prayer list this week is the family of Cathy McCormick

Griffin who had a very bad car wreck on Friday, May 3 and died on Sunday May, 5. Cathy is the cousin of Marilyn Myhan of Chester County. Continue to pray for the people that are in the hospitals, for the ones that are sick in their homes, for our children, teachers, family, the men and women that are serving our country, the storm victims and also the incarcerated. Remember to patronize our local businesses. Let’s sup-

port our own as much as we can. Chester County Head Start is still accepting applications for 3- and 4-year-olds. For more information, call 989-2561 or 9895111. If you live in the City of Henderson and have news about your family, birthday, anniversary, announcements, and things happening in the city, please call 9891907 or send an email to gloria__holiday @msn.com. HAVE A GREAT WEEK!

Happy belated birthday wishes go to Donnie Gibbs on May 3; Lucy Ashbrook and Wayne Finley on May 4; Agnes Tenry Smith on May 5; April Crowell on May 6; Kermit Harbert “WWII”, Beverly Weatherington and Harrison Lambert on May 7; and Jared Harwell on May 8. Happy birthday to Vernon McCombs and Pete Ramey on May 9; Janice Strickland on May 11; Nikole Fletcher and Audrey Pack on May 12; Brittany

Roe on May 10; and Abbey Lambert on May 15. Happy anniversary to Michael and Donna Fawbush on May 14. The Enville Volunteer Fire Department’s Annual Barbeque Fundraiser is this Saturday, May 11. By 10 a.m. the barbeque pork, barbeque bologna and barbeque chicken will be ready. They invite everyone to come out and get it before it is gone. Thank you in advance for your support. The Enville Community Center Committee’s Annual Bake Sale is at 8 a.m. this Saturday, May 11. Everyone is invited to come out and get your Mother’s Day baked goodies. The Enville Volunteer Fire Department will be testing

the tornado sirens between 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Tuesday, May 14. This will not be a silent test. I wish all mother’s a very Happy Mothers’ Day on Sunday, May 12. “If you have a mom, there is nowhere you are likely to go where a prayer has not already been.” - Robert Brault. Have a great week and call 989-0212 if you have anything to share.

Brandon and Jackie Cooper are the proud parents of a baby girl born May 1. The baby has been named Avery Grace. She weighed six pounds 13 ounces and was 19 and one-half inches long. Mother and baby are doing fine. This past weekend my daughter-in-law, Amber Murley, lost her precious grandfather, Mr. Edward Pitts, known as “Granddaddy.” He was a sweet thoughtful man, good to everyone, always willing to wheel and deal for a bargain. He loved his trips to the

From Page 4-A

Corner Greene, Ann Morrison, Randle Jones, Drew and Jesse Lee Rowland, Michelle Rowland, Mattie Davis, Vickie Beshires, our military and their family, and the leaders of our country. Get well wishes to Jason Gray as he recovers from surgery. Christine Gray reports her grandson, Maison Gray, graduates from Chester County High School on May 13. Frank and Diane Clayton’s granddaughter, Natalie Clayton, will also graduate. Joanne Clayton’s granddaughter, Theresa Jones, graduated from Jackson State Community College with an RN degree. Congratulations to all the 2013 graduates.

From Page 4-A

City

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and it doesn’t overpower the flavor of the chicken. I’m a huge fan of this recipe. It’s simple, quick and is very easy. I think it’s something the whole family can enjoy, and it’s very easily doubled. Leftovers

are delicious, and if someone doesn’t like

the aioli, ketchup is always a possibility.

Chicken cakes with aioli dipping sauce

Ingredients: 1 ½ cups bread crumbs 2 skinless, boneless chicken breasts ¼ cup sauted onion, finely chopped 3 tablespoons lowfat mayonnaise ¼ teaspoon chili powder ¼ teaspoon garlic power ¼ teaspoon Old Bay seasoning ¼ teaspoon white pepper ¼ teaspoon salt 2 large egg whites 2 tablespoons canola oil

Aioli

2 tablespoons lowfat mayonnaise 2 teaspoons prepared horseradish 1 teaspoon minced garlic 1/8 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground

pepper Directions: Cut chicken into cubes and place in food processor. Pulse until ground. In a medium bowl, combine breadcrumbs, chicken. onion, mayonnaise, spices and egg whites. Mix well. If mixture is too wet, add more breadcrumbs, but keep mixture moist. Divide into 8 equal portions, shaping into ½-inch thick patties. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add patties and cook 3 to 5 minutes on each side or until done. Patties should be a golden brown on the outside. To prepare aioli, combine mayonnaise and remaining 4 ingredients in a small bowl. Serve with the chicken cakes for dipping.


Page 6-A CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

Only Yesterday “Sue White, prominent lawyer from Henderson, passes away” From the files of the Chester County Independent May 4, 1933

“Boys, Here Is Your Big Chance To Go To Camp For Glorious Outing” This paper is going to furnish a free ticket to some boy to enjoy a week’s outing at Camp Shiloh. [...] The boy who brings us in the most paid subscriptions to this paper between now and July 1 will be awarded the camp trip. Besides, he will be allowed 10 percent on his collections, which will give him nice spending money for the outing – getting ready to go and eats and drinks on the road to and from Shiloh. The winner will know how best to spend his extra money. The boy who may work in this contest and fail to win the ticket, can also make the trip, if they are industrious. We are going to allow the boys who work but fail to win the ticket, 25 percent commission on every dollar they turn in on subscriptions in the contest. Thus, if a boy fails to win, but turns in 50 subscriptions at $1.50 he would turn in an aggregate of $75. His commission at 25 percent on this amount would aggregate $18.75, which would pay his expenses to camp and leave him $3.75 to spend […]. According to this plan, there are no losers [...]. This camp vacation is going to be a wonderful experience for a lot of boys [...]. The price of the paper is $1.50 per annum, and the subscriber will get three months extra subscription free, if he helps the boys out in this contest by paying up or ahead...

May 7, 1943

Chester County Independent archives May 7, 1943

“Miss Sue White Dies In Virginia” Miss Sue White, prominent lawyer and women’s leader, passed away at her home in Alexandra, Va., following an illness of more than a year. Miss White was born and reared in Henderson, being the daughter of the late James Shelton and Mary Swain White, prominent families of this section. She received her early education here and moved with her family to Jackson where she became a leader of women and served as president of the Business and Professional Women’s Club. She went to Washington where she was associated with the National Democratic Committee, later serving in the National Recovery Administration, and at the time of her death held a responsible position with the Social Security Administration. Miss White is survived by a sister, Mrs. Lucy Schiller of San Francisco, Calif., and one brother, Marshall White of San Mateo, Calif. “Letters To The Editor” Camp Crowder, Mo. Dear Folks: You cannot imagine what a gloom came over all the boys here when the President stated

homemade pies for many of the local cafes for several years. T. L. Hearn, Jr., a local boy who graduated from CCHS and later attended West Tennessee Business College has been employed in Memphis for several years. However, he was employed at City Cafe here in Henderson for about two years prior to taking a position in Memphis. The many friends of Mrs. Hearn and T. L., are elated over this business venture and welcome T. L., his wife Chester County Independent archives May 8, 1953 and 4 month old daughin his recent speech that no ter, Ramona Lynne back to prisoners were being taken by Henderson. the Japs – that the ones they “State Theater To Show New already have and the ones they Popular 3rd Dimension are taking were being killed. Film” No one was allowed out of barThe State Theater here is racks and officers remained on bringing to Henderson for the duty. The reason was that there first time, third dimension picis a lot of Japs here, officers tures on Monday and Tuesday, and soldiers, and there was May 11 and 12. such an alarm they were afraid Manager Joe McCorkle has something might happen. booked a double-feature for Instead of the boys dreading these two days and one of the to go over and fight, they were films is in the new third eager to go. People can say all dimension that has become so they want about the nerve of popular over the entire counthe Japs, but I don’t believe try. there are any soldiers as good There will be a slight charge as our own. of 5 cents extra made for colWhen I go for a few days ored glasses which are neceswithout receiving mail it sary to view this newest cinealways puts me in the dumps. ma creation. Audiences alterI just wish some people at nately gasp and duck at the home who are making big hair-raising 3-dimension money and having a big time effects in the thrilling feacould wake up and realize turette, “A Day in the County” what we are up against. If they which will be shown in concould only know what the boys junction with “The Tall “over there” have to go Texan”on next Monday and through. We are all right, but Tuesday. we are the ones who must take May 3, 1963 the places of those on the other “Burglars Take $1,345 From side. If we risk our lives, you Jacks Creek Bank” can risk your money – but Burglars entered the Jacks there is plenty of money and Creek Bank (a branch of First all must help. State Bank) over the weekend God bless you all, and took $1,345 in silver, Haggard Lofton according to W. E. Rhodes, Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. vice-president of First State Dear Mr. Johnston: Bank. I have just finished reading Newton Hodges, bank teller, your wonderful paper. It is discovered the theft early indeed a pleasure to get the Monday morning when he hometown news. opened the bank. Two winI am almost through my dows had been forced open and training here and ready to ship a hole drilled in the door of the to another place. I was fortu- vault where the silver was nate enough to get a three day kept. The money taken was pass last week and spent a few rolls of half dollars, quarters, hours at home. It was really nickels and dimes. Currency great for me to see my old kept in a safe under a time lock friends and some of my school- was not bothered. The loss was mates who are now in service. insured. There is no one here from An investigation is being Chester County, but I have conducted by Sheriff Warren some swell buddies. Thomas, the FBI and TBI. Forgive me for not writing “New Arrivals” sooner as I will try to show Henderson Clinic how much I appreciate your Dr. and Mrs. D. C. King are wonderful work in sending we receiving congratulations boys your paper. I usually read upon the arrival of their first the Independent three or four daughter, Laura Ann, on April times and just sit and dream 26. They have three sons. about the folks back home that Mr. and Mrs. John Henry are doing so much to help us. Garner of Finger are the Very gratefully yours, proud parents of a son who Pvt. Hoyt N. Smith arrived April 15. “Welcome Stranger” Colored Births Mr. and Mrs. Garven Born to Connie and Dorothy Bullman are the proud parents Marie Surratt, a daughter, of an 11 pound baby girl, born Miranda Rena, on April 24. April 28; she is their second Drs. McCallum and child and has been named Wilson Janis Carolyn. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Albert McDaniel of Luray announce Patterson of Luray are the the arrival of a daughter, proud parents of a baby girl, Sarah Louise, on April 20. born April 26, weighing 8 ½ pounds; their sixth child. Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Seaton, Jr., are the proud parents of a baby boy, born April 30, weighing 8 pounds; their third child and he has been named Robert Lamar.

May 8, 1953

“Mrs. T. L. Hearn and Son, T. L. Jr., Buy Electric Grill” Announcement [being made] of the purchase of the Electric Grill at the corner of Main and North Washington by Mrs. Deltha Hearn and her son, T. L. Hearn, Jr. Mrs. Hearn is well known here and has been making

Chester County Independent archives May 3, 1963

I hope everyone has had a great two weeks! Hope you missed my news. I’m sorry I had to skip it last week, but was just too busy with doctors’ appointments and having physical therapy on my neck, besides not feeling good. I guess I am just getting to that age where there is something coming up often with my health. Just very thankful that it hasn’t been anything serious, I can deal with the little stuff. On our prayer list are Nella Rush, Tommy Landers, Sandra Landers, Winna Knipper, Sandra Dees, Norma Tully, Legina Henson, and Edra and Benny Barnett. Please let me know if you or a family member needs prayers. I will add them to our list. Isn’t is a bit unnerving that doctors call what they do “practice?” A little humor to try to make you feel better. Happy belated birthday to Ethan Long on May 3; Orban Goff on May 5; and Ross Hopper and Winna Knipper on May 7. I made Orban’s favorite cake, blueberry, for him. As long as he gets that he’s happy, no gift necessary. Happy birthday this week to Courtney Howell on May 9; Benny Barnett on May 10; and Kehlie Hopper on May 12. “You are only young once, but

you can stay immature indefinitely.” - Ogden Nash We have a little puppy just a few weeks old missing in the Mockingbird Rd. area of Deanburg. It is a black and tan “Min Pin.” She doesn’t have a collar. If you have any information or know where she is there is a reward offered. Call 989-2944 or 608-3177. I want to share a poem with you that my dear cousin wrote: A SEAL OF TRUST In this world throughout our lives We make a lot of commitments to each other, Some are kept and some are not That’s why we need a Seal of Trust. Sometimes in our lives the Lord knows The choices we make can fail or fall, And sometimes we lose our will to carry on And that’s why we need a Seal of Trust. Our love we feel for each other Can come in many different languages, And the words must come from the heart To have and to hold with a Seal of Trust. If you have faith you have joy If you have courage you have hope, And throughout your life with Jesus You will carry a Seal of Trust. - By James Melton James grew up in Deanburg and moved to Chicago at 17 with some friends around See DEAN, Page 7-A

Did you know ...

“Bell Tower at Freed-Hardeman University’s Old Main contained a large bell that was rung remotely from inside the Old Main library with a rope pullcord? This bell rang to signal the beginning of each period during the day.”


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

The wedding will take place with or without you figuring out who the couple is, but hints continue. One reader, Rebecca Morris, has already put the hints together. It’s your turn, but don’t call her. She likes the game and knows you will figure it out like she did. Reminder: Don’t you “wonder” who’ll be the groom? He’ll know which side of the “bread” to butter. A “royal name” is a good first name. Let’s continue thinking with hints. Princess Diana made a vow “to him,” and so will this pretty bride to be in late May. This week Kenny Rogers sings about “a woman” he told not to take her love to town; thus this woman is staying at Jacks Creek part-time after her marriage. The “initials” from the couple’s first names indicate a nearby “grocery store”. Remember the song about a boy named “Sue”? Well, don’t believe it! Call if you’re as smart as Rebecca - she’s not full of bolonie or “malonie”. Someone is rolling in “dough” or perhaps was rolling near “dough” with all these hints! The third Sunday in May is Decoration Day at a church the bride attends. More May birthday candles will flame for those mature in years. Jane Morris blew cold wind on her belated candles on May second; Kristen Denton and her husband, Axle Tates share the eighth of May for their big candle day-Patsy Denton will not tell her daughter’s age, wonder why? Brian Hooper is staring four decades in the eyes on the twelfth of never; Kevin Hooper not only had a walk-in scene in a television series called “Nashville,” but he was in a movie about Jackie Robinson; he was in the dug-out scene. If he is listening to “his producers” Kevin

From Page 6-A

Dean 1952. They experienced a big culture shock going from here to the big city. His friends came home, but he toughed it out, got work and a home then came back for his family, his mom (my father’s sister), his dad, three sisters and a brother. He and his wife Joan provided a home for them and cared for them. He and Joan are very special people and wonderful Christians. My sincere condolences to the Gladys Taylor family. She was a sweet lady and I remember Deanburg School days with her children, Larry, Jean and Anthony. I wish everyone a wonderful week. God bless you all. Call 879-9777 with any news.

might hear someone say “cut” the cake on the fourteenth of May; Allene Johnson blows out 96 candles on the fourteenth; and Maude Newman is inhaling early to blow out 94 flames on the fifteenth. Fire trucks need to be near in case of fire damage on counter tops! Prayer has been requested for Nicky Bridges. Our community expresses sympathy to those who have lost loved ones this week. Thelma Mae Bishop Melton (10-22-29 to 5-113) was buried at Sweetlips. Gerald Bishop (11-18-38 to 4-2913) was buried at Memory Garden. Anthony Murphy (418-67 to 5-2-13) was buried at Memory Garden. Leonard Washington, Jr., “L.W.”, (10-1228 to 4-29-13) was buried at Henderson City Cemetery. He and Frances were supporters of Jacks Creek Home Demonstration Club. They came to the yearly auction and bid on Wilma Frye’s handmade croquet pieces, homemade jellies, chocolate pies, aprons or Santa ceramics mostly made by Murdell Barker. The couple bid higher prices to help the club raise money which was put back into the community. Kathryn Vandiver Bromley (2-2-25 to 5-213) was buried at Center Hill on Decoration Day. I met Kathryn while Naomi

Lott was helping take care of Mama Beck. She was a sweet thoughtful woman always thinking of the other person first. Visitations with her enabled me to see the extent of her love for her daughter, Linda; sisters, Juanita, Faye and Rebecca; granddaughter, Kim, and numerous friends. The words she shared last with Don and me walking out of her room will always be locked in our hearts. She said “If I don’t see you later, I’ll see you in heaven.” Weren’t those lovely words a nice gift to leave behind? Charles Ada, Jr. (220-18 to 5-3-13) was buried Sunday at Cave Springs. Jerry and Carolyn Ada, Tommy and Donette Ada, and Carolyn Griffin have been supportive children, and grandchildren living near have helped. Frances has been a loyal mate for almost 72 years. Their wedding day is May 17, 1941. She said there would be a big change around the house, because she knew her mate was slowly leaving, but she was at his side each morning. I had tender feelings

toward Charles when learning he was the son of Maggie Ada, a childhood memory for me. Maggie lived beside Mama Beck on Royal Street in Jackson. I never knew Maggie’s family would become my new friends. Life is full of nice surprises which included a picture of dear Maggie. Real friendship is shown in times of trouble. Francis Farmer -”I have learned that a good friend is the purest of all God’s gifts, for it is a love that has no exchange or payment.” James Edward “Ed” Pitts (10-4-24 to 5-3-13), son of Joseph Sherman Pitts (18821935) and Mexie Mae Phillip Pitts (1900-1996) was buried Wednesday at Mil-ledgeville Cemetery beside his wife, Virginia Fayrene Bailey Pitts. Not far away are his parents and brother, Sherman Lee (1921-1922). A light went out of Ed’s eyes when Faye died Nov. 15, 2003. She was a leader; he wanted to

please her. How many plants did they share? How many garden items did they produce and share? Ed wore many hats including a sailor hat while serving in the US Navy. He was an excellent mechanic for Stroud Chevrolet and later at Guinn Brothers Chrysler. In 1981, he worked in the high school automotive vocational shop. Ed was gifted with motor repair-if the problem could be found it could be repaired. He enjoyed being a part of the rescue squad. Ed even drove a bus, and the best part he could keep it running. Ed used his talents and tools to help family, friends and neighbors in need. He shared everything he had, but especially loved sharing ice from his repaired ice machine saying, “Come and get all you want or need.” That was his motto which showed his sharing nature. Ed was an animal lover who could recall pets’ names. With a tender

Page 7-A

smile he called the name of his dog “Lucky” on Tuesday before he died on Friday. In the late 60’s Ed was a volunteer Henderson City auxiliary policeman. He worked home basketball and football games. He was handsome and stood with See JACKS, Page 17-A


Opinion

Page 8-A

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Senate votes to end Marketplace Fairness Act debate U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) released the following statement on the U.S. Senate’s decision, by a vote of 63-30, to end debate on the Marketplace Fairness Act, of which he is a lead cosponsor: “This is an important Senate vote for states’ rights, for the prerogative of states to set their own tax policies and to permit states to honor the conservative principle of not picking winners and losers among taxpayers and businesses,” Alexander said. The Marketplace Fairness Act would grant states the option to require that remote businesses, such as those selling online or through catalogs, collect sales taxes on purchases within their borders. Currently, remote businesses do not have to collect sales taxes in the states they sell into, while brick-and-mortar businesses do, creating a price disadvantage. The vote ended Senate debate on the bill, making way for a final vote on the legislation. Alexander sponsored the legislation along with Senators Mike Enzi (RWyo.) and Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) and a bipartisan group of 26 other senators, including Senator Bob Corker (RTenn.). The legislation also has the support of Tennessee’s Republican Gov. Bill Haslam, as well as other Republican governors and conservative leaders across the country.

Marketplace Fairness Act: Just the facts

Here are the facts on the Marketplace Fairness Act, cosponsored by Senators Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) and Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and a bipartisan group of 26 other senators. The legislation is an 11-page bill that received support from 75 senators during the recent budget debate and was moved to the floor for debate by a vote of 74-20. Myth: This legislation would “tax the Internet.” Fact: There is a federal moratorium on state “Internet taxes,” which Senator Alexander voted for and which will still be the law when the Marketplace Fairness Act becomes law. Myth: This legislation is a tax increase. Fact: The

Marketplace Fairness Act is about state sales and use taxes already owed, and does not increase taxes one penny. In fact, by allowing states to collect taxes from everyone who owes them, it will permit states to reduce tax rates. Specifically, the bill would allow states to require online and other out-of-state businesses to do the very same thing in-state businesses have to do: collect sales and use taxes when they make a sale within a state’s borders. Senator Alexander said in March that the legislation “is about two words: states’ rights. Do we have a 10th Amendment, or the spirit of a 10th Amendment? Do we trust governors and legislatures to make decisions, or do we not?” Myth: This legislation is burdensome to businesses. Fact: Using existing Internet software, it is as easy for an outof-state seller to figure a purchaser’s tax as it is to look up the weather. The software identifies the purchaser’s zip code, automatically figures the tax and electronically sends the tax revenues to the appropriate state. Many online sellers already do this. And the law does not apply to any out-of-state seller with $1 million or less in remote sales. Myth: The legislation is being rushed, like the health care law. Fact: This legislation is a Senate rarity: it is only 11 pages in length, unlike the 2,700-page health care law. The first version of this legislation was introduced in 2001. In 2012, both the Senate Commerce and Finance committees held hearings on almost identical legislation. The exact legislation was introduced on Feb. 14, 2013, so everyone has had plenty of time to read it. The problem has been that that the Finance Committee would not consider the bill. Myth: Conservatives oppose the legislation. Fact: Just the reverse is true. Al Cardenas, chairman of the American Conservative Union, economist Art Laffer and governors such as Jeb Bush, Mitch Daniels, Mike Pence, Chris Christie, Butch See DEBATE, Page 9-A

Capitol Hill Review A weekly wrap-up of legislative news From Rep. Steve McDaniel House Pleased With New Rules To Streamline Government, Save Taxpayer Dollars For the first time since 1997, the Tennessee House of Representatives this year adopted permanent rules to govern the body. Following the landmark vote, House leaders emphasized the move would streamline House operations, limit government, and save taxpayer dollars. Legislators said it was important to follow through on promises made to voters by working toward a more efficient and effective state government. Lawmakers also hoped the move would make it easier to prioritize the issues important to voters, including a balanced budget, jobs, and lower taxes. With the legislative session now concluded, lawmakers are pleased the rule changes did indeed lead to a successful overhaul of how government does business. Among the successful rule changes implemented this year is the first-ever limit on the number of bills a legislator may file. For each legislative session, members of the House are now limited to fifteen bills, meaning thirty total for the 108th General Assembly. Previously, the Assembly averaged over 4,000 bills per year while surrounding states considered roughly 2,500. This year, the Tennessee legislature considered only 1,365 pieces of legislation thanks to the new bill limit being in place. Another major change was the restructuring of the House committee system. Now that this year’s legislative session has concluded, it is easy to see the move aided in more efficient operations by better balancing the workload of each committee. In years past, some House committees considered less than 100 bills, while others were often bogged down with more than 800. Under the new system, lawmakers saw this disparity in bill workloads balance out, allowing legislators more time to give each and every bill the due diligence demanded by Tennessee taxpayers. House leaders maintain the changes will continue to, in the long run, increase efficiency, save money, streamline operations, make the process easier for the public to understand, and limit government bureaucracy—all solid conservative principles. Governor Bill Haslam Announces Tennessee Will Not Expand Medicaid Rolls In March, Governor Bill Haslam announced to a Joint Session of the Tennessee General Assembly that he will not expand the state’s Medicaid rolls pursuant to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly referred to as ObamaCare. Instead, Haslam plans to independently pursue a “Tennessee Plan” for expanding healthcare coverage to those truly in need. “I believe Tennessee can be a model for what true health care reform looks like; reform that will take significant steps to save the state and the nation from the unsustainable path we are now on,” Haslam said. The central premise of the “Tennessee Plan,” which includes helping insure an additional 175,000 Tennesseans currently in need of health insurance, would save the state millions of dollars by allowing the Department of Human Services to buy policies for the uninsured from private insurers, rather than adding them to the state’s TennCare rolls. Following the announcement, lawmakers commended the Governor on his decision and praised Haslam for moving forward with a plan to ensure all Tennesseans have access to quality and affordable healthcare without being tied down by federal bureaucracy and mandates. They also praised the Governor for thoroughly researching the issue and approaching it in a

thoughtful manner. Haslam told lawmakers he had not received any assurances from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that the state could proceed with a “Tennessee Plan” under President Obama’s proposal and thus he would not be including the federal funding offered for expansion in his budget. Constitutional Officers Tout Tennessee Financial Success Earlier this year, State Treasurer David H. Lillard, Jr. and Comptroller of the Treasury Justin P. Wilson discussed the positive financial position of Tennessee state government. Both Constitutional Officers credit the financial success the state has experienced over the last two years to conservative fiscal policies implemented by Governor Bill Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly. Despite a poor economy nationwide, both Lillard and Wilson believe Tennessee is on a clear path towards economic recovery, especially when compared to other states across the country. “There have been numerous media reports over the last few years about serious financial problems experienced by governments elsewhere in our country and around the world. Tennessee stands in sharp contrast to those governments. Here, despite a fragile economy, our state government is managing its expenses and meeting its obligations quite well,” stated Comptroller Wilson. Indeed, despite the failure of some states to adequately manage their expenditures in a fiscally responsible way, Tennessee leads the nation in several key economic areas, including being named by Barron’s Magazine as the third best-managed state in the country. “Tennessee is in good financial shape – and that isn’t just our assessment of our own situaSee MCDANIEL, Page 9-A


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

From Page 8-A

Debate Otter and Bill Haslam all have urged the Senate to enact states’ rights legislation that would permit states to decide for themselves whether to collect

From Page 8-A

McDaniel tion. The bond rating agencies and other organizations that monitor government finances have given Tennessee strong marks for its financial practices. Tennessee’s ability to control spending, manage debt, and adequately forecast revenues have all contributed to the state’s strong financial condition,” Treasurer Lillard continued. Going forward, Lillard and Wilson agreed, Tennessee must continue its focus on providing essential services while still leaving room to cut unneeded expenses and keep debt costs low. “I have confidence that Governor Haslam and the members of the Tennessee General Assembly

taxes from all the taxpayers who owe a tax, or just some of those taxpayers. These governors do not like the current system, which requires states to treat some taxpayers and businesses one way, and other taxpayers

and businesses a different way. As Senator Alexander has said, “We have a 10th Amendment to the Constitution. States should not have to play ‘Mother, May I’ to the Congress about what their taxes structures should be.”

will take the appropriate steps over the coming weeks and months to keep Tennessee moving on the trajectory of long-term financial success,” Wilson concluded. Anti-Income Tax Amendment Passes TN General Assembly A constitutional amendment spearheaded by House members to clarify that Tennessee’s Constitution prohibits a statewide income tax was approved by lawmakers this year. The amendment, Senate Joint Reso-

lution 1, specifies that the legislature as well as counties and cities across the state shall be prohibited from passing an income tax on the people of Tennessee. Now that it has been approved by the legislature, the amendment will be placed on the 2014 statewide ballot for a referendum vote by the people of Tennessee. If passed by referendum, the Tennessee Constitution will then be amended to officially ban a state income tax from ever being implemented in Tennessee.

Chester County – Henderson White beans with ham plates May 10 The Chester County Family and Community Education Clubs (Home Demonstration Club) is hosting a plate of white beans with ham, slaw, onion, cornbread, dessert and drink for $6 on Friday, May 10. Carry-outs will be available. In case of rain, it will be held in the UT Extension meeting room. (The old public safety building.) At 10 a.m. there will also be a bake sale. Don’t forget to come on down to the Henderson court house lawn and purchase and enjoy your very own beans and ham plate, and perhaps some sweets also.

Community blood drive in Henderson May 10, 17 The community blood drives in Henderson will be held from 2 to 6 p.m. Friday, May 10 at First Baptist Church, and from 6 to 11 p.m. Friday, May 17 at Chester County High School (a Relay for Life event).

Mid-South Youth Camp plans Fishing rodeo May 11 The 17th Annual Mid-South Youth Camp Youth Fishing Rodeo is set for 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 11, according to camp director Frank Bradford. Young fishermen will be divided into three age categories: 5-8; 9-12; and 13-16. Cash prizes will be awarded in each age group for the highest overall weight caught: 1st - $150; 2nd - $125; 3rd -$100; and 4th - $50. In addition, a $50 prize for the biggest fish caught will be awarded in each age group. MSYC is located on Highway 45, north of Henderson. “The pond has been stocked with fish,” Bradford said, “so come on out for a morning of great fishing.” At 8 a.m. registration will begin. The entry fee for the event is $15 per child and each may use up to two rods. Food, drinks and bait will be available for purchase on the camp grounds. All proceeds from the rodeo benefit MSYC. For additional information, contact Bradford at 435-0177.

Chester County Prekindergarten registration is May 14, 15 Prekindergarten registration will be held from 3:30 – 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 14 and Wednesday, May 15 at East Chester Elementary. A child must be four years old by Aug. 31, 2013 in order to be eligible for Prekindergarten for the 2013-14 school year. Documents needed during the registration process include: birth certificate (official copy), social security card, proof of income (current check stub, 2012 tax return), and proof of residence (example: water bill, electrical bill, or rent receipt). You will be notified in July if your child qualifies for the class. On the first day of school you must provide updated immunization records and physical exam. For more information about registration, call Linda Patterson or Patsy Doyle at 989-5134.

American Legion Post 157 Meeting May 16 The American Legion Post 157 monthly meeting will be held Thursday, May 16 in the Senior Citizens Center, 247 East Main St., Henderson. Officers for 2014 will be elected. Candidates for some positions are needed. Member’s attendance will be appreciated.

Boy Scout Car Wash May 18 Henderson Boy Scout Troup 25 will hold a car wash Saturday, May 18 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the FHU Arts Center parking lot, at the corner of White and Main. There is no set price for the car wash, donations will be accepted. Please come and support our young men.

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Benefit May 18 for Henderson Church of God Henderson Church of God, 931 US Hwy. 45 N, is having a benefit with a bake sale, and $4 hot dog plate or $5 hamburger plate, both plates include chips and choice of either baked beans or slaw. The benefit is being held for needed church repairs. For more information or to pre-order, call Sheila Taylor at 983-0580.

VFW Pancake breakfast May 25 The Chester County VFW Post 4844 of Henderson will have their pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. until 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 25, at the Chester County Senior Center. Tickets are $6 for eat-in or take-out. Come out and help support our Veteran’s. You can also pay at the door. For more information, call 608-6132.

All Areas Free Kids Health Fair May 18 The East Jackson Family Medical Center invites children of all ages to its annual free Kids Health Fair at Isaac Lane Technology School at 746 Lexington Avenue. The annual event on Saturday, May 18 from 9 a.m. until noon will include free health screenings, entertainment, food, fun and education. This is all part of the day designed to bring awareness to children’s health. Childhood obesity and bullying will be two topics addressed. There is something for everyone at the “Fit 4 Life Kids Health Fair.” For more information, call the East Jackson Family Medical Center at 425-7900 or visit http://www.wth.org/kidshealthfair.

Chester County – Finger Finger country dance May 10 Every Friday night, 7:30-10:30, come and enjoy the New Outlaws band. Admission is $5, with 4-yearolds and under free.

Chester County – Enville Enville Volunteer Fire Dept. fundraiser Saturday May 11 The Enville Volunteer Fire Department’s Annual Barbeque Fundraiser is this Saturday, May 11. The barbeque pork, barbeque bologna, and barbeque chicken will be ready by 10 a.m. beside Enville City Hall. The Enville Community Center Committee’s Annual Bake Sale will be ready by 8 a.m. this Saturday, May 11. Come on out and get your Mother’s Day baked goodies.

Henderson County – Reagan Saturday dance May 11 The Reagan Community Center will host its Saturday dance on May 11, 2013. Appearing this week will be “The Hot Country Band” from Gadsden. This is an all ages show, starting at 6:30 p.m. with free dance lessons, and from 7:30 - 10:30 p.m. enjoy live music. Children 11 and younger are free when accompanied by an adult.

McNairy County – Selmer Benefit May 11 for Jason Truett and Martin Hurst You are welcome to attend the Benefit for Jason Truett and Martin Hurst of Henderson, beginning at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 11, 2013, rain or shine, at Selmer City Park in Selmer. For lunch you can purchase a barbeque sandwich, chips and drink for $6, or a hot dog, chips and drink for $4. For your entertainment there will be live music by Tommy Sowell and the River Band, a silent auction, and a cake walk. We will be giving away a Weber grill, a Paramount socket set, and a Makita Cordless Combo Set (for a small donation).


Obituary/Religion Thursday, May 9, 2013

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Obituaries L. W. Melton Jr. Oct. 12, 1928 – April 29, 2013 Mr. L. W. Melton Jr., 84, passed away Monday, April 29, 2013 at the home of his daughter in Henderson. Funeral services were Friday, May 3, 2013 at First Baptist Church in Henderson with Brother Stan Smith officiating. Burial followed in Henderson City Cemetery. Lawrence-Sorensen Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements. He was born in Henderson, the son of the late Leonard Washington Melton and Mamie Colbert Melton. He was a veteran of the U. S. Navy, attended Freed-Hardeman College and Union University and served as a Cub Master for several years. He married Virginia “Ginny” Allen Trice on Feb. 9, 1949. They had two children, Beth and Philip. Ginny went to be with the Lord on May 29, 1982. He later married Frances Lile on Sept. 1, 1985. They were faithful members of First Baptist Church in Henderson and enjoyed attending the Joint Heirs Sunday School Class. Frances went to be with the Lord on June 1, 2012. He worked for Chevrolet Motor Division, traveling throughout the U.S. He and his family truly “Saw the USA with Chevrolet.” He retired in 1983 and moved home to Henderson. He enjoyed his family and tending to his cows and donkeys. He was preceded in death by his parents; his wives; and two older brothers. He is survived by a daughter, Beth Melton Jordan (George); a son, Philip Allen Melton (Jan); five grandsons; five great-grandsons; and one great-granddaughter. The family requests any memorials be directed to the First Baptist Church of Henderson Building Fund. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 9, 2013

Thelma Bishop Melton Oct. 22, 1929 – May 1, 2013 Thelma Mae Bishop Melton, 83, passed away Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at the Henderson Health and Rehabilitation Center. Funeral services were Saturday, May 4, at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Brother John Boler officiating. Burial followed in Sweetlips Cemetery. She was born and reared in Enville, the daughter of the late John Wesley and Nola Esther Massengill Bishop. She attended school in Chester County. She lived in Flint, Mich., for nine years, then Adamsville, Bolivar, Camden, Arkansas, Murfreesboro, Selmer, and then returned to Henderson. She had done restaurant work, worked at Salant & Salant Mfg., and later Jackson Garment Company. She was a Baptist in belief. She is survived by a son, Jerry William Melton of Glenn, Miss.; a daughter, Karen Melton Barber of Murfreesboro; and three grandchildren, Michelle Melton Martin, Luke Barber and Matt Barber. She was preceded in death by her parents; three brothers, Arlin Grady Bishop, Velma Ray Bishop and Woodrow Bishop; and a sister, Mary Reeda Taylor. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 9, 2013

Kathryn Vandiver Bromley Feb. 5, 1925 – May 2, 2013 Allie Kathryn Vandiver Bromley, 88, passed away Thursday, May 2, 2013 at Jackson Madison County General Hospital. Funeral services were Sunday, May 5, at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Rick Seaton and Denny Broadway officiating. Burial followed in Center Hill Cemetery in Henderson County. She was born in Henderson County, the daughter of the late James Edmond and Alma Hautie Weatherington Vandiver. She worked in the garment industry around Henderson, the metal industry in Illinois and operated a convenient store in Ocala, Fla. She retired and moved to Henderson in 1985. She was a member of the Henderson Assembly of God. She is survived by a daughter, Linda Howe (Ray) of Harriman; three grandchildren, Mark Howe, Kimberly Howe and Jonathan Howe (Paula); six great-grandchildren; and six greatgreat-grandchildren; a brother, Joe Edward Vandiver of Finger; and three sisters, Rebecca Adeline Skinner of Henderson, Juanita McBride (James) of Pinson, and Reba Taylor (Richard) of Medina. She was preceded in death by her parents; one grandchild, Danielle Tiffany Howe; five brothers, James Loyce Vandiver, Carl Vandiver, Murray Vandiver, Eddie Vandiver and Donald Ray Vandiver; and three sisters, Pauline Vandiver, Ramelle Roberts and Rachel Hudson. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 9, 2013

Charles Ada, Jr.

James Edward Pitts

Feb. 20, 1918 – May 3, 2013 Charles Benton Ada Jr., 95, passed away Friday, May 3, 2013 at the Henderson Health and Rehabilitation Center. Funeral services were Sunday, May 5, at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Johnson Chapel with Rev. Carl Teel officiating. Burial followed in Cave Springs Cemetery in Chester County. He was born in Madison County, the son of the late Charles Benton and Charity Magdaline Naylor Ada. He attended school in Madison County. He was married to Frances Roland on May 17, 1941. He worked as a plumber and pipefitter most of his life, working in Indiana and west Tennessee, at his retirement he was a member of the Plumbers Pipefitters, Local 407. He enjoyed hunting, especially coon hunting, and he was a member of Unity Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife, Frances Roland Ada of Henderson; a daughter, Carolyn Griffin (Jerry deceased) of Finger; and two sons, Jerry Ada (Brenda) of Henderson and Tommy Ada (Donett) of Homer, Ill.; eight grandchildren, Amy Anderson (Johnny), Mark Griffin (Heather), Matt Griffin, Andrea Talbott (Bryan), Dawn Weisman (Doug), Dana Ada (Brian), Joe Ada (Beth) and Tammy Perry (Randy); 18 greatgrandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. He was preceded in death by three brothers and two sisters, Lillian Frye, Ora Warren, Jack Ada, Clarence Ada and Willie Ada.

Oct. 4, 1924 – May 3, 2013 James Edward Pitts, 88, passed away Friday, May 3, 2013 at the Tennessee State Veterans’ Home in Humboldt. Funeral services were 11 a.m. Wednesday, May 8 at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Randy Morris, John Talbott and Joe Pitts officiating. Burial followed with Military Honors in Milledgeville Cemetery. He was born in Arkansas, the son of the late Joseph Sherman and Mexie Mae Phillips Pitts. He went to high school in Chester County. He was married to Faye Bailey in 1942. He entered the U.S. Navy and was a Signalman Third Class attached to a Marine Unit and also did a tour in Japan. After the service they made their home near Jacks Creek all their married life. He worked at Stroud Chevrolet and later Guinn Brothers as an auto mechanic and then taught auto mechanics at Chester County High School in the Vocational Department. After his teaching career he drove the handicap bus for the Board of Education, serving the CP Center and the school for the deaf. He was a charter member and founder of the Chester County Rescue Squad and was very active in its work. He was an Auxiliary Police Officer for the Henderson Police Department working high school ballgames and other community events. He also worked as Reserve Officer for the Police Department working weekends and vacation relief. Mr. Pitts is survived by three sons, Joe W. Pitts (Brenda) of Kernersville, N.C., Lynn Pitts (Donna) of Antioch and Jere Pitts (Kathy) of Finger; a daughter, Angie Parrish (Lynn) of Luray; eight grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; and three great-great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife Faye Bailey Pitts in 2003; and a brother, Sherman Lee Pitts.

Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 9, 2013

Tony Murphy April 18, 1967 – May 3, 2013 Anthony “Tony” Murphy, 46, passed away Friday, May 3, 2013 at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. Funeral services were Monday, May 6, 2013 at Shackelford Funeral Directors - Casey Chapel. Burial followed in Chester County Memory Gardens. He was born in Springfield, Ohio, and grew up in Phoenix, Ariz., the son of Richard Joseph Murphy and Anne Dillion Murphy. He attended school in Phoenix. He married Beverly Julian and they lived in the Memphis area where Anthony worked in mechanical design in both industrial and residential drafting. They made their home in Blytheville, Ark., where he worked in structural engineering at Tenaris. They had made their home in Finger since 2009 and he worked at Bodine Aluminum in die maintenance and casting. He was baptized a Catholic. He is survived by his wife, Beverly Julian Murphy of Finger; two sons, Nicholas Michael Murphy of Sierra Vista, Ariz., and Chance Dalton Murphy of Finger; his parents Richard Murphy and Anne Murphy of Sierra Vista, Ariz.; three brothers, Bobby Ventura of Ball, La., Johnathon Joseph Murphy of Sierra, Ariz., and Christopher Michael Murphy of Phoenix, Ariz.; and two sisters, Lisa Ann Bibeau of Sierra Vista, Ariz. and Dana Woith of Mesa, Ariz. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 9, 2013

Edward F. Eldridge Sept. 3, 1923 – May 6, 2013 Edward Frederick Eldridge, 89, passed away May 6, 2013 at the Henderson Health and Rehabilitation Center. Funeral services were 2 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, at Shackelford Funeral Directors – Casey Chapel with Tommy Crocker officiating. Burial followed with Military Honors at Milledgeville Cemetery.

He was born in Memphis, the son of the late Goldy and Amelia Viola Grimes Eldridge. He served 30 years in the U.S. Air Force retiring as Technical Sergeant and received many service medals. He married Kathryn Harwell Smith in 2010 and they had made their home at Reagan and Henderson. He was a member of Enville Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife, Kathryn Smith Eldridge of Henderson; a stepson Michael R. Smith (Tracie) of Spartanburg, S.C.; a stepdaughter, Brenda Smith of Memphis; and one grandchild, Eddie Smith of Memphis. The family would like to express a special thanks to the staff and residents at Southern Oaks Assisted Living in Henderson.

Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 9, 2013

Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 9, 2013

Edward Charles “E.C.” Armstrong May 30, 1940 – May 2, 2013 Edward Charles “E.C.” Armstrong, 72, died Thursday, May 2, 2013 at JacksonMadison County Hospital. Graveside service will be 2 p.m. Saturday, May 11. Burial will be at Dean’s Cemetery in Chester County. S&S Chapel Funeral Services handled the arrangements. The body will lie in state from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 11, at J.P. Baptist Church in Henderson. Chester County Independent (Henderson, Tenn.) May 9, 2013


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

Just Hang On By Ronnie McBrayer Keeping the Faith

When I was a bit younger and a bit braver, a group of friends and I shot the rapids on the Ocoee River in southeast Tennessee. The Ocoee, which I think is the Cherokee word for “terrified rafter” is a world class whitewater adventure. Now, I’m no world class athlete, and that became evident on the river. But by the time we finished, I was on a first name basis with rapids named Broken Nose, Table Saw, and Diamond Splitter – and it was an incomparable thrill. Whitewater sports began quite accidentally on this river. The Ocoee is dammed to produce electricity. Only a trickle of water, no more than ankle

deep in places, flowed through the gorge. But in the late 1970s a portion of one of their dams broke, sending the full force of the Ocoee through the canyon for the first time in decades. Whitewater outfitters and kayakers jumped all over the opportunity, setting up impromptu river tours. After the dam was repaired, legislators were wise enough to pass laws to protect the recreation that had developed on the river. So, for 112 days a year the Ocoee River is “turned on” for kayaking and rafting enthusiasts. On the morning I arrived at the river there was nothing but rocks. “How are we going to shoot the rapids when I can rock-

Area Decoration Days Courtesy of Patsy Jones

Second Sunday in May – Cave Springs, Johnson Crossroads, Little Hatchie, Lexington City, Marl Bluff (Off Hwy 22), Middlefork, Milledgeville, Oak Grove Church of Christ, Palestine Baptist, Sweetlips, Union Hill and Woodlawn Third Sunday in May – Big Springs, Cabo, Clarks Creek, Corinth, Estes, Johnson, Montezuma CME, Mt Carmel, Old Jacks Creek, Shiloh, Trices Chapel and Woodsville Fourth Sunday in May – Chapel Hill, Fryes Point, Mt. Moriah and Unity First Sunday in June – Bethel, Jacks Creek Apostolic and Palestine Second Sunday in June – Bailey, Hare, Holly Springs and Montezuma Third Sunday in June – none reported Fourth Sunday in June – Stone Hill Last Sunday in June - Mt. Pleasant Henderson City and Memory Gardens have no set Decoration Day, but many decorate on Mother’s Day.

Cave Springs Baptist Homecoming May 12 Cave Springs Baptist Church will have the annual Homecoming Day Sunday, May 12. Services begin at 10:30 a.m. with singing by Josh and Ashley Franks. Bro. Matthew McAdams will bring the message. Lunch will follow. Everyone is invited.

Johnson Crossroads Cemetery Homecoming is May 12 Johnson Crossroads Cemetery is having a cemetery cleanup before the May 12 Homecoming. Ground flowers and decorations family members wish to keep should be taken up before May 1. The grounds crew will begin preparing the cemetery on May 1 for Homecoming . Please direct questions or comments to Charles Newsom at 989-9701.

Holly Springs United Methodist Church Rededication is May 19 Sunday, May 19, at 11 a.m. Holly Springs United Methodist Church will have a Rededication Service for the newly rebuilt storm damaged Sanctuary. The message will be provided by Brother Richard Clark, District Superintendent, with lunch to be served after the service. This will be a combined service with our Charge partners at Enville United Methodist Church.

jump across the river and never get wet?” I asked my guide. Speaking like a cross between Jedi-Master Yoda and some drugempowered oracle he said, “Sweat it not, dude. The water is coming.” He was right. The water was coming. Thirty miles upstream the water had been released. It took a little while to get there, but as I watched, the babbling stream turned into a torrent of whitewater, and the adventure was afoot. The power of those rapids was incredible. I couldn’t dictate to the river with my little paddle and rubber dinghy any more than I could turn on or off the dam’s floodgates. There was no control over the water; I had to go where it pushed me.

Sure, at times I could steer, paddle or even stop, hiding behind a huge rock; but when released over the rapids all I could do was scream, flay at the water, and pray. The power of the water had been unleashed, and we were just along for the ride. Living out the life of faith is a lot like that. We have our raft, paddle, and are in this boat with our friends on the same journey. What began as a dribble is now an unstoppable flood. We are paddling along best we can, moved by the unleashed Spirit of God. And sometimes we are more than moved. Sometimes life and faith are not placid escapades of reflection and peace. Instead, the journey of faith becomes a bone-jarring exercise in survival, crashing over the rocks and through the rapids, threatening to drown us. We are often jostled from the security of our raft, forced to scream out of desperation for a

rope or lifeline of rescue. We struggle and fight just to keep our noses above the water line. We may get the relieved opportunity to list in quiet pools, catching our breath and resting our muscles from time to time. But then, the water will pick up and we are on our way again. Sure, there are

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things we can and should do along the way: Pray, hang on, watch out for our friends, and paddle like our hair is on fire. But ultimately we are riding the wave of God as he does his good will and purpose. His power has been turned on in our lives, and all we have to do is hang on and let it take us where it will.


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

Bethlehem Baptist Church 678 W. Main St. Henderson


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

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East Jackson Family Medical Center hosts Kids Health Fair Jackson 10

Starting Thurs May 16

71 Conrad Drive Jackson, TN 664-5678

STAR TREK (2D PG13) Running Time 2:12 Thursday 1:30pm 4:15pm 7pm 9:45pm

Starting Thurs May 16

Opening Friday May 3

STAR TREK (3D PG13) Running Time 2:12 Thursday 4:30pm 7pm

GREAT GATSBY (PG13) Running Time 2:22 Fri-Thurs 12pm 1pm 3pm 4:10pm 6:05pm 7pm 9pm 9:45pm

Now Showing

PEEPLES (PG13) Running Time 1:35 Fri-Thurs 12pm 12:45pm 2:10pm 2:55pm 4:20pm 5:05pm 6:30pm 7:15pm 8:40pm 9:45pm

“42” (PG13) Running Time 2:08 Fri-Sat 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm

Now Showing

IRON MAN 3 3D (PG13) Running Time 2:15 Fri-Sat 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm

“42” (PG13) Running Time 2:08 Fri-Thurs 12:00pm 2:30pm 5pm 7:30pm 10pm IRON MAN 3 2D (PG13) Running Time 2:15 Fri-Thurs 12pm 12:40pm 1:20pm 2pm 2:40pm 3:20pm 4pm 4:40pm 5:20pm 6:05pm 6:45pm 7:20pm 8pm 8:45pm 9:25pm 10pm

JURASSIC PARK 3D (PG13) Running Time 2:07 Fri-Sat 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm OZ: The GREAT & POWERFUL 3D (PG) Running Time 2:10 Fri-Sat 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm PAIN & GAIN (R) Running Time 2:09 Fri-Sat 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm

MUD (PG13) Running Time 2:10 Fri-Thurs 12:45pm 4:10pm 7pm 9:40pm OBLIVION (PG13) Running Time 2:05 Fri-Thurs 12pm 2:30pm 5pm 7:30pm 10pm OZ: The GREAT & POWERFUL 2D (PG) Running Time 2:10 Fri-Thurs 12:45pm 4:30pm PAIN & GAIN (R) Running Time 2:09 Fri-Thurs 12pm 2:30pm 5pm 7:30pm 10pm

SCARY MOVIE: 5 (PG13) Running Time 1:25 Fri-Sat 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm THE CROODS 3D (PG) Running Time 1:38 Fri-Sat 2pm 4:30pm 7pm 9:30pm Sun 2pm 4:30pm 7pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7pm

Hollywood 16 575 Vann Drive Jackson, TN 422-3456

SCARY MOVIE: 5 (PG13) Running Time 1:25 Fri-Thurs 12:30pm 2:30pm 4:30pm 7:15pm 9:20pm THE BIG WEDDING (R) Running Time 1:29 Fri-Thurs 1:30pm 3:30pm 5:30pm 7:30pm 9:30pm THE CROODS 2D (PG) Running Time 1:32 Fri-Thurs 12pm 2:10pm 4:20pm 7pm 9:10pm TYLER PERRY’S TEMPTATION (PG13) Running Time 1:51 Fri-Thurs 7:25pm 9:45pm

Cinema Planet 10 231 Kenworth Blvd Jackson, TN 427-7000 Starting Thurs May 16 STAR TREK (2D PG13) Running Time 2:12 Thursday 4:30pm 7:15pm

Opening Friday May 3 GREAT GATSBY (PG13) Running Time 2:22 Fri-Sun 1:15pm 4:15pm 7pm 9:45pm Mon-Thurs 4:15pm 7pm PEEPLES (PG13) Running Time 1:35 Fri-Thurs 12pm 2:15pm 4:30pm 7:25pm 9:35pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7:25pm HOME RUN (PG13) Running Time 1:53 Fri-Sun 12pm 2:15pm 4:30pm 7:15pm 9:30pm Mon-Thurs 4:30pm 7:15pm

Now Showing “42” (PG13) Running Time 2:08 Fri-Sun 12pm 2:30pm 5pm 7:30pm 10pm Mon-Thurs 5pm 7:30pm IRON MAN 3 2D (PG13) Running Time 2:15 Fri-Sun 12pm 1pm 2:30pm 3:30pm 5pm 6:05pm 7:30pm 8:35pm 10pm Mon-Thurs 5pm 6:05pm 7:30pm OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R) Running Time 1:59 Fri-Sun 1:30pm 5pm 7:25pm 9:50pm Mon-Thurs 5pm 7:25pm PAIN & GAIN (R) Running Time 2:09 Fri-Sun 12pm 2:25pm 4:50pm 7:20pm 9:50pm Mon-Thurs 4:50pm 7:20pm THE BIG WEDDING (R) Running Time 1:29 Fri-Sun 1:15pm 3:15pm 5:15pm 7:30pm 9:30pm Mon-Thurs 5:15pm 7:30pm THE CROODS 2D (PG) Running Time 1:32 Fri-Sun 12:15pm 2:25pm 4:35pm 7pm 9:10pm Mon-Thurs 4:35pm 7pm

The Smoking Gun By Dr. E. Kirsten Peters Washington State University

As any child can tell you, the Mesozoic Era ends with the extinction of the dinosaurs. Most geologists think the cause of that extinction was the impact of an enormous meteorite that hit the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. As the theory goes, the impact was so large it led to global changes in the composition of the atmosphere. Smoke and dust raised by the collision blocked the sun’s light for a time, making temperatures drop and plants die off. Many species of both plants and animals didn’t live through the crisis, as parts of the food web simply fell apart. As it happens, the dinos were one group that gave up the ghost and slipped into extinction. The extinction that carried off the dinosaurs is one of five mass extinctions in the geologic record during the last three eras of geologic time – the time marked by animals of sharply increasing complexity first in the seas and then on land. Because the dinosaurs are famous the world around, the extinction that killed them is often discussed in public circles. But the causes of the other four mass extinctions are just as interesting

to scientists. Recently new evidence has been brought to light about the mass extinction that occurred during, rather than at the end, of the Mesozoic Era. The time in question stands at the boundary between the Triassic Period and the Jurassic Period (think of the movie Jurassic Park if you want a little help with these names). The extinction at issue saw the end of three quarters of the species then living in the seas and on land. The massive die off helped clear the ground for the dominance of the dinosaurs for more than the next 100 million years. In the early Mesozoic what is now North America was united with Europe as part of a supercontinent called Pangaea. Pangaea broke up into separate continents as geologic time unfolded. Volcanic rocks of the same type and age are found along the East Coast and in Morocco, areas that were next to each other in the Triassic. The rocks resulted from a giant rift in the crust of the Earth, one that ultimately grew to become the Atlantic Ocean. The massive eruptions that occurred in the late Triassic Period created what’s called

the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province or CAMP. Along with volcanic rock, the eruptions would have added carbon dioxide and other gases to the atmosphere, potentially triggering strong climate change. The new evidence about CAMP published in the journal Science relates to the age of the volcanic rocks in question. Sophisticated dating techniques now indicate the whole CAMP province of volcanic rocks was formed during a period of only 40,000 years. Geologically speaking, that’s nearly instantaneous. Such a massive outpouring of lava in such a short time could well have rapidly changed the atmosphere and thus climate. The more we learn about major extinctions, the more respect we must have for the ferocity of Mother Nature. Let’s hope we don’t live long enough to see her bear her volcanic claws once more. Dr. E. Kirsten Peters, a native of the rural Northwest, was trained as a geologist at Princeton and Harvard. This column is a service of the College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences at Washington State University.

The East Jackson Family Medical Center invites children of all ages to its annual free Kids Health Fair at Isaac Lane Technology School at 746 Lexington Avenue. The annual event on Saturday, May 18 from 9 a.m. until noon will

include free health screenings, entertainment, food, fun and education. This is all part of the day designed to bring awareness to children’s health. Childhood obesity and bullying will be two topics addressed.

There is something for everyone at the “Fit 4 Life Kids Health Fair.” For more information call the East Jackson Family Medical Center at 4257900 or visit http://www.wth.org/k idshealthfair.

Vaccination Reminder! The Tennessee Department of Health issued new immunization rules that went into effect July 1, 2010. All newly required vaccines are routinely recommended and most children have already received them. However, there was a new requirement for entrance into the 7th-grade. The vaccines required are a Tetanus-Diphtheria-

Pertussis booster (Tdap) and two doses of Varicella (chicken pox vaccine) or history of the disease. You can get these vaccines at the local health department or your primary care physician. There is also a new Tennessee immunization form. This form will be given to you at the time the student receives the new vac-

cines. This form should be turned in to the school office. We will need proof of these vaccines in order for your child to enter the 7th-grade. Thank you for your cooperation with this matter. For more information, call 989-8135 if you have any questions, and speak to Jamie Carson, CCJHS and JCES nurse.

Electric cooperatives celebrate National Lineman Appreciation Day The U.S. Senate passed a resolution last week designating April 18 as National Lineman Appreciation Day, honoring line workers for their efforts at keeping power flowing. In Tennessee there are more than 400 linemen with electric cooperatives who work in the field restoring power during outages and maintaining distribution lines and equipment. Across the nation, more than 19,000 men and women maintain 2.5 million miles of line for electric co-ops, public power districts, and public utility districts. “The caliber of our line employees is top notch,” says David Callis, executive vice president and general manager of the

Tennessee Electric C o o p e r a t i v e Association. “Each and every member of our line crews should be commended for their hard work in delivering safe and reliable power to our members.” The Senate resolution resolves that these workers ... • Are steeped in personal, family and professional tradition; • Are often first responders during storms and other catastrophic events, working to make the scene safe for other public safety heroes; • Work with thousands of volts of electricity high atop power lines 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, to keep electricity flowing; • Must often work

under dangerous conditions far from their families to construct and maintain the energy infrastructure of the United States; • And put their lives on the line every day with little recognition from the community regarding the danger of their work. “It’s time line workers were recognized like this,” Callis says. “It’s a great acknowledgment.” The Tennessee Electric Cooperative Association provides legislative and communication support for Tennessee’s 23 electric cooperatives and publishes The Tennessee Magazine, the state’s most widely circulated periodical. Visit tnelectric.org to learn more.

Sec. Hargett announces changes to photo ID law The General Assembly amended Tennessee’s voter photo identification law during its recentlyconcluded legislative session. Amendments sponsored by Senator Bill Ketron (RMurfreesboro) and Representative Susan Lynn (R-Mount Juliet) seek to clarify and strengthen the law that was successfully implemented during the 2012 election cycle. Voters may no longer use photo IDs issued by other states as acceptable forms of identification when voting in person. This change mirrors similar laws in other states, including Indiana. Indiana’s photo ID law

has been upheld by the United States Supreme Court. The amendments also clarify the General Assembly’s original intent in passing the law by explicitly excluding photo IDs issued by counties and municipalities. These changes took effect when the amended law was signed by Governor Bill Haslam this week. “The General Assembly continues to enact laws that protect the integrity of the ballot box,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett. “I am grateful that our legislators continue to seek out policies to ensure that only eligible voters may cast

their ballots in Tennessee.” Examples of acceptable forms of identification, whether current or expired, include Tennessee driver licenses, U.S. passports, Department of Safety photo ID cards, U.S. military photo IDs, and other photo IDs issued by the federal or Tennessee state government. Voters without one of these forms of identification may obtain free photo IDs for voting at Tennessee Department of Safety driver service centers. For more information about the driver service centers, v i s i t : http://tn.gov/safety/d riverservices.shtml.

For $3 donation, Arbor Day Foundation offers tree-care booklet The Arbor Day Foundation is offering a handy tree-care booklet designed to help people plant and care for trees. Anyone can receive “Conservation Trees,” a user-friendly booklet featuring illustrations, colorful photos and easily-understood descriptions, by making a $3 donation to the Foundation this month. “‘Conservation Trees’ is an ideal resource for tree

planters,” said John Rosenow, founder and chief executive of the Arbor Day Foundation. “Taking care of existing trees is just as critical as planting new ones, and proper care ensures communities are able to fully enjoy the diverse benefits of urban forestry.” The booklet provides details about the right way to plant and prune trees. It also includes tips on using shade

trees and windbreaks to save on energy costs, attracting songbirds and creating a living snow fence. To receive the Conservation Trees booklet, send a $3 check along with your name and address to: Conservation Trees, Arbor Day Foundation, 100 Arbor Ave., Nebraska City, NE 68410, or order online at www.arborday.org/conservationtrees.


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

CITY OF HENDERSON POLICE DEPARTMENT May 2, 2013 Erin Gerasimenko is being charged with theft $1,000 - $9,999. Jessica Leighann Hicks was issued a citation for driving on a suspended license. May 3, 2013 A possible identity theft was reported when a woman received a bill for Charter Cable. The woman did not have Charter services. A theft was reported from a residence on Mifflin Avenue. Two long guns were reportedly taken from the residence. A value is not known. May 4, 2013 Patricia Louanna Dugan was arrested and charged with assault and disorderly conduct. She is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $2,000 bond. Grace Baptist Church reported that their glass front door was broken out. It did not look like entry had been made and they did not notice anything missing. A theft of medication was reported from a residence on Dusty Lane. Medications missing included Endocet 10-325mg (88 pills) and Alprazolam

0.5mg (82 pills). May 5, 2013 Kevin Gerrard Reid, 30, was arrested and charged with driving on a canceled/revoked/suspended license. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $2,000 bond. CITY OF HENDERSON FIRE DEPARTMENT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT April 30, 2013 Bradley Odell Henley, 20, was arrested and charged with community corrections - misdemeanor. He is held in the Chester County Jail. No bond has been set at this time. May 2, 2013 Justin Lee Byrd, 19, was arrested and charged with vandalism, desecration of a venerated object and theft of property $1,000-$9,999. He is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $20,000 bond. Tiwana K. Hemby, 38, was arrested and charged with violation of community corrections - misdemeanor. She was reinstated on probation. Christopher Tyler

Mason, 20, was arrested and charged with desecration of a venerated object, vandalism and theft of property $1,000-$9,999. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $20,000 bond. Christian Clay Trice, 21, was arrested and charged with manufacture/delivery/sell of controlled substance. He is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $25,000 bond. May 3, 2013 Ashley Jean Lewis, 30, was arrested and charged with violation of community corrections-misdemeanor and failure to appear. She is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $2,250 bond. Seaman Wade Vanhoose, 32, was arrested and charged with assault. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $2,000 bond. April 5, 2013 Kelly Ann Burton, 44, was arrested and charged with public intoxication. She is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $250 bond. Billy Ray Sadler, 63, was arrested and charged with public intoxication, violation of open container and simple domestic

assault. He was released from the Chester County Jail after posting a $5,000 bond. Damon Monta Trice, 34, was arrested and charged with simple domestic assault. He is held in the Chester County Jail in lieu of a $25,000 bond. CHESTER COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT April 24, 2013 8:16 a.m. - 235 Clayton Road - Station One responded to a vehicle fire. April 27, 2013 10:51 p.m. - 1285 Cagle Trail - Station One responded to a lighning strike on a gas line. April 28, 2013 6:43 p.m. - 2305 Hutchinson Road Sweetlips responded to a tree on a power line. May 2, 2013 12:37 a.m. - 2735 Hughes Road - Hearn Chapel responded to a malfunctioning smoke detector. CHESTER COUNTY RESCUE SQUAD No reports CHESTER COUNTY GENERAL SESSIONS COURT No reports. CHESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT No reports

TBI increases reward for murderer of Franklin County man The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation last week increased the reward for the remaining at large fugitive wanted for the murder of a Franklin County man in March 2013. Information leading to the arrest of David Gordon Jenkins now stands at $2,500. Jenkins, 46, last known address 3554 Asbury Road, Manchester, is wanted by the Franklin County Sheriff ’s Office and TBI for one count of first degree murder and one count of felony murder for the beating death of 26-year-old Corey Nathaniel Matthews. Matthews’ body was found in a corn field across from the Jackson Cemetery in Cowan on March 24 after his family reported him missing. He was found lying on his back in wet clothes from a recent rainstorm with blunt force trauma to his head and face. Investigators believe Matthews’ was targeted because of his affiliation with the Aryan Nation. Jenkins was put on the state’s Top Ten Most Wanted list on April 10 and has not been located. Although some leads on his whereabouts have been from out-ofstate, search efforts are now being concentrated in the Tennessee and Kentucky area. Jenkins is

described as a white male with brown hair and brown eyes. He is 5’10” and weighs approximately 185 lbs. He has numerous tattoos on his arms, left shoulder, chest, back and thighs, as well as numerous scars. Jenkins criminal history dates back to 1985 and includes assault, drug trafficking, resisting arrest, possession of stolen property, robbery, escape, writing bad checks, DUI and traffic violations. Another subject wanted for the murder, Cody Keith Holmes, was also added to the state’s Top Ten list with Jenkins, but was located in Fort Walton, Fla. on April 16. He and the other two subjects, Todd Eugene Dalton and John Corey Lanier, have been charged in the murder are currently in the Franklin County Jail being held without bond. All four subjects are from Coffee County and have known affiliations with the Aryan Brotherhood and Aryan Nation. Jenkins should be considered armed and dangerous and approached with extreme caution. Anyone with information on the whereabouts of David Gordon Jenkins is urged to call the TBI at 1-800-TBI-FIND (1800-824-3463). There is a $2,500 reward for information leading to his arrest.

David Gordon Jenkins


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

A glowing tan is possible by drinking vegetables Juicing is hot like the vibrant fashion colors for summer -- lemon, raspberry, orange, lime and tomato. Making delicious fruit and veggie juices is great for your energy, immune system, and workout. But did you know the juices can also improve the color of your skin? Many people wonder if they should use a self-tanning cream or slather on copious amounts of sunscreen so they can get a little color in the summer. There’s another option you may never have heard about that can give your skin a healthy golden tan the safest way possible. New research suggests that eating vegetables gives your skin a healthy golden tan color. A study led by Dr. Ian Stephen at the University of Nottingham revealed that eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables gives you more of a healthy golden glow than the sun, according to the journal Evolution & Human

Behavior. Instead of heading for the sun, which can irreversibly damage your skin, you can get your tan on by munching on or juicing up vegetables such as carrots, broccoli, spinach, and tomatoes. These can do double duty, depending on the ingredients you choose. In her newest book, “The Juice Lady's Big Book of Juices and Green Smoothies,” Cherie Calbom, MS, CN, shares recipes for veggie combinations that soothe headaches, cleanse the liver, boost endorphins and help heal stomach ulcers, among other ailments. To think you can get all that and a beautiful tanned appearance! “Our research shows that eating lots of fruit and vegetables is actually more effective” than getting a suntan, Dr. Stephen says. Most people just don’t eat enough brightly colored vegetables and fruit to make a difference.

Television Listings, May 9-15

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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

Five Tennessee sites added to the National Register of Historic Places The Tennessee H i s t o r i c a l C o m m i s s i o n announced five Tennessee sites have been added to the National Register of Historic Places. The National Register of Historic Places is the nation’s official list of cultural resources worthy of preservation. It is part of a nationwide program that coordinates and supports efforts to identify, evaluate and protect historic resources. The Tennessee Historical Commission administers the program in Tennessee. “The National Register honors places that help Tennesseans understand our heritage and what makes our communities unique and enjoyable,” said Patrick McIntyre, executive director of the Tennessee H i s t o r i c a l Commission. “We are confident this recognition will help retain these unique sites for future generations to know and appreciate.” Sites recently added to the National Register of Historic Places include: Allendale Farm – The Allen House in Montgomery County was listed in the National Register in 1978 with less than four acres of land, known as the domestic complex, around the main house. The expanded nomination includes 310 acres and additional information on the agricultural importance and settlement history of the farm. The Allen House is an 1858 Federal-style residence with a 1919 extension that connects to a circa 1800 log

building. Other historic resources on the farm include servant’s quarters, tenant houses, ponds, a stock barn and the agricultural landscape. New information documents that by the mid-20th century, Allendale Farm was involved in statewide farm demonstration programs with Austin Peay State College (now University) and the University of Tennessee, making the Allen family leaders in agricultural innovation. Bodenham Mill – The Bodenham Mill was built around 1930 on the ruins and foundation of a mill built nearly 100 years earlier. The 2.5-story frame building, with a Fitz overshot wheel, was the center of the Bodenham community in Giles County for 25 years. The grist and flour mill was constructed at a time when commercial patterns were changing in rural parts of the state. The first mill on the site drew customers from far away, but by the 1930s as transportation improved in the 20th century, most farmers traveled to cities like Pulaski where there were larger mills that were more efficient. The Bodenham Mill then served the local region, providing more specialized and personalized service. Operated by water power, the basic technology of the mill did not change from the 1830s, but the milling equipment inside was updated. The mill ceased operating in 1955. Moye Boarding House – Constructed between 1878 and 1892, the Moye Boarding

House was originally a one-story frame Cumberland plan house with two rooms. The Cumberland plan is characterized by two front entrances, now visible on the south elevation of the house. A 1.5-story central hall plan house was added to the west end in 1882, becoming the front of the house, and in 1892 the rear porch was partially enclosed and the wood porches and additional decorative woodwork were added to the house giving it the current Folk Victorian styling. The house is a good local representation of the early Cumberland plan, the later central hall plan, and the turned and sawn woodwork that give it a distinctive architectural character in Portland. Today, the property is known locally as the Moye-Green House and is important as an early commercial enterprise in this Sumner County community. Oak Hill Farm – Oak Hill Farm spans Tipton and Haywood counties in West Tennessee. The centerpiece of the 213-acre farm is the 1834 Taylor farmhouse. Other historic resources on the property include a barn, dairy parlor, hog house, tenant houses, granary, smoke house, well house, chicken house, pond, cemetery and the agricultural fields. The Taylor family began farming here in the 1830s and the land continues to be farmed. The changes to the resources and addition of buildings on the farm reflect the evolution of agricultural trends, such as changes in crop pro-

duction and sharecropping. The farm is an important part of the agricultural and architectural history of Tipton and Haywood counties. The house is a fine example of a Federal I-house and the farm itself is representative of preWWII progressive farming and postWWII agricultural innovation. Thomas P. Kennedy Jr. House – The Thomas P. Kennedy Jr. House was listed in the National Register in 2003 for its architectural importance. This revised nomination expands the boundaries from 25.7 acres to 166.6 acres in order to document how the property represents a country estate of the early 20th century. The Colonial Revival style house was designed by Nashville architect Donald Southgate and built in 1937 on the outskirts of Nashville. In addition to Kennedy’s house, stock barns and farm outbuildings were built on the property and several 19th century features such as stone walls, a historic cemetery, springhouse and sunken roadbed were incorporated into the landscaping. The Thomas P. Kennedy Jr. House is one of the few historic estates like this in the Nashville area. Links to each of the completed nomination forms can be found in the site descriptions listed above. For more information about the National Register of Historic Places or the Tennessee Historical Commission, please visit the website at www.tnhistoricalcommission.org.

Public invited to provide environmental assessment imput to review use of genetically modified crops The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking public input as it evaluates the future use of genetically modified crops on national wildlife refuges that use farming in the Southeast Region. These refuges use farming as a wildlife management tool to help meet refuge specific conservation objectives for waterfowl and other species. Genetically modified crops (GMCs, GM crops, or biotech crops) are plants that have had their DNA modified by using genetic engineering techniques to improve growth and resist pests and other harmful agents. These crops have been used since their de-regulation by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) in the mid 1990s. Since then, GMCs have become a widespread feature of American agriculture. The public is encouraged to review information or attend public meetings that will be held in June. Comments will be considered and a determination will be made after addressing those comments and any new

information that is accumulated during this environmental assessment. The 90-day comment period will end on July 28. APHIS continues to evaluate each GMC through an extensive scientific evaluation and regulatory process before granting non-regulated status. Only those GMCs that have been evaluated and deregulated by APHIS will be considered for use on our farming refuges in the Southeast Region. The list of deregulated GMCs and GMCs still under petition is located on the APHIS website at: http://www.aphis.usda. gov/brs/ph_permits.ht ml. The Southeast Region ceased using GMCs at the conclusion of the 2012 planting season as a result of litigation. It is undertaking additional NEPA analysis as a result of that litigation to further analyze the effects upon the human environment of the use of GMC soybeans and corn in the Southeast Region’s refuge farming program. The NEPA analysis will focus on corn and soybean GMC varieties and on their Bacillus Thuringiensis (Bt) insertions. Bacillus

Thuringiensis (Bt) is a bacterium found in soil that has properties that allow it to be used as a biological pesticide. It has been used as a pesticide since the 1920s, and can now be inserted into the DNA of plants to serve as a pesticide to larva and other insects. These crops will be the only ones considered for use to meet conservation goals on refuges in the foreseeable future. We invite public scoping comments on the environmental assessment as it is being planned. Comments may be submitted in several ways: Public scoping meetings will be held at five locations in the region at 6 – 8 p.m. local times at the following dates and locations: June 6 – Pocosin Lakes NWR, 205 South Ludington Drive, Columbia, N.C.; June 10 – Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, 2700 Refuge Headquarters Road, Decatur, Ala.; June 11 – Dyersburg Activity Center, 1101 Shelby Drive, Dyersburg, Tenn.; June 12 – Natchez Convention Center, Natchez Room, 211 Main Street, Natchez, Miss.; and

June 13 – Best Western of Alexandria Inn & Suites & Conference Center, Magnolia Room, 2720 N. MacArthur Drive, Alexandria, La. For additional information and to submit comments for consideration in the scoping phase of the PEA please visit the website https://sites.google.com /site/fwsregion4gmcpei s/. The website will be the online center for public information, updates, and involvement in the environmental assessment process. Comments may also be sent by mail by July 28, 2013 to: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1875 Century Boulevard, Suite 400, Attention: NEPA Coordinator, Atlanta, Georgia 30345, and may also be sent via email to: fw4_gmcpea@fws.gov. The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov/southeast.


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Vet Cemetery receives donation

Henderson Post 157 American Legion donated $500 to West Tennessee Veterans Cemetery. Russell Clayton, left, service officer, and James Phillips, adjutant, presented the check to Julia McBee.

Beverly Holloman receives ‘Who’s Who” award The Tennessee Health Care A s s o c i a t i o n ( T H C A ) / Te n n e s s e e Center for Assisted Living (TNCAL) has named Beverly Holloman, a resident at Henderson Health and Rehabilitation Center, to its annual Who’s Who in Tennessee Long-term Care. Honorees in this year’s Who’s Who recognition program include military heroes, educators, entertainers and other elders living in THCA/TNCAL member nursing homes and assisted living c o m m u n i t i e s statewide. Holloman was a teacher for many years. She and her husband, Bill, traveled around the world and lived many places across the United States for his job. To

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Jacks good posture in his freshly ironed uniform. His in-laws, Neva Harvey, Jane Morris, Charlotte Joyner and Lance and Robert Bailey felt he was a brother instead of a brother-in-law. He was a volunteer Chester County deputy sheriff along with my husband. They became close friends. They relieved regular officers who needed vacation time. I fondly called Ed a nickname from the television series Andy Griffin. Doesn’t “Andy” suit his personality - a gentleman, a good dad, a community helper, but most of all a soft-spoken and kind peacemaker with a smile? A tender salute travels with our friend. Mayberry isn’t the same and our community isn’t either! Sophocles - “For whoever knows how to return a kindness he has received-must be a friend above price.” The Bailey family also has another loss. Their deceased brother, Robert, married Ruby Brewer (sister of Max Brewer and Nell Rankin). Ruby lives in a retirement home. Their son-in-law, Jim Loy, age 65, died May 4 while mowing the lawn. He is survived

this day, she loves to share stories about her travels and the children she taught. Holloman will receive a Who’s Who certificate of achievement during National Nursing Home Week, May 12-18, an event celebrating the staff, residents, volunteers and family members who contribute to the quality of life for those living in our nation’s long-term care facilities. Her profile will also be featured on THCA’s website, www.thca.org. “This year, our theme was ‘Glory Days,’ and we asked our caregivers to help our residents relive the great times in their lives,” THCA Executive Director Jesse Samples said. “It is a privilege to recognize these men and women for their

accomplishments. They have made many notable contributions to their communities and touched the lives of all who have known them.” Since 1983, the Who’s Who in Tennessee Long-term Care program has recognized almost 2,000 outstanding individuals living in THCA/TNCAL member facilities that have made noteworthy contributions to society and helped to shape history through their actions. Henderson Health and Rehabilitation Center is a member of THCA/TNCAL, a nonprofit organization whose members include senior living c o m m u n i t i e s throughout the state. For more information on long-term care in Tennessee, visit www.thca.org.

by his wife, Nancy and their children, Jamie from Florida and Brian Loy from Waynesboro. Jim will be buried at Bay View Cemetery in Pensacola, Fla. Several of the Bailey family members traveled to Florida to show support, and returning

sadly to attend Ed Pitt’s funeral. Oscar Wilde- “Where there is sorrow there is holy ground”. God bless good mothers on Mother’s Day. I miss mine. Forget chicken soupMommas are good for the soul. Call 989-7485 with tidbits.

TAKE US on vacation Chester Countians are now planning exciting destinations around the globe. When you take your trip this summer, be sure to Take Us With You. Just take along a copy of the Chester County Independent, and have your photo taken as you read the paper on the beach, or in front of a well-known landmark (similar to the photo above). Then submit the photo to the newspaper and we’ll publish it in a special edition next fall. You can also win prizes. For more information, call the Independent at 989-4624.

Your Roving Reporter spoke with many people Monday morning, May 6, from a 5-year-old to ones in their 70’s. This weeks question was, “What do you think is the best thing about living here in Henderson?” How about you – what would you answer? Think about it - What would you expect the most people would say??? Strangely enough, almost everyone I talked with Monday chose to remain anonymous, and what made it seem so strange to me was that almost everyone had the same answer – “It’s the people.” – With very slight variations. One lady simply said, “It’s quiet and you know everybody.” Daisy said, “I just moved here … so I don’t know. I like it so far … it’s alright. I came from Memphis, so, you know. … But I like a small town.” An older lady said, “It’s just a nice place, and people are friendly … I moved away once, but moved back.” When I asked her why she came back she replied, “Well, my folks live here, and I came back.” She has no intentions of moving again. Kevin stated, “I think it’s because it is a small community.” A lady sitting in her car after shopping

said, “Well, I don’t know. I’ve just always lived here. … I’ve never had a reason to leave.” Paul Hatch, also sitting in his car, rolled his driver side window down and took the time to talk with me, and his answer was, “Because people are friendly.” (He was a good example of that.) Another gentleman, sitting in his car, paused for quite a while as he thought about how to answer the question, “What is the best thing about living here in Henderson?” After several seconds went by he said, “I don’t know how to answer that question … I live here, but I can’t answer that right now.” I asked if he liked it here, and this was his reply, “It’s OK. It’s a … I hate to say it …” and after a small laugh he continued, “But … it’s a … ‘college town,’ and it’s never going to change. It’s gonna always be the same. I’ve been here for 40-something years and nothing has changed at all. It’s the same thing as it was … except people move in and out.” He said all this with a smile on his face, so I guess even with how he feels about living here, he must still like it – he’s still here! (smile) I was raised in a college town in Kentucky, and after 50 years have gone by, the college is now a University, it

has sprawled out encompassing many city blocks, but the town, the downtown is still the same – there are malls and shopping centers and hotels that didn’t use to be there, but downtown – it truly has never changed. So, I do understand what this gentleman said. Finally a little guy, 5years old, was nearby so I asked him, “Do you like living in Chester County?” I got a great big up-anddown shoulder-shrug! I asked a few other little questions to put him at ease, like does he like School? To which I got a repetitive up-anddown head shake, intimating a “Yes” answer, along with a slight smile. He looked at his mom, and she spoke for him, with his positive head shakes agreeing with everything, she said, “He loves the country. When we first moved here he said, ‘I love this place, because I can have my dog!’” Next week’s Roving Reporter question is “What is the most important quality in a friend.” Think about it – and check back next week to see what fellow Chester Countians have to say. If you have a question you would like the “Roving Reporter” to ask Chester Countians, email it to jpatterson@chestercountyindependent.co m.


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

Freed Hardeman Nursing Program 2013 Graduates give advice to future students

Paige Atkinson, 22

Brittany Nichols, 22

Andrea Chambers, 22

Kathleen Childress, 22

Michelle McLeod, 22

Lauren Oliver, 21

“Don’t give up. I’m not going to try to sugar coat it and say it wasn’t hard because it was very hard. And there were times where you felt overwhelmed and stressed but I would never take back the hard work because I learned so much and it’s helped me prepare to start working as a RN.”

“If you know that nursing is your true passion, I just want to tell you to persevere. It’s going to be tough but if you know that’s how you want to serve God and that’s what’s truly in your heart, don’t ever give up ... because it’s worth it. Your interactions with your patients makes all the studying worth it....”

“... Looking back I realize the things I thought were challenging my first and second year were nothing compared [to this]. You’re junior and senior years are there before you know it so take it seriously from the beginning and it will just make it better in the future.”

“...When things seem down, don’t give up. You’re going to have to study a lot. I know that’s kind of a given. That’s kind of cliché but nobody really told me that.”

“Learn how to study early. It takes a lot of effort to learn how to acurately study and waiting until you actually get into nursing school is very hard; makes the beginning of nursing school even harder than it already is.”

“I think that one thing that is very important to start your nursing education is to really develop a passion for nursing because that’s going to fuel the dedication that you put toward your education and with dedication you can really succeed.”

FHU graduate photos courtesy of Freed Hardeman University

Florence Nightingale Pledge

Olivia Poteete, 22

Marianne Sansom, 23

“Get ready to work hard. Everything that your teachers are doing, they’re doing for your benefit so don’t complain just take the work and it’s hard work but in the end it’ll help you with the test. They’re just preparing you for the NCLEX And that’s the most important thing.”

“Keep things in perspective but study hard and realize that what you’re going to be doing is different than a lot of other careers. You’re taking care of people when they’re so very sick.” She wishes someone had told her “Passing matters but don’t be upset if you don’t get an A on something.”

I solemnly pledge myself before God and in the presence of this assembly, to pass my life in purity and to practice my profession faithfully. I will abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous, and will not take or knowingly administer any harmful drug. I will do all in my power to maintain and elevate the standard of my profession, and will hold in confidence all personal matters committed to my keeping and all family affairs coming to my knowledge in the practice of my calling. With loyalty will I endeavor to aid the physician in his work, and devote myself to the welfare of those committed to my care. courtesy of the American Nurses Association

Sarah Thompson, 26 “Make sure you’re committed to it before you come into it because it does require a lot out of you and if you misunderstand what it’s going to take then you’re not going to succeed because it does take a lot. Realizing that from the start will really help you.”

Chester County High School Nursing Students share their dreams for the future

Briera Lockett, 17 “I’ve always wanted to be a nurse and I just like helping out people, just giving them a helping hand.” She plans on attending Austin Peay University.

Carie Massengill, 17 In five years Carie plans to “be a pharmacist. I [will] still be in pharmacy school then because it’s six years so I’ll work as a CNA until then.” She plans on attending Union University

Chloe Sweatman, 17

Christine Guymon, 18

Dakota Crouse, 17

Dylan Collins, 17

Ultimately, ... I want to be a medical missionary and talk to people about the gospel and give them a second chance both physically and spiritually.” She plans on attending Freed Hardeman.

“I know I want a career in healthcare but I’m not sure what route I want to go yet so hopefully in five years I’ll be graduated from college with a career in healthcare.” She plans on attending Southern Utah University.

In 5 years she sees herself “hopefully as a RN in the ER or the neonatal or something like that”. She plans on attending Jackson State Community College.

“Once I graduate Union, ... I want to go somewhere like Vanderbilt for my graduate degree and then while I’m at Vanderbilt working I’m hoping to go into something like pediatric gastroenterology. ” He plans on attending Union University.

Melanie Hanson, 17

Kaitlyn Colbert, 18

In 5 years she says “I will have my respiratory therapy degree and physical therapy assistant so I’ll just get a job and work from there.” She plans on attending Jackson State Community College and transferring to MTSU.

In 5 years she will “hopefully work in either oncology or labor and delivery and hopefully have a good job.” She plans on attending Jackson State Community College and transferring to complete her degree.

Morgan Williams, 17

Steven Cody Henson, 18

Krista Hatch, 18

Laura Eaton, 18

Tamacha Couch, 18

Lauren Mobley, 18

In 5 years “I see myself graduated from college through Memphis with a four year Bachelor degree and hopefully working in a pediatric unit at Jackson General.” She plans to attend Jackson State Community College.

“In 5 years, I’ll be graduated from Union with my BS in Nursing and I’m hoping to be working at Vanderbilt .... And then I want to go to graduate school to get my doctorate.” He plans on attending Union University.

In 5 years she sees herself “Working as a RN.” She is not sure of the field yet but would like to work at Jackson General. She plans on attending Jackson State Community College.

In 5 years “I plan to be working as a RN in the emergency room and I plan to become an emergency room physician.” She plans on attending Jackson State Community College.

In 5 years “I really want to be in graduate school and I want to become a registered nurse.” She would like to work with older people. She plans on attending Dyersburg State Community College.

In 5 years she sees herself “graduated from college with a Bachelor degree in Nursing and working in pediatrics at Vanderbilt or somewhere like that.” She plans on attending the University of Tennessee at Martin.


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SSppoorrttss Thursday, May 9, 2013

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Victorious Lady Lions earn NAIA bid The FreedHardeman University Lady Lion softball team is finally headed to the national tournament. The Lady Lions did it the hard way, playing out of the losers’ bracket and winning five straight games to claim the TranSouth/Gulf Coast Unaffiliated G r o u p Championship and an automatic bid to the N A I A National Softball Tournament opening round later this month. FHU (31-7) capped the bid with a 2-1 victory over Bethel in the final game played in the long history of the T r a n S o u t h Conference. It was an exciting day for the team and Coach Todd Humphry in particular. Humphry was tasked with restarting the program 13 years ago and, although there have been a few close calls, has never had the opportunity to

coach in the softball national tournament. “It means a lot for our program,” Humpry said. “We had a goal this year after last year's close call [finished runner-up in the conference tournament] that we wanted nothing less than a trip to national tournament. It's definitely a sense of accomplishment to get where we are right now.” The tournament was scheduled to end on Friday, but heavy rainfall forced the postponement until Saturday. When the rain became too much for the fields to handle, Freed-Hardeman had already built a 6-0 lead in the second inning over the Lady Wildcats. When play resumed on Saturday, that big lead was a good thing to have. Bethel got back-toback home runs from Brooklyn Jenkins and Shelby Evans in the third to cut the FHU

Photo courtesy Freed-Hardeman University

Members of the Freed-Hardeman University women’s softball program receive their championship banner Saturday after charging through the loser’s bracket last week in Jackson to win a NAIA national tournament bid. lead in half, then pulled another run closer in the fifth on an RBI single by Jenkins. That was as close as the Lady Wildcats would get, as FreedHardeman responded with two runs in the sixth on RBI singles from Caneisha Turner

and Natalie Nelson. Sarah Elizabeth Cousar, meanwhile, retired eight of the last nine batters she faced to earn her 24th win of the year - a new singleseason program record. The second game See FHU, Page 4-B

District softball tournament delayed Games in the District 14-AA softball scheduled for Monday at Eaglette Field were postponed by rain. Chester County was scheduled to take on South Side at 7:30 p.m., however, the tournament has been pushed back one day with championship round now set for 7:30 p.m. May 10, and the if necessary game at 7 p.m. May 11.

Eagle baseball charging through district tourney Chester County won its first two games last week in the District 14-AA baseball tournament. Weather has delayed several area tournaments and the Eagles were scheduled to play early this week, weather permitting. In the first round game played April 30 at Eagle Field, CCHS had little trouble disposing of Jackson-Central Merry 13-0. CCHS scored seven times in the first inning, two in the third, and sent the Cougars packing with a four-run fourth. Collin McPherson, two innings, and Malcolm Tipler, three, threw a combined nohitter. McPherson fanned four and Tipler five. Offensively, the Eagles whacked nine hits and benefitted from four JCM

errors and received three free passes to first base. Braden Lott, Brandon Berry and Mason Connor each had two hits. The Eagles rallied from twice to come from behind and beat Lexington 5-4 Thursday in Selmer. Trailing 4-3 in the sixth, Connor led off with a single and moved up on Heath Graves sacrifice. Humphry’s double tied the game with a double over the left-fielder, and one out later Zach Phillips reached base on an error bringing home Tipler who had pinch-run for Humphry. However, the Tigers exerted their claws in the top of the seventh, hoping to steal the win. A lead-off walk put excitement in the Lexington fans, and a one-out hit-by-

pitch put more drama into the equation. A single then loaded the bags, but the lead runner was cut down trying to steal home, and a subsequent ground out ended the contest. Berry had two hits for CCHS including a fifth-inning home run. Hunter Denbow doubled home a run in the second. On the mound, Brady Clark threw the first five frames giving up four earned runs on five hits with a strikeout. McPherson got the win with two innings of relief work. In other baseball news …. Brandon Berry and Taylor Thomas were recently named to the All-Tournament team at the Independent-Appeal Photo by Tammy Lott, Independent Baseball Tournament which Brandon Berry is greeted at home plate by his Chester was played last month in County teammates after Berry hit a home run May 2 against Lexington in the district tournament. McNairy County.

Junior High boys’ soccer places third in tournament Chester County Junior High soccer recently took home the

third place trophy in the West Tennessee Regional Tournament.

The Junior Eagles concluded the season with a record of 9-5.

They had seven shutouts with the starting unit. After a 3-

Photo courtesy Carrie Burns

Chester County Junior High boys’ soccer team celebrates their recent victory in the West Tennessee Regional Tournament in which they finished in third place, the best in school history.

4 start to the season CCJHS concluded by winning six of their last seven contests. The team had to win their last three district games to qualify for the tournament and they did so by beating Jackson Christian and Selmer on the road and St. Mary’s at home. Other notable moments in the season included a 3-0 win over No. 2 seed Covington, a 2-1 overtime victory over No. 1 see Union City, and 4-0 victory over No. 3 seed Medina to secure third place in the tournament out of 24 teams. The Junior Eagles lost 4-0 to University School of

Jackson, the Bruins closest game of the tournament. The 2013 season is the highest finish ever for Chester County Junior High boys’ soccer. The third place trophy was bittersweet for head coach Tommie Kirk who will leave the coaching ranks to become assistant principal at Chester County Middle School. Kirk had a four-year record of 34-12, 74 percent, and the team qualified for the tournament each season, getting to the final round each of the last two years. Assistant coach is Hunter Callis.


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

CCHS soccer competing in district Chester County plays host to a first-round tournament game Monday with the winner advancing on to play Thursday at Trinity Christian Academy in Jackson.

In its last regular season affair, the Eagles romped over McNairy Central 5-12 behind goals by Manny Perez, Ryan Woodham, Brennan Conaway, Austin Coleman and Brodie Weeks.

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Golf Tournaments Date May 10 May 24 May 30

Event Hittin’ for Hospice CCHS Quarterback Club Future Choices

Time 12:30 Noon TBA

Location Woodland Hills Woodland Hills

Pickwick

Freed-Hardeman Softball Date TBA

Opponent Place NAIA National Tournament

Time TBA

Chester County High Baseball

Submitted photo Submitted photo

Brodie Weeks breaks free toward the goal for Chester County in its recent victory over Jackson Central Merry.

Date

Michael Whitehead is right on the ball for the Eagles in a recent game against McNairy Central.

Opponent Time Location District Tournament, Now in Progress, Selmer

Chester County High Softball Date

Opponent Location Time Now in Progress, Eagle Field, Henderson

Chester County High Tennis Date Opponent Location May 9-10 Team Regional Tournaments May 13-14 Individual Regional Tourneys May 16-17 Sectional Tournaments May 21-24 State Tournaments

Time TBA TBA TBA TBA

Hospice golf tourney is May 10

Submitted photo

CCHS Eagle Manny Perez, right controls the ball during a recent game against McNairy Central.

Local couple places at Regional Shoot and Retrieve field trials The Mid South Region of the National Shoot to Retrieve Association conducted its Regional Elimination Trial at Pond Field near Lawrenceburg, on April 5 and 6. Rowdy Waco, owned by Steve and Angela Autry of Chester County was the runner-up. The first round kicked off early Saturday morning to narrow down contestants to the final six dogs. Those six dogs were: Tash's One Eyed Jack, Autry's Rowdy Waco, Tricky Dick Too, Tash's Southern June, Autry's Racie Macie also owned by the Autrys, and Stone Matrix Kate. When the runs were complete it was June handled by Chuck Tash as this year's elimination winner, with Waco handled by as the runner up, followed by third place finisher LJ, handled by Chuck Tash, fourth was Dick, handled by Bill Moore, fifth was Kate, handled by Bill Moore, and Macie came in sixth.

Mid-South Youth Camp plans fishing rodeo, May 11 The 17th Annual Mid-South Youth Camp Youth Fishing Rodeo is set for 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 11, according to camp director Frank Bradford. Young fishermen will be divided into three age categories: 5-8; 9-12; and 13-16. Cash prizes will be awarded in each age group for the highest overall weight caught: 1st - $150; 2nd $125; 3rd -$100; and 4th - $50. In addition, a $50 prize for the biggest fish caught will be awarded in each age group. Entry fee for the event is $15 per child and each may use up to two rods. Food, drinks and bait will be available for purchase on the camp grounds. At 8 a.m. registration will begin. All proceeds from the rodeo benefit MSYC. For additional information, contact Bradford at 435-0177. MSYC is located on Highway 45, north of Henderson.

Steve and Angela Autry pose with one of their championship dogs.

Lions stumble in tournament, end season without NAIA bid Freed-Hardeman University baseball saw another lateinning lead disappear as Bethel University used a five-run seventh inning to fuel a 10-9 win over the Lions at the TranSouth/Gulf Coast Unaffiliated Group Tournament May 1 in Pulaski. The loss eliminated FreedHardeman (38-13-1) from the tournament and left the Lions on the outside looking in when at-large bids to the national tournament were released Sunday. As they did in their opening game, the Lions jumped ahead early with a six-run third inning. However, Bethel answered in the bottom of the third with a three-run home run to cut the FHU lead in half, and both teams scored twice in the fourth to make it 8-5. Mackey's sacrifice fly in the sixth gave FHU a four-run lead and after Dan Creighton worked a scoreless bottom half of the frame, the Lions looked to be in good shape. Creighton, though, ran into trouble in the seventh after allowing a single and double to lead off the inning, so Lion head coach Jonathan Estes went to the bullpen and Joe Creasy. After a walk loaded the bases, Creasy gave up a single to Jerrald but retired the next two hitters and was on the verge of getting out of the jam. But in a near-replay of the pre-

Hospice of West Tennessee will hold a fourman charity golf scramble tournament on May 10 at Woodland Hills Golf Course. “Hittin’ for Hospice” is an annual fundraiser benefiting Camp WINGS. “WINGS” stands for wisdom, insight, knowledge, and guidance through sorrow. The camp is for children ages 7-14 years of age who are grieving the loss of a loved one. The camp is designed to offer these children the opportunity to express their grief through art, music, and play while in the company of caring volunteers and other children who are experiencing loss. The camp is staffed by trained counselors and volunteers and there is no charge for children to attend. Tournament registration and lunch on May 10 start at 11:30. Shotgun starts at 12:30. For more information, call 664-4220 or 1800-286-5717.

vious day's loss to Talladega, a two-out grand slam quickly changed the momentum - and in this case, the lead. Bethel's Celtic Rush hit a 1-1 pitch over the right field fence, turning a three-run deficit into a 10-9 Bethel victory. FHU out-hit the Wildcats, 1110, but stranded six compared to three for Bethel. Mackey went three-for-four with three RBIs while Ferguson and Kyle Dearing both had two hits. Creasy (1-4) took the loss, his second in as many games.

Big lead evaporates

After losing two of three games in the regular season's final series against Martin Methodist in Pulaski, the Lions saw an 8-1 lead through six innings evaporate and turn into an eventual 9-8 loss to Talladega College on the first day of the TranSouth/Gulf Coast Unaffiliated Group Tournament April 30. Talladega scored six runs in the seventh, all off of FHU starter Chris Hatfield, to pull within one run, and took the lead for good with two more in the eighth - strangely enough, on no hits. Hatfield cruised through six innings, allowing a run in the third while fanning seven. Meanwhile, the Lions scored three times in the third and four in the sixth as part of building an 8-1 lead. In the sixth, seniors Justin Mackey

and Joe Mike delivered a pair of big hits - an RBI single by Mackey and a two-run double by Mike - to aid in extending the lead to seven runs. But the seventh inning brought trouble, as Hatfield began to struggle with control. He allowed only three hits in the inning but threw two wild pitches, walked two and hit another to set up a momentumchanging two-out grand slam by Dion Duncan. After that, the Lions didn't recover. FHU didn't truly threaten to score in its final three chances, only putting a runner at second once (in the seventh) and that rally was killed by an inning-ending double play. Joe Creasy took the ball from Hatfield in the eighth and loaded the bases by walking two and hitting a third. Ryan Wood replaced him, hitting the the first batter he faced to tie the game. He coaxed a 6-4-3 double play from the next batter, but it brought in what proved to be the winning run. Pinch-hitter Connor Kohlscheen drew a two-out walk in the ninth to keep hope alive, but Kyle Dearing grounded into a fielder's choice to end the game. Mike and Garrett Ferguson accounted for six of FHU's eight hits with three apiece. Mike had two RBIs as did Ryan Huber.

QB Club Golf Tournament is May 24 at Woodland Hills The Chester County High School Quarterback Club is sponsoring a golf tournament at noon May 24 at Woodland Hills Golf and Country Club north of Pinson. Registration and lunch is at 11 a.m. with a shotgun start to follow. Hole sponsorships are $300 for a four-man team which includes lunch, greens fees, cart rental and hole sponsorship. A four-man team may enter for $250. Hole sponsorship alone is $100. For more information, contact Jason Butler at 697-9342.

Future Choices Golf is May 30 The sixth annual Future Choices Charity Golf Tournament is scheduled for May 30 at Pickwick Landing State Park Golf Course. More information will be released in the future.

Vintage base ball series now underway in Franklin Games of vintage base ball will be played by the vintage base ball team, the Franklin Farriers, beginning noon to 3 p.m. May 5, June 2, June 30, July 28, Aug. 25 and Sept. 29 on the large open field west of Carnton Plantation. It is free and open to the public. The Tennessee Association of Vintage Base Ball – two words as it was in the 1860s – has announced the inaugural season of vintage base ball between its current two teams, the Franklin Farriers and the Nashville Maroons. The games will be played on alternating home fields. This new summer attraction from the Trust will transport players and spectators to the Civil War era, as the game will be played according to the rules and traditions of base ball at that time. Players will pitch underhanded, as was the rule in the 1860s, and will play without gloves, which weren’t introduced to the sport until around 1875. The presence of umpires in vintage base ball is more of a formality than necessity, as calls such as “safe” or “out” are expected to be resolved between the players.


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

Chester County Elite competes Submitted photo

Seventh grade students from Chester County Junior High comprise the West Tenn Elite travel basketball team that recently competed in McNairy County, posting a 2-1 record. The Elite is coached by Bianca Thomas. Team members include, from left: Jermaine Barham, Edmund Dotson, Brennan Phelps, B.J. Burton, Colby Farley, Brandon Lewis, and Jake McCaskill. Not pictured was Ben Phillips.

Waverly’s Hill signs with FHU softball The FreedHardeman University Lady Lion softball team recently added another player to its 2013-14 recruiting class with the signing of Taylor Hill of Waverly. Hill is in her senior season at Waverly Central High School where she is a fouryear starter as a pitcher, first baseman and left fielder. Hill has thrown 310 innings in her career with 261 strikeouts and more than 30 wins while posting an 2.20

ERA. She has also performed at the plate, hitting .381 as a junior with a .505 on-base percentage Hill was named cocaptain and captain of her team as a junior and senior respectively as was named the team's most improved player as a sophomore. She was also an AllMid-State candidate as a junior. "We are looking forward to having Taylor as part of the FHU family," said FHU head

coach Todd Humphry. "Taylor will help add some pop to our offense as well as give us depth at pitchers position. She is a versatile player and will benefit in numerous ways." Hill is the fourth member of the year's recruiting class joining Amanda Bond of Jackson, Katie Clarke of Huntsville, Ala. and Haley Craig of Brighton. She is the daughter of Rick and Tami Hill and Terry Smith.

Freed-Hardeman University Lady Lion softball team recently added to its 2013-14 recruiting class with the signing of Taylor Hill of Waverly.

South Fulton’s Cross signs with Lady Lions

Freed-Hardeman University Lady Lion basketball team recently added to its recruiting class with the signing of Taleeah Cross of South Fulton.

The FreedHardeman University Lady Lion basketball team recently added a West Tennessee player to its 2013-14 recruiting class with the signing of Taleeah Cross of South Fulton. Cross, a 5-foot-5 guard, prepped at South Fulton High School where she was named the District 14A Most Valuable player after averaging 17.7 points, 6.0 rebounds and 2.3 assists per game during her senior season while shooting 48 percent from the

field. Her stellar season helped the Red Devils to a record of 23-8 and a trip to the region semifinals. Cross was also a member of the District 14-A All-Academic squad. The three-time alldistrict selection finished her career with 1,637 points and 603 rebounds. "Taleeah has the ability to take over a game offensively," said FHU head coach Dale Neal. "She has great versatility in her

game. She can handle, she can drive, she can shoot the three and she can defend the quickest of guards. She has a quiet demeanor but a very competitive nature. Taleeah is the kind of player that does whatever she needs to help the team. She certainly has the ability to make an immediate impact on our continued success." Cross is the daughter of Eric Davis and Tiea Cross-Davis and played for Coach Curt Lee.

Junior park ranger program open for ages 6-14 Do you know a child, age 6 to 14, who loves fun and adventure, exploring and discovering nature’s secrets and spending time outdoors? The Tennessee State Parks’ Junior Ranger Program offers all of these, along with excellent educational opportunities, designed to foster a love of nature and to encourage a healthy lifestyle. There are two ways to become an official Tennessee State Parks’ Junior Ranger. Interested kids ages 614 may attend a Junior Ranger Camp, slated for June and July at various parks throughout the state; or complete a series of activities found in the

Junior Ranger Adventure Guide. The sign-up process is easy. To get started, sign up for a Junior Ranger Camp by contacting the office of participating state parks. Free Junior Ranger Adventure Guides are available at any state park. To download a copy of the Adventure Guide or to find upcoming Junior Ranger Camps in your area, visit www.tnstateparks.com /junior_ranger. The state parks’ Junior Ranger Program is designed with flexibility in mind so that participants can choose their own path and set their own pace. Junior Rangers, along with

their families, can enjoy exploring parks, touring visitor centers, attending park programs, hiking the trails and experiencing all the fun and exciting adven-

tures Tennessee’s great state parks have to offer. “Tennessee State Parks’ Junior Ranger Program provides unique opportunities for children to learn about the great outdoors in a fun environ-

From Page 1-B

groundout brought in Evans to tie the game. The lead went right back to FHU in the third after Amber Vansandt's single to right field brought home Cousar. Bethel again appeared to be on the verge of tying or perhaps taking the lead, getting runners on second and third with no outs in the top of the fourth. What happened next could have cost the Lady Wildcats the game. When Evans hit a grounder to Norfork at shortstop, Heather Capps immediately took off from third. Norfork fired the ball

home to Vansandt, who blocked the plate and tagged out Capps. Evans then got hung up between first and second trying to take an extra base and was also tagged out on a quick exchange from Vansandt to Cousar to Cummings. Cousar then struck out Blakley Robertson to end the inning and extinguish what turned out to be Bethel's last real chance to score. “It was a big momentum shift for us as it took air out of their sails,” said Humphry. “Being an experienced team allows us to make those type of plays.”

FHU was close the entire way, a fitting way to end the tournament that saw a pair of early upsets. Shelby Cummings hit a solo home run in the first inning to give FHU a quick 1-0 lead, but Bethel got it right back in the second after a leadoff walk to Evans who then stole second and advanced to third on an error by Mercedes Norfork on the throw down to the bag. Two batters later, Ashley Denfip's

ment,” said TDEC Deputy Commissioner Brock Hill. “We put a lot of thought and effort into all of our programs and activities, while offering an incredibl e

value to parents looking for quality, summer activities.” The Junior Ranger Adventure Guide is divided into four steps. Each step covers different topics and offers a selection of fun, hands-on activities.

Upon completion of each activity, the child gets one step closer to becoming a Junior Ranger. Topics in the initial two steps include safety, history, plants, wildlife, astronomy and water. Step three involves the creation of a stewardship project. In step four, the adventure guide is taken to the park ranger or park office. Upon completion of the program, participants will take the Junior Ranger pledge, receive a badge and are sworn in as official Tennessee State Parks’ Junior Rangers. Tennessee's 54 state parks offer diverse natural, recreational and cultural experiences for individuals, fami-

lies, or business and professional groups. State park features range from pristine natural areas to 18hole championship golf courses. Celebrating its 75th Anniversary this past year, the Tennessee State Parks system was established through legislation in 1937. Today, there is a state park within an hour's drive of just about anywhere in the state, offering a variety of recreational, lodging and dining choices. For more information about Tennessee State Parks, please visit www.tnstateparks.com . For a free brochure about Tennessee State Parks, call 1-888-8672757.

FHU, which after the opening game had hit the ball well all tournament, went cold at the plate against reliever Shawna McAdams, leaving Cousar in a position to keep Bethel from scoring as well. “Sis has been a dominating pitcher for all three years here,” Humphry said. “This year we had a situation where we had to throw her a lot. It was big for her to face teams this many times and still get outs. There are only a few pitchers that could handle a one-run lead in seventh with trip to nationals on the line.” Cousar retired seven

straight batters including a strikeout of Jenkins - before Evans singled with one out in the seventh. She stole second and moved to third on a groundout, leaving Denfip at the plate with a chance to tie the game. Instead, Cousar coaxed a pop-up into shallow left field that, for a moment, looked like it might fall into no-man's land. But Norfork backpedaled underneath the ball and secured it for the final out. Humphry mentioned a lot of players who contributed to the

tournament championship including some who many may have been overlooked such as Jessica Weeks, Kamara Trice and Summer Cole, whose RBI double on Thursday helped FHU stay alive with a 2-1 win over Martin Methodist. “If it wasn't for her double,” he said, “we wouldn't be playing today.” But because of her double, as well as the performance of the other players on the team, the Lady Lions keep playing longer than any previous FHU softball team has before.


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By Melissa Allen This has been a busy week at East Chester Elementary School. First-graders went on a field trip to the Circle Y Ranch in Corinth, Miss. Secondgraders took their field trip in the town of Henderson. They visited the Courthouse, City Hall, County Office Building, Independent, Library, Sonic, and they ended their day eating lunch at Gene Record Park. Third-graders went to the Safari Park in Alamo. Our school hosted Agri-Nature day at our school for all the 3rd-graders in our county. Riley Plunk, Caroline

Education Rogers and Carter Welch were interviewed by WBBJ. While the other grades were busy on their field trips this week, the kindergarten classes were busy practicing for their awards night that was held Thursday. This year’s theme was “Oh, the places you’ll go!” The kindergarteners received their awards and sang several songs that touched everyone’s hearts. This week is just as busy as last week. Third-graders are taking their last constructed response test. Mrs. Nancy Canada, from the Chester County Library, will be coming to talk about the Summer Reading Program. Every grade is taking their last STAR assessments for the year. It is also Teacher Appreciation week. Teachers have been able to enjoy a lot of

good treats brought by very thoughtful parents. Kindergarten teachers are busy testing next year’s kindergartners. As we are meeting new East Chester students, we are saying goodbye to our 3rdgraders. This is the last few days that we will get to see them in the halls as East Chester students. They will be touring the middle school this week. A parent breakfast will be held in their honor from 8 to 8:30 a.m. on Wednesday, May 11, and from 8:30 to 10 a.m. will be their awards ceremony. The 1st grade will have their awards program in their classroom from 8:30 – 9:15 a.m. Tuesday, May 14. The 2nd-grade awards programs will be held in their classrooms at 9:15 – 10 a.m. on the same day.

Lane professor selected to participate in special seminar Lane College is pleased to announce that Montana Torrey, Assistant Professor of Art, is one of a select group of faculty members nationwide chosen by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC) to participate in a special week-long seminar on Teaching European Art in Context. The seminar will be held in conjunction with an exhibition of rare traveling masterpieces of Dutch art featuring works by Vermeer, Hals and Rembrandt. The exhibition, Girl with a Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings from the Mauritshuis, will be on view at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia, beginning in June 2013. CIC selected 21 faculty members to participate in the seminar, “Dutch Art, Patrons,

and Markets,” which will take place at the High Museum June 23–28, 2013. The seminar aims to strengthen the teaching of art history to undergraduates at smaller colleges and universities. Catherine Scallen, Chair of the Department of Art History and Art at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, where she has taught since 1995, will lead the program. “The seminar will be especially valuable for faculty members at institutions without large campus museums or proximity to major art museums. Art historians in all fields and studio artists, as well as faculty members who specialize in history, European studies, and related fields will find this seminar of inter-

est. We believe that Prof. Torrey will play a strong role in the seminar,” said CIC President Richard Ekman. “We are very pleased that Prof. Torrey has been accepted to the CIC Seminar on Teaching European Art. She is an excellent artist and educator who makes exceptional contributions to our students. Additionally, she has contributed to the local community through gallery exhibits here is Jackson, TN. I am sure that her experience this summer will be of great benefit to our students upon her return. We look forward to her continued growth as an educator and artist,” said Dr. Deborah Buchanan, Lane College Vice President for Academic Affairs.

FHU to host summer camps With summer quickly approaching, in addition to its usual slate of athletic camps, Freed-Hardeman University is making preparations for four summer camps: MidSouth Youth Camp, GO! Camp, QUEST and Horizons. Students are invited to participate in one or more of these camps, which offer service, leadership and creative opportunities. Mid-South Youth Camp, located on Highway 45 outside of Henderson, offers something for students of all ages. Beginning June 2, MSYC will hold eight weeks of camp and five weeks of junior camp. The daily schedule consists of classes, devotionals, sports and nightly activities, including a hike and talent show; campers have the opportunity to grow closer to God and each other throughout the week. Those interested

my contact Frank Bradford at 989-6987 or v i s i t http://www.fhu.edu/m syc for more information. FHU’s GO! Camp, an event that moves teenagers into acts of meaningful service, is scheduled for June 2-7. Aimed at students from grades 7 to 12, GO! Camp strives to “Love God. Love your neighbor. Change the world.” GO! campers will participate in sessions and labs, and work together to serve others. Interested persons should contact Brad Montague, the director of GO!, at 9896023 or visit http://www.fhu.edu/g o for more information. High school students with a passion for knowledge are encouraged to attend QUEST, which stands for “ Q u e s t i o n . Understand. Explore. Solve. Think.” The aca-

demic camp will be held on FHU’s campus June 16-21. The theme for QUEST is “ComiConquest,” and the camp will be separated into two disciplines, fine arts and science. One may contact Dr. Barbara England at 989-6089 or visit http://www.fhu.edu/q uest for more information. Horizons, FHU’s annual Christian leadership camp, will be July 7-12. In honor of its 33rd year, the theme for this year’s Horizons is “33: My Life, His Business.” Campers will attend devotionals and classes throughout the week, and participate in games, group discussions and service projects. Horizons is directed by Kirk Brothers and Doug Burleson. For more information, one may v i s i t http://www.fhu.edu/h orizons.

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Virginia Richards, representative of the Education Consumers Foundation, presents Melinda Harris, principal of The Montessori School at Bemis, with an award recognizing the school as one of the most effective schools in the state.

Harris recognized for success of Bemis school Every parent wants their child to go to a school that does all it can to advance student learning, one that helps every single child “be all that they can be,” no matter their starting point. On April 18, the Education Consumers Foundation, host of the Value-Added Achievement Awards, joined with parents, students, and staff at a ceremony to recognize Principal Melinda Harris for her role in making The Montessori School at Bemis one of the most effective schools in the state of Tennessee. While attention is often paid to the importance of teachers, it is the principal who works behind the scenes to make great teaching possible, building a culture of excellence and supporting the efforts of teachers throughout the school. A 2012 study reported in Education Next found that highly effective principals raise the achievement of a typical student in their schools by between two and seven months of learning in a single school year; it is this kind of important but often unheralded work that the Foundation seeks to acknowledge. Every year, the Education Consumers Foundation (ECF) selects 18 elementary and middle school principals for this award based on the most important school measurement available: Learning gains across the entire student body, as measured by Tennessee’s ValueAdded Assessment System (TVAAS).

TVAAS measures achievement gain in a way that permits schools to be compared regardless of the makeup of the student body. Schools whose students make the greatest annual gains in achievement earn the highest valueadded scores. The Montessori School at Bemis is one of the state’s top performers on TVAAS, ranking 28th in the state among 530 K-8 and middle schools, and is the third place winner of the ValueAdded Achievement Awards among middle schools in West Tennessee. Harris was also recognized in 2011 through the awards program. “Schools like The Montessori School at Bemis show what a dedicated principal and teaching force can achieve in Tennessee schools,” noted ECF President Dr. J. E. Stone. “If every school performed at the level of our 18 winners, Tennessee would lead the nation in educational improvement.” According to Commissioner of Education Kevin Huffman, “I am pleased to join with the Education C o n s u m e r s Foundation in recognizing the principals and schools that are really moving the needle on student achievement. These education leaders are shining examples of what’s possible in Tennessee.”

How the winners were selected Each year, the Education Consumers Foundation ranks Tennessee elementary

and middle schools according to their value-added performance. Rankings are made using schools’ letter grades for reading/language arts, math, science, and social studies; reading/language arts and math scores are double-weighted to reflect the importance of these areas. A “grade point average” is calculated, with a complementary measure – the raw TVAAS value of schools’ reading/language arts and math scores – used as a secondary factor. In all, 18 winners were selected from among Tennessee’s nearly 1,300 public elementary and middle schools. First, second and third place awards are given in two categories, Elementary and Middle schools, in each of Tennessee’s three regions: East, Middle, and West. Because the awards recognize high quality leadership, only schools where the principal has served for at least five years were considered. “School leaders like Melinda Harris are the kinds of principals we want to see in every Tennessee school: dedicated leaders willing to do whatever it takes to create the conditions for student success,” said Dr. Stone. The winning principals each receive a certificate, a banner and a cash award: $3,000 for first place, $2,000 for second place, and $1,000 for third place. Additional information about the winners, including school performance charts, is available at www.education-consumers.org.

Chester County prekindergarten registration is May 14, 15 Prekindergarten registration will be held from 3:30 – 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 14 and Wednesday, May 15 at East Chester Elementary. A child must be four years old by Aug. 31, 2013 in order to be eligible for prekindergarten for the 2013-14 school year.

Documents needed during the registration process include: birth certificate (official copy), social security card, proof of income (current check stub, 2013 tax return), and proof of residence (example: water bill, electrical bill, or rent receipt).

You will be notified in July if your child qualifies for the class. On the first day of school you must provide updated immunization records and physical exam. For more information about registration, call Linda Patterson or Patsy Doyle at 989-5134.


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CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

Dealerships, highway dept. assist auto tech at CCHS

Chester County Head Start Center,

Photos by James A. Webb, Independent

Richie Reed, center, service manager at Moss Miller Inc. pre-owned automobile dealership, hands over the title to a 1995 Lexus with an approximate value of $3,000 to James Carter, instructor at Chester County High School. The automobile will be used by students in the automotive technology class. Below, students put their skills to the test repairing a Corvette. At left, two CCHS students stand next to a truck loaned to the class by the Chester County Highway Department.

Henderson student receives award R a c h e l Bloomingburg, of Henderson, was honored at FreedH a r d e m a n University’s academic awards ceremony May 1. The Department of Behavioral Sciences and Family Studies recognized her for her work in her major

By Ally Rogers Final exams will be given next week. Lists of students who may be exempt from an exam due to grades or lack of absences have been posted and teachers are reviewing the lists with students. Please clear up any absences that have occurred with the office ASAP. All 8th-graders enjoyed “8th-Grade Day” in their honor, last Friday. There was a slide show, speeches for Student Council positions, announcements of 8th-grade superlatives, yearbook signing time, lots of picture taking, a special lunch, ice cream and nacho snacks and a talent show.

department. Bloomingburg will receive a Bachelor of Science in child and family studies May 11. She has consistently excelled in her academic pursuits. She is the daughter of Randy and Joyce Bloomingburg. Accredited by the

Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to offer bachelor’s and master’s degrees, FHU has been consistently listed in the top tier of U.S. News and World Report’s “Best R e g i o n a l Universities—South” category.

Special thanks go to Mrs. Ivery, Miss Bradford and Mr. Murphy for their hard work in planning this day! Our boys’ soccer team completed their district tournament last week. They made it to the Final Four and placed third in a very tough match of games. They have had an outstanding season and we are very proud of their hard work! We appreciate Coach Kirk and Coach Callis for working with these players. Congratulations go to our 8th-grade freshman class officers and student council members. Those elected were President, Colton Cronin; Vice-President, Hanna Hopper; Secretary, Dominique Poe; Reporter, Reyna Thomas; and Student Council Members, Paige Pipkin, Candice Barber, Emily Colbert, Madison Duff and Joe Fuller. These students had to present a speech to the

class and were voted on by their classmates. Several try-outs for various sports are being held this week and in the upcoming weeks. Junior High basketball try-outs for boys going into 6th grade were Monday, those going into 8th grade were Tuesday, those going into 7th grade will be Wednesday, and Thursday will be a callback day. Girl’s try-outs were last week and results will be posted. High school Volleyball try-outs will be May 9-10 and will be until 5 p.m. at the high school. HighSchool soccer try-outs will be May 22-24. Boys will try out from 9 - 10:30 a.m., and girls will try out from 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. These will be held at the field behind North Chester. Dates to put on your calendars include: May 9 - Art Club Trip May 10 - CSH Health Fair May 13-15 - Final Exams

FHU schedules pinning ceremony for first BSN graduates Freed-Hardeman University has set the pinning ceremony for its first class of Bachelor of Science in Nursing graduates for 5 p.m. May 10 in Ayers Auditorium. Nine students will receive their BSN degrees Saturday, May 11, in Loyd Auditorium. Pinning, a symbolic welcoming of newly graduated nurses into the profession, is a tra-

dition of nursing. The modern ceremony dates to the 1860s when Florence Nightingale was awarded the Red Cross of St. George in recognition of her service during the Crimean War. She then presented a medal to her brightest graduates. By 1916, the practice of pinning new nurses was standard throughout the United States.

Students participating in the ceremony include the following: Paige Atkinson, Centerville; Andrea Chambers, Franklin; Michelle McLeod, Elkhart, Ind.; Brittany Nichols, Nolensville; Lauren Oliver, Wetumpta, Ala.; Olivia Poteete, Jackson; Marianne Sansom, Eudora, Kan.; and Sarah Thompson, Adamsville.

East Chester Elementary, Jacks Creek Elementary, and West Chester Elementary Schools and Chester County Middle School *Milk choice offered daily Monday, May 13 MANAGER’S CHOICE

Tuesday, May 14 MANAGER’S CHOICE

Last Day of School —MANAGER’S CHOICE

Wednesday, May 15 Last Day of School —MANAGER’S CHOICE

Chester County High School *Cereal, fruit choice, fruit juice, and milk choice offered daily Also, pizza choice each day

Chester County Junior High School *Cereal, fruit, milk choice offered daily Monday, May 13 MANAGER’S CHOICE Tuesday, May 14 MANAGER’S CHOICE Wednesday, May 15

Monday, May 13 MANAGER’S CHOICE Tuesday, May 14 MANAGER’S CHOICE Wednesday, May 15 Last Day of School —MANAGER’S CHOICE

Medical schools honor FHU alumni Two alumni of Freed-Hardeman University, Kyle Wiser and Nick Darby, have been recognized for their work and success in medical school. Both students graduated from FHU in 2011. Wiser is one of 61 students accepted into the Pediatric Oncology Education, or POE, program for 2013. The program, sponsored by St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, provides students with biomedical and oncology research experience. In addition to research training, stu-

dents will also attend lectures and work with a faculty mentor. Wiser is finishing his first year of medical school at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis. Darby has been named one of six Dean’s Primary Care Scholars at University of Alabama Birmingham School of Medicine. As a Dean’s Scholar, Darby will receive $10,000 in scholarship money per year of medical school. He will have the opportunity to enroll in

extra classes and clinic times. Darby was also recently selected president of his interest specialty group at UAB. “FHU emphasis on strong preparation for professional schools is evidenced by high acceptance rates for our graduates,” Dr. Leann Self-Davis, dean of the School of Sciences and Mathematics, said. Approximately 91 percent of FHU graduates who prepared for medical school have been accepted into the professional program.


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

PAGE 7-B

Draw Your Mom Contest The Chester County Independent recently asked kids to submit their best drawing of their mother in honor of Mother's Day. Below you will find some of the cutest entries we've had to date. The staff of the Chester County Independent wants to wish all mothers a very Happy Mother's Day!


Page 8-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

FOR SALE

FOR RENT

FOR SALE ~ New lots in Sweetlips on Stewart Rd. From 1.5 to 35 acres. As low as $150 down & $150 / month. Some have running creek water. 901-8268978 (local) or 731-989-4859. No restrictions & NO CREDIT CHECK. 7 days a week. (TFC)

ROOMMATE to Share Expense in a 2 BR, 1 BA Duplex. 731-4379965. (1P)

FOR SALE ~ Camper Shell for SWB Pickup $100. New Holland used 7’ Sickle Hay Mower $650. 6’ Heavy Duty Box Blade $200. Stevens 410 Double Barrel Shotgun $650. Call 989-4094, leave message. (1P) FLOWERS FOR SALE ~ Iris $2 Each. Angel Trumpets $5 Each. Confederate Roses $5 Each. 731453-4962. (1P) FOR SALE ~ Queen Size Mattress & Box, 2 Sheet Sets & Comforter with Frame, $180. Swisher Big Wheel Weed Eater, 6.75 Motor, $175. Streamer Electric Wheelchair with Car Carrier, $400. Western Auto Tractor, 14.5 B&S Motor, Runs Good, No Deck, $100. 1984 Ford Van, 6 Cylinder Automatic, Runs Good $1,500. Call 731-608-4841. (1P) FOR SALE BY OWNER ~ From 6 to 35 Acre Lots. $250 Down and $250 / Month. No Restrictions and NO CREDIT CHECK. Chester County. 901826-8978 or 731-989-4859. (TFC) FOR SALE ~ Table & Chairs, $60. Call 731-616-8152. (1P)

MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE NEED A FRESH START? We Have Multiple 3, 4, & 5 BR Homes. All Types of Financing Available. Clayton Homes of Lexington, TN 731-968-4937. (4C) I BUY, SELL & TRADE USED Mobile Homes, Will Pay TOP Dollar and Quick Cash. Call Today With Your Year, Make and Model! 731-427-3387. (2C) CLOSE-OUT HOME. 4 BR, 2 BA. Reduced - $8,000. Call 731968-4937. (4C) SALE – SALE – SALE! Model Displays Must Go ~ New Spacious 4 Bedroom 2 Bath Homes Starting at $43,500 ~ Single Sections Start at $29,500. CLAYTON HOMES ~ Hwy 72 West, Corinth, MS ~ ¼ Mile Past Magnolia Hospital. (7C) $0 DOWN With Your Land. 3, 4 and 5 Bedroom Homes! EZ Financing! $500 Dep. Call 731427-3388. (2C) BANK REPO on Land Available State-Wide. 3 & 4 Bedrooms. 731-968-4937. (4C)

FOR RENT – 1 BR Apartment. Assistance Animals Only. $350 / Month and 50% Deposit. Call 879-9119. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath House. 3,500 Sq. Ft., Double Car Garage. $850 / Month. $500 Deposit. No Pets. Call 989-0371. (1P) FOR RENT – Efficiency Apartment. $640 / Month. Includes Electricity, Water, & Cable. Call 731-394-2232. (1P) FOR RENT – 2-bedroom, 1-bath townhouse, $390 a month, $150 deposit. 467-0226. (TFC) FOR RENT – Mobile Homes in Jacks Creek Area, Nice Community. No Pets. Senior Discount. Call 989-4227. (TFC) FOR RENT – 3 bedroom brick house, carport, new CHA. 927 Woodland. $675 / month. 983RENT. (TFC) FOR RENT – Commercial building. 3900 sq. ft. plus basement. Will divide. 117 W. Main. Grantham Properties. 983-RENT. (TFC) FOR RENT – Retail / office space. 1250 sq. ft. $500; 1950 sq. ft. $800. 865 Hwy. 45. 983RENT. (TFC) FOR RENT – 4 BR, 1 ½ BA Brick Home on 50 Acres. Shown by Appointment Only. 731-3589587 or 901-387-8067. (1P) FOR RENT – Downstairs 2 BR Apartment. Call 989-2173. (1C) FOR RENT – 2 BR Duplex. $400 / Month. 50% Deposit. No Pets. Call 879-9119. (TFC) FOR RENT – 2 bedroom house, garage, appliances, fenced yard, near Chickasaw. 180 Taylor Trail. $575 / month. 983-RENT. (TFC)

MISCELLANEOUS JIM’S TRASH SERVICE ~ $16 / Month. $13 / Month for Senior Citizens. Call 731-989-5732 or 731-879-0662. (4P) ROOMMATE to Share Expense in a 2 BR, 1 BA Duplex. 731-4379965. (1P) BABYSITTER – Seeking children to care for in my home. 3 full-time openings. Over 20 years experience, excellent references. Will give your child one-on-one time and keep child if sick. Any shift, Sundays off. Call 731-3432024, Pinson area. Perfect if traveling to Jackson. $85 / week. (2P) POOR BOYS LAWN CARE and More! Mowing, Weedeating,

Trimming, Trash Removal, Gutter Cleaning and Repair, Siding and Repair, Pressure Washing, Construction Clean-Up. Call Ryan at 731-879-6418. (1P)

HELP WANTED LOCAL TRUCKING COMPANY Looking for Owner / Operators. Great Pay & Company Provides Fuel Card & Cargo Insurance. Call 731-608-5083 and Ask for Brandon. (4P) ADULT DAYCARE ~ Caring for the elderly in my home. I have 15 years experience. For more information call Debra Clayton at 731879-0304. (1P) AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE ~ Reasonably Priced! Call 731549-0826. (2P)

STATEWIDES AUCTION SATURDAY MAY 25 at 10 AM. 615 Acre Duck, Deer and Wildlife Hunting Preserve, McNairy County, Ramer Tennessee. Heritage Auction and Real Estate TFL#4556 (731) 9253534, Visit www.TonyNeill.com or Call (731) 412-2344 For Detailed Brochure (TnScan) SAVE ON CABLE TVInternet-Digital PhoneSatellite. You’ve Got A Choice! Options from All major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call Today. 888-686-1164 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1888-733-7165, 24/7 (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or DriveTrain 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-4232730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1-985-6461700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) LIVE,

WORK,

PARTY,

PLAY! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. Fun Sales Job! $400-$800 Weekly. Paid Expenses. Signing Bonus. Are You Energetic & Fun? Call 1866-574-7454 (TnScan) OTR CDL DRIVERS NEEDED Run out of Nashville, TN. Teams needed 1 yr exp. with clean MVR. Home Sunday & Monday’s. Great pay & benefits 1-800356-4120 (TnScan) MILAN EXPRESS DRIVING ACADEMY *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” Approved for Veterans Training 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks 1-888-4075172 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS - OTR DRIVERS is looking for OTR drivers in the Memphis and surrounding areas. Drivers must have a Class ACDL, good MVR and at least 6 months experience. Call Recruiting at 800-684-9140 x2 or go online at w w w. b i g g e x p r e s s . c o m . (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED C O M P A N Y Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business. Call Today 800277-0212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVER - TWO RAISES IN first year. Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 8004 1 4 - 9 5 6 9 w w w. d r i v e k n i g h t . c o m (TnScan) COMPANY DRIVERS: $2500 SIGN-ON Bonus! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. Excellent hometime options. CDL-A required. Call 888-441-9358 or apply online at www.superservicellc.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - FLATBED & HEAVY Haul Owner

Operators/Fleet Owners. Consistent year round freight. Avg $1.70 - 2.00 all miles. No forced dispatch. Apply online www.tangomotortransit.com or call 877-533-8684 (TnScan) KNIGHT REFRIGERATED - CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed! Get Paid Daily or Weekly, Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive & Benefits! Become a KNIGHT of the Road. EOE. 855-876-6079. (TnScan) FLATBED DRIVERS NEW PAY Scale- Start @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus, Home Weekends, Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800-6489915 (TnScan) AVERITT OFFERS CDL-A DRIVERS a Strong, Profitable Career. Experienced Drivers and Recent Grads - Excellent Benefits, Weekly Hometime, Paid Training. 888-362-8608 AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer (TnScan) DRIVERS: TRAINING, CLASS A-CDL. Train and work for us! Professional and focused training for your Class A-CDL. You choose between Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer.

(877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) EARN $1000 A DAY. Need Final Expense Agents. Direct Mail & TV Leads. Same Day Advances. Health/Dental Ins. Guidance In Obtaining License. Call 1-888-713-6020 (TnScan) WEST KENTUCKY SELECT BRED HEIFER SALE - Selling 200 Fall Calving Bred Heifers www.ca.uky.edu/bredheifer/ Tues., May 21, 7:00 PM. KY–TN Livestock Market Guthrie, KY (TnScan) SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00- Make & Save Money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan) MOBILE HOMES WITH ACREAGE. Ready to move in. Seller Financing with approved credit. Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 865-291-0506 LandHomesExpress.com (TnScan)


CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

Public Notices NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated June 25, 2007, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded June 29, 2007, at Book 302, Page 703 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Marcella M. Deleon and Alan P. Deleon, conveying certain property therein described to John Clark as Trustee for Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for First State Bank, its successors and assigns; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on May 23, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron pin set in the West right of way of Walnut Cove, which point is the Northeast corner of lot 7; thence from the point of beginning and with the North line of lot 7, North 79 degrees 32 minutes 35 seconds West 168.64 feet to an iron pin set: thence North 02 degrees 50 minutes 00 seconds West 125.00 feet to an iron pin set in the South line of Haskell Cox; thence with the South line of Cox, North 85 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East 178.55 feet to an iron pin found at the Northwest corner of lot I; thence with the West line of lot 1, South 05 degrees 57 minutes 20 seconds East 146.20 feet to an iron pin found in the North right of way of Walnut Cove; thence with the North right of way of Walnut Cove, following a curve having an arc length of 31.71 feet to the point of beginning, containing 0.62 acres as surveyed by Advanced Land Surveying Inc. R.L.S. Number 1999 on June 20, 2007. ALSO KNOWN AS: 826 Walnut Cove, Henderson, Tennessee 38340 This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Marcella M. Deleon; Alan P. Deleon The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 1286167714 DATED April 25, 2013 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.Com

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE WHEREAS, default has occurred in the performance of the covenants, terms, and conditions of a Deed of Trust Note dated December 31, 2007, and the Deed of Trust of even date securing the same, recorded January 10, 2008, at Book 310, Page 206 in Office of the Register of Deeds for Chester County, Tennessee, executed by Mary Jane Hutcherson and Bobby G. Hutcherson, conveying certain property therein described to Arnold M. Weiss, Attorney at Law, Weiss Spicer, PLLC, Memphis TN 38108 as Trustee for Residential Loan Centers of America, Inc.; and the undersigned, Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., having been appointed Successor Trustee. NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the entire indebtedness has been declared due and payable; and that an agent of Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C., as Successor Trustee, by virtue of the power, duty, and authority vested in and imposed upon said Successor Trustee will, on June 13, 2013 on or about 12:00 P.M., at the Chester County Courthouse, Henderson, Tennessee, offer for sale certain property hereinafter described to the highest bidder FOR CASH, free from the statutory right of redemption, homestead, dower, and all other exemptions which are expressly waived in the Deed of Trust, said property being real estate situated in Chester County, Tennessee, and being more particularly described as follows: A certain tract or parcel of land located in Chester County, Tennessee, described as follows towit: Beginning at an iron rod set (all iron rods being referred to as set are 1/2 inch in diameter by 18 inches in length with a plastic identification cap stamped SLS, INC. RLS 2148) at the Northeast corner of the herein described tract and at a Northwest corner of Troy Moore etal. (Deed Book 201, Page 693) and on the Southern right-of-way of Sweetlips Road (50 foot right-of-way, 25 foot measured at right angles from the centerline); thence with a Western boundary line of Moore South 15 degrees 43 minutes 41 seconds West 440.00 feet to an iron rod set at the Southeast corner of the herein described tract and an interior corner of Moore: thence with a North boundary line of Moore North 83 degrees 57 minutes 08 seconds West 220.00 feet to an iron rod set in the center of Tar Creek Canal at the Southwest corner of the herein described tract, a Northwest corner of Moore, and in the East line of J.M. Smith (Deed Book 152, Page 269 as found in the Register’s Office of McNairy County.

Tennessee); thence with the center of said canal and the East boundary line of Smith the following 13 courses, North 45 degrees 16 minutes 01 seconds East 6.42 feet to a point, North 13 degrees 17 minutes 23 seconds East 20.08 feet to a point, North 39 degrees 32 minutes 32 seconds West 22.53 feet to a point, North 24 degrees 00 minutes 38 seconds West 59.18 feet to a point, North 00 degrees 25 minutes 58 seconds East 42.44 feet to a point, North 18 degrees 01 minutes 29 seconds West 35.85 feet to a point, North 05 degrees 23 minutes 23 seconds East 102.27 feet to a point, North 36 degrees 44 minutes 30 seconds East 68.37 feet to a point, North 61 degrees 40 minutes 11 seconds East 18.38 feet to a point, North 31 degrees 00 minutes 20 seconds East 34.59 feet to a point, North 37 degrees 31 minutes 44 seconds East 23.75 feet to a point, North 50 degrees 17 minutes 04 seconds East 36.09 feet to a point, North 65 degrees 48 minutes 10 seconds East 35.69 feet to a point on the Southern right-ofway of said Sweetlips Road at the Northwest corner of the herein described tract; thence with the said right-of-way and with a curve to the right having an arc length of 110.35 feet, a radius of 1737.55 feet, and a chord length of 110.33 feet bearing South 84 degrees 37 minutes 47 seconds East to a point; thence South 83 degrees 16 minutes 15 seconds East 109.68 feet to the point of beginning. ALSO KNOWN AS: 2140 Hutchison Road, Finger, Tennessee 38334 This sale is subject to all matters shown on any applicable recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements, or setback lines that may be applicable; any statutory rights of redemption of any governmental agency, state or federal; any prior liens or encumbrances as well as any priority created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that an accurate survey of the premises might disclose. In addition, the following parties may claim an interest in the above-referenced property: Mary Jane Hutcherson; Bobby G. Hutcherson; Secretary of Housing & Urban Development The sale held pursuant to this Notice may be rescinded at the Successor Trustee’s option at any time. The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time, and place certain without further publication, upon announcement at the time and place for the sale set forth above. W&A No. 1626232560 DATED April 16, 2013 WILSON & ASSOCIATES, P.L.L.C., Successor Trustee FHA No. 482-3859617-952 DSaleNoticeTNShellie_asims_130416_ 713 FOR SALE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.MYFIR.COM and WWW.REALTYTRAC.COM

STATEWIDES CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 97 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 24 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to w w w. t n a d v e r t i s i n g . b i z . (TnScan) AUCTION SATURDAY MAY 25 at 10 AM. 615 Acre Duck, Deer and Wildlife Hunting Preserve, McNairy County, Ramer Tennessee. Heritage Auction and Real Estate TFL#4556 (731) 9253534, Visit www.TonyNeill.com or Call (731) 412-2344 For Detailed Brochure (TnScan) SAVE ON CABLE TVInternet-Digital PhoneSatellite. You’ve Got A Choice! Options from All major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call Today. 888-686-1164 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1888-733-7165, 24/7 (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or DriveTrain 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-4232730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1-985-6461700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) LIVE, WORK, PARTY, PLAY! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. Fun Sales Job! $400-$800 Weekly. Paid Expenses. Signing Bonus. Are You Energetic & Fun? Call 1866-574-7454 (TnScan) OTR CDL DRIVERS NEEDED Run out of Nashville, TN. Teams needed 1 yr exp. with clean MVR. Home Sunday & Monday’s. Great pay & benefits 1-800356-4120 (TnScan) MILAN EXPRESS DRIVING ACADEMY *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” Approved for Veterans Training 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks 1-888-4075172 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS - OTR DRIVERS is looking for OTR drivers in the Memphis and surrounding areas. Drivers must have a Class ACDL, good MVR and at least 6 months experience. Call Recruiting at 800-684-9140 x2 or go online at w w w. b i g g e x p r e s s . c o m . (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED C O M P A N Y Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business. Call Today 800277-0212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVER - TWO RAISES IN first year. Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 8004 1 4 - 9 5 6 9 w w w. d r i v e k n i g h t . c o m (TnScan) COMPANY DRIVERS: $2500 SIGN-ON Bonus! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. Excellent hometime options. CDL-A required. Call 888-441-9358

or apply online at www.superservicellc.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - FLATBED & HEAVY Haul Owner Operators/Fleet Owners. Consistent year round freight. Avg $1.70 - 2.00 all miles. No forced dispatch. Apply online www.tangomotortransit.com or call 877-533-8684 (TnScan) KNIGHT REFRIGERATED - CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed! Get Paid Daily or Weekly, Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive & Benefits! Become a KNIGHT of the Road. EOE. 855-876-6079. (TnScan) FLATBED DRIVERS NEW PAY Scale- Start @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus, Home Weekends, Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800-6489915 (TnScan) AVERITT OFFERS CDL-A DRIVERS a Strong, Profitable Career. Experienced Drivers and Recent Grads - Excellent Benefits, Weekly Hometime, Paid Training. 888-362-8608 AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer (TnScan) DRIVERS: TRAINING, CLASS A-CDL. Train and work for us! Professional and focused training for your Class A-CDL. You choose between Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) EARN $1000 A DAY. Need Final Expense Agents. Direct Mail & TV Leads. Same Day Advances. Health/Dental Ins. Guidance In Obtaining License. Call 1-888-713-6020 (TnScan) WEST KENTUCKY SELECT BRED HEIFER SALE - Selling 200 Fall Calving Bred Heifers www.ca.uky.edu/bredheifer/ Tues., May 21, 7:00 PM. KY–TN Livestock Market Guthrie, KY (TnScan) SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00- Make & Save Money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan) MOBILE HOMES WITH ACREAGE. Ready to move in. Seller Financing with approved credit. Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 865-291-0506 LandHomesExpress.com (TnScan) CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 97 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 24 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to w w w. t n a d v e r t i s i n g . b i z . (TnScan) AUCTION SATURDAY MAY 25 at 10 AM. 615 Acre Duck, Deer and Wildlife Hunting Preserve, McNairy County, Ramer Tennessee. Heritage Auction and Real Estate TFL#4556 (731) 9253534, Visit www.TonyNeill.com or Call (731) 412-2344 For Detailed Brochure (TnScan) SAVE ON CABLE TVInternet-Digital PhoneSatellite. You’ve Got A Choice! Options from All major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call Today. 888-686-1164 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR children WITHOUT $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1888-733-7165, 24/7 (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or DriveTrain 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-4232730 www.drive-train.org

Page 9-B

(TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1-985-6461700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) LIVE, WORK, PARTY, PLAY! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. Fun Sales Job! $400-$800 Weekly. Paid Expenses. Signing Bonus. Are You Energetic & Fun? Call 1866-574-7454 (TnScan) OTR CDL DRIVERS NEEDED Run out of Nashville, TN. Teams needed 1 yr exp. with clean MVR. Home Sunday & Monday’s. Great pay & benefits 1-800356-4120 (TnScan) MILAN EXPRESS DRIVING ACADEMY *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” Approved for Veterans Training 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks 1-888-4075172 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS - OTR DRIVERS is looking for OTR drivers in the Memphis and surrounding areas. Drivers must have a Class ACDL, good MVR and at least 6 months experience. Call Recruiting at 800-684-9140 x2 or go online at w w w. b i g g e x p r e s s . c o m . (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED C O M P A N Y Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business. Call Today 800277-0212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVER - TWO RAISES IN first year. Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 8004 1 4 - 9 5 6 9 w w w. d r i v e k n i g h t . c o m (TnScan) COMPANY DRIVERS: $2500 SIGN-ON Bonus! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. Excellent hometime options. CDL-A required. Call 888-441-9358 or apply online at www.superservicellc.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - FLATBED & HEAVY Haul Owner Operators/Fleet Owners. Consistent year round freight. Avg $1.70 - 2.00 all miles. No forced dispatch. Apply online www.tangomotortransit.com or call 877-533-8684 (TnScan) KNIGHT REFRIGERATED - CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed! Get Paid Daily or Weekly, Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive & Benefits! Become a KNIGHT of the Road. EOE. 855-876-6079. (TnScan) FLATBED DRIVERS NEW PAY Scale- Start @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus, Home Weekends, Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800-6489915 (TnScan) AVERITT OFFERS CDL-A DRIVERS a Strong, Profitable Career. Experienced Drivers and Recent Grads - Excellent Benefits, Weekly Hometime, Paid Training. 888-362-8608 AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer (TnScan) DRIVERS: TRAINING, CLASS A-CDL. Train and work for us! Professional and focused training for your Class A-CDL. You choose between Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan) EARN $1000 A DAY. Need Final Expense Agents. Direct Mail & TV Leads. Same Day Advances. Health/Dental Ins. Guidance In Obtaining License. Call 1-888-713-6020 (TnScan)


Page 10-B CHESTER COUNTY INDEPENDENT • Thursday, May 9, 2013

FLATBED DRIVERS NEW PAY Scale- Start @ .37cpm Up to .04cpm Mileage Bonus, Home Weekends, Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800-6489915 (TnScan)

WEST KENTUCKY SELECT BRED HEIFER SALE - Selling 200 Fall Calving Bred Heifers www.ca.uky.edu/bredheifer/ Tues., May 21, 7:00 PM. KY–TN Livestock Market Guthrie, KY (TnScan) SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00- Make & Save Money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan) MOBILE HOMES WITH ACREAGE. Ready to move in. Seller Financing with approved credit. Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 865-291-0506 LandHomesExpress.com (TnScan) CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 97 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 24 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to w w w. t n a d v e r t i s i n g . b i z . (TnScan) AUCTION SATURDAY MAY 25 at 10 AM. 615 Acre Duck, Deer and Wildlife Hunting Preserve, McNairy County, Ramer Tennessee. Heritage Auction and Real Estate TFL#4556 (731) 9253534, Visit www.TonyNeill.com or Call (731) 412-2344 For Detailed Brochure (TnScan) SAVE ON CABLE TVInternet-Digital PhoneSatellite. You’ve Got A Choice! Options from All major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call Today. 888-686-1164 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1888-733-7165, 24/7 (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or DriveTrain 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-4232730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1-985-6461700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan)

LIVE, WORK, PARTY, PLAY! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. Fun Sales Job! $400-$800 Weekly. Paid Expenses. Signing Bonus. Are You Energetic & Fun? Call 1866-574-7454 (TnScan) OTR CDL DRIVERS NEEDED Run out of Nashville, TN. Teams needed 1 yr exp. with clean MVR. Home Sunday & Monday’s. Great pay & benefits 1-800356-4120 (TnScan) MILAN EXPRESS DRIVING ACADEMY *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” Approved for Veterans Training 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan) 25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks 1-888-4075172 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS - OTR DRIVERS is looking for OTR drivers in the Memphis and surrounding areas. Drivers must have a Class ACDL, good MVR and at least 6 months experience. Call Recruiting at 800-684-9140 x2 or go online at w w w. b i g g e x p r e s s . c o m . (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED C O M P A N Y Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business. Call Today 800277-0212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVER - TWO RAISES IN first year. Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 8004 1 4 - 9 5 6 9 w w w. d r i v e k n i g h t . c o m (TnScan) COMPANY DRIVERS: $2500 SIGN-ON Bonus! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. Excellent hometime options. CDL-A required. Call 888-441-9358 or apply online at www.superservicellc.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - FLATBED & HEAVY Haul Owner Operators/Fleet Owners. Consistent year round freight. Avg $1.70 - 2.00 all miles. No forced dispatch. Apply online www.tangomotortransit.com or call 877-533-8684 (TnScan) KNIGHT REFRIGERATED - CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed! Get Paid Daily or Weekly, Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive & Benefits! Become a KNIGHT of the Road. EOE. 855-876-6079. (TnScan)

AVERITT OFFERS CDL-A DRIVERS a Strong, Profitable Career. Experienced Drivers and Recent Grads - Excellent Benefits, Weekly Hometime, Paid Training. 888-362-8608 AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer (TnScan) DRIVERS: TRAINING, CLASS A-CDL. Train and work for us! Professional and focused training for your Class A-CDL. You choose between Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. (877) 369-7191 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (TnScan)

Problem! 2 Weeks Local training in Jackson, TN or Dyersburg, TN. *Great Pay *Benefits *Job Security *Student Tuition Loans Available *Placement Assistance. Drive-Train 119 E. L. Morgan Dr. Jackson, TN 1-800-423-8820 or DriveTrain 2045 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 1-800-4232730 www.drive-train.org (TnScan) NOW HIRING: COMPANIES DESPERATELY need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Fee required. Info. 1-985-6461700 Dept. TN-1196 (TnScan) LIVE, WORK, PARTY, PLAY! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. Fun Sales Job! $400-$800 Weekly. Paid Expenses. Signing Bonus. Are You Energetic & Fun? Call 1866-574-7454 (TnScan)

EARN $1000 A DAY. Need Final Expense Agents. Direct Mail & TV Leads. Same Day Advances. Health/Dental Ins. Guidance In Obtaining License. Call 1-888-713-6020 (TnScan)

OTR CDL DRIVERS NEEDED Run out of Nashville, TN. Teams needed 1 yr exp. with clean MVR. Home Sunday & Monday’s. Great pay & benefits 1-800356-4120 (TnScan)

WEST KENTUCKY SELECT BRED HEIFER SALE - Selling 200 Fall Calving Bred Heifers www.ca.uky.edu/bredheifer/ Tues., May 21, 7:00 PM. KY–TN Livestock Market Guthrie, KY (TnScan)

MILAN EXPRESS DRIVING ACADEMY *Student Loans & Placement Assistance Available “Qualified Applicants” Approved for Veterans Training 1-800-645-2698 www.milanexpress.com/drivingacademy 53D E.L. Morgan Dr., Jackson, TN 38305 (TnScan)

SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3997.00- Make & Save Money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N (TnScan) MOBILE HOMES WITH ACREAGE. Ready to move in. Seller Financing with approved credit. Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 865-291-0506 LandHomesExpress.com (TnScan) CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING WORKS! ONE call & your 25 word ad will appear in 97 Tennessee newspapers for $265/wk or 24 West TN newspapers for $95/wk. Call this newspaper’s classified advertising dept. or go to w w w. t n a d v e r t i s i n g . b i z . (TnScan) AUCTION SATURDAY MAY 25 at 10 AM. 615 Acre Duck, Deer and Wildlife Hunting Preserve, McNairy County, Ramer Tennessee. Heritage Auction and Real Estate TFL#4556 (731) 9253534, Visit www.TonyNeill.com or Call (731) 412-2344 For Detailed Brochure (TnScan) SAVE ON CABLE TVInternet-Digital PhoneSatellite. You’ve Got A Choice! Options from All major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call Today. 888-686-1164 (TnScan) DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children $125.00. Includes name change and property settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast and easy. Call 1888-733-7165, 24/7 (TnScan) DRIVING FOR A CAREER – No Experience? No

25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $750 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks 1-888-4075172 (TnScan) BIG G EXPRESS - OTR DRIVERS is looking for OTR drivers in the Memphis and surrounding areas. Drivers must have a Class ACDL, good MVR and at least 6 months experience. Call Recruiting at 800-684-9140 x2 or go online at w w w. b i g g e x p r e s s . c o m . (TnScan) TANKER & FLATBED C O M P A N Y Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available. Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business. Call Today 800277-0212 or www.primeinc.com (TnScan) DRIVER - TWO RAISES IN first year. Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 8004 1 4 - 9 5 6 9 w w w. d r i v e k n i g h t . c o m (TnScan) COMPANY DRIVERS: $2500 SIGN-ON Bonus! Super Service is hiring solo and team drivers. Excellent hometime options. CDL-A required. Call 888-441-9358 or apply online at www.superservicellc.com (TnScan) DRIVERS - FLATBED & HEAVY Haul Owner Operators/Fleet Owners. Consistent year round freight. Avg $1.70 - 2.00 all miles. No forced dispatch. Apply online www.tangomotortransit.com or call 877-533-8684 (TnScan)


Chester County Independent 05-09-13