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WILD ABOUT NATURE Students at Pike Lake School are learning all about the outdoors, thanks to some innovative classes -3

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

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the province will be competing for the right to represent Saskatchewan at the Canadian finals rodeo and the North American finals rodeo later this summer. The event is a longstanding tradition at the OK Corral, owned by Ray and Norreen Kneeland. The organizers donate all the funds raised at the rodeo to Kins-

Sask. economy to remain strong, conference board says Economic prospects remain bright in Saskatchewan. Coming off growth in real gross domestic product (GDP) of nearly five per cent in 2011, The Conference Board of Canada’s Provincial Outlook-Spring 2012 forecasts that Saskatchewan will grow by 2.9 per cent this year and 3.5 per cent in 2013. If the debt crisis in Europe continues to fester, economic growth in Saskatchewan and its neighbouring provinces would slow modestly this year. “Saskatchewan’s economy will continue to perform well in 2012, despite cuts to potash production, and ongoing uncertainty in the global outlook,” said Marie-Christine Bernard, Associate Director, Provincial Outlook. “The domestic economy has plenty of momentum and business investment remains high. As a result, employment will grow as will wages and salaries, further boosting consumer demand for homes and retail goods.” Saskatchewan’s unemployment rate, which will average 4.8 per cent this year, is expected to fall to 4.5 per cent in 2013 —the lowest among all provinces. The strength of Saskatchewan’s labour market is reflected in personal disposable income, which is expect-

ed to grow by a strong 4.4 per cent this year and 3.9 per cent next year. A steep cut in production by major potash producers during the first quarter of 2012 is the primary reason for a decline in non-metal mining output this year. Offsetting the decline in potash output is growth in mineral fuels - such as oil - thanks to strong drilling activity. Overall, the mining industry is expected to grow by 2.7 per cent this year and by a blistering 9.2 per cent in 2013. Fiscal restraint will hold back growth in public sector employment and output. But Saskatchewan will be one of the few provinces to post budget surpluses this year and next. The Conference Board is convening its first-ever forum on Saskatchewan on May 29 and 30 in Regina. The Saskatchewan Forum will attract provincial, regional, Canadian, and international thought leaders, decision-makers, and influencers to discuss Saskatchewan’s current performance and to generate a vision for the province’s future in 2022 and in 2050. The Forum will include the presentation of the Conference Board’s 10-year economic outlook for the province.

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men Telemiracle. Over the years, thousands of dollars have gone toward this worthy cause and have helped many individuals. The rodeo is a family fun event, according to Yvonne Duffus, daughter of Ray and

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Learning to be wild about nature Popular program at rural Pike Lake School into second year By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

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TUESDAYS

hich came first - the chicken or the egg? Students at Pike Lake School got a first-hand look at how baby chicks come into the world last week as part of their studies into the wonders of nature. After picking up a dozen eggs from the University of Saskatchewan Poultry Science Department on Monday, May 14, a Grade 1 class watched the eggs hatch inside a homemade incubator in their classroom. “We got the plans for the incubator off a YouTube video,” explained Heather Robertson, a Grade 1 teacher at the rural K-5 school in the hamlet of Pike Lake. “We used a little styrofoam cooler, a 25-watt light bulb, a little bit of duct tape and some chicken-wire. The kids helped make the incubator, they named each of the eggs, and then we waited for them to hatch.” A small camera was mounted on top of the incubator and hooked to a computer. Photos taken at regular intervals gave the kids a graphic picture of the eggs hatching and the baby chicks emerging. The chicks are all destined to be laying hens, and at the end of the week they were transferred to a poultry farm near Saskatoon. But in the meantime, the students tended to the small flock, providing the little cheepers with food, water and plenty of TLC. “This is our second year with this program, which is run in several schools,” explained Robertson. ““It’s absolutely amazing each time. The kids love it, and they get a real appreciation for nature when they can experience something like this.” The school, nestled in the rolling sand hills near Pike

Grade 1 students Nyah Kwasny and Lexi Lee hold a pair of newly-hatched chicks Lake, has many advantages when it comes to offering outdoor education to students, said Robertson. “Spring is a wonderful time for studying nature,” she said. “We study life cycles of animals. A while ago, the kids collected tadpoles and now we have frogs developing in an aquarium in one of our classrooms. Next week we’ll be taking a walk to a local alpaca farm to see the baby alpacas.” The school has its own garden on the grounds where students are involved in planting vegetables, and learning how to compost. “We have been studying worms, and showing the kids how the worms break down the compost and help the garden,” said Robertson. She added that since the school is located in an area with a lot of wildlife, the vegetables have to be protected by screening to keep the deer from eating the young plants. The school is working with the University of Saskatchewan’s Ecological Education

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(Above) Pike Lake School Grade 1 teacher Heather Robertson with students Kyle Mitlon, Joanathan Kube, Sophie Rose, Sam Howlett, Aidan Howden and Paul Brace in front of their brood of chicks that were hatched using a home-made incubator. (Below) Students work together to build bat houses.

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and Ecology Camp to bring an appreciation of some littleknown animals to the students. The kids learned how to make “bat houses” during a session on Friday afternoon. Armed with drills, hammers, pieces of wood and a lot of enthusiasm, groups of kids constructed 5 homes for bats. As part of the session, they saw a few of the winged mammals up close, and learned what a valuable contribution they make to the ecosystem. “Bats are actually wonderful creatures for getting rid of local pests, like mosquitoes,” said Robertson. “Part of the lesson was to clear up some of the misconceptions about bats, and to also show them how to be safe around wild animals.” “These are great ways to engage students, and I think it gives them an appreciation for the outdoors,” she concluded. “It helps create empathy for the natural world, where things don’t always run smoothly, and it helps them become flexible, creative, problem-solvers.”


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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

Public warned of high-risk violent sex offender

Mayor Barb Adams Eichendorf with a map of the town during a recent public open house

Just filling in Residential growth in Hepburn created by infilling neighbourhoods, subdividing lots

12054DX00

By TERRY PUGH

A

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

s Hepburn prepares to move to town status this fall, the pace of development will likely continue to be gradual, says Hepburn Mayor Barb Adams Eichendorf. “It’s a very steady pace, and to my way of thinking it’s actually ideal,” she said. “We don’t want to be growing so fast that we can’t keep up with the infrastructure needs.” She said the gradual rate of growth allows the town to plan development of residential neighbourhoods in a way that emphasizes the rural character of the town. “We have a couple new subdivisions that have grown up in the last decade or so,” she explained in an interview recently. “We have Heritage Place, on land that used to be where the railway tracks were located. That area is pretty well-established now. Our newest subdivision is called Whisper Ridge, and it’s located in the northwest part of town.” Much of the growth of Hepburn is in the form of “infill”, as large lots in the town limits are subdivided into more manageable parcels, noted Eichendorf. “It’s actually a very positive thing to see these large spaces subdivided and made into more intimate neighbourhoods,” she said. “There are a lot of advantages to making

The Hepburn Museum of Wheat is located near a park on former railway land cause they didn’t think it use of existing land.” She said with the tra- would make any difference ditional large lots in town, one way or the other,” she which could be as large as said. “Most people are saying several acres, weeds and un- it’s a great idea.” kempt yards can sometimes She said the move to town be a problem if the homeowner status won’t necessarily mean isn’t able to keep up with the higher taxes. yardwork. “That’s something that is “When you get weeds tak- determined independent of ing over, it’s not an ideal sit- whether you’re a village or uation,” she said. “By subdi- a town,” she said. “It all deviding these large parcels, we pends on what needs to be have a bigger tax base, more done and where the money to houses and more people.” do those projects is to come The completion of a pota- from.” ble treated water pipeline from There will also be no Saskatoon has made the com- change in policing costs, munity much more attractive which is set on a per-capita bato potential residents and busi- sis in the municipality’s agreenesses, said Eichendorf. ment with the RCMP. Coupled with the latest She said there are many census figures that put the similarities between the way municipality’s 2011 popula- villages and towns are regution at 562, it’s the ideal time lated in the provincial Municito move from village to town palities Act. status. The big differences come She said during a recent when a town takes the step to open house, the vast majority become a city, she noted. of residents were happy with “The cities have a lot more the change. “I think there was independence when it comes only one person who was op- to making a lot of decisions,” posed, and that was only be- she said.

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The Saskatoon Police Service, under the authority and pursuant to the Public Disclosure Act, is announcing that a high-risk violent sex offender, following his release on May 9, 2012, has chosen to reside within the Saskatoon area. Richard James Netmaker, 28, has a history of committing violent sexual offences against female adults with whom he is acquainted or whom he comes into contact with. Netmaker is described as a male of First Nations descent, 5’10”, 150 lbs., with medium length black hair, brown eyes, and a moustache. Netmaker’s conditions include: a) Report weekly to Saskatoon Police. b) Abide by a curfew of 10 p.m. - 6:00 a.m. daily.

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c) Reside at a residence approved by a parole officer and the Saskatoon Police Service. d) Abstain from the purchase, possession, and consumption of alcohol or intoxicating substances unless prescribed. e) Submit to search of person upon demand by a parole officer and the Saskatoon Police Service. f) Receive written permission by a parole officer and the Saskatoon Police Service for travel. It is important to note that this information is intended to enable members of the public to take suitable preventative measures, and not to embark up on any form of vigilantism or unreasonable conduct toward this individual. The Saskatoon Police Service wants the public to be

aware of Netmaker’s presence within the Saskatoon area and of his potential to re-offend. If any person is aware of any violations relating to the actions of Netmaker, please notify the Saskatoon Police Service immediately at 975-8300. If you consider the event emergent in nature, please call 9-1-1.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

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COLLEGE POST

Forty-one students comprise 25th graduating class from Warman Campus

The 25th class of graduates from Warman Campus included 41 students from five different programs. Grad was held April 26.

Forty-one students from five programs at Great Plains College received their certificates April 26 at the Warman Campus graduation ceremony. The 25th graduating class from Warman Campus includes students from Business, Educational Assistant, Office Administration and Youth Care Worker

certificate programs, as well as adult basic education. “Our students are educated and their certification is in their hands,” said program coordinator and instructor Susan Huntley. “They may think of it as the ticket to the good life, but I also ask them to think of it as their ticket to change the world.” Grad was held at the Brian King Centre. Special guests in attendance included Great Plains College interim president and CEO Bruce Probert, as well as representatives from the Town of Warman, SIAST, Prairie Spirit School Division, the Saskatoon Tribal Council, and the Great Plains College board and management team. “Over the past 25 years, our graduates have continued on to excel in the trades, professions and academia,” said Warman Region manager Dale Kroetsch. “The college feels honoured to have been part of their lives and is proud of their successes. We are excited for the opportunities these graduates will experience in the future.”

Matchap, Prosper take the road less traveled

Blair Matchap

Getting an education is not always the easiest road to success. Great Plains College educational assistant graduates Blair Matchap and Abigail Prosper learned that lesson – among many others – literally and figuratively over the past year.

There was the intimidation factor of going back to school in their 30s and, for Matchap, of completing her practicum in a school of 800 students after being raised in a small community. Then there was the travel: A 45-minute one-way drive, many occurring in the dead of winter, from One Arrow First Nation to Warman Campus just to make it to class. And through it all Matchap and Prosper persevered, graduating last month along with 39 other students at the 25th Warman Campus graduation ceremony. “It was just a really good experience and we’re so glad we made it through,” said Matchap. “We got along with everybody right away and the staff there are really nice. The only hard part was the traveling. We were traveling every day and the roads were pretty rough in the winter, but everyone

Practical Nursing student and “accident victim” Amanda Weekes had to be cut out of her vehicle during a mock accident in Biggar on May 9 to raise awareness about the dangers of drinking and driving.

understood when the weather was really cold and we couldn’t make it in to class.” Since graduating, Matchap and Prosper have both returned to work as EA’s at the Almightyvoice Education Centre, where they were employed prior to enroling at Great Plains College. Matchap is working in the Grade 3 classroom assisting with group activities as well as working one-on-one with students as special needs arise. The benefits of her new training, she says, are clear. “I’m more confident now,” said Matchap. “My experience at the college, especially on practicum, it helped me out a lot. There were a lot of things I didn’t know before that I do now. “It was worth going to and we had a great experience.”

Nine adult basic education students were among the 18 Great Plains College graduates from Biggar Program Centre on May 8. A further 11 practical nursing students will complete their diplomas in November.

UPCOMING PROGRAMS FALL PROGRAMS One-year certificate programs offered at Warman Campus are: • Educational Assistant • Office Administration (part-time studies only) • Youth Care Worker Visit greatplainscollege.ca/programs for full details or stop by the college to meet with our counsellor or coordinators. ADULT BASIC EDUCATION The Basic Education program has flexible options to help you reach your goals - Adult 10, Adult 12, GED, and academic upgrading. Call Warman Campus for details.

ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE Classes offered Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 7-9:30 pm. For additional information or to register, contact the college at 242-5377. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION HUMD 183: Child Guidance May 22-June 27 SAFETY TRAINING Red Cross First Aid/CPR/AED June 16-17 Petroleum Safety Training Offered on an on-going basis CUSTOM TRAINING Call for more information custom training for computers, industry credit, First Aid, forklift, customer service, accounting, and more!

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012 • PG. 6

SMA winners offer inspiration

C O M M E N T A R Y

How about filling that tank with a few litres of honesty?

“When someone tells you that your community isn’t big enough or it won’t work here, they are almost always wrong.” “When someone tells you that it is too expensive or you won’t find the money, they are almost always wrong.” The above inspirational quotes came from Maple Creek’s successful entry in the 2012 Saskatchewan Municipal Awards honouring excellence in local governance. And while it may have been the above words from the Maple Creek that caught the judging panel’s attention this year, even more inspirational was the determination and optimism in overcoming adversity that was reflected not only in Maple Creek’s entry but also several other entries for this year’s SMA awards. In fact, as solid and successful a submission as Maple Creek’s entry was, it wasn’t even the biggest winner. In a year that seemed all about rural communities overcoming adversity, there was an even more impressive entry. For the sixth consecutive year, I was honoured to be on SMA’s selection committee along with fellow judges Holly Hetherington, President of Executive Source, Jim Angus, RM administrator of Harris Bob Linner, former City of Regina manager and Senator Pamela Wallin. In the Heritage Conservation category, Maple Creek won for its Main Street Revitalization Program that emphasized restoration as means of tourism development. The determination in getting this accomplished – especially

By the Canadian Taxpayers Association

On its 14th annual Gas Tax Honesty Day, the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) released new data on gas taxes with several major findings. Highlights include: That the average two-car family will pay approximately $1,225 in gas taxes every year. Federal and provincial tax-on-tax cost Canadians an average 2.5 cents/litre, or $82 a year for a two-car family, or $1.7 billion nationally. Taxes make up nearly 29 per cent of the pump price for gasoline. There is a strong positive correlation between lower pump prices in provinces with lower gas taxes. CTF federal director Gregory Thomas points out that gas taxes continue to eat up a disproportionate amount of Canadian household income. But Canadians are not only paying high gas taxes, they are paying unfair tax-on-tax. In 2004, the Conservative Party wrote in a national news release: “The fastest and easiest way to give Canadians relief at the pump is for the federal government to stop charging GST on top of gasoline excise taxes. It’s time to axe the tax on the tax.” The CTF agrees with the Conservative policy commitment of ending the tax-on-tax. The question is: do they still agree with themselves. Every year before the May long-weekend, the CTF holds its Gas Tax Honesty Day as a reminder to motorists that nearly 29 per cent of the price at the pump is taxes, many of them hidden. In addition, the CTF today released new data detailing gas tax breakdowns in every province. The report showed a clear and strong correlation between provinces with lower gas taxes and lower pump prices. The evidence is clear: lower gas taxes mean lower pump prices. If Canadians want relief at the pump, the way to deliver it is to cut gas taxes, starting with the GST/HST tax-on-tax.” Gas and carbon tax hikes in Manitoba and British Columbia will force significant increases in gas prices in those provinces, at $68 and $216 respectively for a two-car family.

MURRAY MANDRYK

Provincial Politics

while this community also coped with the impact of severe flooding – was truly impressive. The runner-up was a solid entry from Moose Jaw to restore the 1949 Peacock War Memorial. The judges further recognized the Maple Creek entry as the winner of the economic development leadership category where it topped a solid entry from the town of Assiniboia, village of Limerick and RMs of Excel, Lake of the Rivers and Stonehenge that created a regional economic alliance to support local development and policy making. In the Municipal Innovation and Service Excellence category, the Town of Carrot River and RM of Moose Range won for its Pasquia Trust – a first-of-its kind in this province that has become an investment vehicle for worthwhile community development projects. The runners-up were from the villages of Paradise Hill and the RM of Frenchmen Butte for converting the closed hospital into a Level 1and 2-care facility. In the Regional Leadership and Partnership category, the town of Fort Qu’Appelle, RM of North Qu’Appelle, and communities of B-Say-Tay, Katepwa, Fort San, Lebret and Lipton won for its Calling Lake Planning District Commission. The runners-up were the joint entry from towns of

White City, Pilot Butte and Balgonie and Village of Edenwold that got together on the White Butte Regional Commission to enhance local fire and protective service, utility service delivery and highway safety. The Environmental Stewardship Award went to the town of Unity that worked with Sifto Salt Mines to build a six-kilometre underground pipeline to carry town wastewater to the mine for needed use. Unity was also the runner up in the Community Life Enrichment Award for its compelling Unity Community Resources Centre – a non-profit, volunteer-run facility that now houses a food bank, second-hand clothing store, toy exchange, parent mentoring and support program and a

high-school equivalency program. In a normal year, Unity might have been the handdowns winner, but it had to compete with City of Yorkton’s Aviva Project that turned the devastation in that city’s downtown after the July 2010 flood into a skateboard park. Using social media, it secured a $150,000 prize needed to finance the construction. And for turning the devastation into something productive, the Yorkton project was awarded with the special judge’s award only handed out on two other occasions. This was indeed a great year for rural communities showing what they can accomplishment – especially in the face of both the elements and naysayers suggesting they couldn’t.

Reader Opinions Vellacott’s hidden agenda to slash OAS changes will be phased in over time The Harper Government is com- We also introduced two new mea- not act now, the Chief Actuary has protection for the environment mitted to ensuring the sustainability sures for OAS. In January 2013, we projected the annual cost of OAS This week MP Maurice Vellacott voted in favour of a 400 page budget bill that amends over 70 different acts and devotes an astonishing 150 pages to weakening laws to protect our environment. The Conservatives claim that this “streamlining” of environmental legislation is so important that it has to be passed right away. So why didn’t we hear about it until now? Why didn’t they campaign on it in the last election? And why are the Conservatives ramming all these changes through Parliament and refusing to break up the mammoth bill so that all its parts can be properly studied? The Conservatives are trying to avoid public scrutiny by cramming major environmental changes into a sweeping “kitchen sink” bill.

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They want to eliminate federal environmental assessments for all but a few projects and do less comprehensive reviews where they still occur. They want to eliminate protection for fish habitat, despite the fact that you don’t have fish without a habitat!All of this comes on top of announcements of 900 positions to be cut at Environment Canada. Mr. Vellacott and the Conservatives didn’t campaign on gutting environmental regulations, yet they are trying to pass them under the radar. Mr. Vellacott needs to come clean to his constituents about his hidden agenda of environmental destruction. Kirsty Duncan, MP Liberal Critic for the Environment

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of the Old Age Security program for future generations. As recently announced, the age of eligibility for OAS will be gradually increased to age 67, beginning in 2023 and fully implemented by 2029. Canadians who are 54 or older on March 31, 2012 (born on or before March 31, 1958) will see no change and will still be eligible to apply for OAS at age 65. There will be no reductions to the amount collected, and Canadians who are currently collecting benefits will not be affected. These changes will not affect the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). The CPP has been adjusted over the years and is sustainable for the long-term. We have ensured that the changes will be made with substantial notice and an adjustment period so that Canadians can plan for their retirement.

will start to proactively enrol seniors for OAS and GIS, eliminating the need for them to apply for these benefits. As of July 2013, Canadians will have the option to choose to delay receiving their OAS benefit for up to five years. For every month an individual delays receiving OAS, their monthly payment will be increased for the remainder of their retirement. Canada is undergoing a significant demographic shift and soon the number of seniors will nearly double. The ratio of workers to seniors is also changing. Currently, we have four working Canadians for every senior; by 2030, that will be reduced to two workers. OAS is the largest individual transfer made to Canadians by the government and is completely funded by tax revenues. On its current path, OAS is unsustainable. If we do

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TERRY PUGH - Reporter/Photographer tpugh@ccgazette.ca JOANNE URLACHER - Production/Typesetting ads@ccgazette.ca ANGIE WHITEHEAD - Production/Typesetting ads@ccgazette.ca

to increase from $38 billion in 2011 to $108 billion in 2030. That will account for nearly 25% of all federal program funding and is unsustainable. The Opposition’s reckless and irresponsible approach to Canada’s finances would put future seniors’ retirement benefits at risk. Our Government is determined to take responsible, fair and prudent action to ensure that the OAS program is sustainable for all Canadians—now and into the future. We are committed to providing a secure and dignified retirement for seniors who have spent their lives building this great country. For more information on how we are safeguarding the OAS program, please visit www.servicecanada. gc.ca/retirement. Maurice Vellacott, M.P. Saskatoon-Wanuskewin

HAVE AN OPINION? EXPRESS IT HERE

The Clark’s Crossing Gazette welcomes Letters to the Editor regarding topics of interest to our readers. The Gazette reserves the right to edit letters for brevity and clarity. Letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, signature and daytime telephone number for verification purposes (name and daytime telephone number in the case of emailed letters). Letters must be tastefully written and meet the Gazette’s legal standards in order to qualify for publishing. Letters must be signed and include contact information for authenticity purposes. The Gazette does not necessarily support or oppose the opinions, expressed or implied, in this newspaper. The Clark’s Crossing Gazette is independently owned and operated. Any reproduction for non-personal purposes, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of the Publisher is strictly prohibited. The Gazette is distributed free of charge to residents in the area. Subscriptions outside the market area within Canada are available at a rate of $90.00+GST/yr.

VOL. 4 NO. 46


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

7

Thousands expected for First Nations Pow Wow at Wanuskewin Heritage Park By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

W

anuskewin Heritage Park will be hosting as many as 5,000 campers on its grounds during the weekend of June 21-24. It’s all part of a massive First Nations Pow Wow and gathering of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) scheduled for Saskatoon. Co-hosted by the Saskatoon Tribal Council, the TRC hearings will be held at Prairieland Park and are expected to see as many as 20,000 people attend the event. The cultural and educational displays and events will also spill over to nearby Diefenbaker Park in Saskatoon. A fleet of buses will transport people to and from Wanuskewin Heritage Park during the five-day event, with many visitors expected to camp on the Wanuskewin grounds. A news conference outlining the event was held in Saskatoon on Thursday, May 17. Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada head Justice Murray Sinclair told the news conference that there are an estimated 28,000 Residential School Survivors in Saskatchewan, and the event is designed to provide them with the opportunity to share their experiences with the TRC. “The gathering is a chance for all Canadians, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, to learn about and bear witness to the legacy of the residential school system,” Sinclair stated. Saskatchewan has the largest number of Residential

School Survivors in Canada. Approximately 10 per cent of them reside in Saskatoon. The TRC was established as a result of the 2007 Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. Its mandate is to inform Canadians about what happened in the 150 year history of the Residential Schools and promote reconciliation.

WANUSKEWIN SITE The convergence of such a large number of people on the grounds of Wanuskewin Heritage Park for the fourday weekend period is a major undertaking for organizers, according to Dana Soonias, Chief Executive Officer of Wanuskewin. He said the event organizers, including the City of Saskatoon, are putting special measures in place to ensure the safety and security of visitors and residents in nearby communities. At a presentation to Corman Park council on Monday, May 14, Soonias and Gilles Dorval, Aboriginal Relations Advisor for the City of Saskatoon, explained the objectives of the gathering and the logistics involved in keeping things running smoothly. In order for the gathering to proceed, organizers requested the council grant a temporary exemption for the rural municipality’s noise bylaw, as well as exemptions to any fire bans that may be in place at that time. Dorval said small open fires are necessary for ceremonial purposes. He also stated that the organizers have made arrangements with Saskatoon City Police, the RCMP, and a private security firm to ensure that quiet times during the

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Wanuskewin Heritage Park will be home to thousands of people during the weekend of June 21-24 as part of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada hearing night are enforced, and that the crowd does not get out of control. “There is going to be a lot of security,” Dorval explained in an interview after the presentation to council. “The peo-

ple who will be there are not there to party. They’re there to take part in a very serious gathering.” The RM council granted the exemptions requested by organizers.

Town of DALMENY

PUBLIC NOTICE Public notice is hereby given that the Council of the Town of Dalmeny intends to adopt a bylaw under the Planning and Development Act, 2007 to amend Bylaw No. 4/09, known as the Zoning Bylaw. INTENT The proposed bylaw amendment is intended to: • Add a new definition for Public Utility; • Add a new definition for Telecommunication Tower; and • Add Telecommunication Towers as a permitted use in the CS – Community Service District. REASON The reasons for the amendments are: • To clarify the difference between Public Utilities and Telecommunication Towers; and • To facilitate the development of telecommunication towers only in the CS – Community Service District. PUBLIC INSPECTION Any person may inspect the bylaw at the Town Office, located at 301 Railway Avenue East, in the Town of Dalmeny, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM (closed between 12:00 PM and 1:00 PM) on Monday to Friday excluding statutory holidays. Copies of the proposed bylaw are available at the Town office at a cost of $.20/pg. PUBLIC HEARING Council will hold a public hearing on June 18/12 at 7:30 p.m., at the Dalmeny Town Office to hear any person or group that wants to comment on the proposed bylaw. Council will also consider written comments received at the hearing, or delivered to the undersigned at the Town Office before the hearing. Issued at the Town of Dalmeny this May 16, 2012. Shelley Funk, Town Administrator

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

Warman Rodeo set to celebrate 20 years of wild west family fun For casual spectators the sport of rodeo provides only a small glimpse into the lives of what most competitors live each day. In two short weeks, dozens of men and women will be making the trip to town to compete at the 20th Annual Warman Diamond Rodeo and Family Days. According to chair Don Dyck, the Warman event, to be held June 8-10, is one of the jewels within the Canadian Cowboys Association’s (CCA) event calendar. “I think our relatively central location certainly helps with the number of entries we receive each year,” he explained. “It’s an outdoor event so we do rely on the sun to shine for the crowds and we’ve been blessed for good weather over the years.” Competitors will battle over the course of three days in all the usual events such as bull riding, team roping, tie-down roping, ladies barrel racing and steer wrestling. Every second counts for the competitors as points are collected throughout the season with only a select few chosen to compete at the CCA Finals Rodeo in November. Rodeo performances are slated for Friday evening at 6:30, Saturday at 6:00 and Sunday afternoon at 2:00. Tickets for each performance, which will take place at the Warman Diamond Arena, can be purchased at the gate each day. Beer gardens will also open Friday afternoon at 5:00, Saturday at 2:30 p.m. and Sunday

at 12 noon. For ball players, a threeday slo-pitch tournament will run at Prairie Oasis Park starting at 6:00 p.m. Friday, 8:00 a.m. Saturday and 9:00 a.m. Sunday with the finals scheduled for 5:00 p.m. Sunday. Dyck and his committee of a dozen or so volunteers have gone to great lengths to ensure there’s always something new for the audience each year. In 2012, there will be an outdoor family movie next to the arena right after the Friday performance with fireworks to follow. Something else that is new is the intermission show each day at the rodeo. The Graham Sisters, a pair of professional trick riders living just outside Wainwright, AB, will bring their high energy stunt show to Warman all three days. Saturday morning kicks off with a pancake breakfast at the arena followed by the parade, which will snake its way through Warman beginning at 10:00. A show and shine for automotive enthusiasts will run at the high school following the parade while children can play away the afternoon at Kidsville in Lions Park. Should the weather play a factor, the Kidsville event will move indoors to the high school. The rodeo grounds will also be the centre of attention starting at 11:00 a.m. for a gymkhana. Recording artist Jordan Doell will hit the stage for the 20th edition of the Warman Diamond Rodeo CJWW Cabaret

on Saturday night. The cabaret, according to Dyck, always draws a capacity crowd to the arena for an evening of dancing and socializing. Tickets are on sale at a number of venues, including Warman Corner Service, Warman Esso and the Warman Hotel. Advance tickets can also be picked up in Saskatoon at Claypool’s Boot & Jean as well as Bronco’s Western Wear. Doell just finished recording his third CD with longtime producer and guitar player, Bob Funk, who has worked with country greats such as Patricia Conroy, Rodney Atkins, LeAnne Rhymes, Beverley Mahood and Lisa Brokop. In 2009, Doell’s cover of Journey’s Don’t Stop Believin’ won him the ourstage.com Cover Song of the Year as voted on by people from around the world. The weekend wraps up on Sunday with a Cowboy Church Service at the arena starting at 10:00 followed by the final day of rodeo. “There’s an awful lot of planning that goes into putting together an event of this type,” Dyck added. “We have a really great team of people who donate a lot of time to make this a major community event and I want to personally thank each and every one of them for all that they have done and continue to do.” Parade entries are still being accepted and will be taken until Saturday morning, June 9, at 9:30 a.m. Contact Grant Brunen at 222-8857 to enter a float or for more details.

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LANGHAM MUSEUM OPENING DAY

Doris Tarasoff (right) of Langham guides visitors Marion Schultz and George Loewen through the Langham Museum as it opened for the season on Saturday, May 19. Exhibits include an old fire truck and antique toy vehicles, as well as farm machinery, domestic items and local history artifacts. (Gazette photos by Chris Pugh)

Prairie Spirit students set sail for adventure on the high seas By BRENDA ERICKSON

(Left) Sailing aboard the Pacific Grace (Photo by Brad Milton). (Inset) Participants (lL-R) Kelsey Derksen (Borden School), Lana Abercrombie, PSSD Deaf and Hard of Hearing Special Education Resource Teacher and Brad Milton (Delisle Composite School)

Communications Consultant Prairie Spirit School Division

T

wo students from Prairie Spirit School Division recently had a chance to participate in an incredible adventure. In March, Kelsey Derksen (Borden School) and Brad Milton (Delisle Composite) were part of a five-day trip on a tall ship off Vancouver Island. Approximately 30 people travelled together on the tall ship, including deaf and hard of hearing students (aged 13 to 18) from around Saskatchewan, their interpreters and seven ship crew members. The trip was facilitated through the Saskatchewan Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (SDHHS) organization. Brad, 13 years old and in grade 8, is a cadet with experience in sailing small sailboats. He was the youngest student on the trip and point-

ed out that he was the first to climb to the top of the sails of the tall ship! Kelsey

is 17 years old and in Grade 11. She enjoys boating on the lake in the summertime.

They are both hard of hearing but do not use sign language as their main means

of communication. Kelsey and Brad heard about this opportunity through SDHHS at the end of January, when the deadline for applications was imminent. They both jumped at the chance to be part of the trip and sent in their applications. This opportunity was offered at the incredible cost

of $60. The rest of the funding for the trip was provided through the SDHHS. The students and crew spent five straight days on the tall ship. Brad described the sleeping quarters, noting that his sleeping bunk left him about a foot and half of space from the ceiling. The students sailed on the Pacific Grace, one of three tall ships owned by Sail and Life Training Society (S.A.L.T.S.). Brad reported that the Pacific Grace weighs 800 tonnes, with an 800 pound anchor. Each student was required to drive the boat and learned to drive it by compass, landmark and direction. Students were expected to be active participants in the work on the ship, which was challenging and, at times, risky. Brad said the students were to be clipped on in a harness at all times Continued on Page 10 Please see “SAILING”

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

SAILING

PRAIRIE PAINTINGS

Continued from Page 9

on the boat. Brad and Kelsey agreed it was good to get members of the deaf and hard of hearing community together. “It was hard to communicate,” Brad said. “We had interpreters on the ship to help out. I learned some sign language. That was cool! It was awesome to be around other deaf kids. They can do what normal kids can do, too.” “Most of the time, we forgot that people were deaf. We would work together and then realize that we did it without talking,” Brad explained. Brad and Kelsey noted that the crew and students really had to pay attention. “It was spectacular how we could get the message across to that many deaf people,” Brad said. Brad and Kelsey talked about seeing various animals like orcas, otters, porpoises and seals during their time on the ocean. “I’m glad I went on this trip,” Kelsey added. She acknowledged that her parents were a little worried about her as this was her first time flying and this was a big trip to take on her own. Brad and Kelsey said the best part of the trip was driving the ship, learning sign language and making new friends. Since neither uses sign language as their primary mode of communication, they enjoyed the chance to learn a new skill in signing. The students said they would certainly recommend this type of opportunity to other students. As part of their participation in the trip, they will both make presentations to their schools about their adventure. Lana Abercrombie, the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Special Education Resource Teacher for Prairie Spirit School Division, works with students throughout the Division. She was very pleased to have two Prairie Spirit students participate in this opportunity. “What an experience!” she enthused. “What an opportunity for these students to have exposure to other students and leadership opportunities.” Abercrombie said she appreciates the resources available to students through the SDHHS organization.

Funds earmarked for MVA trail system

The Government of Saskatchewan is partnering with the Meewasin Valley Authority to build new trails and improve existing ones. The Meewasin Valley Authority is committed to conserving the South Saskatchewan River Valley’s natural and cultural heritage in Saskatoon and surrounding area. It also develop opportunities that might improve visitors’ experiences in the valley. The reallocated funds will support adding almost 14 kilometres of new trails - a northwest portion from 71st Street to Wanuskewin Heritage Park (a non-profit interpretive centre that teaches visitors about First Nations history and culture) and a southeast portion from Gabriel Dumont Park through Chief Whitecap Park (located south of Saskatoon on Cartwright Street and bordered by the South Saskatchewan River). “This reallocation of funds will have a positive effect on Saskatchewan residents and visitors to Saskatoon,” Tourism, Parks, Culture and Sport Minister Bill Hutchinson said. “These trails promote healthy, active families by encouraging people to walk, bike and ski.”

Mary Ens of Langham displays some of her recent oil paintings, while explaining the techniques involved, to a group of residents of the Langham Senior Citizens Home. An accomplished artist in both oils and watercolours, Mary Ens said her religious faith, combined with the beauty of the prairie lanscape, provides her with an unending source of inspiration for her pictures.

GAZETTE PHOTO BY TERRY PUGH

How Earth can grow 50% more food and 100% more human potential. Once people have enough to eat, they can make the most of their lives. Yet with the Earth’s population expected to reach 9 billion by the year 2050, producing enough food for everyone will be a challenge. Potash and other crop nutrients are responsible for half the world’s food production, helping farmers grow more food on less land. They make the soil more productive, for crops that are stronger, healthier and more abundant. To learn more about the benefits of potash and how it’s helping feed human potential around the world, visit us at PotashCorp.com.

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

11

South Corman Park School’s future scientists tackle varied experiments at science fair Submitted by AMY DABGHI South Corman Park School

The Grade Five Science Fair at South Corman Park School was a blast (not literally, thankfully)! These young students took their scientist roles seriously and developed impressive projects. The purpose for this unit of study was to learn about the Scientific Method with an experiential approach. The students based their projects on an investigative question followed by methodical testing and data collecting. They strengthened their knowledge bases by conducting relevant research on their topics. The topics ranged from non-Newtonian fluids to the aerodynamics of paper airplanes, from how to create slime, crystals, and giant bubbles (some with gum, some with soap) to the social relationships of plants. The most exciting part of the Science Fair was observing these young scientists enthusiastically and patiently teaching younger students with their interactive demonstrations. Several of the younger students were heard saying, “I can’t wait until I get to do this!”

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CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012 • PG. 12

Warman Gems set sights on provincials By TERRY PUGH

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arman Gems manager Darwin Davis would be really happy if his squad chalked up a winning record over the course of the Saskatoon Amateur Softball Association (SASA) league play this summer. But he’s not worried if they lose a few either. Because the real goal for the team is the provincial Senior Men’s “C” championship, slated for July 20-23 in Rhein, Saskatchewan. Last year, the Gems captured the Intermediate A championship, but that category has been shelved as part of a reorganization by Softball Saskatchewan. With their roster practically intact from last season, the Gems are gunning for the equivalent crown this year. “Our goal is the provincial title, definitely,” said Davis in an interview on Friday, May 18. “The games are important because the level of competition is very high, we’re playing against some of the best teams in the province. We’d like to have be playing 500 ball, but ultimately, our record during the league play isn’t what counts.” Davis said the team is aiming to have everybody on the roster gets lots of playing time, including the pitchers. “We intend to use three pitchers every game,” he said. “Especially during the games early in the season when it’s still a bit colder.” The Gems picked up right-hander Brett Casey this season to replace Carmen Baier, who left the team because of family commitments. Casey will join veteran pitchers Taylor Sean and Todd Dyck on the mound, as well as Monty Scherr, who usually plays second base. The lineup also includes catchers Blaine Gabrysh and Casey Brooks, shortstop Matt Scherr, infielders Darwin Davis, Josh Reid, Shane Reid, Mike Stefaniuk, Mario Degagne, Chris Lehmann, outfielders Tyson Almasi, Riley Almasi and Brett Peppler. Davis said the team will likely be looking to pick up one more player for the provincials, since Peppler will likely be playing for his hometown team in Rhein during the tournament.

GAZETTE PHOTO BY TERRY PUGH

Warman Gems starting pitcher Brett Casey winds up during the opening inning against the Poly Plus Junior DIamondsbacks during SASA action in Saskatoon on Thursday, May 17. The Gems jumped out to an early lead but ended up being edged 5-3.

GEMS LOSE CLOSE ONE After winning their season opener 10-3 against the Saskatoon Junior A Bullets, the Gems dropped a 5-3 decision to the Poly Plus Junior Diamondbacks on Thursday, May 17. The Warman squad got off to a quick start in the first inning when Riley Almasi scored a run off a single by Brett Casey with two out, but the Junior Diamondbacks tied it up in the bottom of the inning. The Gems regained the lead in the top of the third inning thanks to a two-run RBI double by Chris Lehmann, who drove in Matt Scherr and Riley Almasi. The Junior Diamondbacks scored a run in the bottom of the fifth, as Warman

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starting pitcher Brett Casey was beginning to tire. Todd Dyck replaced Casey on the mound in the 6th, but the Junior Diamondbacks clearly had his number as they punched in three runs that inning to take the lead. Taylor Sean finished the inning for the Gems and retired the side, but the Gems weren’t able to score any runs in the top of the seventh. “Brett pitched really well for almost five innings, but he was getting tired at the end,” conceded Davis after the game. “We had intentions of pulling him out sooner, but he said he was good, so we left him in. Then they got a couple unfortunate bloopers off Todd, and by the time we brought Taylor in it was too late. But over-

all I thought it was a great game. The Junior Diamondbacks are a good team with good pitching, They just had trouble hitting against Brett early on.” Davis said the team is looking to be more consistent through seven innings as the players shake off the rust from a long winter. “We still haven’t had a full lineup,” he added. So far, the Gems are sticking to the script and playing 500 ball, thanks to a 5-5 tie last Monday night against the Hanley Merchants. Their scheduled game against the Parktown Hotel Padres was rained out on Tuesday. Their next game is slated for Monday, May 28 at Bob Van Impe Field at 6:45 pm.


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

13

Senior Bowl showcases top high school players in province Players from Martensville and Delisle were in the lineup for the annual Ed Henick North-South Senior Bowl game at Griffith’s Stadium last Monday. While the North lost 15-11, it was a game the players will remember for years to come. Five members of the Delisle Rebels football club, including Dylan Larson, Logan Frohaug, Des Vessey, Brayden Knackstedt and Zak Stevenson, were named to the North squad. Vessey was selected as the North’s MVP for the game. Two players from the Martensville Royals also made the all-star squad, including Travis Fehr and Jared Loewen. The Victoria Day weekend also featured the Roughrider Bowl, which showcased the best high shcool football players in Grades 9 through 11. Two local players received honours for their role in that game, including Spencer Ulrich of the Warman Wolverines for best receiver and Shayne Hayward of the Martensville Royals for best defensive back. The football weekend was a highlight for minor football in the province. Football Saskatchewan, the sport governing body, announced that SGI Canada is the Premier Sponsor of Minor Football in the province.

(Left) Running back Des Vessey of Delisle is corralled by Michael Stefanovic of Moose Jaw during the North-South Senior Bowl. Des Vessey (lower inset) receives the North’s MVP award for the game from U of S Huskies coach Brian Towriss. (Above inset) Martensville’s Travis Fehr and Delisle’s Zak Stevenson get some tips from a coach along the sidelines during the North South Senior Bowl game. (Gazette photos by Wayne Shiels)

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Get that old junker to the SaSkatoon Hyundai Pre-owned SuPerStore give you you $$3,000 guaranteed! andand wewe’ll will give 3000 forfor it, it, guaranteed! $15,995 19,995

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$ Lancer Cobalt se 6,995 $6,995

$

2009 dodge Journey

19,995

-$3000 trade

16,995

$

2009 $ $14,995 12,995 kia sportage -$3000 trade -3000 trade all wheel drive

$11,995 Pursuit 9,995 $ 4 door

$

2009 kia sportage

18,995

$

-$3000 trade

15,995

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all wheel drive

8,995

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2005 Hyundai tucson all wheel drive

99 20 off $

air conditioning tune-up process provides $two step

99

$ 34,995 2005 Hyundai 2010 Ford $ $30,995 2005 2011 11,995 -$3000 trade 2005 -$3000 trade 2007 tucson F-150 Lariat Buick $ $ -$3000 trade -3000 Ford all wheel Ford4x4 drive trade superCrew 8,995Hyundai 31,995 rendezvous

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tune-up

Service $ PartS

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interior odors. installed Genuine expiry – May 31 Hyundai Hood cut-out to redeem two step process provides deflectors.

$

sonata Explorer XLT

expiry – May 31 installed Genuine Hyundai Hood deflectors. expiry – May 31 Service

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2009 $18,995 2009 $9,995 2006 9,995 2006 -$3000 trade -$3000 trade 2011 dodge $ $ Pontiac -$3000 trade -3000 trade Journey Chevrolet Mitsubishi 16,995 15,995 Pontiac G5 19,995 $

$

SPecialS PartS

all wheelLTD drive Escape

2010 Ford F-150 Lariat

34,995

-$3000 trade

31,995

$

superCrew 4x4

Quicker Cool-down, Lower expiry – May 31 temperatures, and removes interior odors. expiry – May 31 cut-out to redeem

Service

air conditioning tune-up

99

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help offset program costs and make minor football afford-

!

FOOTBALL GRANTS Both Warman and Martensville Minor Football associations were among the recipients of grants from SGI. Warman received a total of $6,000 while Martensville received $4,000. Through Football Saskatchewan, Minor Football Programs across the province will have the opportunity to obtain financial assistance to

SHINING STARS

two step process provides Quicker Cool-down, Lower temperatures, and removes interior odors. expiry – May 31

33,995

$

-$3000 trade

2008 Ford F-250 Lariat

28,995

$

-$3000 trade

2008 toyota tacoma trd

35,995

$

-$3000 trade

2011 Ford F-350 XLt

hemi CrewCab 4x4 superCab 4x4 deisel CrewCab 4x4 nav Loaded Long box CrewCab 4x4 28,995 30,995 25,995 32,995 $ $ $ 18,995 11,995 34,995 2009 2009 2005 Hyundai 2010 Ford $33,995 2012 -$3000 $35,995 2011 -$3000 $24,995 2011 -$3000 $31,995 2011 -$3000 trade trade trade trade dodge kia sportage tucson F-150 Lariat -3000 trade -3000 trade -3000 trade -3000 trade Dodge $ $ Dodge $ $ Mustang $15,995 $33,995 all wheel Ford Ford $ drive all wheel drive superCrew 4x4 Journey 16,995 8,995$28,995 35,995 2011 dodge 2008 Ford 2008 toyota 31,995 2011 Ford $30,995 31,995 $32,995 $21,995 $28,995

$

$

$

$

19,995

$

Pony Convertible ram sLt

-$3000 trade

28,995

$

hemi CrewCab 4x4

15,995

$

-$3000 trade

12,995

$

31,995

$

30,995

2011 Hyundai sonata GLs

$ 33,995 2011 dodge $16,995 $13,995 SOLD! -$3000 trade ram sLt $

2010 MAZDA 3 GS -$3000 trade

$ $12,995 2011 HYUNDAI15,995 Accent GL 2011 $15,995 Hyundai hemi CrewCab 4x4 28,995 30,995 -$3000 trade sonata GLs

$

-$3000 trade

$

2011 FORD Ranger Sport $22,995 $19,995 $ Loaded 12,995 2008 NISSAN Titan XLT $22,995 $19,995

Loaded

F-350 XLT Lariat F-250

superCab 4x4 deisel

24,995

$

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21,995

$

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25,995

$

2011 dodge Charger sXt plus, Loaded

Charger SXTtrd tacoma

CrewCab 4x4 nav Loaded

17,995

$

-$3000 trade

14,995

$

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32,995

$

2007 Hyundai tiburon Gtp

Ram 1500 Laramie F-350 XLt

62,995

$

-$3000 trade

59,995

$

Long box CrewCab 4x4

2011 cadillac escalade

$ $ 28,995 35,995 2008 Ford 2008 toyota 2011 Ford 2010 FORD F-150 Lariat $34,995 $31,995 2012 FORD Mustang GT Convert. $39,995 $36,995 -$3000 trade -$3000 trade F-250 Lariat tacoma trd F-350 XLt $ $ $ 24,995 17,995 62,995 $ $ 2011 HYUNDAI Sonata GLS $22,995 $19,995 2009 KIA Spectra5 SX $11,995 $8,995 2011 dodge 2007 SOLD! 2011 superCab 4x4 deisel CrewCab 4x4 nav Loaded Long box CrewCab 4x4 25,995 32,995 -$3000 trade -$3000 trade Charger $23,995 Hyundai 2012 FORD Fusion SEL $20,995 2006 HYUNDAI-$3000 Santatrade Fe GLS $13,995 cadillac $10,995 $ $ $ sXt plus, Loaded tiburon Gtp 21,995 14,995 59,995 escalade 2007 Hyundai Sonata $15,995 $12,995 2007 HYUNDAI Santa Fe GL $13,995 $10,995

cut-out to redeem

nor th, saskatoon saskatchewan

-$3000 trade

!

2011 dodge ram sLt

31,995

$


14

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

Bethany Eagles teams had a great season By WES ENNS

Rob Braun and Wes Enns for leading the Men’s squad. Thanks for a great season!

he sports of Volleyball and Basketball have long histories at Bethany College, as decades of students have participated in various leagues and tournaments across Saskatchewan and Alberta, representing the college in competition and sportsmanship.

BASKETBALL TEAMS Coach Tasha Fehr led the Bethany Women’s team, and saw the team progress and grow into a solid unit throughout the year. In SRWL play, the women had tough matchups for each game, playing older and more seasoned opposition. Still, the women fought hard, with determination and persistence. Though their record in the city league doesn’t show it, the women played better and better as the season progressed, finishing strongly and competently. In the PAC Championships, however, their season of hard work paid off, allowing the girls to see and sense their growth and development as a team. With each game, the Eagles gained confidence, leading them to the Gold Finals. Though they fell to a strong Millar team, the Bethany Eagles’ season can be counted as a success as well - both in terms of their result in PAC (2nd place), and their overall sense of accomplishment as a team. In summary, the Eagles Volleyball and Basketball teams at Bethany College have had excellent seasons, and have seen tremendous and varied competition. It has been very rewarding to see the athletes grow and mature in their skills, both as team members, and as sports enthusiasts. If this year is any indication of the future of these sports at Bethany, the Eagles are poised for a bright and exciting future.

Athletic & Recreation Director Bethany College

T

VOLLEYBALL TEAMS This year, Bethany’s Volleyball teams competed in the Prairie Athletic Conference League (pacsask.ca), against college teams from around Saskatchewan. The much sought after prize is the PAC Provincial Championship this year, held in Swift Current, hosted by Great Plains College, in November 2011. Going into this event, both the Men’s and Women’s Eagles teams were strong competitors, starting the year slowly, but gaining momentum throughout league play. The Men’s team finished 2nd in regular season play, ending up with 7 wins and 3 losses. The Women finished 3rd, finishing their season with a 5 win - 5 loss record. The provincial tournament was a tough test, with all league teams attending, bringing out the best in the athletes as they fought for every advantage and point that could be gained. On the Men’s side, the Eagles progressed to the Provincial Finals, but fell in close sets to the Great Plains Sundogs, ending up with a solid 2nd place result in the PAC league. The Women’s Eagles team made it to the Bronze Medal game, and went on to defeat their opposition, claiming 3rd place in PAC. Jaymie Baumann, Craig Pudlas, Kendell Wiens, and Andrew Reddekopp were honoured as AllStars for the league. Many thanks go to Danielle Klassen and Shelley Dueck for coaching the Women’s team, and

Andrew Reddekopp (right) was honoured as an all-star for his play this past season. Chad Braun, Ellaina Brown and Braydon Jordheim all had strong seasons with the Bethany Eagles basketball teams. (Photos submitted by Cora Lynn Carey, Bethany College)

SUMMER SPORTS CAMPS We are looking forward to hosting our summer Bethany Sports Camps, where athletes will continue to grow in their volleyball and basketball skills. To learn more about BSC (which is held in July), visit our camp website at www. bsc.bethany.sk.ca. Space is limited, so apply soon!

Roughrider Bowl stars

Spencer Ulrich of Warman receives the top receiver award from Football Saskatchewan’s Brian Guebert after the Roughrider Bowl game last weekend.

Shayne Hayward of Martensville receives the top defensive back award from Brian Guebert of Football Saskatchewan after the Roughrider Bowl game last weekend. (Gazette photos by Wayne Shiels)

Gazette CLARK’S CROSSING


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

15

Government proclaims money judgment enforcement legislation The Saskatchewan government is proclaiming legislation that will change the procedure for the enforcement of money judgments. Effective May 28, 2012, The Enforcement of Money Judgments Act will replace outdated Acts to introduce a new and more effective enforcement process. Previously, existing legislation included a number of Acts and Regulations, many of which date back more than 50 years. “This new legislation will improve access to justice by streamlining the way money judgments are enforced in this province,” Justice Minister and Attorney General Don Morgan said. “This will make it easier and more efficient for Judgment Creditors who have gone through the judicial process and successfully obtained a judgment.” Information Services Corporation (ISC) will be responsible for the registration of judgments in the new Judgment Registry. To prepare for this, several changes to the system and technical upgrades have been made to accommodate the new legislation. “This is a big step forward for Judgment Creditors and

TURBINE TRACTOR

the way in which they will be able to obtain current information about their money judgments and debtors on a province wide basis,” Minister responsible for the Information Services Corporation Tim McMillan said. The new legislation also updates the exemption rules protecting Judgment Debtors and it will provide the Sheriff’s Office with a larger role in enforcing judgments. Changes have also been made to modernize the internal procedures of the Sheriff’s Office to ensure that they can be effective in this new role.

The Great Western Brewery-sponsored jet fuel-burning tractor churns up the field during a tractor pull demonstration at Ken Beauchemin’s farm in the RM of Corman Park last weekend.

GAZETTE PHOTO BY TERRY JENSON

HELP! MAJORLY OVERSTOCKED!

$10M upgrade Huge Floor Model Clearance • Complete Sets Only SOME SETS proposed for On quality / Canadian made dining room & bedroom AT COST! Gordie Howe FIRST COME football Bowl sale

The Gordie Howe Bowl would get an artificial turf playing surface if a $10-million renovation plan goes ahead. The Gordie Howe Bowl would get an artificial turf playing surface if a $10-million renovation plan goes ahead. Saskatoon’s Gordie Howe Bowl, home to local football since 1960, could be looking at a $10-million facelift. A proposed makeover includes artificial turf to replace the existing natural grass, a score clock, a sound system and field lighting. The city almost closed the stadium, formally known as the Gordon Howe Bowl, in 2006 due to its condition. Without it, the Saskatoon Hilltops and many high school teams would have to look elsewhere to play. Originally, proponents were looking at a $30-million upgrade, but that plan never went ahead. Now, the city wants to create a foundation to raise money for a scaled-down project. According to a report going to city council, it might kick in $600,000 out of 2013 budget funds. The city also plans to spend $45,000 this year to hire an administrator to establish the Gordon Howe Bowl Foundation. According to the CBC Saskatchewan News website, The plans were being discussed today at a meeting of the executive committee, which is made up of members of city council. Download the free Mobio app for your smartphone and scan the code to get the latest news

Gazette CLARK’S CROSSING

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5 - Piece Suite REGULAR $5215 Solid Maple, Coco-Brown-Stained #4100 Style Bedroom Suite, Modern • 1 X 9 drawer Mule Dresser (taller than shown in pic) • 2 X Night Stands with 2 1/2 drawers • 1 X Queen Bed complete (headboard, footboard,   w/rails & supports - 2 pieces)

SOLID MAPLE 7 PIECE DINING REGULAR $7399 SOLID HARD ROCK MAPLE NEWPORT DINING TABLE 42” X 68” plus 2x12” leaves • Table dented • 6 very sturdy RST sidechairs (chairs not as shown) • All dark hickory stained

SUITE SALE

under cost BLOWOUT $

3477

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SOLID HARD ROCK MAPLE, COCO-STAINED, CLASSIC STYLE, TOP-OF-THE-LINE • Deluxe, raised panels  • Queen complete bed • Night stand  • Extra long dresser • Mirror with drawers

AT cost BLOWOUT $

4564

COMPLETE SUITE

* As is * Bed in stock comes with low-profile footboard


16

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

Thursday

May 31

st

Asquith Sportsground

7:30 pm

TICKETS: Adult: $20 in advance $25 at the gate Child: 5–12 yrs. - $10 4 & under free

Presented by:

GUARANTEED

50-50 Payout of $1000 from

BEER GARDEN during the event DANCE after the event

Advance tickets available at:

Saskatoon Safeway Stores Proudly Supported by Sandyridge Gas & Grocery CLARK S CROSSING squith Community Development Corporation Asquith Co-op Box 204, Grandora, Saskatchewan S0K 1V0 Asquith Hotel Asquith General Store This event is a fundraiser hosted by the Asquith Community Development Corporation. Proceeds go toward the construction of a new rink and community hall.

Gazette

For information please call 329-4399 or email ogentes@kinecor.com

Printing provided by:


Classifieds 8

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012 • PAGE 17

ANNOUNCEMENTS: Obituaries..................................101 In Memoriam.............................102 Births.........................................105 Anniversaries............................106 Thank You Notes......................107 Lost & Found.............................108 Tenders......................................109 Legal Notices............................110 Coming Events..........................111 PERSONALS: Personal Notices......................201 Notices..................................... 202 WHAT’S HAPPENING: Services Offered..................... 302 Travel........................................ 305 MERCHANDISE: For Sale......................................401 Pets........................................... 402 Misc. Wanted.......................... 403 FARM & RANCH: Farm Equipment........................501 Livestock.................................. 502 Feed and Seed......................... 503 Lawn and Garden.................... 504

REAL ESTATE: Homes/Condos for Sale.......... 601 Homes/Condos For Rent........ 602 Apartments For Rent............... 603 Land For Sale........................... 604 Commercial Property.............. 605 Recreation Property................ 606 Property Wanted..................... 607 Land For Rent........................... 608 Wanted to Rent....................... 609 TRANSPORTATION: Autos For Sale..........................701 Vehicles Wanted......................702 Motorcycles/ATVs....................703 Recreational Vehicles............. 704 Boats/Motors.......................... 705 Snowmobiles........................... 706 Auto Parts.................................707 EMPLOYMENT: Employment Wanted.............. 801 Child Care................................. 802 Business Opportunities.......... 803 Career Training........................ 804 Careers..................................... 805 AUCTIONS: Auction Sales........................... 901

How will you

Remember your loved one? Ask your funeral director to have your loved one’s obituary appear in

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

$ 111

COMING EVENTS

Planning an event? Tell everyone about it with a notice in The Gazette. Email your ad to ads@ccgazette.ca along with your contact information, call us at 668-0575 or fax your ad to 668-3997. The Warman Mennonite Special Care Home is planning a 10 km Walkathon for Saturday June 2, 2012 at 8:30am. Pledge forms can be picked up at the Care Home. 43-5c 5TH ANNUAL KIDS PHOTO BLITZ with Sandy Lockhart at 208 N. Railway St. W. June 4 9-5. BEST PRICES OF YEAR! IF RAIN CALL 291-0597 FOR NEW DATE.44-4p WARMAN FARMER’S MARKET. Every Thursday 2-6pm (weather permitting). Town Office parking lot. Buy Local - Eat Fresh! 45-4p 2nd ANNUAL VALLEY GOSPEL CELEBRATION June 1517, 2012. Warman Diamond Arena. For more info 9332834/931-9760. 45-4c

109

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD In-person: 430D Central St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0 We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

Run your word ad 3 consecutive weeks, get the 4th FREE!

111

COMING EVENTS

ROCK SOLID REFUGE BENEFIT Rock Solid Refuge Benefit awareness and dessert night on Saturday, May 26 at 7:00 pm, West Portal Church in Saskatoon. Rock Solid is a Christ centred, year-long residential program for young men struggling with life controlling issues. Guest speaker - Dave Scott, music by Exodus (male quartet) and testimony from youth. For more information contact Tim Ramage at (306) 741-3655, website www. rocksolidrefuge.com. 45-2p TOWN OF OSLER GARAGE SALES all around Osler. Friday May 25 starting at 3pm and Saturday May 26 at 9am. Watch for balloons. 45-2c SASK. RIVER VALLEY MUSEUM in Hague will be open for the summer months, May 18-Oct. 8. Hours of operation 1-5 p.m. FriMon. Open statutory holidays 1-5 p.m. For special appointments, booking tours, reunions or birthday celebrations call Frank 225-4361, Museum 225-2112, Henry 225-4585. 46-16p

111

503

FEED & SEED

COMING EVENTS

MONSTER GARAGE SALE Martensville & Warman May 25th & 26th

Numerous households registered!

Address lists and maps available at local gas stations.

Watermelon & Rollkuchen Supper Friday, June 8th, 2012, 4:30-8:00 pm

Valley Christian Academy, Osler SK Admission by Donation Gospel Echoes Team Prison Ministry

OPEN AIR GOSPEL SERVICES in Hague will begin June 2 at 7:00PM & run through to Aug. 25 Everyone welcome

For further information Harvey 225-4687

NOTICES

12054MM02

MONDAY NOON

per week up to 25 words (35¢ per word thereafter) + GST

202

TENDERS

DEADLINE

Helping Hands Preschool Warman now has several openings for 4 year olds (or children who will be 4 by the end of 2012). If you have a child who would benefit from a fun-filled educational program, taught by a qualified and experienced Early Childhood Educator call 931-2556. 46-4c Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and the Clark’s Crossing Gazette does not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements. For greater information on advertising conditions, please contact the Publisher of this newspaper. tfn

401

FOR SALE

FOR SALE - 4 WHEELED MOBILITY SCOOTER, deluxe model, ShopRider. Purchased August, 2011 for $2800, barely used. Price $1950. Call 651-1241. 43-4p MOBILITY SCOOTER LIKE NEW, red. $1,350 or best offer. Will deliver. Call 254-4421 or 291-0284. 44-4p COLORADO BLUE SPRUCE, 2 year old: $1.49/each for a box of 100 ($149.). Also full range of trees, shrubs, cherries & berries. Free shipping. 1-866873-3846 or treetime.ca. STEEL BUILDING BLOWOUT SALE! 20X26 $5,199. 25X28 $5,799. 30X42 $8,390. 32X56 $11,700. 40X50 $14,480. 47X76 $20,325. One End wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800668-5422. www.pioneersteel. ca. DISCONNECTED PHONE? ChoiceTel Home Phone Service. No One Refused! Low Monthly Rate! Calling Features and Unlimited Long Distance Available. Call ChoiceTel Today! 1-888-333-1405. www.choicetel.ca.

Advertise in the classifieds. swna.com/ classifieds 302

SERVICES

601

HOMES/CONDOS FOR SALE

Sell your property or business yourself and

502

LIVESTOCK

For Sale Purebred Black Angus long yearling bulls, and replacement heifers, AI service. Meadow Ridge Enterprises, 306-373-9140 or 306-270-6628, Saskatoon, Sask. 37-12p

HOMES/CONDOS FOR SALE

HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252

CONDO IN SAVANNAH ESTATES, 1st floor. Corner location. 2 large bedrooms, 2 baths, dual underground parking. Asking $232,000. 45-4p WARMAN 55 PLUS ACTIVE ADULT LIFESTYLE! Large Ground Level Townhomes for sale. (306) 241-0123 www.diamondplace.ca. 2012 Modular Homes have arrived! VESTA HOMES INC has 16, 20 & 24 wide homes in stock. Visit us in Vanscoy, or visit us on the web: www. vestamfghomes.com 306-2429099. Classifieds by phone. Visa & Mastercard accepted. Call The Gazette at 668-0575. Moving your mobile home? Over 13 yrs exp, new equip, competitive rates and professional service! Call (780)2651785 for quotes, availability, and fast, friendly service!

STAY AHEAD OF THE COMPETITION.

CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed record removal since 1989. Confidential. Fast. Affordable. Our A+ BBB rating assures employment/travel freedom. Call for free information booklet. 1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366). RemoveYourRecord.com. WAIST AWAY the summer days in a new bathing suit. Get your 1st 9 weeks for $99 Proven Results! Call Herbal Magic right NOW 1-800-8545176.

FOR SALE small, square green feed bales. $2 each. 254-4323. 46-4c

601

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Want to know what your business is actually worth? We offer a

VALUE STATEMENT PROGRAM Give us a call

1-800-606-0310

www.pin.ca

603

APARTMENTS FOR RENT WARMAN 3 BEDROOM basement suite for rent. Available June 1. $900/month. No smoking, no pets. Call Kent 227-7683. 46p

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

Classified Ads that

WORK

(306) 668-0575 Visa & Mastercard Accepted

607

LAND WANTED


18

Classifieds 604

LAND FOR SALE

701

AUTOS FOR SALE

Guaranteed approval drive away today! We lend money to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest rates. Over 500 vehicles sale priced for immediate delivery OAC. 1-877-796-0514. www. yourapprovedonline.com.

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

DEADLINE:

In-person: 430D Central St. W, Warman Telephone: 306.668.0575 Fax: 306.668.3997 E-mail: ads@ccgazette.ca Postal Mail: P.O. Box 1419, Warman SK S0K 4S0

EGG GRADING BUSINESS for sale. Small business with big potential. Part-time, work at home, set your own hours. CFIA Registered. Not necessary to have your own hens. (306) 239-4818. 44-4p FREE FREE VENDING MACHINES Just Collect the Cash Up To $100,000.00 + Per Year. Exclusive Protected Territories. For Full Details CALL NOW 1-866-668-6629 Website WWW.TCVEND.COM SEISMIC DRILLING EQUIPMENT for sale. Turnkey purchase opportunity could position you for entry into lucrative seismic drilling sector for reasonable investment. Low impact equipment, support vehicles, extensive parts and drilling supply + available. Contact Seller: seismic2012@ hotmail.com for complete details.

STAY AHEAD OF THE COMPETITION. Advertise in the classifieds. 805 swna.com/ classifieds

CAREERS

HIRING FULL-TIME interior general home renovation/building position. Apply by email to: procorenterprisesinc@gmail.com. 44-4p

REPORTER

701

AUTOS FOR SALE

2007 DODGE CARAVAN Stow & Go. Lady driven. Complete dealer service record. $10,500. 229-3030. 46-4p

See us for ALL your • Vehicle • Quad • Personal Watercraft SGI ACCREDITED

2204B-Ave. C North Saskatoon

652-7972

or (306) 260-4691 Email: magicpaintandbody@shaw.ca

magicpaintandbody.com

The Clark’s Crossing Gazette is now accepting resumes with samples for the position of general news reporter and photographer within our award-winning team. The position is part-time to start and will grow into full-time. Previous journalism and photography experience is an asset. The successful candidate will possess a reliable vehicle, a digital camera and have basic computer knowledge, proofreading skills, an eye for detail and be willing to work a flexible schedule that includes some weekend and evening assignments. Submit resume including cover letter, along with samples, in confidence to: tjenson@ccgazette. ca . No telephone calls please. Only those chosen for an interview will be contacted and we thank all applicants in advance for their interest. 46tfn EXPERIENCED WINCH TRACTOR and Bed Truck Drivers for drilling, rig moving trucking company. Phone, fax, email or mail. Email: rigmove@telus. net. Phone 780-842-6444. Fax 780-842-6581. H & E Oilfield Services Ltd., 2202 - 1 Ave., Wainwright, AB, T9W 1L7. HEAVY EQUIPMENT REPAIR in Slave Lake, Alberta requires heavy duty mechanic and industrial parts person. Experienced apprentices may apply. Call Herb 780-849-0416. Fax resume to 780-849-4453.

We accept Visa/Mastercard over the phone Do not send credit card information by email. Send your ad by email and call us at 668-0575 during regular business hours and we will process payment to your credit card.

CAREERS & EMPLOYMENT The Clark’s Crossing Gazette is now accepting resumes with samples for the position of

803

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

MONDAY 12 NOON

HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD

reporter photographer

Employment Opportunity

EQUIPMENT OPERATOR III

within our award-winning team

Applications for an Equipment Operator III position will be received by the Martensville Public Works Department. This will be a permanent full time inscope hourly wage position with the Roadways Branch of the Public Works Department. The position must be able to operate all City equipment and have considerable experience on a motor grader. Excellent benefits package. For more information please contact: Mike Grosh, Public Works at the City of Martensville (306) 381-8186, mail resumes to Box 970, Martensville SK SOK - 2TO or e mail to publicworks@martensville.ca

The position is part-time to start and will grow into full-time. Previous journalism and photography experience is an asset. The successful candidate will possess a reliable vehicle, a digital camera and have basic computer knowledge, proofreading skills, an eye for detail and be willing to work a flexible schedule that includes some weekend and evening assignments. Submit resume including cover letter, along with samples, in confidence to tjenson@ccgazette.ca No telephone calls please. Only those chosen for an interview will be contacted and we thank all applicants in advance for their interest.

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

805

CAREERS

NEED A HOME PHONE? Cable TV or High Speed Internet? We Can Help. Everyone Approved. Call Today. 1-877-8521122 Protel Reconnect. PROFESSIONAL SALES CONSULTANTS required. Be a part of Central Alberta’s largest volume Ford dealer. We offer a competitive pay plan with aggressive bonus structures, vehicle allowance and Central Alberta’s largest inventory of new and used vehicles. Relocation assistance and salary guarantee available to the right candidate. If you are looking to be part of our winning team: Please forward your resume: Attention: Dean Brackenbury, GSM. Email: d-brack8@dealeremail. com. Fax 780-352-0986. Toll free 1-800-232-7255. Seasonal full time truck driver and/or general labourer required for the 2012 season. Successful applicant must hold a valid 1A license. Competition closes June 8, 2012. Contact RM of Longlaketon No. 219 for complete details: 306- 939-2144 or email: rm219@sasktel.net TABER TIMES/Vauxhall Advance is seeking an editor to lead a three-person newsroom. Candidate must be able to multitask, produce a quality newspaper and maintain online presence. Send covering letter and resume to: Coleen Campbell, Publisher. Email: ccampbell@abnewsgroup.com. Deadline Thursday, May 31.

Auction Sales

MacGowan Antique & Collectables Closing Out Of Business Auction Sale - May 26,2012, @ 9:00 AM MacDowell Lion’s Hall, MacDowell, SK From Saskatoon 113 Kms North on Hwy 11 1-877494-2437, 1-306-227-9505 PL#318200 www.bodnarusauctoneering.com

We can help you with that.

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

A career ad in The Gazette reaches over 35,000 people each week. One of them could be your next employee.

(306) 668-0575 ads@ccgazette.ca


19

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

Physical assaults, drunk driving, break-and-enters all part of Mounties’ week Submitted by Sgt. Warren Gherasim Acting Commander Warman RCMP Detachment

RHEINLAND ASSAULT On May 12 at 3:40 p.m. the Warman RCMP received a complaint of assaults on two people by another man as a result of a property dispute. The complainants allege that they attended at a man’s property near Rheinland to retrieve a car when a confrontation resulted. The resident is alleged to have reached into the car and punched the driver in the head and then pushed another female. The matter is still under investigation. STREET FIGHT On May 13 at 7:45 p.m. Warman RCMP received a complaint of an assault on 6th Avenue South in Martensville. Police were advised that a vehicle approached two pedestrians who were walking on the street and two male occupants in the vehicle shouted obscenities towards the pedestrians. The two males then exited the vehicle and one of the men punched a male pedestrian, knocking him to the ground. Several more punches were thrown causing a bloody nose and some bruises. When the other pedestrian, a female, attempted to intervene, the man punched her in the head and then kicked her. The assailant was known to the victims and was later located and arrested by RCMP. A 17 year old Martensville man has been charged with two counts of assault and two counts of failing to comply with a youth court disposition. He was held in custody pending further appearances on these and other charges. Alcohol was a factor in this incident.

SUDDEN DEATH On May 17, shortly after 11 p.m., the Warman RCMP, along with MD Ambulance, were dispatched to a newly constructed residence on Jamieson Street in Warman . It was reported that a man who was working in the area had collapsed and was unconscious. The EMS personnel had attempted CPR but were unsuccessful. The worker had been found by his supervisor after his family had not heard from him for several hours. The coroner attended to the site and the cause of death is unknown but it is not believed to be suspicious in nature. A 48 year old man from BC is deceased, next of kin have been notified. No names are being released. PUBLIC INTOXICATION On May15th, shortly after midnight, RCMP were called to the vicinity of a residence in the 700 block of Main St., Martensville. Police were advised that an intoxicated male was approaching houses in the area. Police patrolled to the area and located an intoxicated man near the skating rink, attempting to hide from police. Police located the man, and after observing advanced signs of intoxication, placed the man under arrest for public intoxication. The man was lodged in police holding cells until sober and released. A 32 year old man from Grimshaw, Alberta has been charged for public intoxication. PAIR ARRESTED FOR B&E In the late night hours of May 13, two businesses in the industrial area north of Saskatoon, in the vicinity of highway 16 and 71st Street, were broken into, and vandalized. There were thousands of dollars of tools and construction equipment sto-

len from the two businesses. On May 14th the businesses notified the Warman RCMP detachment of these break and enters and two suspects were identified through the investigation. On May 15 Shayne Wright (39 year old male), and Ashley Dawydenko (22 year old female) were arrested and charged, and remanded into custody in relation to these occurrences. A search warrant was executed on a camper trailer located at a nearby RV park and most of the reported stolen property was located at the accused’s trailer. Shayne Wright and Ashley Dawydenko are both from Alberta, and were scheduled to make their first court appearance in Saskatoon Provincial Court on May 18 at 10:00 a.m. The Warman RCMP Detachment and the Saskatoon Forensic Identification team and other specialized units from Saskatoon were involved in this investigation which resulted in the quick identification of these suspects and the recovery of the valuable tools. The value of the items stolen and recovered is estimated near $10,000. Shayne Wright and Ashley Dawydenko are charged with the following offences: Break and Enter and commit theft (4 counts); Possession of break in tools; Mischief Under $5000 (2 counts); Possession of Property obtained by Crime.

MARTENSVILLE THEFT On May 12 the Warman RCMP responded to a break and enter at a garage in the 500 block of Klassen Street in Martensville.. The culprits had gained access and stole two Kawasaki dirt bikes, a wallet and some hockey equipment. One of the bikes was found dumped

Report from the

VANSCOY BREAK & ENTER On May 12 at 8:45 a.m. RCMP responded to a complaint of a break-in to the Vanscoy Curling Rink. Entry had been gained to the rink sometime overnight by forcing open one of the doors. It appears that nothing was taken. Police have no suspect information, but the investigation is continuing. STOLEN VEHICLE FOUND On May 15, at 9:00 a.m., an off-duty RCMP officer who was driving on Range Road 3073, near Langham, came across a black 2004 GMC pick-up which had sustained some front end damage. The officer called the suspicious vehicle in and learned that the vehicle had been reported stolen from North Battleford days earlier. Police seized the vehicle and investigation is continuing. HIT & RUN IN DELISLE On May 12, the owner of a property in the 500 block of Hillcourt St. in Delisle woke up to damages done to his residence. The driver of a vehicle had driven onto the property, chewed up the lawn and damaged the house and siding overnight while the owner slept A red or burgandy vehicle may be involved. The RCMP are still investigating. THEFT FROM VEHICLE Sometime during the night between May 11th and 12, a wallet with a large amount of currency was stolen from a truck parked in 63. “A Chorus Line” number 64. Contradict 65. Hex

Legislature

Nancy Heppner MLA MARTENSVILLE CONSTITUENCY

On Tuesday May 8, NDP Education Critic Trent Wotherspoon stood in the Legislative Assembly to criticize the Saskatchewan Party government for our recent decision to provide funds allowing for the expansion of the Martensville High School. The NDP wanted that money spent on renovations at Pleasant Hill School in Saskatoon instead, a school with a declining enrolment. Martensville, as one of the fastest growing cities in Canada, needs that school expansion as soon as possible and I am proud that our government is stepping up with a commitment to get it done. Our province is growing at a sustained rate not seen since the 1920s. We ought not to be caught offguard when this happens and continue plodding along the way things have been done for the last 60 years by ignoring the needs of our fastest growing communities. Instead, we need to re-examine the way priorities are set to ensure that we will indeed be “ready for growth”. The NDP Opposition is no doubt disappointed to see the astounding growth that has taken place in this province since voters ushered them out of office five years ago. Saskatchewan residents have moved on and have embraced a new mindset where optimism abounds and growth is welcomed and encouraged. Not growth for growth’s sake; but so that it allows us to provide a better quality of life for all of us. A former NDP economic development minister was quoted as saying around ten years ago that he was unconcerned about population loss because when that happens, “there is more left for the rest of us”. Happily, this is no longer the Saskatchewan way.

a couple of days later at a business in the 900 block. The Warman RCMP are still investigating. If anyone has information concerning the whereabouts of the second Kawasaki they are requested to contact the Warman RCMP at 975-1670 or Crime Stoppers.

Across 1. Small northern India hand drum 6. Bind 10. 100 lbs. 13. “Snowy” bird 14. Indicates 15. Police, with “the”

THIS WEEK’S ANSWERS

Down 1. P.I., e.g. 2. Eastern pooh-bah 3. Bikini parts 4. “___ go!” (contraction) 5. Adjust 6. Anyone (4 wds) 7. “Much ___ About Nothing” 8. The “p” in m.p.g. 9. “C’___ la vie!” 10. Actress Bloom 11. Richard ___, German composer 12. Some suits 14. Grace word 17. Arabic for “commander” 18. Hardly haute cuisine 22. “Buona ___” (Italian greeting) 23. Remaining after all deductions (variant spelling) 24. Bender 25. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir. 26. Long, long time 27. Congratulations, of a sort 28. Amscrayed 16. A loan for a personal item (2 wds) 32. Bound 19. Pretended 33. “... happily ___ after” 20. Ancestry 34. Checkers, e.g. 21. Not yet final, at law 35. “All the Things You ___” 22. Breathed noisily during sleep 36. Free from, with “of” 24. “Yikes!” (2 wds) 37. Bygone bird 29. Dwarf buffalo 38. Chester White’s home 30. Go-___ 41. Altogether (2 wds) 31. Bodyguard to British monarch 42. Brain cell (3 wds) 43. Formal argument 39. Beehive, e.g. 44. “Our Time in ___” (10,000 40. Brawl Maniacs album) 41. July 4 (2 wds) 45. Dog-___ 48. One who requires something 46. “Good going!” 49. “Aquarius” musical 47. Pastry shells 50. IV part 52. Above 51. Curved 53. “Soap” family name 55. South African province settled by 54. And others, for short Boers in 1836 (3 wds) 56. “Crikey!” 60. “Sesame Street” watcher 57. “Concentration” pronoun 61. Cy Young, e.g. 58. Buff 62. Add up 59. Add-on

the 300 block of Bendal Crescent in Martensville. The owner had locked the vehicle but had forgotten to secure the back window. The RCMP are still investigating but continue to impress on people to ensure that no valuables remain unattended in their vehicles, even at home.

DRUNKS ON HIGHWAY 16 On May 11, shortly after 9 p.m., the Radisson RCMP located a Blue Toyota Celica after receiving a report of a driver and passenger consuming alcohol while traveling along Highway #16. An 18 year old North Battleford probationary driver was charged under the Traffic Safety Act for failing to comply with a license endorsement and a 30 day suspension was issued. Her 17 year old female passenger and the driver were also charged under the Alcohol and Gaming Regulations Act for conveying open liquor in a vehicle. HIT AND RUN INCIDENT The Warman RCMP are seeking the assistance from

the public on a hit and run collision that occurred several weeks ago at the corner of !st Ave and Main Street in Martensville. The driver of a black Toyota Echo had completed a left turn onto Main Street from 1st Ave N when the driver of the white truck proceeded north from 1St Ave. South and hit the Echo and left the scene. The Toyota suffered damages to the rear passenger side. Anyone who has witnessed or knows any information about the collision are asked to contact the RCMP.

LICENCE SUSPENSIONS In three separate incidents, Warman RCMP encountered drivers who had been consuming alcohol and had been driving. Roadside breath tests were administered and the results of those tests warranted 24 hour driver’s licence suspensions for the operators. Police continue to place a high priority on alcohol related driving and the Checkstop program is Continued on Page 20 Please see “RCMP REPORT”

sudoku

Horoscopes

CAPRICORN You don’t like to pitch a fit, but if you want to be heard, that’s what you’re going to have to do. Make your stance known, Capricorn. Only then will you get the action you seek. AQUARIUS Attention, Aquarius. Someone close to you has something to say, and they need you to listen. A home improvement project turns out better than expected. PISCES It’s a tall order, Pisces, but it’s not impossible. Gather your supplies and the troops and get crackin’. A report receives glowing reviews just in time. ARIES Please, Aries. You are a go-getter, but sometimes you go too far. Keep that in mind this week as you work with others to get a project off the ground. TAURUS Stop dragging your feet, Taurus. You know what needs to be done, so do it. The sooner you finish, the sooner you can move on to something you really want to do. GEMINI Pragmatic Gemini. You’re always looking to get things done well in the shortest time possible, but sometimes just won’t work. Patience is key. CANCER Clarify, Cancer. Make certain you are understood on all accounts this week. Leave nothing to chance. A friend drops by with an unusual request. LEO Bickering rarely solves anything, so put a stop to the madness the first chance you get, Leo. You will get nothing done if you don’t. VIRGO A loved one has a meltdown, and you’re left to pick up the pieces. You can do it, Virgo, and you will do it well. A new do lifts spirits in more ways than one. LIBRA Clam up, Libra, and you will regret it. Prepare to present your idea and watch the sparks fly. The to-do list nears completion with an addition. SCORPIO A change in attitude picks up the pace, and the team finishes well ahead of schedule. Bravo, Scorpio. Your efforts won’t go unnoticed. SAGITTARIUS What’s that, Sagittarius? Your pleas are falling on deaf ears? Perhaps it’s your method of presentation. Be bold, and you’ll get what you seek.


20

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

EMS Week celebrates work of paramedics M.D. Ambulance, along with all other Emergency Medical Services across the Province is celebrating EMS Week this week. This is the one week that Paramedics are recognized for the work they do in their Community’s. The unsung heroes who respond to anyone in need 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. “We are extremely proud of the team we have here at M.D. Ambulance, we are a dynamic group, and run an extremely lean and diverse organization. My father Michael Dutchak started this service with a single contract with Marquis Downs and now to see where we are today is truly amazing. This is a testament to a great staff, that is truly dedicated to helping others, and takes pride in being the best at their profession” states Dave Dutchak, MD Ambulance President and CEO. EMS Week is also a time to celebrate the success of the profession itself;

many elders paved the way to help Paramedics gain the respect they have in the Medical Profession. M.D. Ambulance started in 1976

with 3 Employees and 1 Ambulance, which has now grown to 157 employees. Working as a Paramedic in an Ambulance (which is

RCMP REPORT Continued from Page 19 being operated year-round.

IMPAIRED DRIVING On May 12 at 10:45 p.m. RCMP observed a vehicle being operated on 3rd St. N. In Martensville at a high rate of speed. The vehicle was stopped and the driver displayed signs of impairment by alcohol. A roadside breath test was administered and the result was a fail. The driver, a 27 year old Saskatoon man, was returned to the police detachment where he provided breath samples that were in excess of the legal limit. The man was later released on charge of impaired driving and is scheduled to appear in Saskatoon Provincial Court next month. DRUNK DRIVING Shortly before midnight

on May 16, a Martensville RCMP officer was stopped in the southbound lane of the Martensville South Service Road. The driver of a van turning onto the service road proceeded in an erratic manner and was observed to continue past the police vehicle. The vehicle was stopped and the officer noticed the two occupants had attempted to switch positions before the officer could approach the car. Both subjects displayed signs of impairment and both were arrested, a 30 year old BC man was charged for impaired driving and the 43 year old male from BC was charged for having care and control of a vehicle while his ability was impaired under the Criminal Code.

CONSTRUCTION

In the fall of of 2012, 2011, Warman Warman Elementary Elementary School School will once again offer a Pre-Kindergarten children Pre-Kindergartenprogram program for for three three and four-year-old four-year-old children (borninin2007 2008-2009). (born or 2008).This Thisprogram programsupports supportschildren children who would benefit who benefit from fromlanguage language and and social social skills programming. Acceptance into the program is based assessment. Acceptance into the program is based on on aa needs assessment.

Parent Information Information meeting Parent meeting Warman Warman Elementary Elementary School School May 25th 30th Wednesday, May 6 - 7:30 7:30 p.m. p.m.

Pre-Kindergarten application forms are available at the Information Meeting and at the Warman Elementary School office. Call Warman Elementary School at 933-2066 for more information.

www.spiritsd.ca

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TRUCKS BOUGHT & SOLD

INSOLVENCY PRACTITIONERS

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• Snow Removal for prices call: • Gravel • Topsoil • Fill Dirt • Bedding Sand west out of Warman on 305 until you reach 3052, • Playsand then north 3.5 miles • Crushed Rock

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FUNERAL SERVICES

Norm Vankoughnett Kristopher Milne Abdullah Patel Christine Miller

Family Owned & Operated ~ Crematory On-Site Kevin Martens ~ Immediate Cremation Funeral Director & Owner ~ Memorial Services 591 Centennial Dr. N ~ Traditional Services Martensville ~ Memorial Tea (306) 242-7888 ~ Celebration of Life ~ Private Family Services www.cremationdirect.ca

DUCT CLEANING

HALL RENTALS

Furnace & Duct Cleaning Experts

Built to your specification * Free Estimates

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Karl Bueckert Jeff Pinder Joann Borkowski Crystal Seed

• Insolvency advice & counselling • Consumer & commercial proposal • Personal & business bankruptcy • Debt Settlements

1-800-667-3023

WEBSITE WWW.FUEL-BSI.CA EMAIL INFO@FUEL-BSI.CA

the Emergency Response Team and in Police Cells, Rapid Access Medics Bike Team, and at Industrial Mining Sites.

Pre-Kindergarten program in Warman

Business & Professional AUTOMOTIVE PARTS/REPAIR

ics working at Saskatchewan Air Ambulance, Royal University Hospital Emergency Room, in Partnership with Saskatoon Police with

also referred to as our Mobile Emergency Room) has been the focus when M.D. Ambulance started in 1976, now you will find Paramed-

Brian King Centre Town of Warman only 15 min. from Saskatoon

32 years experience Biggest equipment in the industry

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Main Hall seating 600 Banquets up to 400 Kitchen & all amenities Ice machine & walk-in cooler No catering or corkage fees

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ACHILLES FOOT CLINIC TEAM KEHLER INC. B R O K E R L I C E N C E # 31 5 7 7 0

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Comprehensive family footcare Custom Orthotics, Coolbreeze laser treatment Safe Ped foot spa

Dr. Simon Davies, Podiatrist, Foot Specialist 105 Klassen Street West, Warman Hours: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday: 12 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Friday: 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

21

Business & Professional

Directory

HEALTH & WELLNESS

REAL ESTATE

Bob Letkeman

www.bobletkeman.com

Independently Owned & Operated

(306) 221-2911 Preserving a family environment and quality of the home • Environmentally friendly cleaning products to promote health and wellness • Totally water based concept replaces outdated cleaning methods

Call Angela

www.healthyhomesplus.com

306.242.4751

MLA / MP

NANCY HEPPNER MLA - Martensville

CONSTITUENCY OFFICE

North Country

DELISLE GIRLS TAKE GOLD

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY MELANIE UNGER

Congratulations to Delisle Thunder Pee Wee Girls Team Div #1 on Winning Gold at Glenn Reeve Park on May 13th. Good Job girls you made us very proud.

TAXIDERMY

WILD BY NATURE TAXIDERMY Nathan Martin Box 432 Waldheim, SK, S0K 4R0 Cell: (306) 221-4482

TOWING

99 4th Street • Hague

Tel (306) 975-0284 or (306) 225-2280 Fax (306) 225-2149 Box 830, Hague S0K 1X0

Email: heppner.mla@sasktel.net

www.nancyheppner.com

GORDON WYANT MLA Saskatoon Northwest 75 B Lenore Drive Saskatoon, SK. S7K 7Y1 Ph: 934-2847 Fax: 934-2867

Email: g.wyant.mla@sasktel.net

www.gordonwyant.ca

RANDY WEEKES MLA - Biggar

106-3rd Ave. West, Box 1413 Biggar, SK S0K 0M0

Phone (306) 948-4880 Fax (306) 948-4882 Toll Free 1-877-948-4880 Office Hours: Monday-Friday 1pm-5pm Please call ahead to make an appointment

Email: randyweekes.mla@accesscomm.ca

www.randyweekes.ca

MOVING & STORAGE • Mobile Storage Containers (delivered to your doorstep) • Moving Boxes (reusable Providing all industrial grade totes) your moving & storage needs

24 Hour Emergency Road Service 1-800-CAA-HELP (222-4357) Towing - Fuel Delivery - Winching Tire Changes - Boom Service 12V Boosting - Key Retrieval - Air Delivery

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230-9983

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Ph: 493-3143

Fax: 493-3176 300 - 2nd St. East, Delisle

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Mon. 9:00 am - 6:00 pm Thurs. 9:00 am - 6:00 pm Tues. 8:00 am - 8:00 pm Fri. 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Wed. 8:00 am - 8:00 pm Sat. 9:00 am - 4:00 pm Grooming appointments Saturday Emergency Services - call for information

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LANDSCAPING & EXCAVATING

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Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. til 5:00 p.m.


22

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

BORDEN & DISTRICT News By LORRAINE OLINYK lolinyk@sasktel.net

CIBC Retirees Ambassador Program Eileen Fountain, CIBC Retiree of Radisson branch, presented a cheque for $300.00 to Don Harris, Chairman of the Radisson Communiplex Committee Inc, to be used towards the cost of the main floor resurfacing that was recently completed. (photo) Doreen Froom, Radisson CIBC Retiree presented a cheque for $250.00 to Doris Hamp, treasurer of Radisson Curling Club to be used toward curling rink costs. Doreen volunteers regularly all winter at the Radisson Curling Rink. Borden School News Borden School athletes did very well at the Prairie Spirit Conference 3,000m run at Martensville on May 16th and at track events at Griffith Stadium on May 17th, with 33 out of 39 students Grades 6 – 12 placing in top 8 to advance to Districts with 3,000m run on May 24th at Martensville and Track & Field at Griffiths on May 25th. From May 30th to June 1st the Borden Grade 11 & 12 Outdoor Ed students are travelling to Meadowlake to participate in canoeing, hiking, fishing and learning general survival skills. Volunteer honorued Ken Tanchak, who has been a volunteer on the Borden Housing Authority Board for over 25 years, was recognized at a special luncheon in Regina on May 14th, when Hon. June Draude, minister responsible for Sask Housing Corp, and Don Allen, President of Sask Housing Corp presented Ken with an engraved set of coasters.

Doreen Froom, CIBC Retiree presenting Doris Hamp of Radisson Curling Rink with a cheque for $250

4010 - Eileen Fountain, CIBC Retiree, presenting Don Harris with a cheque of $300 for the Radisson Communiplex.

Hon. June Draude, minister responsible for Sask Housing Corp and Don Allen, President of Sask Housing Corp presented Ken Tanchak with a 25 year award on May 14th in Regina

DALMENY

Family

DAYS

JUNE 1-3, 2012 *Events subject to change** ALL EVENTS AT CENTENNIAL PARK UNLESS OTHERWISE MENTIONED

FRIDAY - June 1

7 pm – Slow Pitch Tournament 6 pm - 1 am – Beer Gardens Open

(Note: Gardens will close at 8:30pm and re-open at 9 pm in the JJ Loewen for the Dance)

9 pm - 1 am – Adult Only Dance - JJ Loewen Centre

FEATURING: PARADISE ROAD • Doors open for admission from 8:30 pm to 10:30 pm. If it rains on Saturday, the children’s entertainment will be moved to the Dalmeny Rink

Cost $15/person or $10/person participating in Slow Pitch Tournament)

SATURDAY - June 2

9 am – Slow Pitch Tournament begins 7 am - 10 am – Pancake Breakfast at the JJ Loewen Centre 9:30 am – Elementary age students meet at the Community Church to decorate float and bikes. Contests and Prizes. 10 am – Parade line-up at Dalmeny Community Church 10 am - 11 am – Free face painting in front of Dalmeny Funeral Home 11 am - 7 pm – Concession & Beer Gardens @ Centennial Red Barn 11 am - 12 noon – Parade (2 laps starting from Dalmeny Community Church to 3rd St. to Ross Ave to 1st St. to Railway Ave.)

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1 pm - 4 pm – Children’s entertainment in the park

(Bounce houses, obstacle course. Cost $5/wristband. Children 5 & under FREE) 1 pm - 3 pm – Beeper the Clown, FREE face painting, arm tattoos, balloon animals and more

3 pm - 5 pm – Floor Hockey in the rink (Bring your sticks/helmets)

2 pm - 4 pm – Family Fun Bingo at JJ Loewen Centre (Cost $2 / person)

7:30 pm – Movie Night at Dalmeny High School Art Room (Grades 6 - 12. Cost $2.50 for popcorn and beverage)

7:30 pm - 9:30 pm – Family Scavenger Hunt (Bon Fire, Smores 25¢ each and hot chocolate $1 each • Prizes

Call us today for your free in-home consultation!

306.242.7513

10:30 pm – Fireworks in the Park

SUNDAY - June 3

12 noon – Slow Pitch Tournament 12 noon – Beer Gardens and Concession opens (TBA) 9 am - 11:40 am – Family Celebration in the Park (Bagel breakfast, children’s activities, live bands)

12 noon – Family Picnic (Cost $5.00) 1 pm - 5 pm – Mini Diversity Craft & Bake Sale @ JJ Loewen

We are still looking for parade entries and volunteers. CONTACT TOWN OF DALMENY 254-2133 - or CHRISTINE 229-4831

Turning houses into homes by bringing daylight & fresh air into people’s everyday lives CALGARY EDMONTON LETHBRIDGE VANCOUVER KELOWNA PRINCE GEORGE KAMLOOPS WINNIPEG


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

23

Sanctioned by Sanction

20th Annual

Warman 3 B i g D a ys! Diamond

RODEO & Family Days

Saturday Night Cabare t

FE ATURIN G

JORDAN DOEL L 9:00 pm

Warman Diamon d

Arena

No Minors, ID Re quired

Tickets $20

Free Admission for Current CCA Me mbers (must present valid card)

JUNE 8-10, 2012

PERFORMANCE TIMES Friday: 6:30 pm Saturday: 6:00 pm Sunday: 2:00 pm

RODEO ADMISSION

Adults & Students: $10 / performance Children 10 & Under: Free (must be accompanied by an adult) ADVANCE CABARET TICKETS available at Warman Hotel, Warman Corner Service, Warman Esso, Claypool’s Boot & Jean, Broncos Western Wear

FRIDAY, June 8th 5:00 pm 5:00 pm 6:00 pm 6:30 pm Dusk

RODEO CONTRACTOR Battle River Rodeo ANNOUNCER | Warren Allen CLOWN | Lee Bellows PRESIDENT | Don Dyck VICE-PRESIDENT | Grant Brunen

SATURDAY, June 9th

–– Beer Gardens Open (sponsored by Warman Hotel & Tosh’s Allsports) –– Concession Opens –– Slo-pitch Tournament (contact Raylene at 227-2235 for info.) RODEO PERFORMANCE (Warman Diamond Arena, 202 North Railway Street East) Intermission – Graham Sisters Trick Riding –– Big Screen Outdoor Family Movie (East side of Warman Diamond Arena, free admission)

FIREWORKS TO FOLLOW!

PARADE ENTRIES57 call Grant 222-88

8:00 am 8:00 am 9:00 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 - 4:00 11:00 am 2:30 pm 6:00 pm 9:00 pm

–– Pancake Breakfast - rodeo grounds (sponsored by Oxyblast - Grant Brunen) –– Slo-pitch Tournament (Prairie Oasis Park) –– Show & Shine (High School Parking Lot, 201 Central St. East) –– Community Parade (Sponsored by the Wagon Wheel Family Restaurant) –– Concession Opens –– Kidsville & Family Entertainment at Lions Park (9th Ave. North) WATCH FOR MORE DETAILS • $5/wristband Kidsville runs rain or shine! (inclement weather: inside Warman High School) –– Gymkhana (everyone invited to attend) –– Beer Gardens Open (sponsored by Warman Hotel & Tosh’s Allsports) RODEO PERFORMANCE (Warman Diamond Arena, 202 North Railway Street East) Intermission – Graham Sisters Trick Riding ––CJWW Cabaret featuring Jordan Doell (no minors, ID required)

SUNDAY, June 10th 9:00 am –– Slo-Pitch Tournament (Finals at 5 PM at Prairie Oasis Park) 10:00 am –– Cowboy Fellowship Service (at arena) 12:00 noon –– Beer Gardens Open (sponsored by Warman Hotel & Tosh’s Allsports) –– Concessions Open 2:00 pm RODEO PERFORMANCE (Warman Diamond Arena, 202 North Railway Street East) Intermission – Graham Sisters Trick Riding

For more information call

Grant (306) 222-8857 or Don (306) 221-1684


24

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE • THURSDAY, MAY 24, 2012

Warman Road off ramp to Circle Drive eastbound closed till June 10 Motorists encouraged to use Idylwyld Drive and Faithful Avenue to access Circle Drive

The off ramp from Warman Road to Circle Drive eastbound will be complete-

ly closed beginning Tuesday, May 22, at 7:00 a.m., as crews reconstruct the roadway. There will be no access to Circle Drive eastbound from Warman Road northbound or southbound during this closure. Motorists are encouraged

to use Idylwyld Drive and Faithful Avenue to access Circle Drive eastbound, as Millar Avenue will experience increased traffic volumes. Motorists are also encouraged to use alternate bridge crossings when heading eastbound where possible.

In order to minimize the disruption to traffic, crews will be working 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to reconstruct the failing roadway. The off ramp is expected to re-open to traffic by Sunday, June 10, weather permitting and barring any unforeseen

NOTE: Trucks with high/wide excess loads that are heading eastbound/southbound on Circle Drive or Idylwyld Drive may not be able to be accommodated. Please call 6578522 or 975-2640 in advance to ensure you can be routed through the city.

LOWER PRICES

The Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogans are trademarks owned by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. †Finance offers available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on a new Sonata GL 6-Speed Manual/Elantra Touring GL 5-Speed Manual/Santa Fe GL 2.4 6-Speed Manual/Veracruz GL FWD/ 2012 Elantra L 6-Speed Manual with an annual finance rate of 0%/0.96%/0%/0%/1.9% for 84/96/84/84/84 months. Bi-weekly payment is $134/$96/$142/$189/$102. No down payment is required. Cost of Borrowing is $0/$770/$0/$0/$1,185. Finance offers include Delivery and Destination of $1,565/$1,495/$1,760/$1,760/$1,495. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. Financing example: 2012 Elantra L 6-speed for $17,344 at 1.9% per annum equals $102 bi-weekly for 84 months for a total obligation of $18,529. Cash price is $17,344. Cost of Borrowing is $1,185. Example price includes Delivery and Destination of $1,495. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. †♦Prices for models shown: 2012 Sonata GL 6-Speed Manual/2012 Elantra Touring GLS 5-Speed Manual/2012 Santa Fe Limited/2012 Veracruz GLS AWD/2012 Elantra Limited $31,464/$22,144/$37,559/$40,759/$24,194. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. ▼Fuel consumption for 2012 Sonata GL 6-Speed (HWY 5.7L/100KM; City 8.7L)/2012 Elantra Touring GL 5spd (HWY 6.4L/100KM; City 8.9L/100KM)/2012 Santa Fe GL 2.4L 6-Speed Manual FWD (HWY 7.7L/100KM, TM The Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogans trademarks owned by GL Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. †Finance offers available Financial Services based on aon new 2012 Tucson L 5-Speed FeonGL 2.4 6-Speed FWDvehicle Auto accessories. with an annual of 0% for 24/36/24 months. Bi-weekly payment or is $365/$256/$577. No down payment lease a new 2012 Elantra Touring L, GL, or Cityare 11.0L/100KM)/2012 Veracruz FWD (HWY 8.5L/100KM; City 12.7L/100KM)/2012 Elantra O.A.C. L 6 MT from (HWYHyundai 4.9L/100KM; City 6.8L/100KM) are based Energuide. Actual fuel efficiencyManual/Santa may vary based driving conditionsManual/ and the Veracruz addition ofGL certain Fuel finance economyrate figures are used for comparison purposes only. ‡Purchase is required. Cost of Borrowing is $0/$0/$0. Finance offers include Delivery and GLS Destination of $1,760/$1,760/$1,760. Registration, insurance, fees, levies, charges, license◊Purchase fees andorall applicable taxes are excluded. chargetoincludes freight, dealer and a fullcredit tankapplies of gas. Financing example:or2012 GL FWD Auto for GL/Santa $29,995 Fe/Veracruz/Elantra at 0% per annumduring equals bi-weekly for and you will be entitled to a $500 factory to Dealer credit. FactoryPPSA, to Dealer credit applies before taxes. lease a new 2012 Veracruz GL, GLS, Delivery or Limitedand and destination you will be entitled $1,000 factory to P.D.E., customer credit.admin Factoryfees to customer after taxes. ΩPurchase leaseVeracruz a 2012 Sonata/Elantra Touring the$577 Double Savings Event 24 months for a total obligation of $29,995. Cash price is $29,995. Cost of Borrowing is will $0. receive Example price includes Delivery and Destination $1,760. insurance, levies, charges, fees and all applicable taxeson are excluded. Delivery and destinationrating charge includes freight,Manual P.D.E.,(5.9L/100km) dealer admin fees Touring and a full tank of gas. †♦PricesAuto for models shown: 2012 Tucson AWD/2012 Santa Fe Limited and you a Preferred Price Petro-Canada Gas Card worthof $160 (2012 Registration, Elantra)/$250 (2012 ElantraPPSA, Touring fees, and Sonata)/$375 (2012 license Santa Fe)/$540 (2012 Veracruz). Based Energuide combined fuel consumption for the 2012 Elantra / Elantra Auto (7.7L/100km)/Sonata (7.3L/100km)/Santa Fe 2.4L Auto Limited (9.0L/100km)/Veracruz Auto (10.8L/100km) 3.5 AWD/2012 Veracruz GLS AWD is $34,109/$37,559/$43,759. Delivery and Destination charges of $1,760/$1,760/$1,760 are included. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. ▼Fuel consumption for 2012 Tucson L 5-speed (HWY 7.4L/100KM; City 10.1L/100KM)/2012 at 15,400km/year [yearly average driving distance (Transport Canada’s Provincial Light Vehicle Fleet Statistics, 2012)], this is equivalent to $0.20 (2012 Elantra)/$0.25 (2012 Elantra Touring and Sonata) / $0.30 (2012 Santa Fe)/$0.40 (2012 Veracruz) per litre savings on each litre of gas up to a total of 800 Litres (2012 Elantra)/1,000 Litres (2012 Elantra Touring and Sonata)/1,250 Litres (2012 Santa Fe GL 2.4L 6-Speed Manual FWD (HWY 7.7L/100KM, City 11.0L/100KM)/ 2012 Veracruz GL FWD (HWY 8.5L/100KM; City 12.7L/100KM) are based on Energuide. Actual fuel efficiency may vary based on driving conditions and the addition of certain vehicle accessories. Fuel economy figures are used for comparison purposes only. ‡Purchase or lease a new 2012 Tucson L 5-Speed Manual/Santa Fe GL 2.4 6-Speed Manual/ Santa Fe)/1,350 Litres (2012 Veracruz).‡ΩOffers available for a limited time, and subject to change or cancellation without notice. See dealer for complete details. Dealer may sell for less. Inventory is limited, dealer order may be required. ††2012 Elantra Touring and 2012 Veracruz 7 year/120,000 km warranty consists of 5 year/100,000km Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage and Veracruz GL FWD Auto and you will be entitled to a $2,764/$5,764/$5,264 factory to dealer credit. Factory to dealer credit applies before taxes. Offer cannot be combined or used in conjunction with any other available credits. Offer is non-transferable and cannot be assigned. No vehicle trade-in required. ΩPurchase or lease a 2012 Tucson/Santa Fe/ Veracruz during the Double Savings Event and you will receive a Preferred Price an additional 2 year/20,000km coverage under the Hyundai Protection Plan. Hyundai’s Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage covers most vehicle components against defects in workmanship under normal use and maintenance conditions. Additional coverage is in accordance to the terms and conditions of the Hyundai Protection Plan. Please contact your local dealer for all details. Petro-Canada Gas Card worth $250 (2012 Tucson)/$400 (2012 Santa Fe)/$540 (2012 Veracruz). Based on Energuide combined fuel consumption rating for the 2012 Tucson 2.0L Auto (7.9L/100km)/ Santa Fe 2.4L Auto (9.0L/100km)/ Veracruz Auto (10.8L/100km) at 15,400km/year [yearly average driving distance (Transport Canada’s Provincial Light Vehicle Fleet Statistics, 2012)], this is equivalent to $0.25 (2012 Tucson)/$0.40 (2012 Veracruz and Santa Fe) per litre savings on each litre of gas up to a total of 1,000 Litres (2012 Tucson and Santa Fe)/1,350 Litres (2012 Veracruz). †♦‡ΩOffers available for a limited time, and subject to change or cancellation without notice. See dealer for complete details. Dealer may sell for less. Inventory is limited, dealer order may be required. ††2012 Veracruz 7 year/120,000 km warranty consists of 5 year/100,000km Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage and an additional 2 year/20,000km coverage under the Hyundai Protection Plan. Hyundai’s Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage covers most vehicle components against defects in workmanship under normal use and maintenance conditions. Additional coverage is in accordance to the terms and conditions of the Hyundai Protection Plan. Please contact your local dealer for all details.

Surgical initiative continues to tackle wait times

delays. Motorists are reminded to allow extra time when travelling through the orange zone, watch for pedestrians and work crews, and for everyone’s safety, please obey all detours, signs and barriers.

Saskatchewan patients are benefiting from improved access to surgery and new processes and safety practices, according to a new report released recently. The Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative (SkSI) Year Two Progress report shows steady progress in ON SELECTED MODELSΩ improving patient experiences and reducing surgical wait times. Provincially, 97 per cent of surgeries in Saskatchewan were completed within the SkSI’s Year Two target of 12 months. Seven of the ten health regions that provide surgeries succeeded in reaching the target for 100 per cent of surgeries they provide. The two tertiary health reRIGHT NOW FINANCING MONTHS gions, Saskatoon and Regina GET FOR UP TO Qu’Appelle, provided 95 per RIGHT NOW FINANCING MONTHS GET FOR UP TO vehicle A stylish cross-over utility cent of surgeries within one year. Limited model shown Surgical data updated to March 31, 2012 shows that since 2007, there has been a 91 WITH per cent drop in the number ♦ † of patients waiting more than HIGHWAY 18 months for surgery, and a 7.4L/100 KM 82 per cent decrease in the 38 MPG▼ number waiting longer than FINANCING Limited model shown UNTIL 2013 Ω INCLUDES $2,764 FACTORY TO DEALER CREDIT‡ FOR 24 MONTHS 12 months. The number waitLimited model shown OWN IT WITH AND TUCSON L 5-SPEED. DELIVERY & DESTINATION INCLUDED. ing over six months and over SELLING PRICE: $24,264♦ † OWN WITH SONATAAND GL 6-SPEED. SELLING PRICE: $24,264♦ $ %IT $ three months have dropped † DELIVERY$& DESTINATION SONATA HIGHWAY 58 per cent and 41 per cent reGL 6-SPEED. $ % INCLUDED 5.7L/100 KM DELIVERY & DESTINATION spectively. HIGHWAY BI-WEEKLY FINANCING FOR DOWN 50 MPG ▲ INCLUDED 5.7L/100 KM PAYMENT 84 MONTHS PAYMENT “We’re proud of the progBI-WEEKLY FINANCING FOR DOWN 50 MPG ▲ PAYMENT 84 MONTHS PAYMENT ress made so far on our ambitious but attainable goal of providing sooner, safer, smarter care for patients,” Health OWN IT WITH AND SELLING PRICE: $19,194 Minister Don McMorris said. † 2012 OWN IT WITH INCLUDES $500AND FACTORY $ % $ SELLING PRICE: $19,194 “I thank all of our health sysTO DEALER CREDIT † 2012 HIGHWAY INCLUDES $500 FACTORY $ % ELANTRA $ tem partners for their support TOURING GL 5-SPEED. 6.4L/100 KM CREDIT TO DEALER HIGHWAY BI-WEEKLY FINANCING FOR DOWN 44 MPG DELIVERY & DESTINATION ELANTRA TOURING GL 5-SPEED. and encourage them to main6.4L/100 KM PAYMENT INCLUDES 96 MONTHS PAYMENT BI-WEEKLY FINANCING FOR DOWN INCLUDED 44 MPG DELIVERY & DESTINATION $500 FACTORY TO tain the momentum that’s PAYMENT INCLUDES 96 MONTHS PAYMENT INCLUDED DEALER CREDIT $500 FACTORY TO building. Their efforts are reSpirit & practicality in Powerful & effi cient – DEALER CREDIT sulting in better care for paperfect balance Spirit & practicality in the true definition of a cross-over tients and a more sustainable, perfect balance Limited model shown GLS model shown efficient and patient-centred GLS model shown surgical system.” WITH Among the projects and ♦ † improvements championed by HIGHWAY the Surgical Initiative are: 7.7L/100 KM OWN IT WITH AND * an online specialist directo2012 37 MPG▼ WITH SELLING PRICE:AND $25,759♦ † 2012 ry to help family physicians $ %OWN IT † FINANCING $ PRICE: $25,759♦ SANTA FE UNTIL GL 2.4 6-SPEED. 2013 ΩSELLING ‡ $ % $ HIGHWAY and patients choose a surgeon; SANTA FE GL 2.4 6-SPEED. DELIVERY & DESTINATION FOR 36 MONTHS INCLUDES $5,764 FACTORY TO DEALER CREDIT HIGHWAY 7.7L/100&KM Powerful & efficient& DESTINATION INCLUDED. DELIVERY DESTINATION BI-WEEKLY FINANCING FOR DOWN INCLUDED. * patient “pathways” that ▼ SANTA FE GL 2.4 6-SPEED. DELIVERY 7.7L/100 KM 37 MPG BI-WEEKLY FINANCING FOR DOWN INCLUDED. PAYMENT 84 MONTHS PAYMENT the true definition of Powerful a cross-over& efficient 37 MPG▼ streamline care for patients PAYMENT 84 MONTHS PAYMENT the true definition of a cross-over with hip, knee or spine problems and those who have prosLimited model shown tate cancer or uro-gynecologiLimited model shown cal problems; * use of a surgical safety OWN IT WITH AND SELLING PRICE: $34,259 checklist in all Saskatchewan OWN IT WITH AND † SELLING PRICE: $34,259 INCLUDES $1,000 $ % $ † hospital operating rooms; INCLUDES $1,000 $ % $ FACTORY TO HIGHWAY 2012 FACTORY HIGHWAY CUSTOMER CREDIT 8.5L/100 KM TO * faster access to selected day 2012 BI-WEEKLY PAYMENT FINANCING FOR DOWN CUSTOMER CREDIT 8.5L/100 KM VERACRUZ GL FWD. BI-WEEKLY PAYMENT FINANCING FOR DOWN 33 MPG INCLUDES $1,000 84 MONTHS PAYMENT VERACRUZ GL FWD. surgeries and CT services 33 MPG INCLUDES $1,000 84 MONTHS DELIVERY & DESTINATION PAYMENT FACTORY TO “It’s a seven-seater, mid-size SUV with DELIVERY & DESTINATION INCLUDED. FACTORY TO through third party provid“It’s a seven-seater, mid-size SUVCREDIT with CUSTOMER INCLUDED. CUSTOMER CREDIT serious cargo and people-carrying serious cargo and people-carrying ers; capacity.” – the Globecapacity.” and Mail – the Globe and Mail * quality improvement and “It’s a seven-seater, mid-size SUV with serious cargo safety initiatives; GLS model shown and people-carrying capacity.” – the Globe and Mail GLS model shown * training of additional operatGLS model shown ing room nurses; * pooling of specialist referrals WITH so new patients can choose the ♦ next available specialist; † 2012 CANADIAN AND 2012NORTH AMERICAN IT WITH OWN IT AND CANADIAN AND NORTHOWN AMERICAN * a surgical information sysWITH AND HIGHWAY † PRICE: $17,344 † SELLING PRICE: $17,344 $ $ % SELLING tem in hospitals that co-ordi8.5L/100 KM $% $ ELANTRA L 6-SPEED. ELANTRA L 6-SPEED. ▼ HIGHWAY 33 MPG HIGHWAY nates and automates supply DELIVERY & DESTINATION DELIVERY & DESTINATION 4.9L/100 KM BI-WEEKLY FINANCING FOR DOWNFOR 4.9L/100 KM Ω FINANCING INCLUDED. BI-WEEKLY FINANCING DOWN INCLUDED. UNTIL 2013 58 MPG management and scheduling ‡ 58 MPG PAYMENT 84 MONTHS PAYMENT INCLUDES $5,264 FACTORY TO DEALER CREDIT PAYMENT 84 MONTHS PAYMENT FOR 24 MONTHS of staff and operating rooms; VERACRUZ GL FWD. DELIVERY & DESTINATION INCLUDED. and Limited model shown Limited model shown * improved home care and post-operative rehabilitation services. 5-year/100,000 km Comprehensive Limited Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Comprehensive Limited Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Comprehensive Limited Warranty By 2014, the Surgical Ini- 5-year/100,000 km Powertrain5-year/100,000 5-year/100,000 Powertrain Warranty Warranty km Powertrainkm Warranty HyundaiCanada.com tiative’s goal is to provide all 5-year/100,000 km Emission Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Emission Warranty HyundaiCanada.com HyundaiCanada.com 5-year/100,000 km Emission Warranty patients with the opportunity to have surgery within three months, while improving the experience of surgical patients. By the end of 2012-13, saskatoonhyundai.com l toll free 888.815.0349 saskatoonhyundai.com l toll free 888.815.0349 the target is to reduce all surgical wait times to less than Drive North 2035 Idylwyld Drive 2035 North Idylwyld Find us on Facebook!Find us on Facebook! six months.

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Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

To t a l m a r ke t c o v e r a g e w e e k l y t o t h e c i t i e s o f M A R T E N S V I L L E & WA R M A N , S A S K ATC H E WA N

CITIES EDITION

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Seniors housing project progressing By TERRY PUGH tpugh@ccgazette.ca

A

BIG CUT

GAZETTE PHOTO BY TERRY PUGH

Slo-pitch teams have dusted off their gloves, bats and bases and taken to the diamonds for another season. Pictured is Doom Crew’s Danny Weninger launching a hit to deep centre field during a game at Prairie Oasis Park on Wednesday, May 9.

High school expansion moves into design stage By BRENDA ERICKSON Prairie Spirit School Division

expansion and renovation of Martensville The High School has been given the green light to move into the detailed design stage. This Ministry of Education approval was crucial to move the project forward from concept to design and construction. Prairie Spirit School Division received official confirmation about the project from the Ministry on May 11. The conceptual design phase will involve school and community consultation sessions which will lead to the detailed architectural design. The project is scheduled to be completed by 2016. The expansion to the high school is expected to more than double the size of the current high

school facility, adding approximately 50,000 square feet to the building. The Ministry has projected a cost of $26.3 million for the construction and renovation project. Because the expansion of the high school will provide more classroom spaces, students from the two elementary schools in Martensville will move to the high school facility. This reconfiguration of grades will benefit the elementary schools in Martensville that are experiencing tremendous enrolment growth and overcrowding. The details of this grade reconfiguration have not yet been finalized but could include moving Grade 7 and 8 students from the elementary schools to the expanded high school. The elementary schools in Martensville have had numerous

T h u r s d a y | M a y 24, 2012

relocatables added to accommodate growing enrolments. Both elementary schools had relocatables added during the 2011-12 school year. “The expanded high school will provide a much needed long-term solution to ensure the necessary learning spaces for our students and we are excited about it,” said Larry Pavloff, Board Chair. “We just wish the project could be completed much sooner for the sake of students and staff.” The growth in the elementary schools in Martensville reflects the growth in the city itself. According to the recent federal census, Martensville is the second fastest growing city in the country, with a population of over 7,700. Continued on Page 2 Please see HIGH SCHOOL

seniors’ housing project in Martensville is on the fasttrack to becoming a reality. The Martensville Housing Development Committee is working with a Manitoba-based developer to design and build a 24-unit independent-living complex for seniors in the community, according to Terri Hetterly, a member of the committee and a Martensville City Councilor. In an interview on Thursday, May 17, Hetterly said preliminary discussions with Bridge Road Developments of Winnipeg were very positive. She said the developer, which specializes in community-based seniors’ housing, is currently building or has completed roughly 20 projects in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. A public meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, June 20 at Valley Manor School gymnasium, beginning at 7:00 p.m., to explain the progress made on the project so far, and to gather additional feedback from the community. Hetterly noted details of the project, including the location and the final design, are still in the preliminary stages. The Martensville Housing Development Committee was formed following a public meeting in Martensville last February. The meeting was organized because of concerns raised by many residents about the need for more affordable housing for seniors in the community. A consensus emerged from that meeting to pursue possible options, and volunteers put their names forward to serve on the committee. Over the past several weeks, members of the committee conducted a survey to determine the type of project that would best meet the needs of the community. The results of that survey indicated that most people want to see some type of “independent living” complex for seniors, said Hetterly. “The consensus among the committee was that we should start with a development that is tailored for people who can still live independently,” she said. “Over time, the project could be expanded to include some sort of assisted living units, if that is what people decide is needed down the road. It would have to be

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phased in.” She also noted the project is aimed at meeting the needs of residents of Martensville. “For now, we’re going to meet the needs of this community first,” she said. Hetterly said the committee felt it was important to ensure local decision-making was kept in the hands of the people for whom the project is intended. She said the committee was impressed with the developer’s community-based approach to seniors’ housing, and noted there are successful projects in a number of Saskatchewan communities including Wynyard, Shaunavon, and Moosomin. “The slogan they have is ‘turning vision into community’, which is very much along the lines of what we’re trying to do,” she said. “One of the things that impressed us is that they source the materials as much as possible from local suppliers and use local contractors. It’s set up in such a way that they will need investors as well as people who are looking to purchase a unit. So it’s an investment opportunity as well as providing affordable housing to seniors. The people that invest become shareholders and participate in the decision-making, so it’s not just the developer making all the decisions, it’s the people in the community as well.” She said one of the challenges the developer faced in those communities, where population was stable or declining, was keeping the living units filled with tenants or buyers. “That obviously won’t be a problem in Martensville,” she said, noting the city was the second-fastest growing municipality in Canada, according to the most recent national census. “People want to move into places like this,” she explained. “The waiting list in Saskatoon for independentliving suites for seniors is astounding, and if we can keep people here in their home community, then that’s what we’d like to do.” Hetterly said there has been amazing progress done to date on the project, especially considering it was just coffee-shop chatter a few months ago. “I can’t believe how fast this is happening,” she said. “It’s very encouraging, especially now that we have found a developer with the kind of specialized knowledge and experience for making this sort of project happen.”


2

CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE - CITIES EDITION

City

THURSDAY | MAY 24, 2012

Guide

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City Guide is a community events calendar intended for non-profit groups only. $40 plus GST will get your group or club’s events in the City Guide for up to 6 weeks (max. 40 words). Bridal shower, anniversary, birthday and anniversary notices are exempt from the City Guide.

Call (306) 668-0575 for details 1-3 2 7 8-10

JUNE Martensville Buster Days, June 1-3. Ball tournament, parade, family and adult dances, laser tag, petting zoo, talent show, fireworks, face painting, beach volleyball tournament, pony rides and much more! Complete schedule at www.martensville.ca The Warman Mennonite Special Care Home is hosting a 10k Walk-a-thon beginning at 8:30 a.m. Pledge forms can be picked up at the Care Home. Valley-West Community Justice Committee is holding its annual general meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Martensville Civic Centre (corner of Main and Centennial). The public is welcome to attend! 20th Annual Warman Diamond Rodeo & Family Days. CCA Rodeo Friday 7 p.m., Saturday 6 p.m. and Sunday 2 p.m. Parade Saturday 10 a.m. Slo-pitch tournament, Kidsville, show & shine and more! Saturday night cabaret featuring Jordan Doell.

17

JULY All Events Entertainment, along with Magic 98.3FM and the Clark’s Crossing Gazette, proudly presents Nazareth with special guests Riff Raff at TCU Place. No minors permitted, ID required. Tickets at tcutickets.ca.

REGULAR MEETINGS & COMMUNITY SERVICES New to Warman or a new parent? Welcome Wagon would like to extend their welcome. Call Monique Bueckert at (306) 384-3103. Welcome Wagon is Canada’s Neighbourhood Tradition since 1930 and is a free service provided by the civic-minded businesses in Warman.

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HIGH SCHOOL: Project given

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Prairie Spirit anticipates an increase of five per cent in student enrolment in Martensville each year. The expanded school will be designed to accommodate between 750 - 800 students. The two elementary schools currently have a total of over 1100 students from PreKindergarten through Grade 8. The high school’s current enrolment is over 340. “As a Board, we are thrilled to receive Ministry approval to proceed with this project,” said Bonnie Hope, Trustee for Martensville. “This expanded high school facility will be an exciting addition to the City of Martensville.” The high school project was

Looking for help? Place your recruitment ad in the Cities Edition! Ryan Killoh 321-2686 ryank@ccgazette.ca Susan Szydlowski 361-6585 susanm@ccgazette.ca

Larry Pavloff

given the highest priority in the Ministry of Education’s Critical Space Shortage category in July, 2011. An application has also formally been made to the Ministry for another elementary school in Martensville.

Gazette CLARK S CROSSING

CITIES EDITION


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Clark’s Crossing Gazette - Cities Edition Thursday, MAY 24, 2012

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Growing pains Residents concerned for pedestrians, school children trying to cross Centennial Boulevard in Warman

Jai Roberts took his concerns about the intersection and the crosswalk to the Warman Town Council meeting on Monday, May 14. During discussions with the Mayor and councilors, Roberts said he has seen speeds of up to 85 kilometers per hour recorded on the portable radar sign in the 30 kilometer per hour school zone. He added that the amount of truck traffic using Centennial in the past two years has increased considerably because of all the residential and industrial construction in Warman’s north end. Warman Mayor Sheryl Spence said the town will be repainting all the crosswalks throughout the municipality this spring, adding that speeding is an issue in many other areas as well. She also said the town will undertake discussions with the RCMP detachment and the school division to determine what other measures are needed with regard to that crosswalk. During the morning of Wednesday, May 17, the Warman RCMP detachment set up a radar gun at the intersection for about an hour. During that time, they issued 8 tickets to drivers for exceeding the posted speed limit.

By TERRY PUGH tpugh@ccgazette.ca

A

busy crosswalk at the intersection of Centennial Blvd. and 2nd Street in Warman is “an accident waiting to happen,” according to a couple whose children use the crosswalk regularly. And with new residential neighbourhoods, a new school, an expanded recreation facility and new businesses planned for Warman’s north end, they say the situation is likely to get worse unless immediate steps are taken to improve pedestrian safety. Jai and Amanda Roberts moved to Warman three years ago. Their home is located right at the intersection, and their two school-age sons are among the dozens of neighbourhood children who use the marked crosswalk to access the elementary school playground a short distance away on the west side of Centennial Blvd.. But too many drivers are ignoring both the marked crosswalk and the posted 30 kilometer-per-hour school zone speed limit, said Jai Roberts. “We’ve seen some very close calls at the crosswalk because there is a lot of speeding up and down this street,” he said in an interview on Wednesday, May 17. “We’ve spoken about this issue to the Warman RCMP a number of times in the past, and they have stepped up enforcement at times. The police have put up a temporary radar sign here in the past, and some of the speeds we’ve seen have been quite high over the posted limit.” He said because Centennial Blvd. is a major north-south traffic artery, with virtually all the traffic going into the newly-developing north end of the municipality using the road, pedestrian safety is a real concern. “What we’d like to see is a threeway stop at this corner,” he said. “I think that’s the most appropriate solution. It’s a long stretch from 4th Street to Central Street, and this is the mid-way point. A three-way stop would certainly slow the traffic and make it safer for kids crossing the street.” There is already a marked cross-

Jai and Amanda Roberts and their five-year old son Jacob Roberts say it is sometimes very dangerous to cross Centennial Blvd., one of the major north-south arterial roads in Warman. (Right) A member of the Warman RCMP detachment uses a radar gun to clock the speed of the traffic passing through the school zone. During a one-hour check-stop the morning of Thursday, May 17 a total of eight drivers were ticketed.

walk, but the paint has faded and the signage for the crosswalk and the school zone could be improved, said Amanda Roberts. “Putting up two stop signs on Centennial would be a very effective deterrent to speeding,”

she added. “In the future, when the new middle school is opened, then we’re going to have more kids walking and riding their bikes in this area of town, so it’s a logical way to ensure the kids are safe.”

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Martensville Block Parent coordinator receives Queen Elizabeth II medal By TERRY PUGH

tpugh@ccgazette.ca

F

or more than a dozen years, Nicole Moyer has been a tireless volunteer with the Martensville Block Parent program. Last week, she became the first Block Parent volunteer in Saskatchewan to be awarded the prestigious Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. At a short ceremony during the Martensville City Council meeting on Tuesday, May 15, the medal was presented to Moyer by Martensville Mayor Gordon Rutten on behalf of the Governor-General of Canada, David Johnson. Moyer took on the role of coordinator for the community-based program 9 years ago. In accepting the award, Moyer

said she was “honoured” to be singled out, but said programs like this require “many volunteers that spend countless hours” doing community work. “Programs and activities like this simply wouldn’t exist without volunteers,” she said. An official citation from the Governor General was read by Rutten during the presentation ceremony. The Governor-General stated: “On behalf of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, I am pleased to award you the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, which was created to mark the 60th anniversary of her ascension to the throne. In granting you this honour I thank you for your dedicated service to your peers, to your community and to Canada. The contributions

Nicole Moyer, Coordinator of the Block Parent program in Martensville, is presented with the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal by Martensville Mayor Gordon Rutten. Moyer received the medal in recognition of her many years of volunteer work with the Block Parent program in the community.

you have made to our nation are most commendable and deserve our praise and admiration. I wish to convey to you the heartfelt congratulations of your fellow Canadians, to which I add my own.” The Block Parent program was created over 30 years ago to make communities safer. The red and white Block Parent sign is a symbol of a safe place where assistance is available. Police, government departments, educators, sponsors and volunteers suport the Block Parent goal of providing safer communites for chidlren and other citizens. Block Parents are responsible adults who care about the well being of children and others and volunteer to help in an emergency. All Block Parents pass a criminal record

check and are given instructions on the program by local volunteers. The Block Parent window sign is displayed only when someone over the age of 18 is available to answer the door. If the sign is not displayed, this does not mean that no one is home, only that the Block Parent is not available to offer immediate assistance. In addition to the goal of making communities safer for children and others, the Block Parent Program deters criminals and troublemakers. The network of Block Parent homes and businesses is a visible reminder that citizens are watchful in their neighborhood. Anyone wishing to become a Block Parent may contact Martensville City Hall, where they can be put in touch with Nicole Moyer.


CLARK’S CROSSING GAZETTE - CITIES EDITION

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THURSDAY | MAY 24, 2012

TOWN OF WARMAN Notice to consumers of drinking water quality and compliance has been prepared. The substance of this notice is as follows: a) the quality of water supplied by the water works in comparison with the levels set out in the regulations; and b) compliance with sample submission requirements described in the permit to operate waterworks. Copies of the notice are available at the Warman Municipal Office during regular business hours. May 15, 2012 Ivan M. Gabrysh Chief Administrative Officer

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TEDDY BEAR STORY TIME Preschool-age children listen with rapt attention to Marla Skomar, Librarian for the Martensville branch of the Wheatland Regional Library. The library held its final ‘Story Time’ session of the season on Thursday, May 17. The youngsters enjoyed a story with their favourite teddy bear before making crafts and participating in other activities. While the library’s regular programs are winding down, the library remains open throughout the summer months, and is gearing up for its annual summer reading program. GAZETTE PHOTO BY TERRY PUGH


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THURSDAY | MAY 24, 2012

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Taxes held in check, budget targets infrastructure By TERRY PUGH tpugh@ccgazette.ca

R

esidential property taxes in Warman won’t be going up this year. Warman town council adopted the 2012 budget at its regular meeting on Monday, May 14. The budget earmarks a total of $15,191,000 for an ambitious program of capital expenditures, but still comes out in the black, with a projected surplus of $30,735. “I believe it’s a very good budget,” said Warman Mayor Sheryl Spence in an interview last week. “There’s a lot of work that has to be done, given the pace of growth in the community and the demands on our infrastructure. But we also recognize that we need to live within our means and plan things out as best we can.” Ivan Gabrysh, Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) for Warman, said the big expenses this year include road construction and maintenance, recreation facilities, and water and sewer infrastructure expansion. “There are a lot of expenditures, but these are all things that definitely need to be done,” said Gabrysh in an interview May 15. “A lot of these projects are ongoing becase of the growth of the town, and they’re aimed at making sure we have the capacity we need to sustain that growth into the future.” The residential mill rate for 2012 was set at 7.6 mills, which is the same rate as last year, said Gabrysh. “So for residential properties, the municipal portion of the tax will be the same,” he said. “The average homeowner will see no difference in his or her taxes.”

INCREASED REVENUES Gabrysh said the town was able to absorb many of the increasing capital costs in this year’s budget because of a corresponding increase in the municipal operating grant from the province. “There was a bit of an increase in our municipal operating grant this year, which was reflected in some increased revenues,” said Gabrysh. “The grant went from $944,106 last year, to $1,418,770 this year.”

Gabrysh said the municipality is also expecting increased revenues from the sale of residential and commercial lots. He said the town had a two-phase program for land sales. Lots purchased in 2011 needed only 10 per cent of the purchase price as a down payment, with the balance due in 2012. “So with those funds coming due this year, that will bring in about $3.6 million in revenue for the town,” he said.

BIGGER TAX BASE While rapid growth is putting increased demands on infrastructure, the additional houses and businesses being constructed are also contributing to the overall tax base, and that’s helping offset the additional costs, noted Gabrysh. “We did have a substantial increase in assessment this year, just because of the amount of construction that is going on in town,” he said. The overall assessment is done by the Saskatchewan Assessment Management Agency (SAMA), which also factors in other variables to come up with a “Market Adjustment Factor” (MAF) for various municipalities. Gabrysh said the MAF for residential property in Warman has stayed the same as last year, but the MAF for commercial property in Warman has come down slightly. “That means the average business will likely see some reduction if their assessment hasn’t changed,” he said. WATER, SEWER CAPACITY The budget earmarks $1.5 million for a new lift station in Warman’s north end. Lift station 3A will be located beside the existing Number 3 lift station, but will have a much higher capacity and will eventually replace the older facility. Gabrysh said the money for the new lift station will be transferred out of the town’s existing reserve funds. “We’re hoping to complete that project in 2012, but it takes about 9 months to get something like that built and operational, so it is likely to come on stream in 2013,” he said. The town is also in the midst of a major $2.7 million expansion of its sewage lagoon. Funds for the expansion are coming from a loan that Continued on Page 8 Please see WARMAN BUDGET

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EQUIPMENT OPERATOR III Applications for an Equipment Operator III position will be received by the Martensville Public Works Department. This will be a permanent full time inscope hourly wage position with the Roadways Branch of the Public Works Department. The position must be able to operate all City equipment and have considerable experience on a motor grader. Excellent benefits package. For more information please contact: Mike Grosh, Public Works at the City of Martensville (306) 381-8186, mail resumes to Box 970, Martensville SK SOK - 2TO or e mail to publicworks@martensville.ca

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Submit resume including cover letter, along with samples, in confidence to tjenson@ccgazette.ca No telephone calls please. Only those chosen for an interview will be contacted and we thank all applicants in advance for their interest.

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THURSDAY | MAY 24, 2012

Final Week to Enter!

WARMAN LOGO CONTEST All residents may participate, and all submissions will be considered. Choose your own colors. This is an exciting time for our community, and we are eager to see what you come up with!

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There will be a prize of $100 for the winning logo design, so get creating! Entry forms may be picked up at the Town of Warman office, or you may print them off the website at www.warman.ca

Residents of Warman: Would you like to become a part of Warman’s future? To go along with the new status change, Warman needs a new logo! We are calling on the talented people of our community to help create the new logo. The contest deadline is 4:30pm Thursday, May 31st. Please drop off all entries to the town office located at 107 Central St. West. We would like to thank all those who participate in creating Warman’s new logo. Please forward any questions to the Economic Development Department at 933-1830. Best of Luck!

2013 Memorial Cup logo unveiled The Canadian Hockey League and the host organizing committee for the 2013 MasterCard Memorial Cup have officially unveiled the logo for next year’s championship. As per tradition, the logo features a likeness of the Memorial Cup trophy atop logos for the Canadian Hockey League and MasterCard, the event’s title sponsor. A poppy at the centre of the logo symbolizes the event’s longstanding support of Canadian Armed Forces personnel who accepted the challenge to serve and defend. What makes the logo unique for the 2013 event is

the bottom portion of the design which features stylized writing of “Saskatoon” above a wave of Air Force blue. The style and colouring are inspired by the logo of the Saskatoon Blades, who’ll serve as host team of next year’s championship. “With strong support from MasterCard, the Memorial Cup has become a very recog-

nizable brand in the hockey world,” says Jack Brodsky, Blades president and cochair of the 2013 MasterCard Memorial Cup. “We’re proud to be associated with an event that recognizes the contributions of our military personnel and adding a touch of Air Force blue to the logo is a nod to all of those courageous people.” Brodsky is part of a

Saskatoon delegation that are in Shawinigan, Que., to take in this year’s event which runs through May 27. There is one way into the action – 2013 MasterCard Memorial Cup packages are currently available to season ticket holders of the Saskatoon Blades. Become a Blades’ season ticket holder and keep your seat for the 2013 MasterCard Memorial Cup! Eightgame MasterCard Memorial Cup packages start at $95 plus applicable taxes and fees. For more information on becoming a season ticket holder and to secure your seat, call 975-8844 or visit saskatoonblades.com

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WARMAN BUDGET: Clubhouse Blvd. extension planned for this year Continued from Page 6

was taken out by the town last year. “That project will be completed this year,” said Gabrysh. “We’re adding a big secondary cell, and we’re converting the two primary cells and two secondary cells that we have now into one big primary cell, so when that is built it should accommodate the municipality for quite a few more years.” Gabrysh said talks are underway with Martensville, Saskatoon and other municipalities regarding a potential regional wastewater treatment system down the road, but the lagoon expansion will still be required regardless of the outcome of those discussions. “Even if we do get a regional wastewater mechanical system in place, we would probably still have to have some way to store wastewater so the plant could keep up,” he said. Warman is working with SaskWater to replace the existing 8-inch potable treated water pipeline into the community with a new 18-inch pipeline. “We’re hoping to see the new 18inch pipeline installed soon,” said Gabrysh. “Actually, we had hoped it would be in place this year. The total cost of the project is projected to be about $1.5 million. SaskWater has tentatively agreed to pay half the cost if funding goes through, so the town

will have to pay half.” Keeping track of that water once it reaches homes and businesses is also part of the equation, and the installation of new electronic water meters is almost completed throughout the community, said Gabrysh. “We’ve allocated $84,000 in this budget to complete that project,” he said. “That includes all the meters that have been installed from January 1 until now.”

STREET REPAIRS Some of the big-ticket projects on the drawing board for this year include building and repairing streets, said Gabrysh. “We will be extending Clubhouse Boulevard from Centennial to 1st Avenue North, so that it becomes an eastwest through street that goes past the north end of the Legends Centre and the new Middle Years School,” said Gabrysh. “That amounts to about a quarter of a million dollars. That will probably be the main truck route for all the work being done in the Rockwood neighbourhood, and also west of the Legends Centre.” Having that new connector road will take a lot of the heavy truck traffic pressure off 1st Avenue North and Crystal Springs Drive, said Gabrysh. He added that the new street may not be paved until next year. “It all depends on the weather, contractors,

and all those other factors that come into play.” The other big construction project will be the start of a major upgrade to Centennial Blvd. north of the Legends Centre. The steep grade will be altered as the road base is widened and rebuilt. The town is also allocating $776,500 toward street maintenance and repair. “We have some serious problems with the asphalt that has cracked because of the excess moisture in 2008 and 2009,” said Gabrysh. “As we all know, Warman is fairly level and the water table is quite high, and that has taken its toll. There is an area on 8th Avenue, when all the construction was being done in the Legends subdivision, that took quite a beating. But now that most of that new construction is winding down, we’re able to go in and fix it properly.” Gabrysh said the streets will be excavated, and a new base put in with “geo-fabric” and weeping tile installed to drain off excess moisture into the storm drains. “Then we’re going to seal it and pave it,” he said. “The town is also targeting bad spots on 1st Avenue North at 4th Street by Crystal Springs Lake.”

RECREATION FACILITIES The Legends Arena facility will be totally completed this year, said Gabrysh. In addition, half of the in-

door soccer facility in the south half of the complex is also scheduled to be done. “We want to start renting it out and generating some revenue,” he explained. “Our commitment to the Prairie Spirit School Division is to have the entire building completed and connected to the Middle Years School by the fall of 2013.” Gabrysh said initially, the east half of the indoor soccer pitch will be built first. “The reason we’re not doing the whole thing is that on the west side, where the building will be connected to the middle school, there will have to be a lot of heavy equipment brought in, and that would completely wreck the plastic, cushioned floor,” he said. “So it’s better to wait. Meanwhile, all the electrical, mechanical and structural work has already been done in there. We just need to put in the change rooms and washrooms.” Other plans this year include putting in water and sewer lines to the concession building that was moved last fall to Prairie Oasis Park, completion of Gidluck Park in Warman’s north end, a new rescue unit vehicle for the fire department as well as a new generator set for the fire hall, and beginning work on the new cemetery, to be known as Warman Memorial Gardens.


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