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Superintendent Darcy Davidson. RCMP Central District Commander for Saskatchewan, and his wife Linda, drink a toast to Queen Elizabeth II at the eighth annual Martensville Emergency and Protective Services Dine and Dance event on Saturday, February 8. The annual tribute to firefighters, police, emergency responders, military, corrections and public safety personnel and law enforcement officers raised funds for educational programs. Story, photos on page 11.

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A two-vehicle collision Friday, February 7 on Highway 11 south of Warman during the morning rush hour could have been a lot worse, according to Cst. Matt Hiscock of the Warman RCMP detachment.

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No one was seriously injured in the collision, even though there was extensive damage to both vehicles. The crash occurred just south of the intersection of Highway 11 and Township Road 382, the entrance to the Corman Industrial Park, at about 8:30 in the morning. “A super-bee semi pulled out heading southbound onto Highway 11,” said Hiscock. “The semi was on the shoulder of the highway with his four-way flashers on. A Pontiac minivan heading southbound was struck by a faster-coming soutbound Ford F350 pickup truck. The van got rear-ended and both vehicles ended up in the centre median ditch.” The back-end of the grey van that was rear-ended was completely crushed. “It’s fortunate there was no one in the back seat of the van,” said Hiscock.

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TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Two vehicles were involved in a collision after a southbound semi pulled out onto Highway 11 at Township Road 382 on Friday morning, February 7 A 37-year-old Osler man who was driving the Ford F350 truck has been charged with driving without due care and attention under the provincial Traffic Safety Act. “He was going faster than he should have been,” said Hiscock. Hiscock confirmed there were only minor injuries to both drivers. Neither were taken to hospital. MD Ambulance and Warman First Responders both responded to the incident, which slowed the southbound morning commuter traffic for about an hour. At one point, southbound traf-

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TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

fic was diverted onto Township Road 382 while RCMP officers conducted their investigation and Warman Fire Department personnel cleaned up debris on the highway. Hiscock said the intersection is one where motorists need to use extra caution. “A lot of the intersections on Highway 11 don’t have acceleration merge lanes,” he noted. “People need to be aware that these large trucks could be pulling out onto the highway, especially at that time of day. I understand the semis want to get out and onto the shoul-

A woman suffered minor injuries as a result of a collision at the intersection of Cetennial Boulevard and 4th Street in Warman on Thursday, February 6. The collision occurred at about 9:05 a.m. when a Hyundai Santa Fe SUV rear-ended a Chevrolet Silverado halfton pickup truck. The male driver of the half-ton truck was not injured, but the woman who was driving the SUV sustained minor injuries when her airbag deployed. She was treated onscene by Warman First Responders. An infant who was securely fastened in a car seat in the SUV’s backseat was not injured in the incident. Warman RCMP responded to the collision and investigated the cause of the crash. Warman Bylaw Officer Wade Eberle, who monitors the intersection every morning, says there is a high traffic volume due to its location near the Warman Elementary School.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 PG. 3

timeless tradition

Drainage ditch in the works for North Corman Industrial Park

Neil Bartsch gives hayrides on his sleigh as he drives his matching team of horses, Daisy and Paula, during the annual Hepburn Winter Festival last weekend. Residents enjoyed the bright sunshine, but had to bundle up to keep out the chilly temperatures, which averaged about -20 degrees. The festival feautred a movie night, a fundraising breakfast for the town’s historic Museum of Wheat, hockey games, a Kid’s Carnival at Bethany College, public skating and shinny at the Hepburn Arena, and other events.

By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

CHRIS PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Opimihaw Creek Watershed Association looks to start project By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

The Opimihaw Creek Watershed Association (OCWA) is looking to get started on a priority drainage project as soon as possible. At a hastily-called meeting

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of the OCWA during the Saskatchewan Urban Municipalities Association (SUMA) convention in Regina last week, elected officials from Warman, Osler, Martensville, Dalmeny and Corman Park voted to undertake an engineering study on the most pressing drainage priority, commonly referred to as the “Osler ditch”. The study will cost about $40,000, of which the province will pay 75 per cent. The provincial funds are coming from a pre-existing fund of $1 million that was earmarked by the province for the OCWA in 2012.

The municipalities which make up the OCWA are responsible for 25 per cent of the cost of the engineering study, which would amount to about $10,000. The municipalities will share the cost on a per-capita basis. The engineering study is needed in order to define the scope and cost of the proposed drainage project, which would be designed to collect surface runoff from a low area about three miles directly west of Osler. The water would then be directed past the town of Osler, under Highway 11 and along the Blumenheim Road to a natural coulee that drains into the South Saskatchewan River. The OCWA hopes that as much as 70 per cent of the potential floodwaters originating in Buzz Lake, a massive slough at the headwaters of Opimihaw Creek, could be diverted through this channel. The cost of this project alone is estimated to be about $13.9 million. But it is just one of several drainage projects for the watershed in north Corman Park that, taken together, would cost about $59 million.

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That’s well beyond the capability of the municipalities, according to Ben Buhler, Mayor of Osler and Chair of the OCWA. “We simply can’t afford that kind of price tag,” said Buhler in an interview on Friday, February 7. “It’s just out of reach. We need funding from senior levels of government if this is going to become a reality.” The OCWA has been trying to meet with the provincial government and the Saskatchewan Water Security Agency (SWA) to secure a funding commitment to the project. But three attempts at meetings last fall and this winter failed to materialize when the province cancelled out. The latest meeting was supposed to take place on Tuesday, January 28, but the provincial representatives were unable to attend. That set the stage for a meeting in Regina during the SUMA convention. The elected municipal representatives to the OCWA invited Hon. Ken Cheveldayoff, Minister Responsible for the SWA,

and SWA President Wayne Dywas well-received by the probvig, to a meeting. Judy Harvincial officials, said Buhler. wood, Reeve of the RM of “They understand our diCorman Park, and Adam Titte- lemma and they have assured more, Administrator of the RM us that we are right up there of Corman Park, drove to Region the priority list if money is na for the meeting. available,” said Buhler. “Mr. The OCWA representatives Dybvig indicated this area derequested $13.9 million for the serves priority because it is Osler ditch project. While Chev- such a fast-growing region.” eldayoff was not able to prom The next OCWA meeting is ise that level of funding, he did scheduled for Tuesday, Februcommit to doing all he could to ary 25, at which time the orgasecure funds in the upcoming nization should have an indiprovincial budget, according to cation whether the provincial Adam Tittemore. budget has earmarked funding The resolution to go ahead for the project, said Buhler. with the engineering study was designed to “They understand our dilemma ensure that if and they have assured us that and when federwe are right up there on the al funding becomes availpriority list if money is available through a national inable. Mr. Dybvig indicated this frastructure area deserves prority because program, the OCWA would be able to apply it is a fast-growing region ...” for funds right • Ben Buhler, away, said TitChair, Opimihaw Creek Watershed Association temore. The meeting

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Business owners are hoping a new drainage ditch will resolve annual flooding issues in North Corman Industrial Park. Council had directed the administration in early December to prepare a report after discussing the proposed drainage with business owners in Corman Industrial Park. That report came to Corman Park council February 3. Joe Stewart, Corman Park’s public works director, said a new drainage ditch is an achievable project. “It is something that public works can definitely accomplish in 2014,” said Stewart. “This specific drainage plan would be a starting point.” The project will consist of approximately 725 metres of ditching that will then tie into existing drainage, said Stewart. Stewart estimated that a three foot deep ditch will be required for the whole length with the final amount to be determined once snow melts and a survey crew can set elevations and cut stakes. Council hopes to dispose of the material to adjacent owners, to act as fill and landscaping to sites. For budget purposes, administration estimates the project to cost between $130,000 to $170,000. Wendy Trask, councillor for Division 8, put forward a motion to add the drainage project to this year’s budget right away. “This is a project that is long overdue. I think we should have stepped up to the plate a long time ago,” said Trask. Business owner, Jim Christie, who was given permission to address council about flooding in the industrial park, said most of the water flooding into the park is originating from Martensville. “If we could get it to drain, which seems the cheapest way to get it to work, it is going to help everyone,” said Christie. CONTINUED ON PAGE 4

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

Airline giant earned his wings in Warman Former company president left a legacy of generosity By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

Harvey Friesen always wanted to be a pilot, and he worked hard to achieve that dream, according to his sister, Rosella Harms of Warman. Friesen, the former president and co-owner of Bearskin Airlines, a well-known regional carrier in northern Ontario and Manitoba, passed away in Palm Springs, California on Sunday, February 2 at the age of 65. Harvey Friesen grew up in Warman, where he was a star athlete in his youth. But his real passion was flying, recalled his sister in an interview last week. “Harvey worked every summer doing deliveries for Pleasant Hill Bakery in Saskatoon so he could earn enough money to get his private pilot’s license,” said Rosella Harms. “He was still in high school at the time.” After getting his commercial pilot’s license, Friesen got a job with Bearskin Airlines, and in 1972 he purchased a 50 per cent interest in the company. The airline started carrying passengers in 1977 on scheduled flights between Big Trout Lake and Sioux Loookout. In 1978, his brother, Cliff Friesen, also purchased an interest in the company, and eventually they became co-owners. After forty years at the helm of the successful company, the two brothers sold the airline in 2010 to Exchange Income Corp. During their years with the company, both brothers were generous in giving back to their communities, said Harms. “They sponsored annual bonspiels and golf tournaments and raised a tremendous amount

of money for charity,” she said. “They especially raised a lot for cancer research. Cliff’s daughter passed away at the age of 28 from breast cancer, so it was a cause that was near and dear to both of them.” There were six kids in the Friesen family, said Harms, noting that her brothers learned responsbility and leadership skills early in life. Her sister Deanna was born with congenital heart problems, and Harvey and Cliff used to take their sister to school in a wagon or sleigh because otherwise she wouldn’t have been able to go. Both boys also delivered newspapers in Warman after school. When Harvey was in Grade 12, he drove a school bus and had a route that went all the way up to Gruenthal. At the time, the high school was in Osler, and Harvey was also working part-time, playing sports like hockey and ball, and earning his private pilot’s wings. “It was always Harvey’s dream to be a pilot,” said Harms. “He used to take people up for rides, but you had to pay to go. That was one of the ways he paid for his lessons. I

only went up twice, because that was all I could afford. It was a thrill in those days to see Saskatoon and Warman from the air.” In the late 1950s and early 1960s, when she and her brothers and sisters were growing up, Warman was a very small place. “There were a few streets, but not many,” said Harms. “We had a house on North Railway Street that was at the very edge of town. To the west of us was a pasture and we had a couple of cows, some chickens and even a pig. Lots of people had animals in town in those days. The boys learned to milk cows and did all the chores.” Harms said the sudden passing of her brother was a shock to the family. “We will miss him very much,” she said. “He had a big heart. He loved the outdoors, he loved to hunt and fish, he loved his family very much, and his good works touched a lot of people across the country.”

Continued from page 3

Corman Industrial Park drainage Division 6 councillor Bas Froese-Kooijenga explained that there was a former agreement with Martensville where a half a million dollars was put aside into a capital fund for this project a few years ago, but nothing was set in motion. Division 7 Councillor Joanne Janzen thought the RM should be getting some compensation from Martensville. The issue is certainly a conversation to have with City of Martensville officials, said Cor-

man Park Administrator Adam Tittemore. Tittemore added that the province’s Water Security Agency should also be involved. “There is more information that they would require in terms of the estimated volumes of water in the park, how it would affect downstream flow and make sure all the infrastructure further downstream could handle water,” Tittemore said.

BEARSKIN AIRLINES PHOTO

(Inset) The late Harvey Friesen (left) with his brother Cliff Friesen. (Right) Rosella Harms shares memories of her late brother, Harvey Friesen

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Corman Park prepared for flood season By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

After a record snowfall last winter, the RM of Corman Park has put a lot of time and effort into flood preparation before spring runoff starts in the coming months. Reeve Judy Harwood said based on the amount of snow that the RM has received this year, it will make the RM’s flood preparation efforts a lot easier. “It is going to come down to how much rain we get and when we get it,” said Harwood. “We are trying to be proactive to see if we can alleviate some of the problems.” “Last year, the biggest problem areas in the RM were in the Martensville, Warman and Olser districts. It is kind of a bowl area in between the North and South Saskatchewan rivers. The water just has a hard time escaping,” said Corman Park Administrator Adam Tittemore. The biggest concern is the

water table, which since 2007 has risen four metres according to the Saskatchewan Water Security Agency, Tittemore added. “The thing is with so many wet years in a row the water table is so high that we are not seeing any dissipation through the ground,” said Tittemore. “Before 2007 you used to have to drill a well to find water, now you can find water with a shovel.” Tittemore said from 2013 compared to 2012 the RM spent over $80,000 more in culverts that year. This included replacing old culverts and installing new ones. The RM did two major road drainage programs on Range Road 3052 and Township Road 384, which are in the Warman/Martensville area. Tittemore said the RM also built up roads to make sure they would not be affected by floodwaters. “Township Road 400 is a good example. It is in the north part of the RM north of Neuhorst,” said Tittemore. “We

spent about $122,000 on the eastwest road this year to build it up over a metre.” Tittemore said the best way for the RM to be aware of spring drainage issues is for its residents to inform the RM when they have concerns. “The RM sent out a letter in January/February last year where we asked people to identify problem areas,” said Tittemore. “We asked for them to be prepared and noticed a huge improvement in what people were doing to try to help themselves.” Tittemore said residents can take advantage of funding programs so property owners can compete drainage works on their land. He said through the province’s Emergency Flood Damage Protection Program there is eligibility for funding for things like berming or installing other drainage works. Harwood said if a resident knows they are going to have a flooding issue it is better to be proactive rather than wait until the last minute.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

5

Land development bylaws amended RM outlines construction projects for 2014 By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

The RM of Corman Park passed two bylaws after a public hearing held during its council meeting on Monday, February 3. The first bylaw concerned textual amendments to the RM of Corman Park Development Plan, Bylaw 33/13. At an earlier Corman Park council meeting in January, Phil Ratzlaff of North Prairie Developments asked council if it would allow a re-subdivision of a multi-parcel subdivision located half a mile north of the Hamlet of Cathedral Bluffs, said RM Administrator Adam Tittemore. Tittemore said the multi-parcel subdivision was developed in 1983, and that prior to the council’s February 3 meeting, there was no policy that allowed for re-subdivision in existing multi parcel divisions. After Ratzlaff’s request, council gave direction for the RM administration to make amendments to the RM’s Official Community Plan. In the revamped version, the RM decided that if a lot is 1.5 acres greater in size than the largest size in a subdivision, then the lot could be al-

lowed to subdivide into another lot that would be no smaller than the smallest lot in that subdivision, explained Tittemore. After the bylaw received first reading, a public hearing on the issue was required before second and third readings could occur. That hearing took place February 3. Michelle Chuhaniuk, who lives in the hamlet of Casa Rio, applauded the council for seizing the opportunity to create a healthy real estate market in the RM. Chuhaniuk said the current retail market supports smaller acreages opposed to large ones of 10 acres or more. Her biggest concern was the survey and legal fees associated with a Comprehensive Development Review (CDR), which she thinks should be taken out of the policy entirely. “I know there is some concern about the CDR and what it is all about. If the intent is simply to ensure that taxpayers or neighbors within a subdivision are a part of the process it can be addressed in other ways,” said Chuhaniuk. Division 2 councillor Sherry Mervold raised concerns about the suggestion that CDRs be removed from the process. Corman Park Planning Man-

ager Rebecca Row said taking the CDR out of the policy was not something the RM of Corman Park could do. “We are not able to do that because subdivision is not within our purview,” Row said. “It is the provincial government’s rules. It is their application and package.” Division 3 Councillor David Fox said CDR reports have a purpose. “A CDR ensures that within a particular subdivision, the issues concerning wastewater management and all those infrastructure issues are taken care of,” said Fox. Tittemore said one of council’s concerns with amending the bylaw was not to change the atmosphere and intent of the subdivision too much. “They want to give people confidence that the type of development is going to be very consistent moving forward so they are not going to buy into ten-acre country residential living and then end up with one-acre city-style lots,” said Tittemore. Bylaw 33/13 and Bylaw 61/13, which included amendments to the Corman ParkSaskatoon Planning District, were passed after three readings shortly after the public hearing concluded.

Corman Park reduces environmental footprint By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

The RM of Corman Park is planning to reduce its environmental footprint by no longer pumping water out of the storm water retention basin located in Corman Park’s Biz Hub Development area. The Biz Hub Development area was started by Concorde Developments in 2008 and is an ongoing multi-phase industrial park. The retention basin has been part of the naturally occurring land development in the area and is not a true retention basin because it is not man-made. Since 2006, the retention basin had to be pumped out manually due to an increase of water fowl in the area. Public Works Director Joe Stewart said the only circumstance where the RM will have to pump out the retention basin is if it overflows, but in its current state it can remain full. Over the years the RM administration has repeatedly submitted letters and made

numerous phone calls to the Saskatoon Airport Authority outlining concerns about continually having to pump out the water. The Authority recently replied to the RM’s concerns and agreed to the RM’s suggestion of allowing the retention pond to hold water as intended and allow runoff to flow naturally toward Highway 16 to help reduce the environmental footprint in the area. In a letter sent to Clive Stromberg, environment compliance officer with the Saskatoon Airport Authority, Stewart listed the many positive benefits of retention ponds. He stated that retention ponds are often landscaped with a variety of grasses, shrubs and/or wetland plants to provide bank stability and aesthetic benefits. The vegetation provides water quality benefits by removing soluble nutrients through uptake. Future development in the area is likely to result in more industries using this basin, which will contribute to an increase in the size of the envi-

ronmental footprint. The retention pond will help reduce frequent peak storm water discharges and ease downstream flooding, which will in turn reduce scouring and erosion of stream banks. The ponds also act as a replacement for the natural absorption of a forest or other natural process that was lost when the area was developed. Division 7 Councillor Joanne Janzen applauded Stewart’s work on lessening the RM’s environmental footprint in the Biz Hub Development area. [“Having to pump out the retention basin] has bugged me for years. It saves us a few dollars and a lot of manpower,” said Janzen. Stewart also stated in his letter to Stromberg that in 2002 the environmental footprint of the pond and area was 22.74 acres. Presently it is 19.36 acres, reducing the environmental footprint by 3.38 acres. He said this reduction was achieved by excavating the existing pond deeper and by removing the other bodies of water located on the property.

Y BU LK U B

NT OU C S DI

The

By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

The RM of Corman Park is not going to let weather stand in its way when it comes to construction projects, according to Public Works Director Joe Stewart. “In the past if we got a few days of rain, construction would shut down. We would like to change that,” said Stewart. During the February 3 RM Council Meeting, Stewart compiled a list of construction projects on the RM’s agenda. On Range Road 3074 north of TWP 374 the RM would like to build up the road three feet through low-lying slough. The project is three-quarters of a mile long and would take about three weeks to complete. Public Works would like to cut ditches, take hills down for snow clearing and improve drainage problems at Range Road 3063 south of TWP 362. Project length is 300 metres and should take one week to finish. The same plan is to be excuted for range road 3074 north of TWP 370, but that project is one mile and will take three weeks. The RM wants to built up the road at TWP 374 between Range Road 3065 and 3070 two to three feet through low-lying slough and install a culvert and a perform a one-foot clay cap. That project is one mile and would take five weeks. On TWP 382 between Range Road 3042 and 3040 the RM wants to build up the road and construct ditches to improve snow clearing and drainage. Council package documents stated this particular road is a summer road that is maintained year round. With this work completed the road can be reclassified to farm access standard. The same reclassification will be applied to Range Road 3042 and TWP 392. The RM plans to build the summer road up a half a mile to improve snow clearing and drainage. This improvement would give residents two directions to exit the property.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 PG. 6

Winter will soon Time to push back on U.S. trade be over...we hope! As neighbours go, things between Canada and the U.S. are about as good as it gets.

COMMENTARY

The crunching of snow under feet has been replaced by some choice words lately. Let’s just say Mother Nature is not a popular figure these days. Once upon a time, we prairie folk simply rolled with the punches as winter set in. We knew there would be windshields to scrape, snow to shovel and block heaters to plug-in. And, as sure as the driver in front of you refuses to turn right at a red light with an open lane in front of them, there will be a cold snap – a short period consisting of a few days full of numbing cold and calls for furnace repairs. What we hearty Saskatchewanians have had to endure for nearly three months now borders on lunacy. It seems as though the whole winter schedule has been reversed. Most of us know -40C descends upon on the province for a week or so every winter. Problem is, we just don’t know when it will happen from year to year. That’s why there is always that one co-worker who groans when they guess wrong and return from their hot holiday to find out a chinook arrived the day after their plane left for the beach. But, like last year, we have been mired in bone chilling, feet freezing, eyelash icing cold since early December. One small two-day window appeared three weeks ago (seems like a decade ago to many) where snow turned to slush and, gasp, windshield washer fluid was needed! Other than that all too-brief 48-hour respite, the weather has been much more frightful than delightful. But here’s to hoping. And praying. Here’s to raising our travel mugs in unison that spring is only a few weeks away. If the weather forecasts are true, we may be seeing the end of the “polar vortex” this weekend. Single digit highs below freezing would be welcomed by everyone except tow truck companies and travel agents. Yes, it’s been a (insert your own expletive here) awful winter. But, looking back on the winter that has almost ended, there are no better people in this world to handle it. As Saskatchewanians – we can chalk up yet another accomplishment to be proud of.

MURRAY MANDRYK

Provincial Politics

We have not been at war or tried to invade one another – at least not in 200 years. Even then, the War of 1812 happened 65 years before Canada was a country. That is an enviable record compared with countries that share borders on every other continent. Consider how many times England has been at war with France, Germany, Spain. Consider Russia’s relations with its neighbouring countries set free after communism. Think about the relations between Japan, China, and North and South Korea, the tensions between India and Pakistan, the fighting among African nations or the entire Middle East. Our border is the longest undefended border on the

planet. And while those on both sides might gripe about coming through customs, there are still no fences like there is between Mexico and the U.S. The Canada-U.S. relation is a unique one in this world – two strong, diverse modern countries living side-by-side with the same shared values and interests. Heck, the biggest story in Saskatchewan of late is a North Dakota boy who adopted Regina and its football team as his own and is now going back to his own country to play. We wished him well as would a neighbour who watched a son grow up and move on. But is it a perfect relationship? Have we always been treated like the good neighbours that we have been? Well, the recent fight over the U.S.’s Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) policy – an issue that hits us right in the heartland in places like rural Saskatchewan – suggests that much could be improved. How close this issue is to Saskatchewan was evident in comments from Agriculture

Minister Lyle Stewart last week who advocated the federal government consider retaliating with trade sanctions of our own. “We’re just very disappointed that the U.S. Country of Origin Labelling rules are not changed in the proposed (American) agriculture bill,” Stewart said at the Legislature last week. “This is a restrictive trade measure. The cattle industry in this country has said for years that if the U.S. wants to label, that’s fine with us, but it’s discriminatory the way the rules segregate Canadian cattle and even cuts of meat, in U.S. packing plants. It’s discriminatory against Canadian cattle and hogs and is costing our industry a billion dollars a year.” That billion-dollar-a-year is based on what COOL has cost our cattle industry since 2008. “It (retaliatory trade sanctions) is not good for anybody,” said Stewart. “But that’s not the next step at this point. “Hopefully that won’t be necessary, but if it comes to that, we will be in full support.”

Stewart explained that trade sanctions should only be the last resort after Canada takes the matter to the World Trade Organization hearings in Geneva this month. Unfortunately, that bureaucratic path will take until at least 2015 for that to play out before that process concludes. Even if tariffs mean higher prices on some imports, “we can’t be pushed around like this by any of our trading partners,” Stewart said. In the greater scheme of international relations, this might not seem like a big deal. But it is just one of many incidents in which our neighbour has decided to take advantage of our good nature. Whether it’s been the BSE crisis (that’s became the U.S.’s excuses for COOL) or past U.S. sanctions against our wheat, potash and uranium, the Americans have consistently taken advantage of Canadian trade whenever it suits their purposes. There comes a time when you just have to tell your neighbour ­– even your very good neighbour – that you are not happy.

Extra chromosome means extra special When a child reaches age five, for most parents it is considered a milestone. It marks the beginning of school, enrollment in extracurricular activities and sports teams. A whole new world opens up for them. For parents that have children with Down Syndrome, things are a little bit different. It is the reason why I am glad there is a World Down Syndrome Day on March 21. The medical world describes Down Syndrome as “a congenital disorder arising from a chromosome defect, causing intellectual impairment and physical abnormalities including short stature

Gazette

JAMES TARRANT

Prairie Screechin’

and a broad facial profile. It arises from a defect involving chromosome 21, usually an extra copy.” This cold description, however, doesn’t describe the sweet, social and affectionate nature of these kids and the fact that people with Down Syndrome can attend college and university. My daughter Ava will be turning five in April and

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starting school in September. When I think about the first five years of her life, I look back with pride thinking about everything she has been through at such a young age. As is common with children with Down Syndrome, heart problems are a given. Ava had two holes in her heart, which made it hard for her to gain weight because most of her energy was concentrated on breathing. For the first three months of her life, I had to learn how to feed an oxygen tube down to her lungs to help her breathe. This condition was corrected a short time later when Ava underwent open heart surgery

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at just three months old at the Stollery Children’s Hospital in Edmonton. This summer my daughter will be having her second surgery to fix her left eye. Before Ava was born I knew nothing about kids with Down Syndrome. I could remember kids from the special needs class in grade school, but I never really knew them. For most parents it might have seemed like a let down, but to be honest, I never even thought about it. To me I had a daughter and that was all that mattered. When I told my family and friends there was worry – and a lot of apologies which an-

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gered me. There were also the stereotypical responses, including “oh those kids are great because they are always happy” or phrases like “God loves them.” Since that time, her hospital visits have included monthly speech and physical therapy sessions and visits with social workers, eye doctors, ear doctors and family doctors just to name a few. Through all of the appointments and surgeries you will never hear Ava complain. She is just a normal, happy-golucky child to me. A five-yearold girl that thinks she is a princess – a diva – who loves tormenting her big brother

Matthew and running after the dog. I also have a son that will grow up with the sensitivity about children with disabilities and appreciate their accomplishments no matter how simple they may be. My biggest worry is hoping that my daughter will never ever hear that dreaded ‘retarded’ word, which I think is simply an awful word to call any child or person with a mental disability. Whatever the obstacle she faces I am sure she will come to understand that an extra chromosome doesn’t mean anything negative. It just means extra special.

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VOL. 6 NO. 26


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

7

Warman RCMP respond to several crashes on area roads FROM THE CELL BLOCK Submitted by

SGT. WARREN GHERASIM Warman RCMP

On February 4 at 5:45 a.m. police were called to a single vehicle accident on Highway 11 just north of Osler. The 49-yearold male driver of the vehicle from Saskatoon lost control on the highway and entered the ditch. There were no injuries reported and the vehicle did not require towing. On February 4 at 4:00 a.m. police received a complaint of a two vehicle accident at Highway 11 near Saskatoon. A Chevrolet Avalanche proceeded through the stop sign before it was safe to do so and broadsided a Lincoln Town Car. The driver of the car was taken to hospital as a precaution. The 40-year-old male driver of the Avalanche was charged with proceeding from a stop sign before it was safe to do so. On February 6 at 9:00 a.m. police received a complaint of an accident in Warman. A Hyundai Sante Fe rear ended a truck at a stop sign. The 31-year-old female driver of the SUV from Warman was charged with driving without due care and attention. The female received minor cuts and bruises. The occupants of the

truck were uninjured. The vehicles required towing from the scene. EMS assisted at the scene. On February 7 at 8:15 a.m. police received a complaint of a two vehicle accident on Highway 11 near Warman. A truck was travelling northbound when the driver rear-ended another vehicle travelling ahead of him. A 37-year-old male from Osler was charged with driving with undue care and attention. The vehicles were towed from the scene. Minor injuries were reported. On February 7 at 3:00 p.m. police responded to a complaint of a single vehicle rollover near the weigh scales on Highway 16 near Langham. The 22-yearold male driver of the car fell asleep and entered the centre median and attempted to correct the vehicle, when it rolled into the ditch. He was not injured and was charged for driving without due care and attention. The vehicle was towed from the scene.

THEFT FROM VEHICLES

On February 4 at 2:45 p.m. police received a complaint of a theft from a vehicle in Asquith. The owner of the vehicle reports that thieves took a small amount of cash and a flash light from his vehicle. No damage was done to the vehicle. On February 5 at 1:30 p.m. police received a complaint of a break and enter to a garage in Langham. The owner of the residence had his vehicles

gone through and had a small amount of change stolen. Investigation into this matter is ongoing. On February 7 at 8:05 a.m. police received a complaint of a theft from a vehicle in Warman. The owners of the vehicle reported that a couple of small items were stolen from the vehicle. No damage was reported. Police have responded to numerous complaints of thefts from vehicles. The public is reminded to lock their vehicles when they are parked outside of their garages.

HOCKEY BAG LEFT BEHIND

On February 5 at 7:15 p.m. police received a complaint of a found bag of hockey equipment in Langham. The equipment was left on the front lawn of a residence in Langham without any identifiers as to who the owner of the equipment might be. Please contact Warman/ Martensville Detachment at 306-975-1610 to identify and recover the equipment.

BUSINESS VANDALIZED

On February 9 at 8:20 a.m. police received a complaint of mischief to a business in Warman. Suspects spray painted graffiti on the side of the building. Investigation into this matter is ongoing.

FIRE ON LUTHERAN ROAD On February 4 at 5:50 a.m. police received a complaint of a structure fire on Lutheran

Province sets new mill rate factor The Government of Saskatchewan will set a new mill rate factor limit of 9.0 for the 2014 taxation year for all municipalities to support fairer taxation among municipal property tax classes. “By fostering an ongoing climate of taxation fairness, we will help sustain growth and its benefits for all Saskatchewan residents,” Government Relations Minister Jim Reiter said. The majority of municipalities currently have substantially lower ratios than 9.0. This new limit is to mitigate those circumstances where commercial, industrial, residential and agricultural property owners are not balanced fairly. The maximum ratio of highest to lowest mill rate factors that will be implemented by any Saskatchewan municipality in 2014 is 9.0 - retroactive to January 1. The new limit follows consultations conducted with local government organizations, municipalities and business stakeholders, after an interim mill rate factor limit was announced in April 2013. All property in a municipality is classified by various types - either agricultural, residential or commercial. A municipality may use mill rate factors to transfer some costs of

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public services from one property classification to another. Mill rate factors adjust the mill rate, but can potentially result in property taxation of a specific type of property being either disproportionately higher or lower than another. A max-

imum ratio mitigates this risk by putting a limit on how much can be transferred from one property classification to another. This change to municipal mill rate factors does not apply to education property taxes.

Road just west of Highway 12. It appears an animal may have knocked over a heat lamp in the structure, causing the fire. There were no injuries reported. Martensville Fire Department attended and assisted.

TRACTOR CATCHES FIRE

On February 9 at 2:50 p.m. police received a complaint of a fire in the RM of Montrose. A tractor that was parked inside one of the buildings caught fire. The quick response of the homeowner saved the building from burning by moving the tractor out. The fire was not suspicious in nature. Delisle Fire Department attended and assisted in extinguishing the fire.

ries. On February 7 at 8:30 p.m. police responded to a complaint of an assault in Borden. The 25-year-old female reported that her boyfriend assaulted her. He was intoxicated and was arrested for assault and lodged in cells until he was sober. A 27-year-old male from Borden will be appearing in court on an upcoming court date. The female was not injured in the as-

sault.

DRUNK PEDESTRIAN

On February 8 at 1:00 a.m. police responded to a complaint of an intoxicated female walking on Highway 11 near Warman. Police attended and arrested a 23-year-old female from Saskatoon for being intoxicated in public. She was taken to Saskatoon and lodged in cells until she was sober. 14023MM01

STOLEN VEHICLES

On February 10 at 3:00 a.m. police received a complaint of a stolen vehicle from Langham. The vehicle was parked outside of a residence when it went missing. Investigation into this matter is ongoing. On February 10 at 7:45 a.m. police received a complaint of a stolen vehicle out of Borden. The vehicle was parked outside of the residence overnight. The owner of the vehicle did not hear anything suspicious. Investigation into this matter is ongoing.

ASSAULTS REPORTED

On February 4 at 10:30 p.m. police were called to a residence in Martensville for a domestic assault. The 22-year-old female in the residence received minor injuries in the assault. Police are looking for a 21-year-old male who is being charged with assault. On February 7 at 5:10 p.m. police attended to a complaint of an assault in Martensville. A 32-year-old male from Warman was charged with assault and will appear in court on a later date. The 39-year-old male victim of the assault from Martensville received minor inju-

14023AA00

PubLIc notIce Bylaw 2014-04

Public Notice is hereby given that the Council of the City of Warman intends to adopt a bylaw under The Planning and Development Act, 2007 to sell or trade a piece of Municipal Reserve for the purpose of developing residential lots. Intent The proposed Bylaw will authorize administration to subdivide and consolidate a piece of Municipal Reserve with the Legends Stage 6 subdivision Affected LAnd The affected land is legally described as a portion of MR 8 Plan 102123964 in LS 3, Section 7, Township 39, Range 4, West of the 3rd Meridian and in south east ¼ Section 7, Township 39, Range 4, West of the 3rd Meridian as shown on attached map.

ReAson The amendment is to correct a mistake in an over-dedication of Municipal Reserve. PubLIc InsPectIon Any person may inspect the Bylaw at the City of Warman office between 8:30am-4:30pm, Monday-Friday excluding statutory holidays. Copies are available at cost. PubLIc HeARIng Council will hold a public hearing on Monday March 10, 2014 at 6:30pm at the City of Warman office to hear any person or group that wants to comment on the proposed bylaw. Council will also consider written comments received at the hearing (or delivered to the undersigned at the municipal office before the hearing).

CLARK S CROSSING

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Brad Toth Manager of Planning and Development


18

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2013 high efficiency furnace and water heater; water softener; central vac; attached garage. Leave message 306-384-4512.

HAVE SOME STUFF to sell? Advertise them in the Classifieds and watch it disappear quick! Call The Gazette (306) 668-0575.

Canadian Built Modular Homes

Vanscoy 242-9099 Quality, affordable modular & manufactured homes from 864 sf to 2400 sf www.vestamfghomes.com 2014 Show Homes Now In Stock 10 Year Warranty

303 Main Street “Townhouse" Langham 2 bedroom, 5 appliances, balcony, parking, sm. pets, $975 + electricity. Available immediately (306) 956-0044. 410/412 4TH AVENUE “Basement suite” Rosthern 2 bedrooms, 5 appliances, parking, sm. pets, $850 + electric and water heat. Across from Rosthern High School. Two available immediately. Brand new! (306) 956-0044.

5-506 Centennial Blvd “Townhouse” Warman 2 bedroom. F/S, upstairs W/D, dishwasher. Garage, rear facing & quiet, $1,397 + electricity. Available immediately (306) 956-0044. 716 Glenview Cove “House” Martensville 3 bedroom. F/S, W/D, dishwasher, microwave & deep freeze. Unfinished basement, large yard $1,600 + utilities. Available immediately. (306) 956-0044.

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Homes / Condos For Sale

THE RADISSON HOUSING AUTHORITY has 1 & 2 bedroom Senior suites for rent that have fridge, stove, washer, and dryer included. Rent is determined by income, and includes heat, water, sewer, and parking. Pets are not allowed. Application forms available from Radisson Housing or the Town of Radisson office. Contact Chyanne at (306) 827-2229 for more information. WARMAN: One bedroom condo. 5 appliances. F/P and A/C. Own driveway. Positively no smoking and no pets. Seniors Preferred. Phone (306) 221-2637 or (306)229-0991.

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Land For Sale FARMLAND WANTED NO FEES OR COMMISSIONS! SUMMARY OF SOLD PROPERTIES Central - 66 1/4’s South Central - 18 1/4’s East Central - 74 1/4’s South - 70 1/4’s South East - 31 1/4’s South West - 63 1/4’s North - 6 1/4’s North West - 12 1/4’s East - 55 1/4’s FARM AND PASTURE LAND AVAILABLE TO RENT

PURCHASING: SINGLE TO LARGE BLOCKS OF LAND. PREMIUM PRICES PAID WITH QUICK PAYMENT. RENT BACK AVAILABLE Call DOUG 306-955-2266 saskfarms@shaw.ca

Residential Building for Sale and Removal Located at NW 21-34-3 W3M Approx. 7 km South of Clavet

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Vintage 1920 2-1/2 storey “Eaton” style farm house. 4 bdrm, 1 bath, approximately 1,300 sq.ft. per level. For sale “as is” and must be relocated by purchaser. Viewing: Sat., Feb. 22, 2014 from noon - 4:00 p.m. Deadline for signed and completed offers with deposit: 2:00 p.m. CST March 7, 2014. To obtain an offer package please contact: Purchasing Services University of Saskatchewan (306) 966-2252 or cammie.morgan@usask.ca

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FOR SALE: Sask Valley News, a weekly paper operating out of Rosthern, SK for over 100 years. Contact janet@saskvalleynews.com for further information.

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Careers Long haul SEMI DRIVERS AND OWNER OPS REQUIRED to haul RVs and general freight. O/O paid 85% of invoiced amount with open invoice policy. Signing Bonus currently being offered to O/O. Drivers paid 40¢/running mile + pick/drop/border. Benefits, co fuel cards and subsidized insurance. Must have ability to cross border. Call 800867-6233; www.roadexservices.com. NEWSPAPER REPORTER / EDITOR Position is for a reporter with some editorial duties at the Shellbrook Chronicle in Shellbrook Sask. located 44km west of the City of Prince Albert. Shellbrook is a vibrant growing community with all amenities to serve family or individual lifestyles. Qualifications: The successful applicant will have strong writing, and verbal communication skills. Previous experience and knowledge of computers, Indesign and Photoshop are assets. He/she must have a valid driver’s license. Apply by Email forwarding a sample of writing along with resume and references to Clark Pepper, Publisher. Email: clark@sbchron.com

Tired of Semi Truck Driving? Haul RVs from USA to Western Canada! 1 ton and 3 ton trucks required. 1-800-8676233; www.roadexservices. com. WINCH TRACTOR OPERATORS. Must have experience operating a winch. To apply fax, email or drop off resume at the office. Phone 780-842-6444. Fax 780-8426581. Email: rigmove @telus.net. Mail: H&E Oilfield Services Ltd., 2202 - 1 Ave., Wainwright, AB, T9W 1L7. For more employment information see our webpage: www.heoil. com.

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

This Week’s C R O S S W O R D Across

1. Yearly tonnage (abbr.) 4. Licenses TV stations 7. Brain wave test 8. Rowing fulcrum peg 10. Arabian Gulf 12. 55121 MN 13. Trash & tin 14. Actress Farrow 16. Egg of a louse 17. Lesion 19. A Scottish cap 20. Poi vegetable 21. Illness from neurosis 25. Moving truck 26. Gallivant 27. Millisecond 29. Trigonometric function 30. Pinna 31. Loud noise 32. Small auto accidents 39. Thin wire nail 41. Many subconciousness 42. Rocket scientist Werner Von 43. Albanian currency 44. Sum up 45. Grapefruit & tangerine hybrid 46. SE Asia palm genus 48. Drew off fluid 49. Severe & cruel 50. Before 51. It never sleeps 52. Used to be United ___

3. Administrative unit 4. Residential mortgage authority 5. High quality French brandy 6. Gilbert O’Sullivan song 8. Steeped beverage 9. Prefix used in anatomy, biology 11. Nanosecond (abbr.) 14. Mayan language 15. Create mentally 18. Atomic #45 19. 2000 pounds 20. Oceanic rise or fall 22. Did to excess 23. Pouch or baglike structure 24. Browning of the skin

27. A fitting reward (archaic) 28. Diego, Francisco or Anselmo 29. Cognate 31. Physicians 32. Duplicity 33. Doctor of Education 34. E. Canadian province 35. Beat thoroughly 36. $10 gold coins 37. Monarchs or dictators 38. Duke: “The Silver Fox” 39. Dull claptrap 40. Showed old movie 44. Express pleasure 47. Reciprocal of a sine

Down

1. Saucer’s companion 2. Foot controls

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Horoscopes

FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY

CAPRICORN December 22– January 19

Your responsible nature helps those in your care to feel safe and secure. It is good to show others how much they mean to you, and you have been doing it correctly.

AQUARIUS January 20– February 18

Some well-hidden information could come to the surface, and you will have the ability to put it to use, Aquarius. Just don’t let the power go to your head.

PISCES February 19– March 20

Pisces, you must deal with a potentially delicate matter in the days to come. Keep a cool head and remain confident.

ARIES March 21– April 19

Aries, strange forces seem to be working against you, but fortunately you are prepared for anything that comes your way. Allow for some time to get things settled.

TAURUS April 20– May 20

Taurus, keep a firm hand on your wallet so you can avoid spending well beyond your means. It is best if you avoid making any impulse purchases in the near future.

GEMINI May 21– June 21

Gemini, listen carefully when a family member comes to you with some sage advice. Even a seemingly relaxed conversation may prove fruitful.

sudoku

CANCER June 22–

July 22

Cancer, you may seem rushed this week, but resist the temptation to go faster than is comfortable for you. Take your time so things are done right the first time.

LEO July 23– August 22

Leo, you may have so much fun this week that you don’t realize you have been getting work done in the process. Your attitude is even inspiring others around you.

VIRGO August 23– September 22

Take a step back when you don’t see eye to eye with a colleague, Virgo. Disagreements can quickly escalate, so keep a level head and take all things into consideration.

LIBRA September 23– October 22

Libra, your intuition and ability to work with people closely will make your life much more enjoyable. Make use of these talents as you pursue a new career path.

SCORPIO October 23– November 21

Falling into a slump just isn’t your style, Scorpio. Even if things don’t seem to be going your way, your attitude and work ethic will make the most of the situation.

SAGITTARIUS November 22– December 21

Sagittarius, playing games with someone can be fun, but don’t let things turn into a serious rivalry. Focus on being lighthearted this week.

THIS WEEK’S ANSWERS


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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 PG. 9

• LAMINATES • HARDWOOD • AREA RUGS • CARPET • VINYL • TILE

ADVERTISING THAT WON’T BREAK THE BANK... 306.688.0575

Whitehorse-bound fire truck finds warm welcome in Warman Always happy to provide a favour to fellow firefighters... By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

A state-of-the-art fire truck manufactured in Winnipeg and bound for the City of Whitehorse, Yukon, made a pit stop in Warman on the weekend. The vehicle, manufactured

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by Fort Garry Fire Trucks in Winnipeg, is being driven by Gil Bradet and Remi Smith of Whitehorse. The pair were approaching Saskatoon when Bradet decided to phone Warman City Manager Stanley Westby, whom he knew from Westby’s days a City Manager in Whitehorse a few years go. “I remembered Stan saying he was in Warman, which is close to Saskatoon,” said Bradet. “I just thought I’d touch base, since we’re old friends. Stan invited us out for supper and to stay the night, and then the fire department offered us a heated fire hall to park the truck for the night. At minus 30, it’s nice to have that kind of hospitality. To park a fire truck in a fire hall, you can’t ask for better than that.” Warman Deputy Fire Chief Russ Austin said they were happy to provide a favour for fellow firefighters. The City of Whitehorse, with a population of 28,000 residents, has a mix of full-time and volunteer firefighters. All firefighters are trained to professional standards. Bradet, who works as an Aircraft Rescue Firefighter as well as a fire safety equipment sales rep, was attending a sales meeting at Fort Garry Fire Trucks manufacturing plant in Winnipeg when he was asked by the company president to drive the truck back to Whitehorse, a distance of about 3,600 kilometers.

“It’s a long drive,” said Bradet in an interview at the Warman Fire Hall on Monday morning, February 10 just before he and Smith left to hit the road to Edmonton. “This is a nice truck, but it’s made for a fighting fires. It’s not exactly made for long highway journeys.” Bradet said he was impressed not just with the Warman Fire Hall facility, but with the hospitality shown by the city. “It’s pretty amazing to see how this community has grown,” said Bradet. “I was here twenty years ago. I hardly recognize the place.” Austin jokingly offered to trade the Warman Fire Department’s aging pumper truck for the new Whitehorse-bound unit, but the proposition was politely declined. “That probably wouldn’t go over too well with the City of Whitehorse,” said Bradet. Bradet said the truck was custom-designed by the Whitehorse Fire Department to meet the needs of the northern community. “Being made in Winnipeg, the manufacturers understand cold weather,” said Bradet. There’s plenty of heat in this unit, not just in the cab but also in the pumphouse to protect the equipment, and also heat by the tank. It also has very powerful on-scene LED lamps that light up the scene like the sun just came up. “But there are also other features that you don’t find on too many other units.” The truck has chains that can be applied to the tires automatically without anyone having to get out of the cab. “It’s pretty cool,” said Bradet. “You probably wouldn’t need a feature like that in this province, but once you get up north into the Yukon mountains, with those steep roads and all that snow, it’s nice to be able to use those chains in the mountain passes.”

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

The fire truck bound for the Yukon’s capital city of Whitehorse was housed overnight in the Warman Fire Hall on Sunday night. The vehicle left early Monday morning and is expected to arrive in Whitehorse on Thursday, Feb 13. (Left to right) Warman Deputy Fire Chief Russ Austin, Remi Smith of Whitehorse, Warman firefighter Greg Baker, Gil Bradet of Whitehorse, and Warman City Manager Stanley Westby.

Warman library records sharp rise in circulation after move By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

The Warman branch of the Wheatland Regional Library recorded an increase of nearly 5,000 “checkouts” in 2013 compared to a year earlier. The big reason for the increase, according to library board member Richard Beck, was the move to a new facility in the Warman Community Middle School last fall. “Definitely, it made a big difference,” said Beck, a member of both the local library board and the regional library board, as well as a Warman city councilor. “The connection with the school has certainly helped the library gain a stronger profile in the community.” Beck said the new location offers a bigger space, more selection, brighter surroundings, longer hours and increased programming. In 2013, the Warman branch recorded 35,953 checkouts, up

from 31,010 in 2012. That was the biggest yearover-year increase in circulation numbers of any branch in the Wheatland Regional Library system, which includes a total of 47 branches. But the Martensville branch is still the top performer when it comes to circulation numbers, according to the Wheatland Regional Library central office. In 2013, Martensville had 40,353 checkouts, compared to 37,771 in 2012. Overall, the regional library recorded a total circulation of 357,171 checkouts, reflecting the popularity of the library’s new province-wide inter-library loan system. Patrons with any library can access materials from other library systems through an integrated electronic database that was put in place in 2011. Cara Barrett, Assistant Head Librarian for the Warman branch library, said many young families are taking ad-

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signing out books at the same time.” Barrett said the students quickly mastered the art of ordering the books they want to read online by using their own assigned bar code. “It didn’t take them long to get the hang of it,” she said. “The seniors are a little more reluctant. We do all the ordering for most of them.” Beck said the library’s location is convenient for people in the community who are using the recreational facilities in the Legends Centre, which is attached to the middle years school. “In the evening, when parents drop their kids off to hockey practice, they’ll often walk over to the library, especially if they also have younger children,” said Beck. “So this has really helped strengthen the cultural aspect of the Legends Centre, which was the original vision for the facility when it was first launched a few years ago.”

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vantage of the facility and the programs offered for youngsters. “Story time is a big draw,” said Barrett. “We have a really nice space here for the preschool kids, where they can play with the Lego blocks and read picture books.” Barrett said she’s also noticed an increase in the number of seniors. “It’s taken a while for some people to get used to the idea that the library is in a school, but still open to the community as a whole,” she said. “Sometimes they’re a little unsure when they first come in, but they get more comfortable with each return trip.” But the big increase in circulation is also attributable to the heavy use by classes in the middle years school. “We usually have at least one class in here at all times,” she said. “Sometimes there’s more than one. It can be a little hectic, especially when they’re all

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

Martensville to hook into Saskatoon wastewater system Sewage lagoon at capacity; regional option preferred By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

The City of Martensville is looking to hook directly into the City of Saskatoon’s wastewater treatment and potable water distribution systems.

WEBSITE EXCLUSIVE

Get stories like this plus more photos before anyone else! Breaking news as it happens online for free at: www.ccgazette.ca

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to negotiate an agreement on water and wastewater services between Martensville and Saskatoon is currently being considered by both city councils. Saskatoon City Council was scheduled to consider the MOU at its meeting on Monday, February 10. Martensville City Council was slated to discuss the MOU at its “Committee of the Whole” meeting on Tuesday, February 11, and vote on the document at its regular council meeting on Tuesday, February 20.

COST-EFFECTIVE OPTION

dle future growth. So we have to decide, are we going to make other improvements to our facility that may take us a little further down the road, but may not be sufficient to meet upcoming wastewater requirements? There are federal environmental requirements for discharges into the river, which would require significant costs at our end. “At the same time, just a few miles away, the City of Saskatoon has one of the best wastewater treatment plants in Canada,” he continued. “We believe it would save money in the long run to come to an agreement with Saskatoon to tie into that facility.” Blevins said once the Martensville city administration and council determined that tying into Saskatoon’s system was the most affordable long-term option, discussions to hammer out the MOU progressed quickly. “It just took a few months,” he said.

REGIONAL APPROACH

Blevins said it’s a significant The MOU marks “the first step forward toward a regional step towards negotiating an approach, and may prove to be agreement that would work for a model for other communities. He credited Saskatoon with being open to the idea of regionalization. “When I started in this position several years ago, I approached the Saskatoon civ• Scott Blevins, ic administraCity of Martensville Manager tion to inquire about the posboth cities,” according to Marsibility of hooking into their tensville City Manager Scott wastewater system, and the anBlevins. “There has been quite swer was: ‘no way. We do not a lot of discussion around our accept wastewater or provide council table over the last couservices outside our boundarple of years about our options ies.’ But now they are much with regard to wastewater, more open to a regional, coopand it became pretty clear that erative approach, and that’s a working out some form of sergood thing,” said Blevins. vice agreement with Saskatoon Under the proposed MOU, the was the most cost-effective cities would work together to route.” develop a regional plan to share Blevins said Martensville’s costs for upgrading the existsewage lagoon has reached its ing infrastructure and come up capacity. In order to accomwith cost estimates for needed modate the city’s anticipated additons, including a sanitary growth and also comply with sewer lift station, force main, new environmental regulaodour abatement structure and tions, the existing wastewater a gravity pipe. treatment system would need Saskatoon Community Serextensive - and expensive - upvices Department General grades, he added. Manager Randy Grauer agrees “We’re at a point where we that the larger city is better off have to make a decision,” said working in partnership with its Blevins. “We have increased neighbours. our lagoon size as much as we “This is a key step towards a can, but it’s not enough to hanregional planning approach for

“We’re at a point where we have to make a decision. We have increased our lagoon size as much as we can, but it’s not enough to handle future growth...”

land use and servicing,” said Grauer in a news release issued by the City of Saskatoon. “It’ll also help the City of Martensville to continue playing an important role in the growth and development of the Saskatoon Region.”

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Grauer confirmed that Martensville approached Saskatoon to consider allowing a connection to Saskatoon’s existing Waste Water Treatment Plant. “Basically, it’s an agreement to agree,” said Grauer, adding it sets out the regional planning goals of Saskatoon and Martensville, as well as creating an outline for a more detailed formal agreement on water and wastewater services. The MOU would be in effect until the City of Martensville - which currently has a population of about 8,000 residents - reaches a population of 20,000, at which time it would be renegotiated. Under the terms of the MOU, the City of Martensville would pay a premium for water and wastewater services over and above what Saskatoon residents pay. Blevins said that arrangement is acceptable. “There will be a premium, of course,” he said. “It’s their wastewater facility and it makes sense for outside users to pay a bit more.” Similarly, a premium on potable water is appropriate, he said. “Currently, our water is supplied by a provincial agency, SaskWater, which purchases water from the City of Saskatoon and then distributes it through their pipeline system to communities around Saskatoon. So we already pay a premium for water. Under a new agreement, we would buy the water directly from Saskatoon.” Currently, SaskWater is in the process of negotiating a new contract for potable water delivery to communities and rural water utilities in the Saskatoon region. Blevins said new pipelines for both wastewater and potable water would be constructed to tie into the Saskatoon system. “We would have to do new pipes,” he said. “And if we’re putting new pipes in the ground for wastewater, it makes sense to put in new pipes for potable water as well and upgrade them. They would not be high-pressure lines, so we would still need to have our reservoirs for water storage, just as we do now.”

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Life’s brighter under the sun

martensville gala pays tribute to guardians of the community

By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

The men and women who serve on the front lines were honoured for their service to the community at the eighth annual Martensville Emergency and Protective Services Dine and Dance on Saturday, February 8. The gala event, held at the North Ridge Centennial Community Centre in Martensville, attracted several hundred people. It featured tributes to the RCMP and other police services, the volunteer fire departments in the area, first responders and paramedics, the military and other protective services personnel. The Martensville Fire Department presented Long Service Awards to: Rob Whiteside (5 years), Dean Christianson (5 years), Chad Eckes (5 years),

Wayne Ditto (15 years), Lt. Larry Sigfusson (20 years) and Cpt. Gary David (20 years). Fire Service Exemplary Medals for 20 years of service or more were presented to retired Lt. Laurie Loy, Lt. Larry Sigfusson, Cpt. Gary David, Warman Deputy Fire Chief Russ Austin, and firefighter Steve Smith, the longest-serving member of the department with 37 years under his belt. Speakers at the event included Martensville Fire Chief Kurtis Dyck, Warman-Martensville RCMP Detachment Commander Staff Sgt. Kevin Weber and Martensville City Councilor Jamie Martens. Superintendent Darcy Davidson, RCMP Central District Commander, presented a toast to the Queen. A highlight of the evening was an honour guard and ceremony with a minute of silence that paid tribute to emergency

and protective services members who have fallen in the line of duty. The symbols included a round table for “everlasting memories of our fallen comrades”, a white tablecloth for purity of motives in answering the call of duty, a single red rose to signify the blood shed in sacrifice, a red ribbon for remembrance, a slice of lemon for the bitter fate of those who paid the ultimate sacrifice, a pinch of salt for the tears shed by families of the fallen, an inverted glass to symbolize their inability to share the evening’s toast, a candle for the light of hope that their lives were not given in vain and a Canadian flag in honour of their nation. Funds raised at the event – including those from a silent auction – will be used for educational programs and services by the fire department and police service in Martensville.

Martensville Fire Chef Kurtis Dyck

Warman Deputy Fire Chief Russ Austin, Lt. Laurie Loy, Lt. Larry Sigfusson, Steve Smith, Cpt. Gary David.

PHOTOS BY WAYNE SHIELS | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

At left, RCMP Staff Sergeant Kevin Weber

Larry Sigfusson, Dean Christianson, Wayne Ditto, Kurtis Dyck, Jamie Martens (Martensville City Councilor), Tyson Chillog (City Councilor)

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12

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

BOULDING Wyatt Michael Son of Todd & Christie Born: February 27, 2013 Submitted by: Mom, Dad and big brother Greyson

ENNS Haddie Noelle Daughter of Kevin & Caitlin Enns, sister to Jack Born: December 12, 2013 Submitted by: Grandpa & Grandma Enns

DERKSEN Everleigh Renee Daughter of Andrew & Denalle Born: September 21, 2013

FEHR Maelle Eulalia Daughter of Cameron & Erin Born: January 19, 2013 Submitted by: Papa & Nana and Pete & Olinda Fehr

KEATS-AKISTER Brooklyn Lena Daughter of Cody & Bayley

KUFFNER Ava-Lyn Rose

Born: December 26, 2013

Daughter of Angela & Al Kuffner

Submitted by: Grandpa, Grandma and Auntie Rheannon

PENNER Wyatt Son of Travis & Laurie Born: June 30, 2013 Submitted by: mommy & daddy

SWANSON Joshua Ronald Son of Sarah & Beau Born: November 19, 2013 Submitted by: mom, dad and big brother Zachery

! y b a b r u o s ’ t T ha

Born: June 26, 2013

PETERS Warren Blake

Salute to 3 1 0 2 n i n r o b babies POLLOCK Cassie Vi Daughter of Stephen and Jacquie Pollock

Son of Trent & Evonne Peters

Born: October 27, 2013

Born: October 29, 2013

Submitted by her big brother Benson

ULVILD Kade Weston Reid

UNGER Ethan Jeffrey

Son of Blake & Brittany

Son of Jeff & Carla

Born: January 13, 2013 Submitted by: Grandma & Grandpa Bryce and big brother Chase

Born: October 17, 2013

ROLSTON Severin Son of Sasha & Nathan Born: August 28, 2013 Submitted by: Mama & Papa

ELSON Parker Isabella Daughter of Meagan and Stephen Born: October 21, 2013 Submitted by: Kim & Doug McLeay

DOOLEY Brett Mason Son of Nolan Dooley & Nikki Rudachyk Dooley and little brother to Sean Born: September 28, 2013

Neufeld Taya Christine Daughter of Danielle and Gordon Neufeld Born: October 2, 2013 Submitted by: Judy & Allan Wiebe and Velora Neufeld

STUDHOLME Aiden Michael Son of Karen and Jonathan Born: March 10, 2013 Submitted by: Mammy, Daddy and big brother Ellis

ZACHARIAS Anna Evolette Daughter of Lance & Kristina Born: February 9, 2013 Submitted by: Mom, Dad and big sister Kamryn


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

DASH Joseph Micheal

13

DOELL Easton Kenneth

Son of Aaron & Kelly Dash and little brother to Jack Dash

DESROSIERS Trenton Ryland Son of Chad & Tammy Desrosiers

Son of Shane & Ashley Doell

Born: February 6, 2013

Born: January 29, 2013

Born: November 27, 2013

HAMM Ekaterina Wren Wyatt Darryl Douglas Son of Falon Gramlich & Dwight Callfras Born: September 26, 2013

Daughter of Cole, Carla and little sister to Yelena Born: September 28, 2013 Submitted by: Al & Joan Loeppky

HOFSTRA Danica Nicole Daughter of Mike & Chantal Hofstra Born: April 10, 2013

Liam, Emma top baby names for 2013

McLEAN Skylar Bryn Daughter of Craig & Cori McLean

LARIVIERE Addyson Eva Daughter of Bryan Lariviere & Tara Morelli Born: September 26, 2013

Born: June 10, 2013

Submitted by: Granny Jan & Papa Bernie

NERNBERG Atticus Laine & Bennet Maxwell

HOWARD Dylan Oliver

Sons of Farron & Lana Born: March 1, 2013 Submitted by: Mom, Dad, big brother Hudson and big sister Abbotte

ZOERB Clayton Scott Son of Scott & Zabrina Zoerb

Son of Clint & Linda Born: December 13, 2013 Submitted by: big brother Gage & big sister Farrah

MUJER Reteyah Dawn Pia Daughter of Jenna & Bhett Born: August 29, 2013

For the fourth year in a row, Liam was the most popular name for baby boys born in Saskatchewan. Emma was the most popular girl’s name for the last five years. The second most popular names were Carter and Sophia, which moved up several spots from 2012. There were 92 baby boys named Liam in 2013, followed by Carter, Noah, Lucas and Ethan. Ethan held the honour as most popular boy’s name for eight years, from 2001

to 2009. There were 80 baby girls named Emma, followed by Sophia, Emily, Olivia and Lily. Olivia and Emily remained among the top five popular names from 2012. Lily moved up from the sixth spot. To date there are 15,222 live births registered in Saskatchewan in 2013, which is an increase from 15,046 in 2012. These numbers do not include Saskatchewan mothers who gave birth outside of the province. Top 20 Baby Boy Names (by count): Liam (92), Cart-

er (69), Noah (65), Lucas (65), Ethan (60), Jacob (55), Mason (54), William (52), Owen (52), Jace (50), Alexander (49), Jaxon (49), Bentley (47), Benjamin (45), Jase (45), Logan (44), Hudson (43), Ryder (42), Hunter (42), Samuel (40). Top 20 Baby Girl Names (by count): Emma (80), Sophia (72), Emily (64), Olivia (64), Lily (53), Ava (52), Brooklyn (45), Zoey (43), Brielle (40), Avery (38), Grace (38), Hannah (38), Mia (37), Hailey (37), Isabella (37), Aubrey (33), Ella (33), Abigail (33), Sadie (32), Chloe (30).

EAST Parker James Son of Dan & Kim East Born: April 11, 2013

HAANEN Brooklyn Jade & Adalyn Rae

Parents: Darcey & Kalee Haanen of Martensville Born: August 8, 2013

Born: July 6, 2013

Congratulations to all families who submitted photos for this issue...prizes will be announced next week.

Submitted by: Mom, Dad and big brother Wyatt

Watch for details soon on how to get your 2014 baby into next year’s edition of That’s Our Baby!

a friend in need

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

A donation of $1,000 was made last weekend by the Rosthern-Duck Lake-Saskatoon #13 Masonic Lodge to a family from Osler to help with their expenses related to a severe illness. Dallas Donahue of Osler is suffering from a severe kidney disorder, and is currently undergoing paritoneal dialysis four times a day. Formerly employed as a UPS driver in Saskatoon, his illness has made it very difficult for him to work regularly for the past few years. His wife Rebecca works part-time and says the family, which includes two children, 11-year-old Elijah a nd 5-year-old Channah, is coping as well as they can. They are hopeful that Dallas will be able to receive a kidney transplant sometime this year. Masonic Lodge members Tim Newton (left), Mark Caddy (rear) and James Paquette (right) present the funds to Rebecca, Elijah and Channah on Saturday, February 8 at Paquette’s car dealership in Warman, Autosource1. The Lodge intends to additional fundraising events to help the family over the next several months.


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Chiefs split weekend games By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

The Delisle Chiefs split their weekend games with a 5-4 loss to the Saskatoon Westleys, February 7 and a 5-4 win over the Extreme Hockey Regina Capitals, February 9. It was the second straight weekend the Chiefs split games despite outshooting their opponents. In the Westleys game Josh Reinbolt and Tanner Olson each scored a goal and an assist in the contest, while Mark Ganter and Michael Haugen scored the other goals for the Chiefs. Tanner Hilkewich led scoring for the Chiefs with three assists against the Capitals followed by Josh Reinbolt who scored two goals. Carter Yuzdepski, Ryan Fredrickson and Trevor Reinbolt added single markers for the Chiefs. The Chiefs have three games remaining in the 2013/14 season, with road games against the Westleys February 13 and the Silver Foxes, February 16. The Chiefs will take on the Icehawks for their final home game of the season February 14. Game time is 8 p.m.

on the doorstep Saskatoon Blades defenceman Tyler Dea and goalie Troy Trombley combine to stop Medicine Hat Tigers forward Anthony Ast in a game at Credit Union Centre on Friday February 7. Trombley made 34 saves in a 5-2 loss. The Blades next home game is February 19 versus the Regina Pats.

WAYNE SHIELS | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

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Wheatkings drop playoff opener to Vikings By JAMES TARRANT james@ccgazette.ca

A couple of defensive breakdowns by the Dundurn Wheatkings sealed their fate in a 6-3 loss to the Naicam Vikings on February 7. It was the first game of the best-of-five opening playoff series, which will move to Dundurn for two games this week. Last Friday, the Vikings scored twice in the opening frame, putting the Wheatkings behind with less than a minute to play in the first period. The Wheatkings were able to answer back in the second period with goals from Russell Robson, Darcy Schroeder and Conrad Neufeld, but still trailed by one goal heading into the third. The Wheatkings put up a tough fight in the final stanza, but the Vikings potted two goals to increase the lead to 6-3 and ended all hopes of a Wheatkings comeback. During the regular season, the Wheatkings split their games with the Vikings. Despite the Wheatkings lacklus-

tre effort in the opening playoff series, coach Richie Seward said some last minute personal changes by the Vikings late in the season is something they are going to have to pay attention to in game two. “They made a couple of lineup changes early in the new year. They brought in a guy named Rob Holoien who has been doing quite a bit of scor-

ing for them. He is someone we are going to have to definitely watch in game two,” said Seward. Holoein led the scoring for the Vikings with three goals in game one. The Wheatkings will get the services of Justin Higginbotham and Travis Robson in game two. Both defencemen were a significant part of the Wheatkings defensive core all season,

borden curling team off to winter games The Burnett team is going to Winter Games as a result of their recent win in the 2014 Curl Sask bonspiel. The team includes: Coach Dwayne Yachiw, Dallas Burnett, Tyler Camm, Andrew Derksen & Eric Westad (Photo by Lorraine Olinyk)

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explained Steward. He said if his team is to have a chance in game two, they are going to need to play better defensively and capitalize on their scoring chances. Home ice advantage, he noted, will help in that regard. “We are usually pretty good at home. A lot of teams don’t like coming to Durndurn because it is a small ice surface.”

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15

clavet skaters headed to saskatchewan winter games Skaters from the Clavet Skating Club will be participating in the Saskatchewan Winter Games in Prince Albert February 16-22. They include: (left to right) Mikaela McFall, Alison Fedoriuk, Katelynn Montgomery and Laura McLeod, Winter Games Skating Team Coach Laura is a member of the Clavet Skating Club Coaching team. She has been selected as one of the coaches of the Winter Games skating team. (Photos submitted by Bev Fedoriuk)

Mar tensville Minor Hockey Association Looking for the following positions for the 2014/15 season:

Head Coach for PeeWee AA program Head Coach for Midget AA program Please send resume attention to: Derek at dtdoell@sasktel.net or Box 2020, Martensville, SK S0K 2T0 Deadline for applications is Saturday, March 15/14

Clavet School students who are competing in the Saskatchewan Winter Games in Prince Albert include: (left to right) Tori Shmon – figure skating: dance Alison Fedoriuk – figure skating: freeskate, Kalista Senger – womens’ hockey team, Mackenna Parker – women’s hockey team. Emily Perehudoff – women’s hockey team, Willow Slobodzian – women’s hockey team, Rayna Jacobson – women’s hockey team, Katelynn Montgomery – figure skating: freeskate, Mikaela McFall – figure skating: freeskate, Brodie Girod – men’s hockey team

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Wolverines Coach

The Warman Wolverines Junior “A” Girls Basketball team won the Central Valley Athletic Conference Championship for the fourth year in a row on Saturday, February 8 at Warman High School. In the Final 4 Tournament, the girls edged Hague by a score of 41-40 and defeated Valley Christian Academy in the final 30-23. The Junior “A” Wolverines had a very successful season, compiling a record of 16 wins and six losses. Some of the highlights from the season were finishing third as hosts of the Blast-Off Tournament in January and placing second in the Hot Hoops Tournament in Lloydminster. Next year looks very promising for the Junior Wolverines, as eight of 11 players are eligible to return.

FCHL scoreboard

Photo submitted by Corey Fast

Warman Wolverines Junior A Girls Basketball team includes: (back row, l-r): Coach Sproule, Hannah Black, Kaylee Budd, Makayla Sader, Kaylyn Brown, Meghan Hennessey, Kennedi Douglas, Emma Anthony, Coach Fast. Front row: Shawna Cummings, Marissa Olafson, Danica Fast, Rebecca Barkway.

Delisle hosts curling regionals

Delisle Composite School will be hosting Regional girls curling playdowns this weekend at the Delisle Curling Club. Teams from the following communities will be competing: Meadow Lak, Hanley, Maidstone, Spiritwood, Wilkie, Delisle The Regional championships consist of a six or eight team double knock-out format leading to an ‘A’ event and ‘B’ event qualifier to the provincial championship. Hanley School is hosting Provincial Girls Curling the weekend of February 28 and March 1. Competition begins on Friday at noon, with the last game scheduled for 8 p.m. Play continues on Saturday morning at 9 a.m.

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SILVErwOOD HEIGHTS 334 Zeman Crescent Immaculate Bungalow 1,615 sq.ft. 3+1 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Main floor laundry MLS# 480227 $479,900

warman COnDO 8 Crystal Village Crt. Beautiful Condition 1,041 sq.ft., 2 bedroom, 2 Bath, bungalow-style MLS# 482944 $314,900

PIKE LaKE 8 Lakeside Drive Water front home, Stunning View 15 minutes from Saskatoon 1850 sq.ft. on leased lot MLS# 486586 $319,900

LawSOn HEIGHTS 112 - 209B Cree Place Main floor unit, 756 sq.ft., 1 bedroom, south facing balcony, in-suite laundry MLS# 483399 $189,900

HEPBUrn COrnEr Commercial Property 1.28 acres, 40x40 Shop Plus 24x24 addition Great Hwy 12 Location MLS# 486139 $259,900

FrEE COUrTESY TraILEr

Sat, Feb 8: Dalmeny Fury 6 @ Rosthern Wheat Kings 4 Sun, Feb 9: Warman Wildcats 1 @ Prairie Outlaws 8 Tues, Feb 11: Hague Royals @ Bruno T-Birds (score unavailable)

Upcoming Games:

Thurs, Feb 13: Bruno T-Birds @ Hague Royals (8:30 start) Fri, Feb 14: Rosthern Wheat Kings @ Dalmeny Fury (8:30) Fri, Feb 14: Prairie Outlaws @ Warman Wildcats (8:30) Sat, Feb 15: Shellbrook Elks @ Tisdale Ramblers (7:30) Sat, Feb 15: Dalmeny Fury @ Rosthern Wheat Kings (8:30) Sun, Feb 16: Warman Wildcats @ Prairie Outlaws (6:30)

SPHL scoreboard

Game 1: Radisson 4 @ Maymont 1 Game 2: Maymont 5 @ Radisson 3 Game 3: Feb 12 in Maymont (8 pm) Game 4: Feb 14 in Radisson (8 pm) Game 5: Feb 15 in Maymont (8 pm)

Available by request for all my clients!


16

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

Bethany alumni tournaments highlight season Submitted by

ALVIN THIELMANN

Athletics Director Bethany College - Hepburn Photos by Pei Chu

The weekend of January 17 to 18 saw seventy alumni visit Bethany College to compete in the annual indoor soccer and hockey tournaments. The competition was fierce and games were close in both sports. Hockey had two alumni teams challenging the current Eagles team. The young Eagles were not able to overcome the experienced skill of the older teams which placed the two alumni teams against each other for the championship. Eventually, the younger alumni team from 2004-2013 prevailed to win the coveted Alumni trophy. For the soccer competition,

harity C HOCKEY GAME WARMAN TIM BIT + WARMAN/OSLER FIRE DEPT. HOCKEY TEAMS

vs

WESTERN CANADA MONTREAL CANADIENS FAN CLUB HOCKEY TEAM - COACHED BY FORMER STANLEY CUP CHAMPION MR. GARRY PETERS!

Bethany College Eagles 2004-2013 Alumni Hockey team three women’s alumni teams and two men’s alumni teams joined the tournament. Al-

though the current Eagles women’s team was unable to make it out of the round robin play, several of the players were able to score their very first goals. In due course, the Women’s division was won by the 2003-2009 alumni team with Carla Regehr from Saskatoon leading the way with four goals. For this performance, she earned the Golden Boot Award. In the men’s division, friends and family saw great individual battles and tightly played games. In the end, the 20082013 team proved too strong for the other teams by going undefeated in the tournament. The men’s Golden Boot Award went to Lane Thielmann as he recorded a tournament high of 4 goals in the 2 round robin games. As those who participate in

2003-2009 Alumni Women’s Soccer team

this annual event would tell you, the tournament would not be the same without the famous Bethany Brunch on Saturday morning. In a presentation during the meal, Paul and Viola Preston of Vauxhall, Alberta were recognized as Alumni of the Year. Not only do the Prestons generously support the college financially in practical and imaginative ways, all five of their children have attended Bethany College. To top it off, all five of them were able to play in this weekend’s tournament.

Important Dates:

WARMAN LEGENDS CENTRE MONDAY FEBRUARY 17 TH @ 5PM ADMISSION $2 PER PERSON : $5 PER FAMILY Silent Auction

Shoot To Win

FEAT. AUTOGRAPHED N.H.L JERSEYS + MORE

Raffle

ONE YEARS SUPPLY OF BOSTON PIZZA!

WIN A MOTORBIKE! VALUED AT $16,968!

COURTESY OF REDLINE HARLEY-DAVIDSON PARTNERING WITH CHILDREN’S WISH FOUNDATION

50/50

January 31- February 2: Youth Advance February 21-22: Alumni Basketball Tournament April 18: Spring Concert April 19: Commencement and Grad Banquet

All Proceeds PROVIDING SUPPLIES TO THE MEDICAL ROOM AT THE LEGENDS CENTRE KEVIN SCHWARTZ : 306.222.7510 JIM TAMAN : 306.384.4426

THE

RESULTS T EAM The Approachable Professionals View all listings online

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*1,443/2 sq. ft., 3 bdrms, 3 baths * MLS# 478467 116 MARTENS CRESCENT $340,000 MLS®

2008-2013 Alumni Men’s Soccer team

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Clearout $1/39 sq. ft. Compare at 5 /sq. ft $

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* 1,309/2 sq. ft., 3 bdrms, 2 baths * MLS# 478451 509 QUESSY DRIVE $448,000 MLS®

* 1,761 /2 sq. ft., 4 bdrms + den, 3 baths * MLS# 481454 101 BROOKSIDE DRIVE $399,900 MLS®

HAGUE

WARMAN

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* 869 sq. ft., 3 bdrms, 2 baths * MLS# 485985 410 3RD AVENUE S. $277,700 MLS

Lori Miller Joe Wiebe Office Manager (306) 230 7334

LD SO WANNA TRY SOMETHING NEW? *1,302/2 sq. ft., 3 bdrms, 3 baths * MLS# 478493 80 MARTENS CRESCENT $294,900 MLS®

* 1,078/2 sq. ft., 4 bdrms, 3 baths * MLS# 480549 102 CENTENNIAL STREET $234,900 MLS®

HONEY, STOP THE CAR!

ATTRACTIVE INSIDE & OUT

* 1,146 sq. ft., 4 bdrms, 3 baths * 1,349 sq. ft., 4 bdrms, 2 baths * MLS# 484344 * MLS# 481061 178 FINCH CRESCENT 228 BROOKLYN CRESCENT $344,900 MLS® ® $374,900 MLS

We can help you with that. A career ad in The Gazette reaches over 40,000 people each week

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Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

(306) 668-0575 ads@ccgazette.ca


deadline

Mondays 12:00 Noon

$8.00/wk for the first 25 words 35¢/wk per word thereafter + GST THE

IAGL B DE

Run your word ad FrEE! 3 consecutive weeks with no changes, get the 4th week

how to PLACE your Ad In-person 109 Klassen St. West Warman Cash | Cheque | Money Order

E-mail ads@ccgazette.ca Email your ad then call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card Do not send credit card information by email

telephone 306-668-0575 Call us at 306-668-0575 Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. (excluding holidays) and we will process payment to your credit card Do not send credit card information by email

Fax 306-668-3997 Fax your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run) to 306-668-3997 anytime and we will process payment to your credit card

Postal Mail P.O. Box 1419 Warman, SK S0K 4S0 Cash | Cheque | Money Order

Send your ad neatly printed or in typed format (please indicate how many weeks the ad is to run)

Ad Classifications ANNOUNCEMENTS: Obituaries .........................1010 In Memoriam.................... 1020 Births................................ 1050 Anniversaries ................... 1060 Thank You Notes ............. 1070 Lost & Found ................... 1080 Tenders ............................ 1090 Legal Notices....................1100 General Notices................1110 Coming Events .................1120 WHAT’S HAPPENING: Personals ......................... 2020 Services Offered ............. 2040 Travel................................ 2060 MERCHANDISE: For Sale ............................ 3010 Pets .................................. 3020 Misc. Wanted...................3030 FARM & RANCH: Farm Equipment .............. 4010 Livestock.......................... 4020 Feed and Seed ................ 4030 Lawn and Garden ............ 4040

REAL ESTATE: Homes/Condos for Sale . 5010 Homes/Condos For Rent5020 Apartments For Rent....... 5030 Land For Sale .................. 5040 Commercial Property...... 5050 Recreation Property........5060 Land Wanted ................... 5070 Land For Rent .................. 5080 Wanted to Rent................5090 TRANSPORTATION: Autos For Sale ................. 6010 Vehicles Wanted .............. 6020 Motorcycles/ATVs ...........6030 Recreational Vehicles ..... 6040 Boats/Motors .................. 6050 Snowmobiles ...................6060 Auto Parts ........................ 6070 EMPLOYMENT: Work Wanted ................... 7010 Child Care ........................ 7020 Business Opportunities .. 7030 Career Training ................ 7040 Careers ............................ 7050 AUCTIONS: Auction Sales................... 8010

Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement and the Clark’s Crossing Gazette does not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements.

Classifieds CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 • PAGE 17

1090

1090

Tenders

2040

Tenders

PROPERTY FOR SALE

SALE BY TENDER 1. The Town of Hague offers for sale the following building to be moved: Hague Town Shop Civic Address: 406 Main Street, Hague Size: 30 x 44’ with a 32 x 32’ addition

2. All tenders must be submitted in a sealed envelope marked “Building Tender” addressed to the: Town of Hague Address: Box 180 Hague, SK S0K 1X0 3. Tender must be postmarked by 4:30 p.m. on: February 28th, 2014. 4. A certified check to the municipality for 5% of the amount of the tender must accompany the tender. Tenders submitted without certified funds will not be considered. 5. The building for tender will be sold “As Is”, with the exception of the removal of: Overhead Unit Header and Shelving Unit 6. Potential bidders may call the Town Office, 306-225-2155, to make arrangements for an inspection of the building.

Services Offered The Disability Tax Credit Allows for:

Langham Town Office (230 Main Street East) Phone (306) 283-4301 or email: admin@langham.ca.

SHANIA TWAIN July 9th in Calgary

Covers: -Hip/Knee Replacements, - Arthritic knees, hips, hands, or shoulders, - COPD, other Disabling Conditions

BRUNO MARS August 3rd in Saskatoon

For Help Applying 1-844-453-5372

MOTLEY CRUE November 18th in Edmonton November 21st in Vancouver

STAY AHEAD OF THE COMPETITION. Advertise in the classifieds.

The Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority (SLGA) is accepting business proposals for the establishment of new 14023SS02 liquor franchises. A single franchise is available in each of the communities of Bienfait, Emerald Park, White City, Pilot Butte, Dalmeny, Hague and Osler.

9. All permits (moving) are the responsibility of the purchaser and are in addition to the bid price. Tentative move for the building can be scheduled for after June 1, 2014; deadline to be moved off site is June 30, 2014.

A franchise allows a qualifying business in communities with a population greater than 1,000 to sell a full selection of beer, wine and spirits in closed containers for off-site consumption. To qualify, an applicant must be the owner of a business, or a proposed business, considered by SLGA to be suitable for the establishment of a liquor franchise operation, and meet certain additional requirements. There are currently approximately 185 liquor franchises operating in Saskatchewan.

Dated the 30th day of January, 2014. Deanna Braun Administrator of Hague

For further information and to view the requirements of the application process, please visit www.slga.gov.sk.ca. You can also contact:

LAND FOR SALE BY TENDER

Warren Sutherland, SLGA Franchise Manager Phone: 1-800-667-7565 or (306)787-3865

RM OF BIG QUILL NO. 308

The closing date for the receipt of proposals and applications is March 21, 2014.

SE 26 - 31 - 18 - W2, includes 143 cultivated acres SW 26 - 31 - 18 - W2, includes 146 cultivated acres SE 31 - 18 - W2, includes 155 cultivated acres SW 34 - 31 - 18 W2 includes a steel Quonset 7 Westeel Rosco Bins with wood floor, 2 Westeel Rosco Bins on hopper; 1 painted/welded steel hopper bins, Small Rigid Frame Shop, electrical service and 130 cultivated acres

1120

Coming Events

SE 26 - 32 - 19 - W2 Hayland

2nd ANNUAL VALENTINE Cheer Dance February 13 at Warman High School from 6-10 p.m. Pizza, pop and popcorn available; flowers for sale. Sandy Lockhart Photobooth with 10% of sales donated back to Warman Ultimate Cheer. Admission: $5/person or $20/family.

MINERAL RIGHTS NOT INCLUDED Interested parties should submit tenders ON OR BEFORE FEBRUARY 28, 2014 ADDRESSED TO:

LEARN OF GOD’S plan & purpose for this earth. w w w . t h e christadelphians.org.

Kohaly, Elash & Ludwig Law Firm LLP 1312 - 4th St. Estevan, SK S4A 0X2 (306) 634 - 3631 For more information contact Brenda Retier at (708) 998 - 7857 Or Neil Wallace at 011 - 31 - 229 - 506 - 939

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES SHOW & SALE. February 24 to March 2 (inclusive) at Market Mall, Preston & Louise, Saskatoon, during mall hours.

All tenders should be in writing and should be accompanied by a deposit of 10% of the tendered amount payable to Kohaly, Elash & Ludwig Law Firm LLP in trust.

BIG RIVER FISH DERBY on Cowan Lake Saturday, March 22, 2014. For info. visit: www.bigriver.ca or email: krienkemaisie@ sasktel.net. To register call: 306-479-7004.

W 1/2 of NW (LSD 12 & 13) 34 - 31 - 18 - W2, Including 70 cultivated acres

RM OF PRAIRIE ROSE NO. 309

Highest or any tender not necessarily accepted

FRONT ROW SEATS

KATY PERRY August 25th in Saskatoon

Go online to www.dashtours.com or call Dash Tours at 1-800-265-0000 One Call & You’re There

3010

For Sale Liquor Franchises Available

8. Successful bidder will have 30 days to provide the balance of cash to complete the purchase. The deposit will be forfeited if the successful bidder does not finalize the agreement for sale withing the required time.

exclusively for fans in Rural Saskatchewan

$15,000 Refund (On Avg)

Tenders

7. Highest, or any tender, not necessarily accepted

HOT TICKETS and KILLER SEATS

CHER June 21st in Saskatoon

swna.com/ classifieds

1090

Travel

$1,500 Yearly Tax Credit

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Proposals addressed to the Town Administrator, Town of Langham and plainly marked on the envelope “Proposals for Property for Sale” will be received until 5:00 p.m. on February 28, 2014 for the following property: Legal Address: PR1 85S04878 Zoning District: R3 Residential Site Area: Approx. 1.9 Acres Land Use: Residential (Family and Senior Housing) To receive a copy of the full Request for Proposals, please visit:

2060

DeaDline

for placing Classified Ads is Monday at 12 p.m.

1120

Coming Events

2040

Services Offered

COLOUR COPYING

ANNUAL LOW GERMAN AUCTION. March 7, 2014 at Osler Community Hall. Doors & food booth open at 7:00p.m. Auction starts at 7:30. Donations gratefully accepted. Proceeds go to Valley Country School. Josh or Colleen (306) 225-2025

Full service colour copying while you wait or for pick-up later

DALMENY LADIES BONSPIEL March 14-15-16. $160/team. For more info or to register call Bev at 306-254-2642 or Angela at 306-254-2720

azette GGazette

Quality Assurance Course for Health Canada’s COMMERCIAL MARIJUANA PROGRAM. February 22 & 23 Best Western Hotel, Kelowna, B.C. Tickets: www.greenlineacad emy.com or 1-855-860-8611 or 250-870-1882.

Save money and avoid city traffic and lineups! CLARK CLARKSSCROSSING CROSSING

109 Klassen St. W, Warman Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. til 5:00 p.m. (Closed from 12 - 1 p.m.) Tel: (306) 668-0575 Fax: (306) 668-3997 Email: ads@ccgazette.ca

FIREWOOD FOR SALE: Poplar $150/cord; willow and maple $200/cord. (306) 7175298. PROVINCE-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS reach over 550,000 readers weekly. Call The Gazette at 306-668-0575 or email ads@ccgazette.ca for details. RURAL WATER TREATMENT. Patented iron filters, softeners, distillers, “Kontinuous Shock” Chlorinator, IronEater. Patented whole house reverse osmosis. Payment plan. 1-800-BIGIRON (244-4766); www.BigIronDrilling.com. View our 29 patented & patent pending inventions. Since 1957. STEEL BUILDING SALE: ”The Big Year End Clear Out!” 20x22 $4,259. 25x24 $4,684. 30x34 $6,895. 35x36 $9,190. 40x48 $12,526. 47x70 $17,200. One End wall included. Pioneer Steel, 1-800668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca. STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1800-457-2206 www.crown steelbuildings.ca.

4020

Livestock

Nordal Limousin & Angus Bull Sale Feb. 20 Saskatoon Livestock Sales, Saskatoon. 77 Limousin Black & Red Angus 2 yr. olds. Rob Garner (306) 946-7946, online at www.nordallimousin.com.

4030

Feed And Seed HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252


18

Classifieds DEADLINE: MONDAY 12 NOON

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD

In-person: 430D Central St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0

4030

5010

We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

5020

7030

Feed And Seed Homes / Condos Homes / Condos Business Buying/Selling For Sale For Rent Opportunities FEED GRAINS heated / damaged CANOLA/FLAX Top price paid FOB FARM

Western Commodities 877-695-6461 Visit our website @

www.westerncommodities.ca

5010

HOMES, COTTAGES & More. RTMI - Ready to Move in. Call 1-888-733-1411; rtmihomes.com. Red Tag Sale on now - ask about our $100,000 giveaway. ONLY A FEW units left! 55plus adult community. Ground level ranchers. www.diamondplace.ca. 306241-0123, Warman, SK.

Homes / Condos 5020 For Sale Homes / Condos Hafford 1,140 Sq. Ft. BungaFor Rent low 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath;

2013 high efficiency furnace and water heater; water softener; central vac; attached garage. Leave message 306-384-4512.

HAVE SOME STUFF to sell? Advertise them in the Classifieds and watch it disappear quick! Call The Gazette (306) 668-0575.

Canadian Built Modular Homes

Vanscoy 242-9099 Quality, affordable modular & manufactured homes from 864 sf to 2400 sf www.vestamfghomes.com 2014 Show Homes Now In Stock 10 Year Warranty

303 Main Street “Townhouse" Langham 2 bedroom, 5 appliances, balcony, parking, sm. pets, $975 + electricity. Available immediately (306) 956-0044. 410/412 4TH AVENUE “Basement suite” Rosthern 2 bedrooms, 5 appliances, parking, sm. pets, $850 + electric and water heat. Across from Rosthern High School. Two available immediately. Brand new! (306) 956-0044.

5-506 Centennial Blvd “Townhouse” Warman 2 bedroom. F/S, upstairs W/D, dishwasher. Garage, rear facing & quiet, $1,397 + electricity. Available immediately (306) 956-0044. 716 Glenview Cove “House” Martensville 3 bedroom. F/S, W/D, dishwasher, microwave & deep freeze. Unfinished basement, large yard $1,600 + utilities. Available immediately. (306) 956-0044.

5010

Homes / Condos For Sale

THE RADISSON HOUSING AUTHORITY has 1 & 2 bedroom Senior suites for rent that have fridge, stove, washer, and dryer included. Rent is determined by income, and includes heat, water, sewer, and parking. Pets are not allowed. Application forms available from Radisson Housing or the Town of Radisson office. Contact Chyanne at (306) 827-2229 for more information. WARMAN: One bedroom condo. 5 appliances. F/P and A/C. Own driveway. Positively no smoking and no pets. Seniors Preferred. Phone (306) 221-2637 or (306)229-0991.

5040

Land For Sale FARMLAND WANTED NO FEES OR COMMISSIONS! SUMMARY OF SOLD PROPERTIES Central - 66 1/4’s South Central - 18 1/4’s East Central - 74 1/4’s South - 70 1/4’s South East - 31 1/4’s South West - 63 1/4’s North - 6 1/4’s North West - 12 1/4’s East - 55 1/4’s FARM AND PASTURE LAND AVAILABLE TO RENT

PURCHASING: SINGLE TO LARGE BLOCKS OF LAND. PREMIUM PRICES PAID WITH QUICK PAYMENT. RENT BACK AVAILABLE Call DOUG 306-955-2266 saskfarms@shaw.ca

Residential Building for Sale and Removal Located at NW 21-34-3 W3M Approx. 7 km South of Clavet

6010

Autos For Sale FOR SALE 2004 Ford Freestar Command Start. Good tires. Runs Well. $3,000 o.b.o. (306)291-1259 Guaranteed approval drive away today! We lend money to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest rates. Over 500 vehicles sale priced for immediate delivery OAC. 1877-796-0514. www.yourapprovedonline.com.

Vintage 1920 2-1/2 storey “Eaton” style farm house. 4 bdrm, 1 bath, approximately 1,300 sq.ft. per level. For sale “as is” and must be relocated by purchaser. Viewing: Sat., Feb. 22, 2014 from noon - 4:00 p.m. Deadline for signed and completed offers with deposit: 2:00 p.m. CST March 7, 2014. To obtain an offer package please contact: Purchasing Services University of Saskatchewan (306) 966-2252 or cammie.morgan@usask.ca

6070

Auto Parts Wrecking auto-trucks: Parts to fit over 500 trucks. Lots of Dodge, GMC, Ford, imports. We ship anywhere. Lots of Dodge, diesel, 4x4 stuff. Trucks up to 3 tons. NorthEast Recyclers, 780-8750270, Lloydminster.

FOR SALE: Sask Valley News, a weekly paper operating out of Rosthern, SK for over 100 years. Contact janet@saskvalleynews.com for further information.

7040

Career Training START NOW! Complete Ministry approved Diplomas in months! Business, Health Care and more! Contact Academy of Learning College: 1-855-354-JOBS (5627) or www.academyoflear ning.com. We Change Lives!

7050

Careers Long haul SEMI DRIVERS AND OWNER OPS REQUIRED to haul RVs and general freight. O/O paid 85% of invoiced amount with open invoice policy. Signing Bonus currently being offered to O/O. Drivers paid 40¢/running mile + pick/drop/border. Benefits, co fuel cards and subsidized insurance. Must have ability to cross border. Call 800867-6233; www.roadexservices.com. NEWSPAPER REPORTER / EDITOR Position is for a reporter with some editorial duties at the Shellbrook Chronicle in Shellbrook Sask. located 44km west of the City of Prince Albert. Shellbrook is a vibrant growing community with all amenities to serve family or individual lifestyles. Qualifications: The successful applicant will have strong writing, and verbal communication skills. Previous experience and knowledge of computers, Indesign and Photoshop are assets. He/she must have a valid driver’s license. Apply by Email forwarding a sample of writing along with resume and references to Clark Pepper, Publisher. Email: clark@sbchron.com

Tired of Semi Truck Driving? Haul RVs from USA to Western Canada! 1 ton and 3 ton trucks required. 1-800-8676233; www.roadexservices. com. WINCH TRACTOR OPERATORS. Must have experience operating a winch. To apply fax, email or drop off resume at the office. Phone 780-842-6444. Fax 780-8426581. Email: rigmove @telus.net. Mail: H&E Oilfield Services Ltd., 2202 - 1 Ave., Wainwright, AB, T9W 1L7. For more employment information see our webpage: www.heoil. com.

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

This Week’s C R O S S W O R D Across

1. Yearly tonnage (abbr.) 4. Licenses TV stations 7. Brain wave test 8. Rowing fulcrum peg 10. Arabian Gulf 12. 55121 MN 13. Trash & tin 14. Actress Farrow 16. Egg of a louse 17. Lesion 19. A Scottish cap 20. Poi vegetable 21. Illness from neurosis 25. Moving truck 26. Gallivant 27. Millisecond 29. Trigonometric function 30. Pinna 31. Loud noise 32. Small auto accidents 39. Thin wire nail 41. Many subconciousness 42. Rocket scientist Werner Von 43. Albanian currency 44. Sum up 45. Grapefruit & tangerine hybrid 46. SE Asia palm genus 48. Drew off fluid 49. Severe & cruel 50. Before 51. It never sleeps 52. Used to be United ___

3. Administrative unit 4. Residential mortgage authority 5. High quality French brandy 6. Gilbert O’Sullivan song 8. Steeped beverage 9. Prefix used in anatomy, biology 11. Nanosecond (abbr.) 14. Mayan language 15. Create mentally 18. Atomic #45 19. 2000 pounds 20. Oceanic rise or fall 22. Did to excess 23. Pouch or baglike structure 24. Browning of the skin

27. A fitting reward (archaic) 28. Diego, Francisco or Anselmo 29. Cognate 31. Physicians 32. Duplicity 33. Doctor of Education 34. E. Canadian province 35. Beat thoroughly 36. $10 gold coins 37. Monarchs or dictators 38. Duke: “The Silver Fox” 39. Dull claptrap 40. Showed old movie 44. Express pleasure 47. Reciprocal of a sine

Down

1. Saucer’s companion 2. Foot controls

Target customers who are smart and know the answers...your business could be here! Call The Gazette advertising team at (306) 668-0575

Horoscopes

FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES ONLY

CAPRICORN December 22– January 19

Your responsible nature helps those in your care to feel safe and secure. It is good to show others how much they mean to you, and you have been doing it correctly.

AQUARIUS January 20– February 18

Some well-hidden information could come to the surface, and you will have the ability to put it to use, Aquarius. Just don’t let the power go to your head.

PISCES February 19– March 20

Pisces, you must deal with a potentially delicate matter in the days to come. Keep a cool head and remain confident.

ARIES March 21– April 19

Aries, strange forces seem to be working against you, but fortunately you are prepared for anything that comes your way. Allow for some time to get things settled.

TAURUS April 20– May 20

Taurus, keep a firm hand on your wallet so you can avoid spending well beyond your means. It is best if you avoid making any impulse purchases in the near future.

GEMINI May 21– June 21

Gemini, listen carefully when a family member comes to you with some sage advice. Even a seemingly relaxed conversation may prove fruitful.

sudoku

CANCER June 22–

July 22

Cancer, you may seem rushed this week, but resist the temptation to go faster than is comfortable for you. Take your time so things are done right the first time.

LEO July 23– August 22

Leo, you may have so much fun this week that you don’t realize you have been getting work done in the process. Your attitude is even inspiring others around you.

VIRGO August 23– September 22

Take a step back when you don’t see eye to eye with a colleague, Virgo. Disagreements can quickly escalate, so keep a level head and take all things into consideration.

LIBRA September 23– October 22

Libra, your intuition and ability to work with people closely will make your life much more enjoyable. Make use of these talents as you pursue a new career path.

SCORPIO October 23– November 21

Falling into a slump just isn’t your style, Scorpio. Even if things don’t seem to be going your way, your attitude and work ethic will make the most of the situation.

SAGITTARIUS November 22– December 21

Sagittarius, playing games with someone can be fun, but don’t let things turn into a serious rivalry. Focus on being lighthearted this week.

THIS WEEK’S ANSWERS


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

19

Careers

7050 MORE

Local News Careers MORE

EMO Coordinator 14023TC00

The City of Martensville is seeking a coordinator for our Emergency Measures Organization. The EMO coordinator will be responsible for updating the EMO plan for the City of Martensville and continually improving it to meet the changing needs of our City. This is a part-time position in which the successful candidate will receive an annual per diem for their time, reporting directly to City Manager/Fire Chief.

Food Counter Attendant

Full Time/Part Time/Shift Work Nights/Overnights/Early Mornings/Weekends 15 positions available $10.25 - $11.00/hr. + Benefits Wage based on experience/availability Apply in-person or via email to: Iced.capp.restaurants@gmail.com

Account Manager

Please send resume along with cover letter and references in confidence to: tjenson@ccgazette.ca

or drop-off in-person at 109 Klassen Street West, Warman

Gazette

WW1451

Pine View Farms Osler

has immediate part-time openings in poultry processing. Work close to home, Tues- Thurs, in a safe respectful work environment, competitive wages, training provided.

To apply, call Martha at Lilydale Inc - A Sofina Foods Company Is currently seeking full-time Production Workers for their chicken plant in Wynyard, Sask. Starting wage is 13.84/ hr with a comprehensive benefits package and pension program. All applicants welcome! Call Linda @ (306) 554-2555 EXT 238 for more info Send Resumes to: Linda Karakochuk Sofina Foods Inc Box 760 Wynyard, SK SOA 4T0 Fax: (306) 554-3958 Email: LKarakochuk@sofinafoods.com

Auction Sales

No telephone calls, please. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. We thank all applicants in advance for their interest in this position.

CLARK S CROSSING

CLARK S CROSSING

Tel: (306) 668-0575 Fax: (306) 668-3997

Challenge and Opportunity

o/a Tim Hortons 101 Central Street East, Warman SK S0K 4S0

This newly-created position within our company will be filled immediately.

for placing G azette Classified Ads is

As a growing Canadian provider of services to the oil and gas industry, we help our clients succeed through teamwork, pride and empowerment of our people. If you are looking for a rewarding career filled with challenge then look no further… Big Eagle wants to hear from you!

ICED CAPP RESTAURANTS LTD.

Basic qualifications: • own a reliable vehicle and smartphone • ability to communicate positively and professionally • organized and able to multi-task while meeting deadlines • detail-oriented with a creative mindset Previous experience an asset and preference given to those who: • have previous media sales experience • an understanding of sales processes and strategies • have the ability to work towards and take pride in exceeding sales targets We offer many benefits including: • base salary plus commissions • travel footprint of less than 60km in radius with flexible schedules • weekends off • 4 weeks of paid vacation • cost-shared staff directed health/dental benefit plans • ongoing training and industry education opportunities

DeaDline

E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Monday at 12 p.m. www.ccgazette.ca

Louis Dreyfus Commodities in Yorkton, Saskatchewan has openings for the following positions: • Maintenance Planning Supervisor • Maintenance & Reliability Supervisor • Maintenance Technician • Shift Leader • Material Handler We offer competitive wages, health and retirement benefits. Submit resume to Bonnie Penner at e-mail: Bonnie.Penner@ldcom.com fax: (306) 786-8878, Apply by February 28, 2014.

Our company is growing and we want you to be part of it!

locations & electronic subscribers

For more information please visit www.martensville.ca under employment

Louis Dreyfus is among the world’s leading commodity merchants, trading and transporting grain and oil seeds. Established in 1851, Louis Dreyfus ranks among the world’s most effective and reliable private corporations with approximately 34,000 employees in locations in 53 countries. Our international presence and our evolutionary history make Louis Dreyfus a unique career destination.

Are you currently working in media sales (print or electronic) and looking for an opportunity to join a growing company that is closer to home? Do you possess a track record of excellence and the willingness to reach a higher level? Want to work (and have some fun, too) with an award-winning team in a fastpaced, family-owned business atmosphere where each person matters?

T A C OLocal T I MSports E HIRING! F/T food counter attendant MORE Martensville and Warman. Local Information $11-$12/hr depends on the ex periMORE en ce - Empl oy e r willing to train. Operate the REASONS POS, order, TO take MAKEcustomer's THE GAZETTE peel,YOUR cut, prepare and heat NEWSPAPER EVERY WEEK restaurcustomer's orders, ant Deliv clean-up ered(equipment, every floors and trash). Some Thur sday to over secondary education 16, 60 0 to needed. Send resumes residential, business & TacoTimeMWY@gmail.com farm mailboxes, retail

LIVE UNRESERVED HARDWOOD FLOORING AUCTION SAT. FEB 15 - 10:30 AM (VIEWING: FRI. FEB 14 - 8 AM - 4:30 PM) At Both Our Locations! REGINA - EMERALD PARK • SASKATOON - 3350 IDYLWYLD DR. N Over 20,000 sq/ft Per Location of Exotic Hardwood and Laminate Visit Our Website for Terms, Conditions & details

www.McDougallAuction.com Regina* Saskatoon* Moosomin

1-800-263-4193 Dealer Licence # 319916

(306) 239-4763 Heavy Duty Mechanic/Apprentice required for preventative maintenance, repair and service of heavy equipment fleet. Experience with CAT, JD, and Hitachi. Appropriate credentials and/or certifications. Valid drivers license. Both camp and shop locations. Service truck and accommodations provided. Wage negotiable. Send work references and resume to: Bryden Construction, Box 100, Arborfield, Sk. S0E 0A0; Fax: 306-769-8844 Email: brydenconstruct@ xplornet.ca

Positions available in Grande Prairie, Rainbow Lake, Zama City and Swift Current - Heater Operators & Swampers - Pressure Truck Operators & Swampers - Hot Oiler Operators & Swampers Education, Licensure, and Experience: - Applicant must have a class 1 or 3 license with airbrakes - No current license suspension - No suspension or conviction due to impaired driving in last 3 years - No more than 6 demerits (provincial specific) - Being mechanically inclined a very big asset - Participate fully in safety programming such as job observations, near miss and Stop Card reporting, monthly safety meetings, and tailgate meetings - Job may require crews to stay in camp and work shift work for 2 to 3 weeks at a time. - Previous Oil & Gas experience required Sign on bonus may be available dependent on experience.

All new employees will undergo pre-employment drug and alcohol screening as well as fit-testing. Qualified, interested candidates are encouraged to send their resumes and drivers abstract to careers@bigeagle.ca.

Only candidates under consideration will be contacted. Please be advised, at this time Big Eagle is not able to consider applicants not currently legally entitled to work in Canada

ON YOUR COMPUTER, SMART PHONE OR TABLET

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20

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

Business & Professional

Published weekly the Business & Professional Directory is the perfect way to keep your company in front of potential customers.

CALL (306) 668-0575 for rates & deadlines

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Lottery winner buys ticket in Osler Jordy Trotchie knew he had a big winner, but he couldn’t believe just how lucky he was. His PRO-LINE ticket won a huge $82,628 prize! “It was a surprise, a fluke,” he said. Trotchie bought his $100 ticket for the December 28-29th Professional Hockey and Soccer games at Osler Esso Service located at 312-2nd Street in his hometown. He had chosen the maximum number of ties available on a ticket – a less likely result, but offering a higher payout if all predictions are correct. Because he had paid attention to the games, he knew he had correctly guessed the outcome of all six games, including four ties on the hockey games. On PRO-LINE, a hockey game is considered a “tie” when a game goes to a shoot-out after playing regulation time and an overtime period. Trotchie knew he had a winning ticket, but still took the ticket to a retailer to be checkedso he could take a picture of the win on the display screen to show his friends. “They didn’t believe me when I told them how much I had won,” he said with a smile. Trotchie plans to pay some bills with his winnings.

Jordy Trotchie

RCMP invite children to ‘name that puppy’ The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) needs help in naming a handful of their new est (and cutest) recruits! The Police Dog Service Training Centre (PDSTC) in Innisfail, Alberta is asking young Canadians to suggest names for 10 German Shepherd puppies recently born at the Centre. Children are encouraged to be original and imaginative in finding names that will serve these puppies well in their careers with Canadas national police force. When thinking of names, it is important to keep in mind that these are working police dogs, not pets. The 10 children whose names are selected will each receive a laminated 8×10-inch photo of the pup they name, a plush dog named Justice and an RCMP cap. Contest rules are simple: • Contestants can suggest only one name (one entry per per son). • The name may be for a male or a female pup.

• The name must start with the letter G. • The name must have no more than nine (9) letters. • The name must be one or two syllables. • Contestants must live in Canada and be 16 years old or younger. Three ways to enter: 1. Enter online: www.rcmp-grc. gc.ca/depot/pdstc-cdcp/ 2. Email the childs name, age, address, telephone number and the suggested name for a puppy to pdstc-cdcp@rcmpgrc.gc.ca. 3. Send a postcard or letter to the following address. Be sure to print the childs name, age, address, telephone number and the suggested name for a puppy. Attn: Name the Puppy Contest, Police Dog Service Training Centre, Box 6120, Innisfail, AB T4G 1S8 We love to receive drawings and paintings! If submitting by mail or email, children are invited to get creative with their

entries. Although there can be only 10 winners, names not selected for the contest will be considered for other puppies born dur ing the year. The deadline for entries is March 5, 2014. Contest winners and prizes will be announced on April 15, 2014. Winning names will be chosen by the PDSTC staff. A draw will determine the winning entry in the event of multiple submissions of the same puppy name. The PDSTC is home to the RCMP national police dog training program and is a part of RCMP Depot Division.

Hashtags #namethepuppy (English) #nommelechiot (French) Twitter @RCMPDepot (English) @GRCDepot (French)

Facebook facebook.com/rcmpdepot (English) facebook.com/grcdepot (French)


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

Business & Professional

21

Published weekly the Business & Professional Directory is the perfect way to keep your company in front of potential customers.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 PG. 22

AT THE TABLE

Regional growth meeting a positive step, according to Mayors, Reeve By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

A coordinated regional growth plan involving five municipalities is one step closer to reality following a landmark meeting in Warman on Thursday, February 6. The Planning for Growth (P4G) meeting at the Legends Centre in Warman marked the first time that political leaders and key administrators from the RM of Corman Park, the Town of Osler, and the Cities of Saskatoon, Martensville and Warman met face-to-face to set an agenda for regional cooperation and growth. The meeting follows a regional growth summit last November in Saskatoon, and is a continuation of discussions over the past year by municipal administrators and planners. This meeting, however, marks a significant step forward because elected representatives will be making longterm decisions that will affect all the municipalities. “It was a good first step,” confirmed Martensville Mayor Kent Muench in an interview following the meeting. “It was a kind of ‘big sky’ meeting that looked at the overall picture and didn’t get into a lot of specifics. It focused on regionalization in general. We’re looking at overall goals, governance, and what the framework will look like as we move forward.” Muench said he feels the P4G initiative could serve as a “mod-

el of cooperation” for regions across the province. Warman Mayor Sheryl Spence agreed it was a positive meeting. “Our planning people have been meeting for over a year to become familiar with the overall growth plans for all the municipalities,” she said. “Now that the elected people are involved, we’ll move ahead to work with the province and hopefully obtain some muchneeded infrastructure funding from the province and the federal government.” Spence said there was solid agreement among all the municipalities that cooperation is needed. “We’re all growing together,” she said. “We all have common interests. But we don’t have enough money as individual municipalities to do everything on our own. If we work together as a region, we’ll end up with a stronger economy and more facilities and services for everyone to use and enjoy.” Spence said ongoing discussions between Warman, Martensville and Corman Park in the past have proved helpful in the new, larger meetings that involve Osler and Saskatoon. “We’re all on the same page,” she confirmed. “We’re just moving into a bigger arena now.” Osler Mayor Ben Buhler said while his community is the smallest player, and the newest community to be involved, Osler’s proximity to Warman, Martensville and Saskatoon

means it must be part of the decision-making process. “The end result is that we are going to be together and we need to plan our infrastructure in a sensible, cost-efficient way,” said Buhler. “Martensville is already working on a deal with Saskatoon to manage its wastewater, and eventually Osler will likely go in a similar direction. We also need recreation facilities that can be shared by everyone in the region.” The P4G Working Group acknowledged it will be a major undertaking to create a plan that will benefit everyone. “I’m optimistic,” said Corman Park Reeve Judy Harwood. “Whether you have a rural lifestyle, live in the city or own a business, we need to be

Economic growth in the Saskatoon region is reflected not just in the City of Saskatoon, but also in surrounding cmmunities. In Martensville the construction of the new CanAlta Hotel (above) is changing the skyline of that city. In Warman, meanwhile, the Royal Bank is building a new branch (lower left) and the Saskatoon Co-op grocery store (below) are both well on their way to completion able to provide opportunities for everyone to share in the region’s success.” Saskatoon Mayor Don Atchison said the region is the “economic engine” of Saskatchewan. “We must act now to ensure we have a plan for growth,” said

Atchison. “We need to know where our roads will go, where schools and recreation will be built and where industry can thrive.” The administrations from all five governments are currently working on terms of reference for the P4G Working

Group. The Regional Growth Plan will eventually lead to decisions on servicing agreements, neighbourhoods and industrial areas. It will also set out the projected growth areas for Saskatoon, Warman, Martensville and Osler.

TERRY PUGH | CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE

Fortune Minerals plant gets provincial approval A proposal by Fortune Minerals Ltd. (Fortune) to construct and operate a new metals processing facility near Langham has been approved by the Government of Saskatchewan, as required under The Environmental Assessment Act. The proposal was assessed to be both environmentally and technically sound, providing both environmental safeguards and outlining company plans to ensure Saskatchewan’s air, water and natural resources are protected throughout the duration of the project and after. Fortune can now move forward and apply for necessary approvals, permits and licenses

that regulate construction and operation. The company will be required to comply with all applicable provincial and municipal laws. “The Government of Saskatchewan is committed to protecting our environmental resources, and maintaining an enviable quality of life for our residents,” Environment Minister Ken Cheveldayoff said. “Saskatchewan’s Environmental Assessment program provides a comprehensive and integrated approach to decisionmaking to ensure that key environmental safeguards are in place while supporting a growing economy.”

The proposed project – which will process 65,000 tonnes of ore a year into gold, bismuth, cobalt and copper products – underwent a government-wide technical review, including a full assessment of groundwater availability, the potential for groundwater contamination and to ensure that all activity is well within Saskatchewan’s stringent environmental standards. The Water Security Agency confirmed that the proposed use of groundwater is sustainable and the Dalmeny aquifer has the capacity to meet the needs of both Fortune and existing licensed users of the aquifer.

As a condition of approval, the project will be subject to stringent ongoing monitoring and reporting from construction through operation, decommissioning and reclamation activities. Fortune will be required to provide a financial deposit, to be held in safekeeping by the government. This will ensure there is no long-term liability to the province or its residents. The ministry continues its shift to a results-based regulatory model, which is designed to streamline regulatory processes and support growth while improving and strengthening environmental protection.

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Homebuilders going full tilt across province

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 PG. 23

Survey shows strong support for credit unions Eighty-two per cent of Saskatchewan residents agree that Saskatchewan’s credit unions play an important role in the provincial economy and 78% agree credit unions and banks should be treated fairly to reflect their differences when it comes to government policy. Following the federal government’s decision last year to eliminate the additional tax deduction for credit unions, the Saskatchewan government was left with the decision as to whether to allow the federal change to trigger a similar elimination of the provincial tax deduction. To gauge public opinion on the issue, SaskCentral, the trade association for Saskatchewan credit unions, engaged Abacus Data to survey eligible Saskatchewan voters. The survey showed a clear majority (63%) of all respondents believe the provincial government

should amend provincial law to preserve the existing tax deduction in place for credit unions. Among Sask Party supporters, the figure was 57%, while only 30% believed the provincial government should follow the federal direction and eliminate the deduction. The survey also found that most eligible voters (82%) recognize the important role credit unions play in Saskatchewan’s economy, with a large majority (68%) agreeing that credit unions operate differently from banks. 78% of respondents agreed that credit unions and banks should be treated fairly to reflect their differences when it comes to government policy. Among Sask Party supporters, this figure was even higher at 83%. “The survey really reaffirms what we have always believed,” said Keith Nixon, CEO of SaskCentral. “There is a good un-

derstanding of the unique role credit unions play in the economy of the province and no desire to see policies that erode the contribution credit unions are able to make to their communities. What it also shows is that this strong support for credit unions runs right across political party lines.” When asked whether a provincial decision to not reverse the negative effects to credit unions would affect the respondents’ voting preferences, 19% overall indicated they would be less likely to vote Sask Party, while among current Sask Party supporters, this figure was 14%. The survey consisted of phone interviews of 1,000 eligible voters conducted January 11 to 22, 2014. Sampling excluded from the survey anyone who indicated that they or a member of their household worked for a credit union, a market research

SASK LEADING IN JOB CREATION Province’s unemployment rate lowest in Canada Saskatchewan’s unemployment rate remains the lowest in Canada for the thirteenth consecutive month. According to figures released by Statistics Canada on Friday, February 7, the province’s rate currently sits at 4.3 per cent, and well below the national average of 7.0 per cent. The province’s youth unemployment was 7.5 per cent in January - also the lowest in the country. The national youth unemployment rate was 13.9 per cent. “Last year we saw recordbreaking job numbers, low unemployment rates and so much optimism on the jobs front in this province,” Economy Minister Bill Boyd said. “Once again our province is proving that we have more people working in Saskatchewan than ever before and that the momentum from 2013 has clearly sustained itself.” Compared to January 2013, employment is up by 5,500 jobs, an increase of 1.0 per cent

(third largest gain in the coun Regina was next at 4.4 per try). On a year-over-year bacent. sis, job growth was particular Compared to January 2013, ly strong in utilities (up 1,700 or full-time employment grew by 31.5 per cent); business, build10,200 whereas part-time eming and other support servicployment fell 4,600. es (up 2,100 or 19.3 per cent) and Compared to January 2013, transportation and warehousing (4,100 or 16.1 per cent). “Saskatchewan employers are doing their part to keep our economy moving forward, and we • Bill Boyd, are seeing this Saskatchewan Economy Minister progress with more jobs compared to last year,” Boyd said. “We continue to have the off-reserve Aboriginal employstrongest job market in the nament was up by 2,600 (6.5 per tion.” cent) for 12 consecutive months Other highlights include: of year-over-year increases. Saskatoon had the lowest un- Aboriginal unemployment employment rate among major rate stood at 12.0 per cent in cities in the country at 4.3 per January 2014 - down from 14.6 cent (tied with Quebec City). per cent a year ago.

“Last year we saw recordbreaking job numbers, low unemployment rates and so much optimism on the jobs front in this province...”

firm, an advertising agency, the media, a financial institution or an investment organization. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1%.

Saskatchewan’s home buildsuccess. More homes in Sasers saw a spike in activity in katchewan are a clear and posJanuary, according to statisitive sign that we have more tics released on Monday, Febpeople putting down roots, livruary 10 by Canada Mortgage ing and working in this provand Housince.” ing Corpo On a yearration. over-year ba Ursis, construcban houstion starts ing starts on multiple jumped 9.6 units were up per cent 34.4 per cent compared (from 285 to January units to 383 2013. This units) comlanded Saspared to JanConstruction is booming katchewan uary 2013. in fourth “When we increase the acplace among the provinces in commodation options that are terms of percentage change. available to individuals and “Saskatchewan is kicking off families who call this prov2014 on a high note,” Economy ince home, we are helping to inMinister Bill Boyd said. “We crease our quality of life,” Boyd have a strong economy, a grow- said. “We are excited for what ing population, and a busy resthis year has in store for our idential construction industry construction industry, especialthat is keeping pace with this ly on the residential front.”

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24

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014

Dalmeny, Langham groups receive grants FANCY FIDDLER

James Steele plays fiddle with piano accompanist Lionel Gilbertson at the Borden Seniors’ Centre on Wednesday, January 29

The Dalmeny Merchants Association has been awarded a $1,242 SaskFestivals Project grant from the Saskatchewan Arts Board to bring the spirit of Christmas to local families through puppetry, food, carnival games and fellowship. A Creative Partnerships - Exportations grant in the amount of $9800 was also awarded to W.W. Brown High School in Langham to explore the opportunity for students to participate with the community by contributing their art works to different locations throughout town. Through a partnership with

SaskCulture Inc. and Saskatchewan Lotteries, the Saskatchewan Arts Board provides grants under its SaskFestivals program to help eligible festivals celebrate their communities, promote tourism, deliver rewarding experiences for audiences and artists alike, and heighten awareness and appreciation of Saskatchewan art and artists. For the quarter ending December 31, 2013, the Saskatchewan Arts Board awarded over 140 grants to individuals and organizations, totaling more than $1.2 million. Arts Board funding supports a variety of initia-

14023MC04

tives, including organizations that provide ongoing programs in the arts, the creative work of professional artists, community art projects and the engagement of professional artists to work in schools with students and teachers. The Saskatchewan Arts Board was established in 1948 as the first agency of its kind in North America and second in the world to the Arts Council of Great Britain. In the decades since then, it has continued as a leader in Canada and builds on this strong tradition to meet ongoing opportunities for public investment in the arts.


Clark's Crossing Gazette - February 13, 2014 issue