Graduale Parvum - Introits

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GRADUALE PARVUM Introits for Sundays and Holy Days In Latin and English Notated in Gregorian Chant

John Henry Newman Institute of Liturgical Music Association for Latin Liturgy 2018 iii


John Henry Newman Institute of Liturgical Music Association for Latin Liturgy The Oratory of St Philip Neri, 141 Hagley Road Edgbaston, Birmingham B16 8UE First Published 2018 ISBN: Perfect bound edition: [number] Spiral bound edition: [number] Cover design, compilation and typographical design and layout © JHNILM and ALL Concordat cum originali: Mgr Bruce Harbert, MA, MPhil, STL Imprimatur:  Bernard Longley, Archbishop of Birmingham, 1 March 2018

Acknowledgements: Latin and English chants © Rev Guy Nicholls of the Oratory. Latin text of antiphons and some verses from the Graduale Romanum 1974 edition © Desclée & Co., Tournai, Belgium. Latin text of most verses from the Clementine Vulgate Bible. English approved texts of the antiphons from The Roman Missal © 2010, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Psalms reprinted from The Revised Grail Psalms Copyright © 2010, Conception Abbey/The Grail, admin. by GIA Publications, Inc., www.giamusic.com. All rights reserved. The Revised Grail Psalms were confirmed by decree of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments on March 19, 2010 (ProtN172/09/L).

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Contents Concordat; Sources of texts; Copyright...............................................iv Foreword from Bishop Hopes ........................................................viii Introduction by Fr Guy Nicholls (Cong. Orat.) ....................................ix The Chants ADVENT First Sunday of Advent .........................................................................1 Second Sunday of Advent .....................................................................3 Third Sunday of Advent .......................................................................5 Fourth Sunday of Advent .....................................................................7 CHRISTMAS TIME The Nativity of the Lord – At the Vigil Mass ...........................................................................9 – At the Mass during the Night .......................................................11 – At the Mass at Dawn ...................................................................13 – At the Mass during the Day .........................................................15 The Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph .......................................17 Solemnity of Mary, the Holy Mother of God ......................................19 2nd Sunday after the Nativity ..............................................................21 The Epiphany of The Lord .................................................................23 The Baptism of the Lord – Graduale Romanum ....................................................................25 – Missale Romanum .......................................................................27 LENT Ash Wednesday ..................................................................................29 First Sunday of Lent ...........................................................................31 Second Sunday of Lent .......................................................................33 – Alternative ..................................................................................35 Third Sunday of Lent .........................................................................37 Fourth Sunday of Lent .......................................................................39 Fifth Sunday of Lent ..........................................................................41 HOLY WEEK AND THE SACRED PASCHAL TRIDUUM Palm Sunday of the Passion of The Lord ............................................43 Maundy Thursday of The Lord’s Supper – At the Evening Mass ...................................................................45

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EASTER TIME Sunday of The Resurrection (Easter Day) – At the Mass during the Day .........................................................47 Second Sunday of Easter ....................................................................49 Third Sunday of Easter .......................................................................51 Fourth Sunday of Easter .....................................................................53 Fifth Sunday of Easter ........................................................................55 Sixth Sunday of Easter ........................................................................57 The Ascension of The Lord ................................................................59 Seventh Sunday of Easter ...................................................................61 Pentecost Sunday – At the Vigil Mass .........................................................................63 – At the Mass during the Day .........................................................65 ORDINARY TIME 2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time .............................................................67 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time – Graduale Romanum, Cycles A, B ................................................69 – Graduale Romanum, Cycle C ......................................................71 – Missale Romanum .......................................................................73 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..............................................................75 5th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..............................................................77 6th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..............................................................79 7th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..............................................................81 8th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..............................................................83 9th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..............................................................85 10th Sunday in Ordinary Time ............................................................87 11th Sunday in Ordinary Time ............................................................89 12th Sunday in Ordinary Time ............................................................91 13th Sunday in Ordinary Time ............................................................93 14th Sunday in Ordinary Time ............................................................95 15th Sunday in Ordinary Time – Graduale Romanum ....................................................................97 – Missale Romanum .......................................................................99 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................101 17th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................103 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................105 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................107 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................109 21st Sunday in Ordinary Time ...........................................................111 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time .........................................................113 23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................115 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................117 25th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................119 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................121 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................123

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28th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................125 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................127 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................129 31st Sunday in Ordinary Time ...........................................................131 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time .........................................................133 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time ..........................................................135 SOLEMNITIES OF THE LORD DURING ORDINARY TIME The Most Holy Trinity ......................................................................137 The Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ (Corpus Christi) ................139 Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe ......................................141 PROPER OF SAINTS The Presentation of the Lord ............................................................143 The Nativity of St John the Baptist – At the Vigil Mass (Latin - Graduale Romanum) .........................145 (English - Missale Romanum) ..................................................146 – At the Mass during the Day (Graduale Romanum) .....................147 (Missale Romanum) .................................................................149 Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles – At the Vigil Mass (Graduale Romanum) ....................................151 (Missale Romanum) .................................................................153 – At the Mass during the Day (Graduale Romanum) .....................155 (Missale Romanum) .................................................................157 The Transfiguration of the Lord ........................................................159 The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary ......................................161 The Exaltation of the Holy Cross ......................................................163 All Saints ..........................................................................................165 Dedication of the Lateran Basilica ....................................................167 Alphabetical Index of Chants ........................................................169

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Foreword from the Right Revd Alan Hopes Bishop of East Anglia Chairman of the bishops’ Committee for Liturgy and a member of the Bishops’ Conference Department of Life and Worship

Latin is the core, matrix language of the Roman Rite, at the service of the universal Church. In no way can its benign and enriching influence be better and more powerfully felt than in its chant, which is ancient, yet today living and vital. Of course, many of those ancient melodies, though sublime, are difficult music, beyond the capacity of many parish choirs to sing well. So the Graduale Parvum will have a most beneficial role by giving to the Church a simplified but still authentic form of the chants for the Mass, and moreover, in a way that instead of being merely passive auditors, the faithful are active and vocal participants. But there is more. Sometimes it is not possible, for various reasons, to re-introduce Latin in a parish where it has not been heard, perhaps, for decades. But with the Graduale Parvum choirs and congregations will be equally at home singing the same melodies in English, either for a whole Mass, or with some chants in Latin and others in English, or as a support for fully Latin celebrations. I warmly commend the Graduale Parvum for the use of all Catholic churches in this country.

 Alan Hopes Bishop of East Anglia

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Introduction to the Graduale Parvum 1. Sacred Music and the Liturgy In the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy Sacrosanctum Concilium (SC), the Fathers of the Second Vatican Council state that ‘the musical tradition of the universal Church is a treasure of inestimable value, greater even than that of any other art. The main reason for this preeminence is that, as a combination of sacred music and words, it forms an integral part of the solemn liturgy.’1 Similarly, the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM) follows the Council Fathers’ teaching that ‘liturgical worship is given a more noble form when the divine offices are celebrated solemnly in song,’ 2 when it is stated that ‘great importance should...be attached to the use of singing in the celebration of Mass’ and ‘every care should be taken that singing by the ministers and the people not be absent in celebrations that occur on Sundays and Holydays of Obligation.’ 3 Yet although singing has arguably become more common at Sunday and Holyday Masses than was generally the case when the Council took place, there are many important considerations that still need to be taken into account when deciding what, if any, improvements might be made to the musical celebration of the liturgy, particularly when the integral nature of Sacred Music to liturgical celebration is borne in mind, and dealing with the question of what is to be sung in it and by whom. As to what kind of music can be described as best suited to the liturgy, the Council Fathers state that the purpose of sacred music is ‘the glory of God and the sanctification of the faithful.’4 They also speak of the ‘treasury of sacred music’ which is ‘to be preserved and cultivated with great care.’5 This ‘treasury’ consists particularly of two forms which the Fathers name as, first, Gregorian chant, which they describe as 1 2 3 4 5

The Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy of the Second Vatican Council, Sacrosanctum Concilium (SC), 4 December, 1963, para. 112. (trans. Austin Flannery O.P., 1975) SC 113 General Introduction to the Roman Missal, (GIRM), para. 40; The Roman Missal, ICEL/CTS 2010 SC 112 SC 114

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‘being specially suited to the Roman liturgy’. The Fathers also state that ‘therefore, other things being equal, it should be given pride of place in the liturgical ceremonies’.6 SC also mentions ‘other kinds of sacred music, especially polyphony...so long as they accord with the spirit of the liturgical action’.7 2. Participatio Actuosa This ‘spirit of the liturgical action’ is defined as ‘active participation’, by which it is meant that ‘all the faithful should be led to that full, conscious, and active participation in liturgical celebrations which is demanded by the very nature of the liturgy’.8 In particular, participatio actuosa requires that ‘the people should be encouraged to take part by means of acclamations, responses, psalms, antiphons, hymns (cantica), as well as by actions, gestures and bodily attitudes.’9 But while such a definition might seem to suggest that participatio actuosa can simply be understood as ‘active’ in the usual sense of that word, it clearly involves much more, since the definition continues: ‘and at the proper time a reverent silence should be observed.’10 ‘Actuosa’ therefore cannot simply mean ‘active’, for it must include a contemplative or meditative silence (sacrum silentium) which is also integral to the liturgical spirit. Actuosa therefore should be understood as implying an involved and direct entering into the action and spirit of the liturgy, rather than merely outward activity during it. Moreover, the treasury of sacred music requires that ‘choirs must be assiduously developed, 6

SC 116, according to the translation of Austin Flannery O.P., with which there are two difficulties. First, ‘especially suited to the Roman liturgy’ is not a sufficient rendering of ‘Ecclesia cantum gregorianum agnoscit ut liturgiae romanae proprium’, where ‘proprium’ rather means ‘belongs specifically to’. Secondly, ‘pride of place’ is not strong enough to express ‘ideo in actionibus liturgicis, ceteris paribus, principem locum obtineat’, where ‘principem locum’ more precisely indicates that the context in which Gregorian chant should be appreciated is within the liturgy, and not as a culturally important, but liturgically impractical genre which has been superseded. ‘Pride of place’ could be interpreted simply as resembling an exhibit which is seen in a prominent place in a museum. ‘Ceteris paribus’ does not mean that the primacy of chant is negotiable according to personal taste or preference, but that there may be mitigating circumstances in determining whether the more complex chants can be sung sufficiently well by the forces available. 7 SC 116 8 SC 14-20 deals with ‘participatio actuosa’ as requiring both ‘internal and external’ participation (SC19). 9 SC 30 10 SC 30

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especially in cathedral churches,’11 without thereby conflicting with the requirement or nature of proper participation by the faithful. The kind of music that should be sung in the liturgy may therefore rightly include both congregational and choral settings, equally to foster true participatio actuosa. 3. The ‘Propers’ of the Mass The singing of the ‘Ordinary’ of the Mass12 is a generally well established practice, since these texts are stable elements of the liturgy. But there are other texts which also belong integrally to the liturgy, and can be found in the Missal and in the official liturgical book of chants for the Roman rite of the Mass, the Graduale Romanum. Yet because these vary from one Mass to another, rather as the readings do according to the feast or the season, and for which reason they are usually designated the ‘Propers’ of the Mass, they are not as familiar as the ‘Ordinary’ parts. These include the entrance, offertory and communion chants.13 The constant variability of these texts often leads to two unfortunate consequences: on the one hand either they are simply not sung, but recited either by the celebrant, or by the congregation (if they have access to the texts), or by a ‘leader’; or on the other hand, if there is singing at these points, the Proper chants are simply replaced by other sung texts, most frequently metrical hymns and songs. Yet this practice should be examined closely. The Propers are a rich source of liturgical prayer and meditation. In the first place, they are 11 SC 114 12 The term ‘Ordinary’ here is used according to custom to indicate the chants of the ‘Kyrie’, the ‘Gloria’, the ‘Credo’, the ‘Sanctus’ and the ‘Agnus Dei’, but also including the Lord’s Prayer as well as those dialogues which occur between the celebrant or deacon and congregation throughout the Mass, since (excepting the Gloria and Creed) these elements are common to all Masses of whatever feast or season. 13 The ‘Propers’ also include the chants between the readings, that is the Responsorial Psalm, and the Acclamation before the Gospel, although these are more often sung than are the other chants referred to here. Moreover, they belong in the Lectionary and do not always have a close correspondence with the chants between the readings in the Graduale Romanum. The Offertory chant is a special case, since although like the entrance and communion chants it is mentioned in the GIRM, it no longer is to be found in the Missal, but only in the Graduale Romanum, of which there is as yet no official translation.

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overwhelmingly drawn from Holy Scripture, and especially from the psalter, which comprises texts which are of their nature intended for singing, as the Greek psallein or its Latin translation psallere, meaning ‘to sing praise’ tells us.14 They are, therefore, inspired texts suitable for praise and for instruction, and to ignore them or simply read them out is largely to deprive them, and the liturgical assembly, of their fruitfulness and prayerfulness. 4. The Entrance Chant The GIRM says that the purpose of this chant is ‘to open the celebration, foster the unity of those who have been gathered, introduce their thoughts to the mystery of the liturgical time or festivity, and accompany the procession of the Priest and ministers.’ 15 The mere recitation of such texts cannot easily foster a sense of unity, nor can it cover the entire action of the entrance rites. For this reason, several options are given by the GIRM for filling this role: ‘In the dioceses of England and Wales the Entrance Chant may be chosen from among the following: the antiphon with its Psalm from the Graduale Romanum or the Graduale Simplex, or another chant that is suited to the sacred action, the day, or the time of year, and whose text has been approved by the Conference of Bishops of England and Wales.’16 Since these possible solutions are given in a precise order, it would seem reasonable that the first should be preferred. But the chant settings of the Graduale Romanum (GR), while they represent the highest form of liturgical chant available at this point, and should be cultivated in cathedrals, monasteries and major churches served by well-trained choirs, generally lie beyond the capacity of the ordinary parish. Hence the statement in SC that ‘it is desirable that an edition [viz. of books of Gregorian chant] should be prepared containing simpler melodies, for use in smaller churches.’17 Such chants would be suitable for use by ordinary parish choirs, cantors, and congregations. It was to fulfil this need that the Graduale Simplex (GS) was published in 1967. Yet the GS does not provide settings of all the texts of the Propers throughout the year, or even for every Sunday and feast day, 14 To take only a few prominent examples from both Old and New Testament sources, see e.g. ps. 32(33):3; ps. 46(47):7; Eph. 5:19; 1Cor14:15. 15 GIRM 47 16 GIRM 48 17 SC 117: ‘Expedit quoque ut paretur editio simpliciores modus continens, in usum minorum ecclesiarum.’

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but only a limited repertory that could be used generically within an entire liturgical season. This is because the compilers worked from the principle that they would only employ pre-existing chants in the GS. Thus, the settings are all of a simple kind drawn predominantly from the Antiphonal, the book of chants for the Divine Office. This decision has a further corollary, that the GS exists only in Latin, since the vernacular languages had not at that time been used in any of the liturgical chant books until after the Second Vatican Council. It was to supply the need for simpler settings of all the Proper texts assigned traditionally to Sundays and Feast Days, not only in Latin but also in the vernacular languages, that the Hungarian liturgist and musicologist, Professor Laszlo Dobszay devised the principles upon which the Graduale Parvum (GP) is constructed. Within the Gregorian repertoire there is a long tradition of adapting certain melodies to many diverse texts, in such a way that the primacy of the text is always respected. These are known as ‘model melodies’, and there are many examples of the working of this principle in, above all, the Antiphonal.18 Dobszay not only realised that this principle could be extended further so as to provide settings of Proper texts in the Missal, but could also be applied mutatis mutandis to vernacular texts as well. This means that certain melodic patterns can not only be adapted to a variety of texts, but can become more familiar by constant repetition, making them easier to assimilate. Thus, the chants he devised for the GP have the benefit of being more easily memorised and sung by choirs, cantors and congregations. It is important to state clearly that the GP is in no way intended to supplant the GR, which holds the principal place among all settings of Proper liturgical texts. But apart from the advantages of providing settings of all the Proper texts of the Missal and GR, it is hoped that the GP will also have a particularly important role in the life of the modern liturgy, in allowing these texts once more to become what they are intended to be, a vital contribution to the spirituality of the Liturgy of the Mass, and to help re-acquaint parish congregations and musicians with the spirit and culture of the Gregorian chant repertoire, so that it may truly regain the ‘principal place’ in the Church’s liturgical music. Moreover, since the chants are presented here in 18 See The Restoration and Organic Development of the Roman Rite, Laszlo Dobszay, T. & T. Clark, London and New York, (2010), pp. 181-189

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parallel Latin and English versions, using predominantly the same melodies carefully adapted for both languages, this has the further advantage of drawing the vernacular liturgy closer to its parent Latin, and should help to make the transition between one and the other more natural and straightforward. Also, since the Proper texts are, for the vast majority of cases, shared in common by both the Ordinary and Extraordinary forms of the Roman rite, this means they can be used in Latin in either form, especially where it is difficult to find singers sufficiently skilled and experienced in singing the chants of the GR with the necessary degree of competence. 5. On the Nature and Purpose of this Volume The Book of Introits (i.e. Entrance Antiphons) is the first part of the GP to be published in the English-speaking world. It is hoped that the principles of the GP will be more easily introduced and assimilated by parishes and smaller religious communities through becoming familiar with singing the Introit as a regular feature of Sunday and Holyday Masses. Settings of other parts of the Proper will be published in due course. The purpose of beginning with the Introits is to make possible the most fitting and appropriate entrance into the liturgical action, which will also make the adoption of other similar settings more straightforward and easily assimilable in the future. As will be explained more fully further on, these chants are designed to fit the length of the opening rites as closely as possible, without requiring the action to be held up on account of their length, but similarly providing sufficient material to cover either a short entrance with no ceremonial, or a longer procession and incensation of the altar. This volume contains settings of the official texts of the introits in Latin and English for all Sundays, Holydays and such feasts as can replace an ordinary Sunday per annum. Furthermore, the GP chants are designed in such a way as to facilitate their being sung by the congregation led by a choir or cantor. For this reason the antiphons are short enough to be easily memorised, especially when the whole series of model melodies gradually becomes familiar.

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6. The Texts The texts set in this book are those of the Introits to be found in the GR (1974) and in the 3rd edition of the Roman Missal (2002), and of its ICEL English translation (2010). Many of the Latin texts are the same in both the GR and the Missal, and wherever that is the case, the Latin text is set on the left-hand page, followed by the corresponding English text from the ICEL translation of 2010 on the right-hand page. Occasionally a text is to be found in the GR which is not in the Missal, and therefore has no official English translation.19 In this case, where the setting of the text from the GR is found on the left-hand page, there is no corresponding English version on the right-hand page. Wherever a text is found in the GR only, another text is provided in the Missal, in both Latin and English. These texts are also set in the GP, and therefore on such days there will be two Latin introits to choose from, whereas only one English one is provided. Occasionally there is sufficient kinship between the two texts (i.e. of the GR and Missal) for both Latin versions from the GR and the Missal to appear together.20 The introits in the GR retain the ancient practice of supplying a psalm verse to be sung between the repetitions of the antiphon proper. However, these have not been included in the Missal. They have therefore been newly added here to the English introits as well. For purposes of consistency, because the ICEL translations of the introits have been based throughout on the Revised Grail Version, now in common use in the USA, the Bishops’ Liturgy Committee has recommended that this version of the psalms in English be used throughout. Moreover, up to four extra verses from the same psalm as that given in the GR have been added both in Latin and in English for the purpose of ensuring that the introit is sufficiently long to cover all the action customary in a solemn Mass.21 Similarly, the ancient custom 19 See, for instance, the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, where the text in the Graduale, Dilexisti iustitiam, is not found in the Missal, which has a different text altogether, Baptizato Domino, which is therefore the text translated in the ICEL Missal. The English texts set in the GP are always taken from the ICEL version. 20 See, for instance, the two (Latin) introits for Trinity Sunday, one from the Graduale, the other from the Missal. 21 The possibility of extending the introit with extra psalm verses in this way is by no means exclusive to the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite. The Ritus Servandi in Cantu Missae of the 1962 Missale Romanum recommends this practice especially when the chant accompanies the entire procession from the sacristy to the sanctuary. Since the customary version of the psalm verses used in the GR is the Clementine

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of singing the doxology Gloria Patri as the last verse before the final reprise of the antiphon has been retained, and may be sung where desired. It is important to note that not all the verses given in this book need be sung at every celebration. The cantor or choir director will become accustomed to gauging the amount of time he or she has to cover with singing, so that following the doxology, the final reprise of the antiphon may as closely as possible coincide with the celebrant’s being ready to begin the opening dialogue of the Mass. To ensure that this happens, the choir director or cantor will become used to judging how many verses of the given psalm are needed, and how many may therefore be omitted. One feature of the Introits in the GR and the Missal is their varying length. The shorter texts have been easily adapted to any of the appropriate model melodies. In the case of the longer texts, such as the introit for the 3rd Sunday of Advent, a setting of the entire antiphon would not only exceed the bounds of the model melodies, but would certainly prove difficult even for a choir to learn, much less for a congregation to repeat at a single hearing. In such cases as this, the solution which is frequently resorted to throughout the collection is that adopted by Laszlo Dobsay from certain mediaeval sources, of making only the first or principal part of the text into the GP antiphon, and making the remainder into a Versus ad Repetendum (VR), which is sung only at the beginning and the end of the introit. The VR is sometimes simply sung to the same psalm tone as the remaining psalm verses, but sometimes it is a slightly variant form either of the antiphon melody or the psalm tone. The principle of a VR can be traced vestigially in some of the chants of the Graduale Romanum.22 There are other instances where there is a slight discrepancy between the Latin text of the GR and that of the Missal, as in the introit for the 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time, where the first part of the antiphon from ps. 53 is the same, but a different verse from the same psalm has been chosen for the second verse in the Missal from that in the Vulgate, it is that version which is retained in the extra verses given here largely according to the provisions of the Versus Psalmorum et Canticorum ad Usum Cantorum pro Antiphonis ad Introitum et ad Communionem repetendis, Desclee et Socii, Paris, Tournai, Rome, New York, 1962 (republished and reprinted by the Church Music Association of America, 2008). 22 See, for instance, the Offertory De profundis and the Communion Lux aeterna in the GR.

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Graduale. Here the variant verses are both included in the verses from the psalm from which they are both taken. In the case of the introit for the 5th Sunday in Ordinary Time, a different version of ps. 94 has been used in the GP from that used in the Missal. The GP text follows that of the GR, which is drawn from a pre-Vulgate version including the words ploremus ante eum qui fecit nos (let us weep before him who made us). Since this is not found in the Vulgate text it has not been included in the Missal. Although this phrase is included in the GP Latin antiphon, it is used as the VR. Since the English text follows the ICEL Missal text exactly, there is no VR in the English introit. 7. The Adaptation of the Texts to the Gregorian Melodies The principle that the text is paramount has been observed. Therefore there have been no changes to any of the wording. As mentioned in the paragraph above, sometimes the text has been arranged so that a shorter excerpt of the whole has been treated as the main antiphon, and the remainder of the text has been included as a VR. Sometimes too, a part of the original complete text of an introit has been made into a refrain which is repeated after two phrases where originally it occurred only once.23 In keeping with the nature of English stress and word order, the adaptation of the melodies to English words has been generally somewhat plainer melodically than the adaptation to Latin texts. This also seems better suited to a choir or congregation that is at first relatively unfamiliar with Latin, as well as with Gregorian melodies. The simpler setting of the English words may, we hope, act as an encouragement to become more familiar with the Gregorian melodies and with the principle and practice of singing the introits. Those who become more familiar with these English chants will then perhaps be more confident in moving on to sing the Latin antiphons and psalms. This in turn may even assist them, in time, to approach the authentic settings of the GR.

23 See, e.g. the first introit for the Vigil Mass of Ss Peter and Paul, Dicit Dominus Petro, where the phrase Hoc autem dixit is repeated as a choir or congregational refrain after both parts of the Lord’s words to Peter, although these words occur only once in the GR and the Missal.

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8. The Modes, the ‘Model Melodies’ and the Antiphons. The ‘model melodies’ are those which can be found constantly reused and adapted to many differing texts throughout the repertoire of antiphons in the Antiphonale. Their flexibility makes them suitable for being moulded to a wide variety of texts in the GP and the Missal. There are several such melodies in each of the modes, though some are more frequently encountered than others. The modes are the scales in which Gregorian music is written. These scales are more or less unfamiliar at first hearing to ears attuned to modern major and minor scales, though they are by no means completely unknown, and examples of music in some of the modes can be recognised even by those who are relatively unacquainted with Gregorian chant. Some of the modes will undoubtedly prove more difficult to grasp at first, and will need time and use to become familiar. The effort will, however, pay off. The greater the familiarity with the Gregorian modes, the more the individual qualities of each will impress themselves on the singers and the congregations. Precisely because of the distinctive character of each of the modes, and their particular association with any of the texts of the GR, the decision has been taken in the majority of cases to match the mode chosen for the chant melody in the GP with that in the GR. So therefore, an introit in the 1st mode in the GR will be found in the same mode in the GP, and so on for each of the modes.24 The number of the mode in which each of the chants is set will be found at the beginning of each antiphon. Under the italicised 24 There are two principal exceptions to this rule in the GP. First, the introit for Easter Day, Resurrexi, is set in the 4th mode in the GR. This mode probably sounds too austere and difficult for such a joyous piece on the greatest morning of the liturgical year, and so the decision has been taken to set it to a ‘brighter’ melody in the 7th mode. Secondly, the introit in the GR for Maundy Thursday, Nos autem, will be found to be set in Latin to the 4th mode (ending on E), as in the GP; whereas the English parallel text We should glory is set to a virtually identical melody but ending in the 1st mode (ending on D). The reason for this discrepancy lies in the choice of the 1st mode by Laszlo Dobszay for this chant, which is as he set it in English ad experimentum, and remains in that form in homage to him as the originator of the GP in Hungary. Dobszay had noted the ambivalent tonality of the GR introit and chose to end his version in a different mode from the original. When adapting the same melody for the Latin text, it seemed right to restore its ancient modality, if only for the Latin words.

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abbreviation, Ant., can be found a small number and a letter. The number applies to the mode (1-8) and the letter is an identifying mark for the psalm tone to which the verses of the accompanying psalm are sung, concerning which more will be said below. 9. The Psalms and the Tones used Each introit is provided with its own psalm verses, from which the antiphon itself is more often than not derived. Where an antiphon found in the GR is not from a psalm, its origin is pointed out at the head of the antiphon, and the psalm associated with it in the GR is also indicated and used here. Where an introit is given only in the Missal, and is not drawn from a psalm, then a thematically suitable psalm has been provided by the editor.25 The tones used for the verses of the psalms correspond to the mode in which the antiphon is written, and share the same modality, i.e. the position of tones and semitones relative to the principal notes of that mode. These are found from the clef (or key) sign which stands at the beginning of each line of music. There are two clefs, C, which is by far the more common, and F which is used only for the 2nd mode.26 Each of these clefs is always placed on one of the lines of the four-line stave. However, the clefs neither represent a fixed pitch (as they would do on a keyboard), nor are they restricted to the same line, as are the modern F (bass) and G (treble) clefs. There is always a semitone immediately below the clef note (as there is on a keyboard below C and F, but the other semitone varies (as it does on a keyboard depending whether one starts from a C or an F). Furthermore, the tones and semitones can be partially varied by the use of a ‘flat’ sign placed before the note ‘b’ which it will qualify for the duration of the word in which it is found.

25 See e.g. the alternative introit for the feast of the Baptism of the Lord, Baptizato Domino, which is from the Gospel of Matthew. In this case, verses from ps. 28 have been judged most appropriate to match this feast and text. In the case of the alternative introits for Ss. Peter and Paul Vigil and Day Mass in the Missal, neither of which is drawn from a psalm, the same psalm is used as for the corresponding introit in the GR. 26 See e.g. the introits for January 1st (The Solemnity of the Mother of God), the Epiphany, and the 5th and 12th Sundays in Ordinary Time, which all share the same model melody.

xix


A psalm tone is largely sung on a single note (the ‘reciting note’), and varies only at the middle and the end of each verse, consisting of two parts, which are separated by an asterisk. The first part of the verse ends with a cadence (the mediatio), and then the second part continues on the same reciting note until the final cadence. In the Latin psalmody there is also an intonation of several notes initiating the first half of each verse, but in line with the need for greater simplification in the English chants, intonations have not been included in the English psalmody. Each psalm tone has its own characteristic intonation and mediatio, but the final cadences can vary considerably even within the same psalm tone. For the sake of variety, a few different endings are included throughout the GP introits. The last note of the final cadence of the psalm tone gives it its descriptive denominator, and this is shown at the opening of the Antiphon.27 10. The Pitch and the Accompaniment It is important to state that there is no fixed pitch in chant. The singers should set a pitch at which they can comfortably sing the highest and lowest notes of a particular chant. Most of the chants are set within a range of an octave or less. There are very few which occasionally go one step further.28 Thus it is a matter of convenience to select a pitch to suit the voice range of the singer or singers. It is hoped that a version of a written-out harmonic support will eventually be provided, though an organist is always encouraged to accompany singers, especially congregations, if they should need support in singing. There is available as a companion to this volume a recording of the introits in Latin and English on 5 CDs, which gives both a guide to the singing of the chants, and a demonstration how to accompany chant well. The main principles are: 1) Never play too loudly. The antiphon does not require the registration an organist 27 e.g. at the head of the introit for the Second Sunday of Advent stands the description Ant., below which are given the number of the mode and of its psalm tone (7), and the descriptor of the final cadence which ends on the note ‘a’. The Introit of the Day Mass of Christmas is also in mode 7, and has the descriptor ‘b’, which is the last note of the psalm tone. The introit for the 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time, again in mode 7, has the descriptor ‘d’, again from the final note of the cadence at the end of the psalm tone. 28 e.g. the introit for the solemnity of Christ the King contains one note over the octave above the lowest note.

xx


might select to accompany a hymn. 2) Do not think that, as organist, you are required to change accompanying notes or chords too often. As the accompanying CDs well illustrate, the accompaniment should be discreet and meditative, not drawing attention to itself or to the organist. 3) The organist should use as few chords as possible, move slowly and gently through harmonic changes and should not include any notes that are not found in that mode. 4) In particular, the accompaniment should not take away from the free movement of the chant. The organ is not, strictly speaking, essential in the performing of the chants, though it may be desirable especially to support a congregation. Finally, the GP is the work of the Director of the John Henry Newman Institute of Liturgical Music (JHNILM), founded at the Oratory, Birmingham, in 2011. The Institute is forever grateful to its principal patron, His Grace Archbishop Longley of Birmingham, for his generous support and encouragement in its work. Fr Guy Nicholls, Cong. Orat.

xxi


First Sunday of Advent

I NTROIT

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ᢢ ²¯ « ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ A d te E levávi ánimam meam: Deus meus, in te confído, non ² ¯ ¢ ² ² ²¯ ²¯ ² ² ²² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²² ² ² ² ² ² à Ps 24

Ant. 8g

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ à Þ

erubéscam. VR Neque irrídeant me in- i-míci mei :

étenim universi

qui te exspéctant, non confundentur. Ant. Ps. Repeat Antiphon as far as VR after each verse

² ¯ ²² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²² ² ²² ²à Ps. 1. Vias tuas, Dómine, demónstra mihi E et sémitas tuas é² ¯ ¢ ² ² ²¯ à ² ²² ² ² ²²²² ²² ² ² ² ² ² ² à

¢

2. Dírige me in veritáte tua, et doce me : E quia tu

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ à doce me. Ant.

²²²²²à

es, Deus, Salvátor meus, et te sustínu- i tota die. Ant. 3. Reminíscere ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ

² ¯ ² ² ²² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²²à sǽculo sunt. Ant. 4. Dulcis et rectus Dóminus ; propter hoc legem dabit ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ à ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ¯ Þ delinquéntibus in via. Ant. 5. Glória Pátri, et Fílio et Spirítu- i Sáncto, E ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ý miseratiónum tuárum, Dómine, E et misericordiárum tuárum, quae a

¢ ² ² ² ²¯ à

Sicut érat in princípio et núnc et sémper, E et in sǽcula sæculórum.

¢ ² ²¯ à

Amen. Ant...VR...Ant

1


First Sunday of Advent

I NTROIT

¢ ² ²² ² ² ² ² ᢢ ² ² ² ¯ « ң ² ² ² ² ² ª Þ T o² you, E I lift up my soul, O my God.² In² ² you² I²have² ² trust ed; ² ² à ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² Ps 24

Ant. 8g

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

Þ à

let me not be put to shame. VR Nor let my enemies exult over me;

and let none who hope in you be put to shame. Ant. Ps. Repeat Antiphon as far as VR after each verse

² ²

¢

² ² ²

²

²¯

² ² ²

²¯

Þ

Ps. 1. O Lord, make me know your ways. E Teach me your paths. Ant.

² ² ² ²

¢

² ² ² ²ª² ² ² ² ² ² ² à

2. Guide me in your truth, and teach me; for you are the God of my ¢ ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ ² ² ² ² à salvation. E I have hoped in you all day long. Ant. 3. Remember your ¢ ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ

² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

compassion, O Lord, E and your merciful love, for they are from of

¢ ²¯ Þ

² ² ² ² ²Ý

4. Good and upright is the Lord; E he shows the way to

²² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² à ¢ ² ²¯ Þ sinners. Ant. 5. Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the ¢ ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ à old. Ant.

Holy Spirit E as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, E

¢ ²

² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ

world without end. Amen. Ant...VR...Ant 2


Second Sunday of Advent

¢ ҥ ² ² ² ²¯ ª P ópulus Sion, E ¢ Ң ² ²²² Ң ²

I NTROIT

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ɲ ² ² Ԣ ² ᤢ ²¯ « ² ² Þ

Is. 30:19,30; 40:1; Ps. 79:2-3

Ant. 7a

ecce Dóminus véniet ad salvándas gentes: et au-

² ª ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ « ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ²¯ ²

dítam fáciet Dóminus glóriam vocis suæ, Repeat Antiphon after each verse

¢

ᢢ Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

Ps. 1. Qui

in lætítia cordis vestri.

² ²²² ²² ²² Ý

inténde : E qui dedúcis velut ovem ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ ᢢ Ң²

regis

Israël,

¢ ² ᒢ ¯¯ Þ Joseph. Ant. 2. Qui sedes super Chérubim : E manifestáre coram Ephra² ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ᒢ ¯¯ Þ ᢢ Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ im, Bénjamin, et Manásse. Ant. 3. Excita, Dómine, poténtiam tuam, et ² ¯ ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ᒢ ¯¯ Þ ᢢ Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² à veni, E ut salvos fácias nos. Ant. 4. Dómine, Deus virtútum, convérte ¯ ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ᒢ ¯¯ Þ ᢢ Ң ² ² ² ² Þ nos, E et osténde fáciem tuam, et salvi érimus. Ant. 5. Glória Pátri, et ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ ¯ ¢ ² ²² ² ² ² ² ² ² ᢢ Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Fílio et Spirítu- i Sáncto, E Sicut érat in princípio et núnc et sémper, E

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ᒢ ¯¯ Þ

et in sǽcula sæculórum. Amen. Ant.

3


Second Sunday of Advent

I NTROIT

² ¢ ² ҥ ² ² ² ²¯ ª ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ң à Oᢢ people of Sion, E behold, the Lord will come to save the ¢ ² « ² ² Ң ² ² ² Ң ² ² ² ² ²¯ ª ² ² Ý nations, and the Lord will make the glory of his voice heard, in the ¢ ² ² ² ²¯ Þ Is. 30:19,30; 40:1; Ps. 79:2-3

Ant. 7a

joy of your heart. Repeat Antiphon after each verse

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ᒢ¯ ¯ Ps. 1. O ruler of Israël, hear us, E you who lead Joseph like a flock. ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² Þ ¢ Þ Ant. 2. Enthroned on the cherubim, shine forth, E upon Eph-raim, ² ² ² ᒢ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ ¢ ¯ Þ Benjamin, and Manasseh. Ant. 3. Rouse up your might, O Lord, E ² ² ² ²¯ Þ ¢ ² ² ² ² ᒢ ¯¯ Þ ² ² ² ² and come to save us. Ant. 4. O Lord God of hosts, bring us back; E ²² ² ²Þ ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ᒢ ¯¯ Þ and show us your face, and we shall be saved. Ant. 5. Glory be to ² ¯ ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²² ²² ² ² ² Þ ¢

² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ¢

the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit E as it was in the

²

² ² ² ² ᒢ¯ ¯ Þ

beginning, is now and ever shall be, E world without end. Amen. Ant.

4


Third Sunday of Advent

I NTROIT

¢ §ò ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ò§ ᢢҢ´´² ª ² ² ² ᢢ ҥ ² Ԣ 㲧 ²¯ Ң Þ Ң G au-déte E in Dómino sem per: íterum dico, gaudé-te: Dó¢ ²ᢢ ² ² ² ² ² ² Ң ² ² « ² ² ² ² Ң ² ²¯ Þ ² ² ²¯ minus prope est. VR Modéstia vestra nota sit ómnibus homínibus : ¢ ²ᢢ Ң ² ² ²¯ Þ Ý Dóminus prope est. Ant. Ps. Phil. 4:4-6; Ps. 84:2,8

Ant. 1g

Repeat Antiphon as far as VR after each verse

¢

² Ң ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ý Ps. 1. Nihil sol- líciti sitis : sed in omni oratióne petitiónes vestræ in-

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ notéscant apud Deum. Ant. ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

² Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² §ò ² ² ² ² ¯ Ý

2. Benedixísti, Dómine, terram tuam : E

² Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ò§ ² Ý

Þ

avertísti captivitátem Jacob. Ant. 3. Osténde nobis, Dómine, miseri cór-

¢ ² ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² Ң² ² ² ² ² ²² Ý Þ diam tuam : E et salutáre tuum da nobis. Ant. 4. Glória Pátri, et Fílio ¢ ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ² ¯ ² Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ¯ Ý et Spi- rí-tu- i Sáncto, E Sicut érat in princípio et núnc et sémper, E

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ et in sǽcula sæculórum. Amen. Ant...VR.

5


Third Sunday of Advent

I NTROIT Ant. 1g

¢

R

Phil. 4:4-6; Ps. 84:2,8

Ңҥ ejoice

ò§ Ң ² ² ² ò§ ᢢҢ´´² « ² ² Ң ² ² ¯ ² Þ Ң ²

E in the Lord always;

again, I say, rejoice.

Indeed

¢ ² ᢢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² Ң ² Ý ² ²¯ the Lord is near. VR Let all men know your forbearance: Indeed the ¢ ᢢ Ý ² ²¯ Þ Lord is near. Ant. Ps. Repeat Antiphon as far as VR after each verse

¢

² ² ² ² ² ² ² §ò ² ² ² ² ¯

² ² ²² ² ² ² Ý

Ps. 1. Have no anx- i-ety about anything; E but in everything, by prayer

¢ ² ² ²² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²

² ² ²¯

Þ

and supplication, let your requests be made known to God. Ant.

¢ ² ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ¯

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²² Ý

2. O Lord you have blest your land, E you have ended the captiv- i-ty

¢ ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² Ý Þ of Jacob. Ant. 3. Show us, O Lord, your mercy, E and grant us your ¢ ² ² ²¯ ²² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ Þ salvation. Ant. 4. Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the ¢ ò§ ² ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ¯ Ý Holy Spirit E as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, E

¢ ²

² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ world without end. Amen. Ant...VR.

6


Fourth Sunday of Advent

I NTROIT

¢ §ò ² ² ² ² ² ² ò§ ᢢҢ´´² ª ᢢ ² ² ² ᢢ Ң ҥ ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² Þ Ң R o-rá-te E cæli désuper, et nubes pluant iustum: aperiátur ¢ 㲧 ²¯ « ² ² ² ² ᢢ Ң ²¯ ²¯ Ý Is. 45:8; Ps. 18:2,6-7

Ant. 1g

ter-ra,

et gérminet Salvató-rem.

Repeat Antiphon after each verse

¢

² Ң ² ² ² §ò ² ² ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ Ps. 1. Cæli enárrant glóriam Dei : E et ópera mánuum eius annúntiat

¢ ² ² ² ²¯ Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² Ý ² Þ firmaméntum. Ant. 2. In sole pósuit taber - náculum suum : E et i-pse ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Ң²² ²Ý ² Þ tamquam sponsus procédens de thálamo suo. Ant. 3. Exsultávit ut ¢ ² ² ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ²Þ Þ gigas ad curréndam viam, E a summo cælo egréssio eius. Ant. 4. Et ¢ Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ý occúrsus eius usque ad summum eius : E nec est qui se abscóndat

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

² Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ² ¯ Ý

Þ 5. Glória Pátri, et Fílio et Spi-rítu-i Sáncto, E ¢ ² Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ a calóre eius. Ant.

Sicut érat in princípio et núnc et sémper, E et in sǽcula sæculórum.

¢ ² ²¯

Þ

Amen. Ant.

7


Fourth Sunday of Advent

I NTROIT

ò§ Ң ² ² ¯ ª ² §ò ᢢ㲧 ²¯ « ᢢ ² ² ҥ

¢

Is. 45:8; Ps. 18:2,6-7

² Þ ² Ң D rop down dew from above, E you heav-ens, and let the clouds ¢ Ң ² ᢢ ²¯ ²¯ ᢢ ² ² ² 㲧 ² ª ² Ң ² ᢢ Ý rain down the Just One; let the earth be o- pened and bring forth a ¢ ²¯ ²¯ Þ Ant. 1g

saviour.

Repeat Antiphon after each verse

¢

² ² ² ² ² ² §ò ² ² ² ² ¯

² ² ²² ² ² Ý

Ps. 1. The heavens declare the glory of God, E and the firmament pro-

¢ ²

² ² ² ²

²¯

Þ

² ²

claims the work of his hands. Ant.

¢ ² ² ² ²¯

²

²

²

² ò§ ² ² ² Ý

²

2. He has placed his tabernac-

² ² ²

²

² ² ² ² Þ

le in the sun: E he comes forth like a bridegroom coming from his

¢ ² ²¯

² ² ²

² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ² ²

²¯

Ý

Þ 3. He rejoiced like a champion to run his course: E ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² Ý Þ from the height of heaven is his going forth. Ant. 4. And his meeting ¢ ² ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ is at its very summit; E no-one can hide from his burning heat. Ant. ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ò§ ² ² ² ² ¯ Ý chamber. Ant.

5. Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit E

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² §ò ² ² ² ² ¯

²

² ² Þ

as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, E world without

¢ ² ² ²¯ Þ end. Amen. Ant.

8


The Nativity of the Lord - At the Vigil Mass

I NTROIT

¢² ò§ ² ²É ² ò§ ² ² Ý ² ª Ң « ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ң ² H ódie² scié-²²tis,²¯ E qui² a² véniet Dóminus, et salvá-bit nos, et mane ¢ ² ² ² ɲ ² ² ң ң ´´ ² ¯ Ý vidébitis glóriam e- ius. Ps. 97

Ant. 6f

Repeat Antiphon after each verse

¢

² Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ý Ps. 1. Dómini est terra, et plenitúdo eius : E orbis terrárum, et univérsi

¢ ² ² ² ² Ң ²² Ý

² Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Ý

qui hábitant in eo. Ant. 2. Quia i-pse super má-ri-a fundávit eum : E

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ң ² ²¯ Ý

et super flúmina præparávit eum. Ant.

² Ң² ² ² ² ² Ý

3. Quis ascéndet in montem

¢ ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ң ² ²¯ Ý

²Ң ² ²² ² Ý

Dómini? E aut quis stabit in loco sancto eius? Ant. 4. Innocens mánibus

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² Ý et mundo corde, qui non accépit in vano ánimam suam E nec iurávit

¢ ² ² ² ² ² Ң ² ²¯ Ý

² Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Ý

in dolo próximo suo. Ant. 5. Glória Pátri, et Fílio et Spirítu- i Sáncto, E

¢ ² Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ң Þ Sicut érat in princípio et núnc et sémper, E et in sǽcula sæculórum.

¢ ² ²¯ Ý

Amen. Ant.

9


The Nativity of the Lord - At the Vigil Mass

I NTROIT

ò§ ² Ý ¢² Ң Ң ² ²¯ ² ² ²² Ң ² ¯ « ² ² ² T oday you will know E that the Lord will come, and he will save ² ¢ ² ò§ ² ² ² ² Ý ² ² ² ² ң ´´ ² ¯ Ps. 97

Ant. 6f

us, and in the morning you will see his glo-ry.

Repeat Antiphon after each verse

¢

²

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

² ²

² ² Ý

Ps. 1. The Lord’s is the earth and its fullness, E the world and those

¢ ² Ң ² ²¯ Ý

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

² ² ²² Ý

who dwell in it. Ant. 2. It is he who set it on the seas; E on the rivers

¢ ² Ң ² ²¯ Ý ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Ý he made it firm. Ant. 3. Who shall climb the mountain of the Lord? E ¢ ² ² ² ² ² Ң ² ²¯ Ý ² ² ² ² ² ² Ý Who shall stand in his holy place? Ant. 4. The clean of hands and the

¢ ² ² ²

²

² ² ² ² ² ²

²¯

² ² ² ² Ý

pure of heart, whose soul is not set on vain things, E who has not sworn

¢ ² Ң ² ²¯

Ý

²² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²Ý

deceitful words. Ant. 5. Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to

¢ ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Ý the Holy Spirit E as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, E

¢ ²

² ² Ң ² ²¯ Ý

world without end. Amen. Ant.

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The Nativity of the Lord - At the Mass During the Night

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£ ² ² ²² ² ² Ң ² ¯ « ² ² ² ᢢ ² ²² ²¯ « ² Ң ² ² ²² Ң ² ᢢ Ý D ó-ң minus E dixit ad me: Fílius meus es tu, ego hódie génu-i £ ²¯ Þ Ps. 2

Ant. 2d

te. Repeat Antiphon after each verse

² ² ² ²² ²

£

Ps. 1. Quare

£ ² ² ² ²¯

fremuérunt

² ²¯ Gentes: E

² ² ² ² ² ² ²² ² Þ et

pópuli

meditáti

sunt

Þ ²²² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²² ² ²

Þ 2. Astitérunt reges terræ, et príncipes convenérunt in £ ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² Ý Þ unum E advérsus Dóminum, et advérsus Christum eius. Ant. 3. Póst£ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² Ý inánia? Ant.

ula a me, et dabo tibi Gentes hereditátem tuam, E et possessiónem

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² Ý £ ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² Þ tuam términos terræ. Ant. 4. Dirumpámus víncula e-ó-rum : E et ² ² ² ² ²² Ý £ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² Þ pro- i-ci-á-mus a nobis iugum i-psórum. Ant. 5. Glória Pátri, et Fíli£ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Ý o et Spirítu- i Sáncto, E Sicut érat in princípio et núnc et sémper, E

£ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ et in sǽcula sæculórum. Amen. Ant.

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The Nativity of the Lord - At the Mass During the Night

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£ Ң ² ² ² ¯ « ᢢ ² ɲ ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ң Þ T heң Lord said to me: E You are my son. It is I who have begotten £ ² ᢢ ²¯ Ý Ps. 2

Ant. 2d

you this day. Repeat Antiphon after each verse

£ £

² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

Þ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ

Ps. 1. Why do the nations conspire, E and the peoples plot in vain? Ant.

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

2. They arise, the kings of the earth, E princes plot against the Lord and

£ ² ² ² ²¯ Þ his Anointed. Ant. £ ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Ý

3. Ask of me and I will give you the nations E

Þ

as your inheritance. Ant.

£ ² ² ² ² ² ² ²

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Ý

4. Let us burst asunder their fetters; E

²¯

Þ

Let us cast off from us their chains. Ant.

²² ² ² ² ² ² Ý

5. Glory be to the Father

£ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ý and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit E as it was in the beginning,

£ ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

is now and ever shall be, E

²

² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ world without end. Amen. Ant.

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The Nativity of the Lord - At the Mass at Dawn

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¢ Ҥ ² ᢢ²

Ps. 97

² ² ² ² ² ²¯ « ² ² ² ² ² ² Ң ² ² ² ¯ Ý L ux fulgébit E² hódie superà nos, quia natus est nobis Dóminus; ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ²¯ Þ Ant. 8g

Ps. ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² Ң ² ¢ ² ª ² ᢢ ²¯ ²¯ « ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ý VR Et vocábitur admirábilis, Deus, Princeps pacis, Pater futúri sǽcu¢ ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ²¯ Þ cuius regni non erit fi-nis. VR.

li :

cuius regni non erit fi-nis. Ant.

Repeat Antiphon as far as VR after each verse

² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ²² ² ² ² ² ²² ² ² ² ² ² ² à Ps. 1. Dóminus regnávit, decórem indútus est : E indútus est Dóminus for¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ¯ ² à titúdinem, et præcínxit se. Ant. 2. Etenim firmávit orbem terræ, Equi ² ¯ ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ ² ² ² ² ² ²² ² ² ² ² ² Ý non commovébitur. Ant. 3. Paráta sedes tua ex tunc : E a sǽculo ¢ ² ²¯ Þ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ

¢

² ¯ ² ²² ² ² ² ² ²² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ rum multárum. Ant. 5. Glória Pátri, et Fílio et Spirítu- i Sáncto, E ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Ý

¢ ² ² ² ²¯ tu es. Ant.

4. Elevavérunt flúmina fluctus suos, E a vócibus aquá-

Þ

Sicut érat in princípio et núnc et sémper, E et in sǽcula sæculórum.

¢ ² ²¯ Þ

Amen. Ant...VR 13


The Nativity of the Lord - At the Mass at Dawn

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¢ ²Ҥ ² ᢢ

Ps. 97

² Ң ² ²¯ ²¯ « ² ² ᢢ ² ² ² ² ¯ Ý T oday a light will shine upon us, for the Lord is born for us; ² ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ à à Ant. 8g

E

¢ ² ² ² ² ² Ң ² 㲧 ¯ ª ² ᢢ ²¯ ª ² ² ² ² ² Ý ¢ ² ¯ ² ¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ and his reign will be without end. VR.

VR And he will be called Wondrous God,

ag-es:

Ps.

Prince of Peace, Father of future

and his reign will be without end. Ant.

Repeat Antiphon as far as VR after each verse

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

¢

² ² ² ² ² ² à

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ

² ² ² ² à

Ps. 1. The Lord is king, with majesty enrobed, E the Lord has robed himself

¢ ²¯

² ² ² ²¯

²

² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ à

with might; he has girded himself with power. Ant.

Þ

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ à

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ firm, E not to be moved; Ant.

2. The world you made

3. Your throne has stood firm from of old, E

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² à ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² à from all eternity, O Lord, you are. Ant. 4. The floods have lifted up, O Lord, E

the floods have lifted up their voice. Ant.

¢ ² ² ² ²¯

5. Glory be to the Father and to

² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ

the Son and to the Holy Spirit E as it was in the beginning, is now and

ever shall be, E world without end. Amen. Ant...VR

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The Nativity of the Lord - At the Mass During the Day

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¢ ҥ ²¯ ² ² ² Ң ²¯ ª ҥ Ң ᒢ ² ² ² ² 㲧 ² ¯ ² ² ² ² Ң ²¯ ª Þ P er E na² tus² estᢢ nobis, et fíli-us datus est no-bis, cuius impérium ²¯ « ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ¯ ²¯ ª ² ² ² ² ² ¢ ²² ² ² ² Þ Ps. 97

Ant. 7b

u

super húmerum e-ius, et vocábitur nomen e-ius magni consíli- i Án-

¢ ² ²¯ Ý gelus.

Repeat Antiphon after each verse

ᢢ Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ Ps. 1. Cantáte Dómino cánticum novum : E quia mirabília fecit. Ant. ² ¯ ¢ ᢢ Ң ²² ² ² ² ²² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²² ² Þ

¢

² ¯ ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ ᢢ Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ velávit iustítiam suam. Ant. 3. Recordátus est misericórdiæ suæ, E ² ¯ ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ ᢢ Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ et veritátis suæ dómu- i Israël. Ant. 4. Salvávit sibi déxtera eius : E ᢢ Ң² ² ² ² ² ²² ² ² ² ² ² Þ ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ 2. Notum fecit Dóminus salutáre suum : E in conspéctu Géntium re-

¯ ᢢ Ң ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²5. Gló² ria ²Pátri,² et² ¯ Fílio² et² Spi²rítu-² ²i Þ ² ² ¢ et bráchium sanctum eius. Ant.

Sáncto, E Sicut érat in princípio et núnc et sémper, E et in sǽcula

¢ ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ Þ

sæculórum. Amen. Ant.

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¢ ² ҥ ² Ң ² ²¯ ª ² ² ҥ ² Ң ² Ң ² ¯ « ² ² Ý A child E is born² for² us,ᢢ and a son is given to us; his scep²¯ ª ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ª Ý ¢ ² ² Ң ²ª² ² Ps. 97

Ant. 7a

tre of power rests upon his shoulder, and his name will be called

¢ ² ² ² ² ²

²¯ ²¯

Þ

Messenger of great counsel. Repeat Antiphon after each verse

¢

² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯

² ² ²

²

²¯ ² ¯ Þ Ps. 1. O sing a new song to the Lord, E for he has worked wonders. Ant. ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ²¯ ² ² Þ ¢ ² ² ²¯ ² ¯ Þ ² ² ² ² ² ² to the nations. Ant. 3. He has remembered his merciful love E and his ² ¯ ¢ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ᒢ ¯¯ Þ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ truth for the house of Israel. Ant. 4. His right hand and his holy arm E ¢ ² ² ² ² ᒢ ¯¯ Þ ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² ² Þ have brought salvation. Ant. 5. Glory be to the Father and to the Son ² ² ¯ ¢ ² ² ² ² ²² ²² ² ² ² ²² ² ² ² ² ²à 2. The Lord has made known his salvation; E has shown his deliverance

¯ ¢ ² ²

and to the Holy Spirit E as it was in the beginning, is now and ever

²

² ² ² ² ᒢ¯ ¯ Þ

shall be, E world without end. Amen. Ant.

16


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