Page 1

FREE JUNE 2008 VOLUME 26 NUMBER 6

Calendar, Community Resource Directory and much much more! 364 EAST BROADWAY SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84111

SALT LAKE CITY, UT PERMIT NO. 352

PAID

“Nudie” by Jann Haworth

PRESORTED STANDARD US POSTAGE


CATALYST

A World of Wellness Resources in Your Neighborhood!

HEALTHY LIVING, HEALTHY PLANET NEW MOON PRESS, INC.

Get a healthy body ... live a happier life!

PUBLISHER & EDITOR Greta Belanger deJong ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER John deJong ART DIRECTOR Polly P. Mottonen

Cerami Chiropractic

SALES Greta Belanger deJong

Since 1985

Gentle and Specific Chiropractic Care

Initial visit: Examination and Adjustment just $97.00

COPY EDITOR Diane Fouts PRODUCTION Polly P. Mottonen, Rocky Lindgren John deJong PHOTOGRAPHY & ART Polly Mottonen, Sallie Shatz, John deJong INTERNS Now Interviewing CONTRIBUTORS Garrett Alberico, Charlotte Bell, Steve Bhaerman, Melissa Bond, Sunny Branson, Amy Brunvand, Celeste Chaney, Mary Dickson, Kim Hancey Duffy, Scott Evans, Kindra Fehr, Ralfee Finn, Paul Gahlinger, Tony Guay, Barb Guy, M. L. Harrison, Donna Henes,Judyth Hill, Dennis Hinkamp, Carol Koleman, Debbie Leaman, Melissa Martin, Jeannette Maw, Michael Neill, Diane Olson, Jerry Rapier, Pax Rasmussen, Tamara Rowe, Jon Scheffres, Sallie Shatz, Johanna Teresi, Suzanne Wagner, Chip Ward, Beth Wolfer DISTRIBUTION John deJong (manager) Brent & Kristy Johnson Vincent Lee

Follow up visits $40.00

801-486-1818

www.drcerami.com

With over 20 years of experience, Dr. Cerami has helped thousands of people r egain their health naturally and quickly. Call today for a no-charge consultation or to schedule an examination to find out what you need to get back to feeling better. You’ll also be happy that we run a fee-for-service practice so you’ll always know what your care costs and because there are no long term commitments, you can set your own schedule based on your personal needs. Check our website for our monthly specials and newsletter.

Life Counseling and Yoga

Individuals, couples, and groups receive expert facilitation in getting closer to the essence of what it means to be human in a time of tr emendous change and transition. Jon also teaches weekly Kundalini Yoga classes. Call 633-3908 for appointments.

Jon Scheffres, MA, LPC

Visionary & Biodynamic Craniosacral Work Relief from: neck, back & jaw pain/injur y. Ideal for those affected by auto accidents, headaches, sinusitus, stress, dental work, overuse injuries depression & anxiety. Experienced & Milne Institute Certified. Call 633-3910 for appointments. See website below for more information.

Kellie Scheffres, LMT

Massage Therapy

Expert sports and orthopedic massage rehabilitates new and old injuries, enhances athletic performance, and provides relaxation and rejuvenation for the whole body. Call 916-8752 for appointments.

WEB MEISTER, TECH GOD Pax Rasmussen, Michael Cowley RECEPTION, SECURITY Phoebe, Sarah, Cubby, Misha

Open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8am to 6pm

Dr. Michael Cerami

Roger Olbrot, LMT

Exhale Pilates Center

Classical Pilates Instruction tailored for each individual body's needs. Specializing in private and semi-private lessons. Ask about mat classes, pre-natal movement and house calls. www.exhalepilatescenter.com 801-455-0586

CATALYST

is proud to be a part of these fine civic efforts:

Blue Skies

INITIATIVE

Julie Caranddo MA, BFA

Millcreek Wellness 1550 East 3300 South www.millcreekwellness.com


4

Jann Haworth

ON THE COVER "Nudie”

Jann Haworth at work by Alexander Johnstone

J

ann Haworth was closely associated with the Pop art movement in Great Britain throughout the ’60s. Her work has been featured in a number of large scale exhibitions with the resurgence of interest in this period. Recent Pop shows include

2008: g r e e n

k i t c h e n s GREEN KITCHEN DESIGN Saturday, June 28 10 am to Noon Award winning kitchen designer, Bill Cordray of Teerlink Cabinet and Andrea Heidinger of The Green Building Center partner to teach functional and sustainable kitchen design. Cost for the 2-hour class is $50 and includes handouts and the kitchen design book, Good Green Kitchens, by Jennifer Roberts. REGISTRATION REQUIRED!

Photo by Todd Semo from Good Green Kitchens. Reprinted with permission Gibbs Smith.

1952 East 2700 South in Salt Lake City ii05 iron horse drive in park city

hours: Mon – Fri 12 to 7 pm Sat 10 am to 5 pm

801.484.6278

www.greenbuildingcenter.net

“Pop Art UK,” Modena Italy (2004); “Art and the ’60s,” the Tate, Great Britain (2004); “British Pop,” Bilbao, Spain (2005) [together with the BBC program]; and “Pop Art 1956-1968,” Rome, Italy (2007). Her most recent solo show was in 2005 at the Mayor Gallery, London. See her work at the Salt Lake City Library this month and next. Jann will have another a solo show at Galerie Du Centre, Paris this fall. Haworth was a contributor to three public works projects in Salt Lake: The 337 Project, project director and contributor to SLC Pepper (400 W., SLC) and the “On Broadway” mural. Future group shows include Pop Art UK Angers, France 2008, and Philadelphia; and “Beyond the Surface: Women in Pop Art,” which will tour the US from spring 2010. She holds two unusual distinctions: Jann is a female pop artist; and she co-designed the Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper” cover, for which she received a Grammy. N

Celebrating 26 years

of being a L 1. An agent or substance that initiates, precipitates or accelerates the rate of a reaction without being consumed in the process. L 2. Someone or something that causes an important event to happen.

Who we are...

CATALYST is an independent monthly journal and resource guide for the Wasatch Front providing information and ideas to expand your network of connections regarding physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wellbeing. CATALYST presents useful information in several ways: through articles (often containing resource lists), display advertising, the Community Resource Directory, Dining Guide, and Calendar of Events. Display ads are easily located through the Advertising Directory, found toward the back of every issue.

Finding CATALYST

25,000 copies of this magazine have been distributed at over 420 locations along the Wasatch Front, including cafes, bookstores, natural foods stores, spas and libraries. Call if you’d like to have CATALYST delivered in quantity (40 or more) to your business.

CATALYST!

SUBSCRIPTIONS: Third class, $18 per year. Third class subscriptions are slow to arrive and hard to trace if they go astray. Notify us promptly if your address changes. The opinions expressed by the authors are not necessarily (through probably) those of the publisher. Call for reprint permission. Copyright 2008, New Moon Press, Inc.

Advertise in CATALYST If you have a business that our readers would like to know about, please contact us. We would be happy to help you clarify your advertising needs and manifest the clients you want with an appropriate and attractive display ad or a resource directory listing. You can download our rates and specifications from our website (see below).

How to reach us Mail:

140 S. McClelland St. SLC, UT 84102 Phone: 801.363.1505 Email: contact@catalystmagazine.net Web: www.catalystmagazine.net


IN THIS ISSUE Volume 27 Number 6 • June 2008

detail from Jann Haworth‘s “Nudie” featured on this month’s cover.

REGULARS

FEATURES

6

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

GRETA BELANGER

DEJONG

8

DON’T GET ME STARTED JOHN DEJONG Dissing the dead: John visits Picasso’s “Guernica” and the graves of the soldiers who did the deed, and considers the madmen behind the curtain.

10

ENVIRONEWS Environmental news from around the state and the west.

12

SLIGHTLY OFF CENTER Dysfunctioal nuclear family: Should anyone be dating U.S.?

13

SWAMI BEYONDANANDA STEVE BHAERMAN Where Swami answers your questions, and you will question his answers.

28

CATALYST CAFE: RESTAURATEUR PROFILE ED HUNTSMAN That bird cafe returns to SLC’s east side: Not at all extinct, the Dodo is lookin’ good.

34

FEATURED CATALYST EVENTS ADRIANE ANDERSEN Check out our online calendar for complete calendar and continuous updates.

40

PROFILE OF A GODDESS CAROL KOLEMAN White Tara is the goddess of compassion. Read the section about “Practice,” and try it. Then maybe you would like to show up to one of the many Tibetan Buddhist gatherings scheduled in Salt Lake this month.

31

SHALL WE DANCE? AMY BRUNVAND “THE REVENGE OF YOGA THE MUSICAL”Stephen Brown has concocted yet another sublime, ridiculous work, a sequal to last year’s yoga satire.

50

BABYING THE BUDDHA: IN THEIR OWN WORDS, PART KINDRA FEHR Last month we asked the moms to write about what it means to them to be a mom.This month, we invited the dads. The submissions are really different. If you read last month’s be sure to read these, too.

14

21

56

METAPHORS FOR THE MONTH Honor discontent with limits set by mind.

57

ADVERTISER INDEX

58

URBAN ALMANAC: APRIL 2008 Day by day in the home, garden and sky

RALFEE FINN

SUZANNE WAGNER

20

ABODE

41

ARTS & LANGUAGES

41

BODYWORK

42

BOOKS, GIFTS, CDS, CLOTHING

42

CERTIFICATION, DEGREES & SCHOOLS

42

ENERGY WORK & HEALING

43

GETAWAY

44

HEALTH, WELLNESS & BODY CARE

44

MISCELLANEOUS

45

MOVEMENT & SPORT

46

PSYCHIC ARTS & INTUITIVE SCIENCES

46

PSYCHOTHERAPY, COUNSELING & PERSONAL GROWTH

48

SPIRITUAL PRACTICES

RADIOACTIVE: 2012 SERIES

TROY WILLIAMS

Evidence of a world transforming: an interview with Hames O’Dea, president of the Institute of Noetic Sciences and former director of Amnesty International.

22

WHY DO WE MARRY? DOROTHEE KOCKS “Gathered here together,” the dearly beloveds of the bride and groom are more than just an audience. They are all witnesses, and can make vows of their own.

24

THE FREEDOM FILES: SEASON TWO

KATHERINE PIOLI

The ACLU video series, filmed with intent to inspire.

26

THROWING DAD A different kind of father-daughter dance.

32

KRCL’S NEW HOSTS BARB GUY After widespread concern regarding a possible corporate takeover of Salt Lake’s listener-owned community radio station after the board announced they would replace 20 of their 60-some on-air volunteers with paid DJs, the new DJs have taken their place. They’re the old DJs. Just not so many of them.

38

UTAH ARTS FESTIVAL BARB GUY, MELISSA BOND Go to your calendar right now. Clear the decks for June 26-29. Write in “UAF.” You will be spending at least part of your days and all of your evenings at what looks like one of the most interesting arts festivals Salt Lake has ever conjured up. Save gas. Be transported by music, dance and amazing visuals. You are the vehicle.

54

ON THE PASSING OF UTAH PHILLIPS KEN SANDERS An old friend says goodbye to the folksinger, songwriter, activist, iconoclast and all-around amazing human being who once lived in our midst and adopted our state’s name for his own.

54

PLEIN-AIR PAINTING SUZETTE GERTSCH Besides simply walking, humans have conjured myriad excuses to be in some form of the great outdoors: We collectively golf, hunt, fish, birdwatch, photograph and more. Some people, armed like they’re going on a holiday, go stand someplace and paint pictures. They’re called plein-air painters.

A unique network of area businesses and organizations that are making a positive difference locally, nationally and globally. 41

EMILY APLIN

SHORTS & OCCASIONALS

DIANE OLSON

COMMUNITY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

EATING LOCALLY FOR BEGINNERS

The locovore trend doesn’t mean giving up good food, it just means d iscovering the good food being produced in your neighborhood, and even in your own backyard. Emily looks at Slow Food Utah, farmers markets, CSAs and home and community gardening.

DENNIS HINKAMP

AQUARIUM AGE: ASTRO-NEWS FOR JUNE Expect a fast-paced month of thinking, talking and traveling.

STEPHANIE CARTER

They were seeking refuge, rest and a new home. Persecution and atrocities left behind, they settled here in the Salt Lake Valley after long, trial-filled journeys. How could this group of Mormon pioneers have known that their final stop in 1847 would make it possible for another group of people, so different from them, to share the same story more than 100 years later?

AMY BRUNVAND

52

MORMONS AND MUSLIMS: THIS IS THE PLACE

STEPHANIE NICHOLAS


6

June 2008

catalystmagazine.net

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

Babies and children in the workplace

L

in this issue you will see a beautiful photo by Josh Blumenthal of our dear friends Melissa Bond (a frequent CATALYST contributor) and Chase Fetter in the act of being married. (That’s Jerry Lazar officiating, and the accompanying story’s author, Dorothee Kocks, is to the left). That was last September. Now the BondFetters are heavy with child, as is “Babying the Buddha” columnist Kindra Fehr. I’ve never had any of my own, but like babies, and I really like kids. (As I said to my friend Kristen recently: “I want children in my life. I just don’t want them in my body.”) Therefore it’s curious that I’m becoming a de facto spokesperson for babies in the workplace. A few years ago CATALYST received a first place “Psychologically Healthy Workplace” award from the Utah Psychological Association, in part for our open-door policy regarding babies and children. When you have a lot of young women employed, and you love them and don’t want them to leave, letting them bring their newborns to work is the logical thing. Then the babies grow, and we get attached to them, too; toddlers have proved to be good (or at least amusing) inter-office couriers. A baby would never be unamused for long, with so many doting adults. Eventually the mommies would go home, some to be fulltime moms, others— like art director Polly Mottonen—to be part

of the cyber workforce (in addition to being a fulltime mom; it sure looks like giving birth grants a woman an extra six hours to every day.) Someone wrote a recently released book about babies in the workplace, in which I was quoted. People magazine is working on a story re. babies in the workplace, and has talked to the CATALYST staff several times. Now the Boston Globe is calling, re. the same subject. How do I weigh in on babies in the workplace? They’re counter-productive. So are these farting dogs under my desk. There’s more to life—and a workday—than productivity. Max Mottonen, age 7, who came to work in utero, still comes to staff meetings. He pays attention and participates (“Only one person talking at a time, please!”). And leaves me notes like the one pictured here. Too bad they have to go to school. Maybe kids in the workplace is an idea I’ll just have to pioneer. Maybe an intern program for the prepubescent crowd. We could do all kinds of fun stuff. We could have an office test kitchen, could go on field trips, and have a big kids section in CAT. And they could walk the dogs. Okay, all you babies, grow! Anty Gret has plans for you. Can’t wait. ◆ — Greta Belanger deJong Greta Belanger deJong is the editor and publisher of CATALYST. GRETA@CATALYSTMAGAZINE.NET.

Web of Life Wellness Center

Todd Mangum, MD • Aymi Bennhoff, FNP for the treatment of:

stress • f atigue • toxicity weight issues • sleep disor ders hormone imbalances anxiety & depression gynecological concerns 989 East 900 Sout h, Ste. A1, SLC tel. 531.8340

www.weboflifewc.com


8

DON’T GET ME STARTED

June 2008 catalystmagazine.net

Dissing the dead Reflections on the bombers of Guernica

W

BY JOHN DEJONG

e slipped back over the fence just as the security patrol pulled up inside the cemetery. I pulled my camera through the bars and walked down the street, iPod playing Andres Segovia’s performance of Francisco Tarrega’s “Recuerdo de la Alhambra.” Our European adventure was off to an excellent start. Our early morning adventure to the cemetery in the heart of Madrid had a photographic expedition as its original purpose. For an hour and a half, w e walked through the crypts and walls of niches. The endless cemetery spilled off a hill into arroyos on two sides. The crypts were crowded with enough roses to choke Portland; and everywhere, crucifixes. Then, behind a tall hedge, we discovered a memorial inscribed in German. We had stumbled on the last resting place of some of the Luftwaffe fliers who had bombed the Spanish town of Guernica.

Previously, our unofficial tour guide had briefed us on Picasso’s “Guernica,” the subject of the next day’s tour. The Spanish government of dictator Francisco Franco had commissioned Picasso to paint a mural for the 1937 World’s Fair in Paris. No strings attached. Picasso responded with a giant canvas depicting the horrors of the German Luftwaffe’s bombing of Guernica in the service of Franco’s side in the Spanish Civil war.

Tears streamed down my face as I pondered madmen, patriotism and Picasso’s centaurs and horses. As we tried to decipher the words on the memorial, I told my friend that, even though these were some of the flyers who pioneered strategic bombing—the

$28/$35 ON SALE APRIL 14 ON UAF.ORG

PRESENTED BY

SATURDAY, JUNE 21 7PM SUMMER SOLSTICE SOIREE LIBRARY SQUARE, SALT LAKE CITY AMPHITHEATRE STAGE A PREVIEW CONCERT TO BENEFIT THE UTAH ARTS FESTIVAL


“Myy Brokerr Promised d Myy Moneyy Wass Safe.

Now w whatt doo I do?” There IS something you can do. Graham Law Offices acts on YOUR behalf to recover losses or get you out of investment traps.

intentional bombing of civilians to break the will of an adversar y—I had to honor these men who had stepped up when their country, led by a man not known by them to be mad, had asked them to. Friends of mine from Vietnam lie in graves mad men sent them to. The next day I entered the Picasso exhibit with a different perspective than the rest of our group. What stirred me more than the actual painting was the galleries of sketches, studies and pre-figurative works by Picasso. The music on my iPod that day was a grand, melancholy mix I call “South China Sea,” reminiscent of opera music I once heard in a dream. Tears streamed down my face as I pondered madmen, patriotism and Picasso’s centaurs and horses. I resolved then to go back and piss on the graves of the German aviators. Collateral damage is one thing. Bombing civilians to break the will of a nation is, or should be, beyond belief. (See Vonnegut’s “Slaughterhouse Five” or John McCain’s solution to the Iran problem.) I had the opportunity two days later, when part of our group took a side trip to the cemetery during visiting hours. I couldn’t. Wrong as they were, those men thought they were doing what was honorable and necessary. What I needed was to insult the men who lied to them —Franco’s grave (I couldn’t find it), Hitler’s grave, Nixon’s grave, George W. Bush’s grave. But that wouldn’t do any good. To paraphrase the last words of a local boy who met a sticky end, “Don’t piss, organize.” And make sure your leaders aren’t mad. ◆ John deJong is associate publisher of CATALYST. JOHN@CATALYSTMAGAZINE.NET

DID YOUR BROKER R (orr otherr advisor)... * Sell you investments that were too high risk? * Sell you a costly annuity with no access to your funds? * Sell you an insurance plan you can’t afford? * Sell you APEX Equity Options Fund? * Take advantage of your trust?

Consultation is free. You pay no attorneys’ fees unless we recover for you.

888-596-9199

Jan Graham, former Utah Attorney General

www.GrahamLawOffices.com


ZION CANYON – SEASONAL FIELD GUIDE

4th Annual Zion Canyon Art & Flute Festival

Zion National Park ; 147,551 acres. Geographic features include narrow slot canyons and towering sandstone cliffs, among the highest in the world, plus one of the last free flowing river systems on the Colorado Plateau. The park has a large, diverse plant community spanning three climatic zones. Zion Park Discovery Center hours: 8 am to 7 pm. Info: www.nps.gov/zion • CLIMATE, June Daytime temperatures average in the 80’s and 90’s with minimal precipitation. • WILDLIFE, COMMON VIEWING Wildflowers: Flora lower elevations continue to show color.… Plant life along the West Rim Trail and other upper meadows blossomed early because of the mild winter but should continue to bloom throughout the month. Birds: Look for Peregrine Falcon fledglings as they make their first flight from their cliff face nests. Many more California Condors are being spotted as they increase their habitat range from the Vermillion Cliffs along the Colorado River... Reptiles: The Zion Tree Frog is camouflaged on rock walls above their abandoned watery homes. Whiptail, Blue Collared and Earless Lizards are busy trying to avoid having their tails pulled off by pesky children after a long hibernation. • ACTIVITIES, FEATURED HIKING TRAIL Zion Narrows: Voted #1 River Walk of our nation’s national parks … This strenuous 16 mile walk follows a narrow slot canyon carved by the Virgin River through two thousand feet high layers of sandstone. Permit and shuttle required. Shorter day walks from the Temple of Sinawava along the Riverside Walk lead into the lower portion of the Narrows … easy and refreshing, weather permitting. • ACTIVITIES, FEATURED BIKING TRAIL Scenic Ride / Pa’Rus trail: The easy 2 - mile paved multi use trail follows the Virgin River into the 7 mile Zion Scenic Drive devoid of most vehicles and fumes. Park Shuttle busses have bike racks allowing those wanting to start at the top end of the canyon and experience a pleasant downhill cruise…very easy. • JUNE, ZION CANYON FIELD INSTITUTE PROGRAMS (pre-registration required. 800.635.3959 or 435.772.3264) for detailed 2007 course descriptions - visit www.zionpark.org June June June June June

7th, 11th, 12th, 14th, 29th,

East Rim to Weeping Rock 10-mile strenuous hike $60 Wednesday Wildlife Walk - Flora, Fauna & Ecology of Zion $35 Thursday Trek – Intro to geology and cultural history of Zion $35 North Gate Peaks exploratory 4 mile hike on Kolob Terrace $50 Zion by Moonlight - Naturalist’s perspective $60

ZION CANYON - EVENTS Art Exhibit: 2nd to 14th JUNE 7th

Paul G. Fuentes

Community Center Gallery

Concert Vince Redhouse O.C. Tanner Amphitheater 8 pm

Tickets at Flanigan’s Inn or at the gate. $10

June 8th to 11th

Native American Flute School !

New this year. 4-day course. Pre-registration required.

JUNE 13th thru 15th

4th Annual Art & Flute Festival

Workshops, displays, information booths, and performances. Performers include; Gary Stroutsos, John Dumas, Sacred Winds Consort, Clint Goss, Gentle Thunder, Will Clipman, Mark Holland with Autumn’s Child, One Heart, Jesse Kalu, Three Trees, Arvel Bird, and David Lance, among others. Tickets at the gate or online … for more information: www.zionartandflutefestival.com

June 20th Z-Arts! Independent Film “10 Questions for the Dalai Lama” June 21st O.C. Tanner Concert Randy Anderson Band 8 pm

COMING EVENTS

ZION CANYON - LODGING June is a great time to visit Zion. The canyon is peaceful, wildflower blooms peak for the Spring. Rates are reasonable. www.SpringdaleGuide.com

Best Western Zion Park Inn

800.934.7275

Switchback Grille, Gift Shop, State Liquor Store. Satellite TV with pay-per-view movies. Seasonal outdoor pool, year round hot tub. Conference and Banquet Facilities. Free HSIA available Ask for the “Catalyst Rate”

Bumbleberry Inn

800.828.1534

www.bumbleberry.com

Spacious rooms with private balcony or patio. Cable TV, phones and pool. Scenic views. Conference rooms, racquetball court, indoor Jacuzzi. “Wild Willie’s” Restaurant, Gift Shop.

Cliffrose Lodge & Gardens

800.243.8824

www.cliffroselodge.com

A tranquil riverside setting; rooms and suites surrounded by beautiful grounds featuring a large pool and a year-round waterfall hot tub. Staff naturalist will help design your outdoor activities.

Flanigan’s Inn & deep canyon Spa 800.765.7787www.discoverZion.com Rustic park lodge atmosphere, well-appointed rooms and suites, superior amenities, decks and patios. Hot tub and nature trail to a hilltop Labyrinth. The Spa offers a full menu of theraputic massages, exotic wraps, luxurious facials.

Majestic View Lodge

866.772.0665

www.majesticviewlodge.com

Log buildings with lodge-style interior design. Visible from your deck or patio are dramatic and unsurpassed views of Zion National Park. Seasonal outdoor pool and year round hot tub. Steakhouse, Micro-Brewery, Bakery, Gift Shop, and Wildlife Museum.

Novel House Bed & Breakfast

800.934.7275

www.novelhouse.com

Exquisite rooms, private bath/phone/TV. A quiet, romantic getaway for adults, free of children, pets, and smoke. Weekend Romance and Honeymoon packages available.

July 4th Zion Canyon Celebrates Independence Day – Springdale Lion’s Club Pancake Breakfast, Flag raising ceremony, 9 am Parade, Bands, Softball, and Laser Light Show June 21st O.C. Tanner Concert Tingstad & Rumber 8 pm June 20th Z-Arts! Independent Film “Big Dreams, Little Tokyo” June 21st O.C. Tanner Concert Randy Anderson Band 8 pm

www.zionpark.com


10

June 2008

ENVIRONEWS

catalystmagazine.net

BY AMY BRUNVAND

Utah cities rank low for air quality Logan, Salt Lake City and Provo are among the nation’s worst cities for short-term particle air pollution (locally known as “the inversion”) according to the American Lung Association State of the Air 2008 report, which warns that “air pollution is more dangerous than many people realize —partly because you can’t even see the most dangerous, microscopic particles that do the most damage to your lungs.” The nation’s old, dirty coal-fired power plants are among the biggest sources of air pollution. State of the Air 2008: WWW.STATEOFTHEAIR.ORG/ Rick Walker

Coal power threatens national park vistas Two Utah national parks are listed among the top 10 at risk from air pollution from new coal-fired power plants, according to a new report from the National Parks and Conservation Association. Seven new coal-fired power plants are either already under development or currently seeking permits in the region surrounding Capitol Reef National Park and Zion National Park. These plants will emit toxic mercury and fine particles of soot that cause haze, as well as other air pollution. The problematic power plants are Sevier Power Company Project, Intermountain Power Plant and Bonanza Power Plant in Utah; Topquop Energy Project, White Pine Energy Station and Ely Energy Center in Nevada and Desert Rock Energy Project in New Mexico. Citizen groups including the Sierra Club, Sevier Citizens for Clean Air and Water, Western Resource Advocates, Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment, and National Parks and Conservation Association oppose this flurry of coal-powered energy development. Sevier County citizens have collected enough signatures to put a citizen’s referendum concerning the Sevier Power Company project on the November ballot. However, during the 2008 General Session, the Utah legislature passed SB53, a new law that “prohibits the use of local initiatives for land use ordinances or changes in land use ordinances.” It is unclear whether the law is constitutional, and if so, whether it applies retroactively to the anti-coal power initiative. NPCA report: Dark Horizons: WWW.NPCA.ORG/DARKHORIZONS/PDF/DARK_HORIZONS_REPORT.PDF

U.S. Senate hears oil shale testimony On May 15, the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources held an oversight hearing on development of oil shale resources in Colorado, Wyoming and Utah. Colorado Governor Bill Ritter expressed deep concerns about federal efforts to fast-track commercial oilshale leasing, saying “Establishing a leasing program prior to understanding what technologies are viable and the implications of these technologies would be a dangerous course, with enormous risk of unintended consequences.” His concerns included the amounts of water and energy needed to process oil-shale, the impacts to the environment and wildlife, the infrastructure needed to cope with a government-subsidized oil-shale boom, and the cumulative impacts of other energy development in the same areas. Steve Smith, representing the Wilderness Society, testified that it is not worth sacrificing communities, water, clean air, wildlife and scenic beauty to a theoretically but not actually usable energy source. Smith testified that past attempts to develop oil shale have failed to produce a usable energy source: “Between 1920 and 1980 the federal government issued patents on over 345,000 acres of oil shale claims in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. None of these claims are in commercial production.” Utah Senator Orrin Hatch and Governor Jon Huntsman Jr., on the other hand, are willing to volunteer Utah as an oil-shale sacrifice zone. Huntsman sent the committee a letter requesting to lift the current oil-shale lease moratorium, while Hatch derided environmental concerns as “smokescreens for a hidden agenda,” and said that “there is no room in our energy policy for an anti-oil or oil-shale attitude.” U.S. Senate Committee on Energy & Natural Resources: http://energy.senate.gov/public/

Mulberry Grove- Real Estate A Pedestrian-Centered, Green Community in Moab, Utah x x x x x x

www.mulberrygroveonline.com ~ (435) 210-1161

The debate over how to manage Utah’s public lands has been raging for over 25 years without getting any closer to a community consensus. The Wildlands Dialogue Project aims to bridge such disagreements by asking the question, “If so many of us love the land, why then do we have such difficulty agreeing on how to care for it?” During the next year, the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance will sponsor a series of facilitated community dialogues in communities throughout Utah. The sessions are open to anyone intrigued by the question: “What should the future of Utah’s wild lands be?” and who is willing to talk with others about this question with respect for a variety of viewpoints. Wildlands Dialogue Project: www.suwa.org

Environmentalists oppose Washington County land use bill Despite improvements from a previous version, the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance, the Sierra Club, and Wasatch Mountain Club have come out in opposition to the Washington County Growth & Conservation Act of 2008 due to concerns over wilderness boundaries, public land sales and off-road vehicle management. Sierra Club’s Lawson LeGate says, “Local governments should not develop a dependence on selling off public lands to fund local projects. That’s why we need to remove the provision that grants millions in land sale revenue to Washington County.” Environmentalists are still hopeful that further dialogue will help produce a bill that offers real and lasting protection for southwestern Utah’s public lands.

Jordan River: sewer or urban jewel? In a KCPW interview, Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon lamented the condition of the Jordan River which runs through Utah, Salt Lake and Davis counties saying, “Unfortunately our Jordan River has become a toilet for Salt Lake County, and it’s not what we want it to be.” Mayor Corroon has made Jordan River restoration one of his top priorities with possibilities for trails, riverside restaurants and shopping, wildlife habitat and boating. In May, Salt Lake County and Envision Utah held a series of public meetings to envision the future of the Jordan River, but if you missed the meetings you can fill out a survey on the Blueprint Jordan River website. Blueprint Jordan River: WWW.BLUEPRINT.SLCO.ORG

Feldenkrais® • Structural Integration • Yoga • Massage “When you pay profound attention, profound things can happen.” — David Whyte

“Learning To Age Gracefully” a 6-week class with Carl begins mid-June

Lot sizes range from 5,000 square feet to 15,000+ Green building program 60% permanent open space Community gardens, orchards and wildlife habitat Protective covenants preserve views Architectural standards encourage a village-like atmosphere

Lots starting at $99,000

Wildlands Dialogue Project bridges differences

“Empelvised, Embellied, Empowered” a course for women with Erin begins mid-June Check website for details Visit our new website for audio downloads, articles and videos on the rich world of somatic education. www.bodyhappy.com

Erin Geesaman-Rabke 801.898.0478 Carl Rabke LMT 801.671.4533


12

SLIGHTLY OFF CENTER

June 2008 catalystmagazine.net

Dysfunctional nuclear family Should anyone be dating U.S.? DENNIS HINKAMP

T

he campaign rhetoric is getting so creepy that I’m actually starting to think about the advertisements. The pro-Clinton ad about “who do you want to answer the red phone at 3 a.m.?” is especially disturbing. The scary part is that apparently the impending nuclear holocaust hinges on somebody answering a 1970vintage handset landline. I mean couldn’t a message that important come in on a cell phone, text message or instant messaging? Where are all those billions of dollars of militar y funding going?

Clearly we are world leaders and deserve to wave our giant foam rubber “We’re number one” fingers around in the air like nutbag fans at sporting events. The next thing I thought was “I wonder who the number one nuclear threat in the world is? Syria? North Korea? Switzerland? After a little research, it turns out that it’s us. The United States has about 12,000 nuclear weapons located in 14 states, seven foreign countries and an undisclosed number touring the oceans onboard submarines. Our best buddies, Great Britain and France are about fourth and fifth on the nuke list. Israel has never officially admitted that they have any nuclear weapons at all, but most sources estimate they unofficially have about 100. R ussia is

still leading the pack in sheer numbers of nukes , but most of them are in the same condition as that 1967 VW van in your neighbor’s back yard. So, clearly we are world leaders and deserve to wave our giant foam rubber “We’re number one” fingers around in the air like nutbag fans at spor ting events. The only question is will we use them? I borrowed this potential abuser assessment tool that the rest of the world should be using on the United States right now before they decide to go out with us. “The list below provides you with some extremely valuable information. Use it to help you determine if the person you are dating is already an abuser or has the potential to become one.” 1. Low Frustration Tolerance—Reacts to stress in self-defeating ways, unable to cope effectively with anxiety, acts out when frustrated. Frustration leads to aggression. We are getting a little edgy about the pr ice of oil and the economy in general. 2. Impulsive—Is quick to act, wants immediate gratification, has little or no consideration for the consequences, lacks insight, has poor judgment, has limited cognitive filtering. “Rush to war” and “quagmire” are the words that most often come to mind. 3. Loner—Is isolated and withdrawn, has poor interpersonal relations, has no empathy for others, lacks feeling of guilt and remorse. We have a president who does not like to read newspapers and a vice president who, when told that two-thirds of the American public oppose the war, said “so?” 4. Overly sensitive—Hypersensitive to criticism and real or perceived slights, suspicious, fearful, distrustful, and paranoid. Homeland Security is the result of our insecurities. All shoes and bottles of shampoo ar e poten-

tial bombs, all cell phone calls are to potential enemies and we’ve exported our legal system to Guantanamo Bay. 5. Threats of Violence—Toward self and/or others, direct, veiled, implied, or conditional. Let’s see, last week Hillary Clinton said we would “totally obliterate” Iran if they attacked Israel. 6. Blames Others—Projects blame onto others—Is fatalistic, external locus of control, avoids personal responsibility for behavior, views self as “victim” instead of “victimizer,” self-centered, sense of entitlement. "They hate us for our freedom" is the national equivalent of high school cliques saying “they hate us because we are popular.” 7. Chemical Abuse—Especially alcohol, opiates, amphetamines, crack, and hallucinogens (PCP, LSD), an angry drunk, dramatic personality/mood changes when under the influence. We do have the highest percentage of our population in prison for drug crimes of any developed country, and we’re still a big importer of the drugs that last time I checked. 8. History of Violence—Towards self and others, actual physical force used to injure, harm, or damage. This element is the most significant in assessing individuals for potential dangerousness. Well, we did use nuclear weapons one, no two, times. We really tried to stop, but they made us do it. 9. Odd/Bizarre Beliefs—Superstitious, magical thinking, religiosity, sexuality, violent fantasies (especially when violence is eroticized), delusions. I still support freedom of religion, but we’ve had a lot of this in the news lately. 10. Preoccupation With Violence Themes—Movies, books, TV, newspaper articles, magazines (detective), music, weapons collections, guns, knives, and implements of torture. Have you looked at the movie or video games listings lately? Tales of the Roman Coliseum seem tame in comparison. Dang, if I were the rest of the world, I would leave skid marks in the driveway trying to get away from us. ◆ Dennis Hinkamp has not given up on America, but thinks it needs to seek some serious therapy.


SWAMI BEYONDANANDA Where Swami answers your questions, and you will question his answers.

YOU WANT MASSAGE SCHOOL?

What Do In A

• Small Classes?..................... 8 Students, Max • Friendly Place?.................... Very Much So • Marketable Job Skills?....... Definitely • Mentor w/Professionals?...Yes • Work In a Live Spa?........... Absolutely • Pay for my Utah Test?........Yeah, We’ll Pay • How About Nationals?.......Yep, Those Too • And My Utah License?.......No Charge To You

Dear Swami:

Dear Randi:

• Advanced Coursework?.....We Have It

I have to wonder what kind of collective mental illness we have in America where a public-minded prosecutor like Elliot Spitzer can be brought down in days when he runs afoul of Wall Street. Meanwhile, the Bush Administration has violated national laws, international laws, and our collective moral sensibilities, and somehow that’s okay. I wouldn’t put it past them to bomb Iran while they’re still in office. I’m concerned, and I’m wondering if there is anything we can do to head off that horrific possibility. Tristan Schaute

Past predictions? 100% accurate. I can predict the past with uncanny accuracy. If it’s already happened, you can count on me to tell you. If it hasn’t happened yet, that’s trickier. After all, this is a universe of infinite possibilities. You’ve heard of Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle? Well, now they’re not even sure that is true. Even so, the best way to predict the future is by accurately assessing the present. In other words, if we keep going where we are headed, we are likely to end up there. As for making me your adviser, I have to tell you it is not advisable. For one thing, anyone who asks me for advice is already in so much trouble, that it is doubtful I can help. So, here is my policy: I am happy to offer you advice, provided you promise not to take it.

• For One Low Price?............ Guaranteed

Dear Tristan, I’m afraid we now have a new affliction to add to the panoply of diseases our poor body politic is suffering from. Along with Mad Cowboy Disease, Deficit Inattention Disorder, Irony Deficiency and Truth Decay, we now have Spitzerphrenia. That is where you can be nailed for screwing a prostitute, but if you screw the entire world, you get off scot-free. Regarding your other question, we must bring the Iranian and American people together to face the one danger we share in common—our lowest common dominator misleaders under the influence of unfun fundamentalism, motivated by fear instead of love. This mutually reinforcing terror is a loco motive that has us on track for a train wreck. That is why the unarmed forces of both nations must be willing to take up arms in a totally new way. Yes, that’s right. Arms. Only this time, we are to use our arms in the only appropriate way— for hugging. Imagine a preemptive peace ceremony where ordinary American and Iranian citizens stand in front of one another in complete attention, present arms, and hug. And then the whole world can be put at ease.

Dear Swami: I’m thinking of hiring you as a spiritual adviser. How accurate are your past predictions? Randi Holway-Holm

• Grants & Loans?..................Those Who Qualify • Accredited?.......................... Through ABHES

Why Not

Choose Paradise

Healing Mountain Massage School

1-800-407-3251 www.healingmountain.org

•GUARANTEED, BEST BUY IN UTAH•

$20 One Hour Massage When You Get A Spa Treatment

Dear Swami:

Spa treatment prices when booked with a massage

I noticed a while back you suggested a name change to an individual suffering from bad luck. I may have a similar problem. I’m sure my Vietnamese parents didn’t mean me any harm, but I think they’ve put me at a distinct disadvantage. Not only that, but I recently had my astromusicological chart done and found out I was born under the song sign, “I Can’t Get No Satisfaction.” Can you help me, Swami? Ho Lai Minh

Dear Ho, Wow. Having said that, I realize you’re in more trouble than I imagined. So, yes. A name change can make a huge difference. Like the guy who came to me with money issues. His name was Osborne Poe. We made the switch, and now he’s Richard Denhue. Then there was the unsuccessful football player, Ben Schwarmer. He became Linus Grimmage, and his name is synonymous with football. For you? Well, you might try Hugo Farr. And while you’re making changes, change your birthdate. They won’t let you do it in California, but if you just drive to Nevada, you can legally change your date of birth. You’d only have to become six months older to be born under the Beatles, “I Feel Fine. ◆ © 2008 by Steve Bhaerman. All rights reserved. Swami is coming to Salt Lake City on June 24! Mark your calendar. WWW.WAKEUPLAUGHING.COM.

• • • • • • • • • • •

Eucalyptus Steambath............. $15 Oriental Hot Rocks.................. $15 Reiki Energy Treatment........... $15 Acupressure Facial................... $17 Stone Facial............................. $17 Crystal Chakra Balance............ $17 Footbath+Reflex Rub............. $20 Danish Salt Glow.................... $20 Steam+Detox Wrap................ $30 Herbal Body Wrap.................. $30 1-Hr Spa Pedi-CARE Pkg.......... $30

• • • • •

1-Hr Swedish Massage............. $25 Deep Tissue or Graduate..........+10 4-Handed Massage.................. $45 1.5 Hr Couples Massage........... $70 1.5 Hr Hot Stone Swedish........ $35

Paradise@1/2 the Price 355-6300 Healing Mountain Massage School 455 South 300 East • Suite 103 Salt Lake City (Enter thru underground parking on 500 South)

www.healingmountain.org/clinic.html

NEW CLINIC HOURS: Monday – Friday.................10:00 am – 9:00 pm Saturday.............................. 9:00 am – 6:00 pm Sunday................................10:00 am – 6:00 pm Gift certificates are available. Call or come in today.

R ARE & U N U S U A L R O C K S , C R Y S T A L S , G EMS F R O M A R O U N D THE W O R L D

Phantoms, Scepters, Lasers, Record Keepers, Elestials, Windows, Timelinks, Clusters, DTs

Healing Mountain CRYSTAL Co. 455 South 300 East, #100 • SLC 1-800-811-0468


14

June 2008

CULTURAL CROSSINGS

They were seeking refuge, rest and a new home. Persecution and atrocities left behind, they settled here in the Salt Lake Valley after long, trial-filled journeys. How could this group of Mormon pioneers have known that their final stop in 1847 would make it possible for another group of people, so different from them, to share the same story more than 100 years later?

This is the place, for Mor mons and Muslims

STORY BY STEPHANIE CARTER PHOTOS BY SEAN GRAFF WWW.SEANGRAFF.COM


Everyone knows everyone else. Even when services start, children and babies continue to play happily, surrounded by friends and family. In this congregation, a child has not just one, but many, mothers. It’s a scene many Latter-day Saints could relate to. However, it’s not Mormons, but Muslims, who are worshipping tonight.

y 1999, after two international wars—one with Iran, the other with the United States—and nearly a decade of sanctions, Iraqis were left destitute. That same year, American and British forces began weekly, sometimes daily, air strikes on the country in an attempt to weaken what seemed to be the iron grip of Saddam Hussein. It was also the same year Thikra Mohammed and her husband decided it was time for their y oung family to leave their home and native country.

B

“We did not feel we were free,” Thikra recounts. “We could not talk. There was a lot of interruption and interference with our jobs as doctors. The situation got worse and worse in every aspect of life.” The couple, along with their infant daughter, left for Yemen. “It was very tough and hard, difficult to explain to our families — leaving Iraq, leaving our profession.…We don’t know where we are heading. So it is very difficult situation, but we thought about our kids and their future,” Thikra explains. Yemen, a country struggling with its own internal conflicts, was little

improvement over the family’s situation in Iraq. The family moved again, this time to Jordan. There they were registered as refugees with the United Nations and told they were being relocated to another desert region, the state of Utah. “Some people in the American Embassy in Jordan, they just gave us some advice, some information about the people in Utah. They say, ‘They are kind of religious.’ We just felt comfortable with that.” Though Thikra says she was wary of the term Mormon. She had no idea what it meant, what it entailed. “We said that’s fine, maybe later, if we

don’t like it we can change state. We can move to another state. But when we arrived here we just felt it was very nice and it is convenient for us as a family.” Mustafa, another Iraqi refugee who also fled the rule of Saddam, likened living under the dictator to an abusive husband. “He takes away all feeling of safety in the home, the most important place. The place you should always feel safe. That is what Saddam did. He took away safety in my country, my home.” In 1997, Mustafa left Iraq and came to Utah at the encouraging recommendation of a friend. He’s now passing along the advice. “I think Utah is nice,” he says. “I visit many states where Muslims are living. They think that it’s the best place for them, but my recommendation is to come to Utah. It’s a good place to raise children. You

Continued on next page


16

continued from page 14:

June 2008

can protect them. Because it is a conservative state, you can shelter them from certain things.” Conservative is an understatement to some. The predominantly Republican state is also home to the headquarters of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 2004, an official estimate counted a little over 60% of Utah’s population as members of the Church. Though they are not minarets, the steeples of Mormon churches and temples that pierce Utah’s skyline are evidence of the state’s religious atmosphere, something many Muslims find appealing.

Though they are not minarets, the steeples of Mormon churches and temples that pierce Utah’s skyline are evidence of the state’s religious atmosphere, something many Muslims find appealing.

“They focus on religion, like attending churches, mosque like us.” Thikra emphasizes, “This is very important in life.” The Mormon majority in Utah have created a state that reflects the religion in both laws and culture. It’s a phenomenon central to the complaints of the non-Mormon residents of the state, but as Muslims, Thikra, Mustafa and many other Iraqis share common religious restrictions and morals with Mormons. Both Islam and Mormonism encourage their followers to abstain from alcohol, drugs and gambling. “I’d rather have a Mormon neighbor,” says Khalid Al-Hamed, an Iraqi refugee from the province of Basra. “They don’t drink. They don’t smoke. You feel the same.” There is a strong emphasis on family, a value apparent in both church and day-to-day activities of both religions. The LDS church has established Welfare Square near downtown Salt Lake, an area dedicated solely to helping those in need. In Islam, charity is one of the five religious pillars of the faith. It may seem an odd comparison to some, but to Daniel Peterson, a member of the LDS church and a professor of Islamic Studies and Arabic at Brigham Young University in Provo, it’s a phenomenon he’s observed for years. “There is a large theological difference, of course, but not quite so far apart as people may guess. Theologically we speak the same language,” Peterson says. Peterson also says he’s not surprised to hear that Muslims in Utah are finding the “moral climate” in Utah to their liking. It’s a sentiment he hears echoed from his own Muslim friends and acquaintances. He says quite often, diplomats from Muslim countries visiting BYU are pleased to find an American university that has not become as liber al as most. Because the University has a strict honor code and requires its Mormon students to closely follow LDS standards, diplomats often send their children to the campus. “They can receive an American education in an atmosphere that more closely resembles the one in which their parents were educated back in the ’50s or ’60s,” Peterson explains. Internationally, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints donates more money to Islamic Relief Worldwide than any other church. The LDS church donated $1.6 million in aid to tsunami vic-

CULTURAL CROSSINGS

tims; Peterson says it is easier for the church to donate to an established charity with ties and links to a community that would be hard for a Christian church in a Muslim country to establish. This tie fueled fire behind a Boston Globe article earlier this year alleging that former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney was a member of a church that funded terrorism. The article alleged some of the money donated was diverted to the Palestinian militant group Hamas. According to an official statement addressing the article from the church’s website, “All donations from the Church to Islamic Relief Worldwide have been in the form of relief items such as clothing, quilts, disposable diapers, infant formula, wheelchairs, washcloths, soap and first aid supplies. In each case, representatives of the Church accompanied the shipments and oversaw distribution.” The LDS church is also established in the Middle East. Though they are forbidden to proselytize, there are members in Jordan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon and Syria. “We do not actively seek out or target Muslim converts,” Peterson says, though it is an ongoing discussion within the church. “We’re there to build relationships and friendships,” he continues. “We certainly won’t deny that.” Nationally, bridges are also being built. Peterson is traveling to Claremont University in Southern California to speak at a MuslimMormon dialogue to address the on-going and future relationship between the two religions. Here in Utah, the LDS church, as it has done with numerous other religions, offered to donate money to help Muslims build a mosque in the Salt Lake Valley. Peterson says the offer was declined. Peterson also believes many Mormons may not be aware that their conservative atmosphere is benefiting others, especially their Muslim neighbors. The appreciation and recognition may also encourage more Mormons to make more of an effort learn about Islam. “There is a lot of ignorance, but there a lot of interest in learning more. There is a hunger to understand,” Peterson says.

A home and a place to worship Before the service begins, there are warm greetings and inquiries of

health and well-being, how children are doing in school, what solutions one can offer to another’s problem, general gossip. Everyone knows everyone else. Even when services start, children and babies continue to play happily, surrounded by friends and family. In this congregation, a child has not just one, but many, mothers. It’s a scene many Latter-day Saints could relate to. However, it’s not Mormons, but Muslims, who are worshipping tonight. A table is laid with numerous dishes of rice, stews and breads, dishes as familiar and traditional as green Jell-o and funeral potatoes are to Mormons, in preparation for a meal before the service. Now the sheik will speak. Tonight, his sermon is about the media and the sometimes harmful stereotypes of Muslims that are often portrayed. “We should know what the American people think…,” he continues, “this is one way to help understand, and therefore, prevent potential prejudices.”

It’s just one of the ongoing str uggles Iraqi refugees are facing. Another is citizenship. Most are permanent residents, official refugees. They’ve taken their naturalization tests, passed, but citizenship still eludes them. The majority of Iraqis living in Utah were here before the 9-11 attacks. After that, however, the process slowed to a standstill. Many have taken their cases to court with the help of lawyers working for Catholic Community Services.


“Even after 10 years of living here, paying taxes and abiding by the law,” says Mustafa who is still fighting for his citizenship. Thikra took her naturalization test in April 2005 and still waits for citizenship. “We have everything documented here,” she says, “The government brought us here as legal refugees. We are permanent residents now. It’s just a matter of processing.” For Thikra, the pursuit of citizenship may force her to leave Utah. “If I apply for residency, I have to apply in different states. If I get any chance or opportunity in another state, I have to move. But I really love this state.” If that is the case, Thikra is adamant about coming back. “Maybe if I finish residency, which is four years in a different state, I can move back again and work here as a doctor.”

Still looking for refuge Nearly every Iraqi in Utah, and the rest of the nation, has family still living in the war-torn country. Mustafa went back to see his family in Karabala, a city that has made its fair share of headlines for violent clashes and bombings. He tells of limited electricity, rising gas prices, the way life has slowed to an excruciatingly slow pace. “I saw my country and I’m not optimistic about it,” he shakes his head. “A term you hear repeatedly is ‘democracy,’ and we’ve seen that ‘democracy’ comes with a price.” Thikra and her husband lost numerous relatives in the violence that erupted after the fall of Saddam. “In the beginning it was hopeful, but now it is hopeless.” Her voice waivers and she struggles to control her emotions as she talks of the despair and helplessness she feels knowing that her loved ones are suffering. “Every time I call my family they say, ‘We just have one wish in our life, to see you before we die, because we don’t know what may happen.’ It is very hard,” she continues. “They wish now they could leave Iraq.” And many do. This month is the fifth anniversar y of America’s 2003 invasion of Iraq. Backlash from the conflict has spilled outside Iraq’s borders into neighboring countries. There is a growing concern over the crisis brewing in countries like Syria, Egypt, and Jordan around the 2.5 million Iraqi refugees who have fled the ongoing violence in their homeland. Not since the displacement of

AS SEEN ON THE BACK COVER OF THE

Salt Lake & Park City’s Sustainable Business Directory & Resource Guide

the Palestinian people with the creation of Israel in 1948 has there been a refugee crisis this large in the Middle East. Syria, after taking in one million Iraqi refugees, has effectively closed its borders, overwhelmed by the continuous flow. Jordan admitted more than 700,000 of the refugees before shutting down its border crossings. Egypt has taken in 100,000. The United States initially set a goal to allow 7,000 refugees into American borders over the last 12 months. The Bush Administration then lowered the goal to 2,000. As of the end of 2007, 1,608 Iraqis have been resettled in America. The growing strain the refugees are creating in the Middle East is one America cannot afford to ignore. Not only is there resentment from Iraqis, who risked their lives to help the U.S. in exchange for visas, but citizens of other Middle Eastern countries are now competing with the refugees for jobs and aid money. Sooner or later, the U.S. will have to recognize that taking in a mere 2,000 of more than 2.5 million is not enough. As yet another group faces the struggles and hardships of making a home in a foreign land, the Salt Lake Valley, and other Mormon communities throughout the nation may prove helpful in the transition. “I think Mormons and Muslims can become a model of how MuslimChristian relations can work,” Peterson says. “The best kinds of relationships are built by neighbors, having people over to dinner. Mormons tend to be good at that. It could be a model for a lot of people.” N Stephanie Carter is a recent graduate of the University of Utah with a BA in communications and a minor in Middle Eastern Studies. Last summer she lived and blogged in Cairo. Her experiences with the LDS Church in the Middle East inspired this article.

Clients at Long Okura P.C. feel cared for and well informed. From your first consultation, we work with you to develop and execute an immediate plan of action.

LONG OKURA IS PROUD TO BE A

We also have an extensive “Green Pledge” that lists the many ways we are trying to help our environment. For more information, visit our site: www.longokura.com/green

1981 Murray Holladay Rd Salt Lake City, UT (801) 746-6000 www.longokura.com


18

RADIOACTIVE: 2012 SERIES

June 2008

Evidence of a World Transforming An interview with James O’Dea BY TROY WILLIAMS ames O’Dea is the president of the Institute of Noetic Sciences (IONS), after serving as director of the Washington, DC, office of Amnesty International for 10 years. O’Dea is also a contributor to the new anthology “The Mystery of 2012: Predictions, Prophecies and Possibilities.” His chapter, “You Were Born for Such a Time as This,” argues that humanity is rapidly approaching our pay date, “when our debt will be maxed and no further credit from a depleted and over-taxed Nature will be extended to us.” I invited O’Dea on RadioActive to talk about the breakdowns and breakthroughs that we can anticipate over the next several years.

J

Troy Williams: What do you mean by a “noetic science”? James O’Dea: Noetic science comes from the Greek word nous— to know directly. In the western development of our intellectual capacities, technologies and worldviews, we’ve relied heavily on the rational mind—which we still love and treasure—but it’s not the only part of us. There is another way of connecting with our deepest wisdom. It goes beyond the “left/right,” “up/down” sequential logic of the rational mind and captures a whole gestalt of information. The Institute of Noetic Sciences was founded by Edgar Mitchell, Jr., the sixth man to walk on the moon who, when coming back to Earth, had an intense sense of connection beyond his body and into the universe. He was a hardcore scientist and marine pilot, but when he came back to the planet he realized there is a whole other way to connect science and spirituality. Social justice, wisdom civilization—whatever you want to call it—humanity is reaching into our highest evolutionary possibilities to activate the transformation and changes that are possible. “The Mystery of 2012” is really a compendium of thought from many perspectives that says: It’s coming. There is some synthesis of evolution that is about to change the course

of events. These are predictions and possibilities—they are not some Biblical truth being passed on as a new religion. TW: And your primary work focuses on health and healing, extended human capacities and emerging worldviews. What exactly are you trying to track? JO: Just as in that experience with Edgar Mitchell, we are seeing a big crack in the dominant materialist scientific worldview. Science can only relate to that which is material. The whole of western civilization has organized around materialism —and materialism gone insane—to

And yet, I have seen the heroism of the human spirit. You can see the indomitable nature of the human being rising through those kinds of catastrophic abuses. You see profound humanity. After I left Amnesty International, I led dialogues around the world called “Compassion and Social Healing” where we brought together former Nazis and Holocaust survivors —people who you would never imagine could look at each other and offer each other love and forgiveness and reconciliation. That is what led me to the Institute of Noetic Sciences. We have this deep

It’s activism in which we are not projecting out into the world. It’s all too easy to say the problem is out there, whether it’s the corporations or the military or whomever. We believe that the emerging worldview is more innersourced. It’s more about how do I transform and become a transformational agent myself? the extent that we are destroying the habitat essential to our sur vival. We have traced the breakdown in this materialist worldview and the beginning of our understanding into the subtle field of mind, healing and energy. We’ve also looked at the relationship between attitude, belief and health, for example, the whole field of epigenetics—the study of the relationship between consciousness and your own genetic triggers —the notion that our consciousness and awareness are truly causal. We can now begin to reframe a civilization not built on materialism but on consciousness and awareness. We can ask how do we raise the kind of awareness that will sustain us ecologically, bring us peace and health, and activate our highest wisdom. I was in Turkey during the period leading up to the coup in 1980. I was knifed and my house was machine-gunned. After that I was in Beirut during the massacres of the Palestinians. It was a very low point for me because I saw children murdered. It was a true nightmare.

capacity to transform the worst and rise out of it. South Africa created the Truth, Reconciliation and Forgiveness work, and that is the model we need to hold for this planet. It is not the cowboy “go get ’em!” approach, but rather, how do we find the means and the consciousness to transform, as in South Africa, the apartheid of hatred into an intercommunal civilization? TW: You talk about the need to clean wounds before they can properly heal, whether it’s the dispossession of indigenous peoples or even our current occupation of Iraq. Before wounds can heal, they first need to be cleaned. So there is a need for us to take responsibility for our own actions and the actions of our people, before this healing can begin. JO: Yes, we can look at evolution and all the errors that were made, but we need to hold it in a container of compassion so that it can be resolved—so that we can move on. That cleaning-out process is truth. It’s not a vindictive truth. It’s

not “my truth” above “your truth.” But it is, as in the case of S outh Africa, truth, reconciliation and then forgiveness. Let’s look honorably at the past— for example, the devastation of indigenous cultures—not so that we can fixate on blame or punishment, but so we can realize the preciousness of what was lost and the po wer of what can be reconfigured when we unite indigenous wisdom and the western way of knowing. That is what is being called for—a whole new synthesis of how we know. That is what people are looking for in “The Mystery of 2012.” They are looking at some synthesis that will take us beyond the either/or polarities of western development and indigenous knowing. What planetary civilization can be sustainable, eco-centered, naturebased and yet also allow for the ingenuity and creativity of the human spirit to optimize? We’ve got to learn these lessons quickly, knowing that we have a choice to change the course of history and not repeat it. TW: Talk about “The Shift Report: Evidence of a World Transforming.” You are exploring innovations in all kinds of different fields. JO: “The Shift Report” looks at education, commerce and a whole variety of fields and begins to tr ack the worldview shift from the reductionist to the more integrating. From competition to cooperation and from outer-directed to innerdirected. What, below the radar, is an evolutionary sign of change? For example, we are seeing a deep and amazing conversation happening between science and spirituality. We are seeing that the evolutionary story of domination and competition is actually more collaborative. We are seeing that the human body —the mind-body system—is much more healthy when we focus on love. We’ve discovered in the last 20 years many of the powers and capacities of the human heart that were never understood before. Just think of someone you love and your body starts to break down cortisol, which is the driver of stress, and


may be extremely harsh. We’re not waking up at sufficient rates to respond to the ecological crisis. We’re still caught in a ver y punitive mentality. We’re not exercising our deepest capacities to dialogue with “the other.� The human story is likely to unravel until we reach some turning point where we see that we have no other choice but to r each for our better natures. We will see graphically how profoundly we are connected and how we can in fact shift consciousness itself. There are model cooperatives where people are learning prosperity and health through new paradigm economics, new paradigm psychology, and new paradigm health-care. These will become a much more central part of the story. And yet it’s an ancient story too. The fasci-

Kanzeon ZEN CENTER

starts to create DHEA. It starts to release the pleasure seekers, the hormones, the biochemical stew of love, friendship and empathy. This conversation between scientific and spiritual worldviews is accelerating. It was triggered by the mind-body health movement and the startling insights of quantum physicists. They’re looking deep into the quantum world and seeing a reflection of our own attitudes and beliefs. The observer is fundamental to the thing that is obser ved. I am personally interested in this domain, as someone who has an activist perspective. How do we bring this conscious model into activism? Some people are talking about spiritual activism or transformational activism. It’s activism in which we are not projecting out into the world. It’s all too easy to say the

nating thing about 2012 is that it gives you tremendous respect for those in ancient times and in v arious cultures, who looked up in the heavens, studied them and tracked them as accurately as we can track them today. They saw 26,000-year cycles that come to a closure in the years ahead. It gives you a sense of awe of our place in the cosmos . We do have a place in the cosmic story. We’re a little planet, but w e’re in the midst of great cycles and movements within the starry heavens themselves. The people of the Kalahari have an endtimes story where they visualize All Devourer eating up the trees, rivers, everything. It devours Mantis, the divine spokesperson of the Kalahari people. Eventually they emerge out of the belly of D evourer completely restored. There is some sense that we are inside the very thing that needs to be transformed. And that’s the good news. Because if we are in here, in it, we can transform it. We have to go back into our own awareness to find out those deep truths that will then be essential to the next evolutionary shift. N Learn more about IONS at WWW.IONS.ORG. RadioActive airs every weekday on KRCL 90.9 FM. WWW.KRCL.ORG.

Zen & the Environment July 1 – August 2, 2008

July 5, 7:00 PM Earth, Air, Fire, Water Art Show Opening & Garden Party July 12, 7:00 PM Evening Benefit with Utah’s Poet Laureate Katharine Coles July 19, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM Ikebana - The Art of Japanese Flower Arranging with Theresa Suoeka July 26, 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM Big Mind & The Four Elements with Diane Hamilton Sensei at Boulder Mountain Zendo in Torrey, UT

“After I left Amnesty International, I led dialogues around the world called ‘Compassion and Social Healing’ where we brought together former Nazis and Holocaust survivors—people who you would never imagine could look at each other and offer each other love and forgiveness and reconciliation.� problem is out there, whether it’s the corporations or the military or whomever. We believe that the emerging worldview is more innersourced. It’s more about how do I transform and become a transformational agent myself? How do I go beyond the polarity? You know the beautiful quote from Rumi, “out there beyond right and wrong there is a field. I will meet y ou there.� How do we get to that place in consciousness where we’re not creating the enemies who are the solutions to our problems, but rather configuring a new sense of community? TW: You make this connection that because of the interconnectivity of our globe—our economy, our environment—if things break down, it’s a global breakdown. And then you juxtapose the potential of that for a global breakthrough. JO: Yes, there is something so accelerated about the way ideas, perceptions and business is conducted these days. The skies and oceans are whole elements that we share. We see the weave of connections of how what happens in one place affects another. There is a sense of these years now, accelerating more into that window of 2012, where the lessons before us

Arts Month

August 2 Evening Photography Nature Walk with Stephanie Merzel July 1, 8,15, 22, 7:30 PM Intro To Zen with Genpo Roshi & Michael Mugaku Zimmerman Sensei July 9, 16, 23, & 30, 7:30 PM Four Elements Writing Series with Stephanie Merzel July 3, 7:30 PM Movie Night - Quest for Fire with Diane Musho Hamilton Sensei July 10, 7:30 PM Zen & Creativity with Margaret Esterman July 17, 7:30 PM How to Train a Goldfish and Other Stories from the Open Road with special guest Teresa Jordan July 31, 7:30 PM Talent Show with Mo Bruder (Bruce Lambson)

ĂžO\hS]\

July 25, 7:30 PM Zen Poetry, Tantra & Song with George Jisho Robertson July 29, 7:30 PM Heart Sutra Evening: Body, Mouth, and Mind with Peter Dokuho Verbogt

Email:signup@kzci.org

WWWKANZEONZENCENTERORGs 1268 E. South Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah 84102


34

April 2008

catalystmagazine.net

LOCAVORE REPORT

The Banana Revolution: Eating locally for beginners The locavore trend doesn’t mean giving up good food, it just means discovering the good food being produced in your neighborhood, and even your own backyard BY EMILY APLIN

raspberries right now, I could go to any grocery store and find them—even in February. The store always has every fruit and vegetable, so why didn’t the Farmers’ Market? The answer, which is so simple I’m embarrassed to say it, is that food growers are bound by the seasons of the climate they are growing in. It had not occurred to me until that day at the Farmers’ Market that if I was buying peaches in F ebruary, they had traveled from some exotic locale, thousands of miles from Utah. When I went home and faced the bananas sitting on my counter, I felt the disconnect that comes from not knowing what you are eating or how it came to be in your kitchen. As the locavore trend grows, communities across the country are starting “Eat Local” Challenges, which encourage participants to commit to eating only locally produced foods for a specified length of time. In Salt Lake City, Andrea and Mike Heidinger completed their first 30-day challenge in October 2007. They said they were amazed at how quickly word spread about the challenge and how many people actually joined them. The parameters were flexible and participants committed to eating locally grown food (within 250 miles) for as shor t as one day to an entire month. The Heidingers and other participants detailed their experiences on a blog, often offering advice on where to find hardto-find items.

...if I was buying peaches in February, they had traveled from some exotic locale, thousands of miles from Utah.

A

s a child of a casserole family, where most meals contained only store-bought canned vegetables and a can of gelatinous cream-ofsomething soup, my understanding of where food comes from was limited, to say the least. Over the last few years there seems to have been a shift in the way many people think about the food they eat. A growing trend, locally and nationally, encourages people to consider their roles as consumers in the food market. They’re calling themselves “locavores” and their aim is to buy food that is grown and produced locally whenever possible. The reasons for becoming a locavore are as varied as they are for becoming a vegetarian. For some, the environmental impact of buying food

that has traveled in refrigerated vehicles from halfway around the world is reason enough. For others, it’s about supporting local farmers and investing in their local economies. For me, it’s about getting back to basics. My first visit to the Downtown Farmers’ Market four years ago marked the beginning of a revolution for me. As I wandered around the vendors’ booths on that sunny July day looking for fresh fruits, such as peaches and raspberries, I was baffled. I approached one of the vendors and asked when there might be peaches at the market. He responded with a kind smile and said, “Not until August or September.” It didn’t make any sense. If I wanted peaches or

In order to complete their challenge, participants relied on a variety of resources including local farmers’ markets and community supported agriculture (CSA) programs. Some actually produced their own fruits and vegetables. Complete commitment to the challenge required giving up some foods altogether. Rice, coffee, black pepper and cinnamon were among the foods that the Heidingers said they missed most. According to Andrea, however, the challenge helped them discover honey as a substitute for sugar, and they haven’t gone back to using refined sugar since. For the Heidingers, eating locally is about supporting local farmers. As Andrea explained, “Anything we can do to preserve the local farms is


cool. Some of them have been around for generations and they’re all struggling, always on the edge of going out of business.” Christi Paulson of Slow Food Utah agrees with the Heidingers about supporting local farmers, and said she believes educating children about agriculture is a good start. Slow Food promotes organic, sustainable food growing and buying practices and educates the public about the benefits of those practices. According to Paulson, there has been an increase in membership in the last three years and more significantly, a drastic increase in the number of people who know about Slow Food and what it does.

that explain Slow Food’s core beliefs, which Paulson explains as, “good, clean, fair food.” Paulson says she is particularly proud of the school outreach programs that Slow Food is involved with. “Kids generally don’t know where their food comes from. They just think it comes straight from the grocery store. And just seeing their faces when they’re digging in the dirt and they’re seeing what happens when they plant a seed and it grows....,” she said. “And it’s good for their health. Kids don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, but if they grow it, they’ll eat it.” In addition to teaching kids where food comes from, Paulson sees the school garden as a recruiting tool. She is cultivating the gardeners, and maybe even farmers, of tomorrow. Members of Slow Food meet monthly and the group holds informal potluck dinners regularly, open to others interested in joining. Visit the Slow Food Utah Web site (WWW.SLOWFOODUTAH.ORG) for upcoming events and other helpful information about eating local in Utah.

Shop local

Eating locally is more than a trend, though. Becoming a locavore requires more than just passing up Starbucks for a local coffee shop. It requires a shift in thinking. Perhaps you’re not ready to give up eating iceberg lettuce in January just yet, and neither am I. For those of us trying to find a balance between enjoying the foods we love and supporting local business, there are many small steps that can make a big difference to local food growers.

Meet new people According to Christi Paulson, Slow Food Utah used to be a small group of middle-aged food enthusiasts who gathered four times each year to enjoy a dinner made from local, organic food. In 2004, when Paulson was asked to lead the group, Slow Food began reaching out to the community through programs like the schoolyard garden at Riley Elementary, where Paulson teaches. Among other things, Paulson has transformed Slow Food Utah from what she characterized as a “supper club” into a more community-based organization that welcomes everyone. Slow Food Utah often maintains a booth at the Downtown Farmers’ Market, offering flyers and brochures

Farmers’ markets are a great introduction to understanding where your food comes from. Each week at the markets, growers sell their farm-fresh produce and answer questions about their growing practices. During the season (June through October) the variety of produce available will change with the weather. In the early months, fresh produce is mostly leafy greens, peas and beans. Each week the offerings expand and change. There are dozens of farmers’ markets throughout Utah, from Logan to St. George. To find one near you, visit WWW.UTAHSOWN.UTAH.GOV/ FARMERSMARKETS.HTM. Besides the mainly fruit and vegetable options available at local farmers’ markets, several local dairies and ranches throughout Utah provide milk, cheese and meat. Beehive Cheese Co. in Uinta makes its cheese from milk from a local dairy, Rockhill Creamery in Richmond has its own grassfed cows, and you can find their products in grocery stores along the Wasatch Front. Local meat producers like the G Bar Ranch and Morgan Valley Lamb offer all-natural, chemical-free, Utah-raised beef and lamb and can be found online and in stores specializing in local food. Local First Utah is a helpful resource to find local food. On the website (WWW.LOCALFIRST.ORG) you’ll find a business directory of local businesses. Local First promotes all kinds of local businesses in an effor t

to support small businesses and local economies. In addition to a listing of local food retailers and producers, the site also lists restaurants that serve locally grown food.

Help a farmer Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) is another way to get some face-to-face interaction with the people who grow your food. Unlike farmers’ markets, where customers can shop for specific items each week just as they would at the grocery store, Community Supported Agriculture requires a season-long commitment. With CSAs, customers buy a share of a grower’s crop before the crops have been harvested, and then fresh produce is delivered weekly to various pick-up points. Several farms along the Wasatch front offer

CSA programs. The programs vary in price, as well as the selection of produce they offer. Christi Paulson said she has been involved with her CSA for five years. She said she enjoys the variety of produce and the interaction with the grower that she gets from it. “Usually you have to try things you’ve never had before,” she said. “And you know where your food came from, you know that farmer. You can trust that person.” Buying produce from a CSA can be unpredictable because you don’t know what fruits and vegetables you’ll be getting from week to week, and sometimes you may get vegetables you’ve never eaten and aren’t sure how to prepare. Many of the CSA pro-

Continued on page xx


COMMUNITY RITUAL

34 May 2008 catalystmagazine.net

Why do we marry?

The congregation makes vows as well BY DOROTHEE KOCKS

real feat of love is the same as always: In this moment, do you act toward this person with more kindness than less, more generosity, more forgiveness, more tenderness, more … pleasure, delight, welcome…? Do you do the bittersweet waltz of everyday life together? When small acts of love become a habit, year after year, love grows. Love expands into parts of yourself you don’t know yet that you have. As my father said on the occasion of my sister ’s wedding, you think you love each other now? You have no idea.

Today, you are going to vow to love each other forever. Vowing in public before your friends and family is a solemn and holy act. And to help y ou do it, we will go first. We’ll make some vows to you: We promise to love, honor and protect this couple through all the days of their lives together. We promise to whisper sweet nothings into their ears, (you’re a great couple… I love how you are, together… the two of you are gorgeous)… so they feel the current of love and remember it’s there. We promise to make them laugh in times of trouble and help them to turn to each other in times of sorrow. We vow to support them in keeping their marriage alive and full of spirit.

Consciousness melding—profound though it is—is merely the party trick of marriage. The real feat of love is the same as always: In this moment, do you act toward this person with more kindness than less, more generosity, more forgiveness, more tenderness, more... pleasure, delight, welcome...? Do you do the bittersweet waltz of everyday life together? When small acts of love become a habit, year after year, love grows. Love expands into parts of yourself you don’t know yet that you have.

This writing was originally presented during the wedding ceremony of our good friends Melissa Bond and Chase Fetter last fall. For this traditional month of weddings, we offer it to you—a reminder to all of us who hav e taken (or who contemplate taking) this step.

W

e all hear a lot about how we fail each other. Great literature tells us about it, and country music songs. We know heartbreak and all its good reasons. But we can also love. We can. Do it. We can love. Love, when it lasts, becomes a habit. Habit is usually a bad word. But it is also part of inhabit, and that’s what lovers do, they inhabit each other, they house each other. The container of where you were before changes to a place where your beloved is also. Where does your self end and the beloved’s begin? Where does your body end and the other’s begin? Sometimes you don’t know. (You really don’t know.) I read in the paper recently that scientists have proven, using trick cameras and willing volunteers, that human consciousness is capable of out-of-body experiences. To which mystics will say “we knew that.” To which the married say “we knew that. We are out of our selves in love.” But consciousness melding—profound though it is—is merely the party trick of marriage. The

As they embark on this ancient tradition of mating for life, we, the community, the congregation…we hold them in our protection and that of all those who have come before us. This verse was transcribed from hieroglyphics on a 3,500-year-old Egyptian vase: This love is as good as oil and honey to the thr oat, as linen to the body, as fine garments to the gods, as incense to worshippers when they enter in, as the little seal-ring to my finger. It is like a ripe pear in a man’s hand, it is like the date we mix with wine, it is like the seeds the baker adds to bread. We will be together even when old age comes. And the days in between will be food set before us, dates and honey, bread and wine. Amen. Dorothee Kocks is managing editor and fiction editor of the Wasatch Journal. Author of the non-fiction book "Dream a Little," she's currently writing a novel about a woman, a man, and a strange musical instrument. Called "The Glass Harmonica, or The Sensualist's Tale," it's a historical novel about how love and pleasure can change the world.


Continued:

LOCAVORE REPORT

grams offer recipes and serving suggestions along with the weekly boxes of food, but eating produce in season can sometimes get a little tedious. As Paulson explains, “In the fall I can’t wait for the winter squash. By January, I feel like if I have to look at another winter squash, I’m going to die.” During the summer months, many CSA participants start to feel the same way about tomatoes, which most CSAs have in abundance. Ranui Farms specializes in leafy greens, so their customers always get greens. But other products change over the course of the season. In the summer, customers are likely to get tomatoes and zucchini, and in the fall deliveries will include more root vegetables like potatoes and beets. John Garofalo, owner of the biodynamically run Ranui Farms near Coalville, said their CSA program gets him through the early spring. “Typically growers around here spend a fair amount of money in late winter and early spring to get the operations up and running; but a lot of times we don’t have sellable crops until late May to early June,” he explains. “CSAs mean we don’t have to borrow money.” Among the five CSAs operating along the Wasatch Front, prices for a two-person weekly allotment over the roughly five-month season careen from $175 for the season to $736. Most of these CSAs are full for 2008; you can put your name on a waiting list for 2009, however. The Slow Food Web site has a comprehensive list of the CSA programs in Utah that details the cost and variety of produce offered from each one: WWW.SLOWFOODUTAH.ORG.

Grow it yourself For fresh produce, you can’t beat a backyard garden (or front yard, for that matter). Of course, growing a garden has a learning curve, and most new gardeners chalk their first season up to experience. Starting a garden requires research, a few resources— and courage, faith and follow-up. Home gardens are convenient and under complete control of the gardener, so there can never be any questions about whether the tomatoes really are organic. If you grow them from seeds, you know everything your plants have been exposed to. You also get the convenience of pulling fresh herbs from the garden to throw in the spaghetti sauce cooking on the stove. For those of us who may not have space to plant a garden in, or who

don’t know the first thing about planting squash, there’s still hope. Thanks in part to the growing focus on eating locally, dozens of community gardens have sprouted up along the Wasatch Front in the last 10 years. In Salt Lake, Wasatch Community Gardens operates four gardens in the downtown area. The gardens offer youth programs to educate kids about organic gardening, and they also offer rental plots for members of the community to use. In conjunction with the rental plots, Wasatch Community Gardens teaches related workshops which are usually free and open to the public. According to Susan Finlayson, the Community Education Coordinator for Wasatch Community Gardens, the gardeners at the downtown gardens come from a wide range of backgrounds. “It’s a really diverse community,” she said. “There are people who have been gardening for years who are looking for a space to garden in and who like the idea of meeting people, and then there are the newbies, and they all come together here.” The four gardens currently have 62 rental plots, at $40-$48 each. For some gardens, there is a waiting list that may mean waiting a full year before a plot opens up. For information about workshops and rental applications, visit WWW.WASATCHGARDENS.ORG

Think before you eat Like vegetarians, every locavore has to live and eat according to his or her own values. Being a locavore sometimes means simply making better choices, even if you aren’t buying local. If you can’t find products that are locally produced, Christi Paulson suggests comparing food labels. Choosing the product that traveled the lesser distance brings you one step closer to eating locally. And as Paulson said, you have to be realistic. “I’m not a purist,” she said. “I can’t ever grow a banana here, so am I never going to eat a banana again? No. Am I never going to have anything with vanilla in it, or chocolate, or coffee, or olive oil? No. But I try to get as many local products as I can.” Like Paulson, I can’t say I am or will ever be a purist. I do plan, however, to be more conscious about where my food is coming from. Considering where I started, I would say that’s a pretty big revolution. ◆ Emily Aplin is a recent graduate of the University of Utah . She is a regular at the downtown farmers' market and plans to attempt her own “eat local challenge” this summer.

GEM & BEAD FAIRE South Towne Expo Center

FINE JEWELRY Exhibit Hall 5, 9575 S. State St. (Sandy) GEMS June 27, 28, 29 BEADS FREE HOURLY DOOR PRIZES CRYSTALS UNUSUAL AND RARE GEMS & MINERALS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE SILVER AT GEM FAIRE!! MINERALS CLASSES & DEMONSTRATIONS FRI. 12pm-7pm SAT. 10am-7pm SUN. 10am-5pm

Clip & bring this ad to receive a $2 discount off one general admission. General admission $5 weekend pass. Not valid with any other offer. One coupon per paid admission.

NEXT

SALT LAKE CITY Sep. 26-28

Sponsored by GEM FAIRE, INC. (503) 252-8300 info@gemfaire.com www.gemfaire.com


24

June 2008

CITIZENSHIP

catalystmagazine.net

organizing tool because it directly impacts your audience in a short period of time,” says Remington. Speaking to both filmmakers and activists, she stressed the importance of individual action. “I am going to encourage all of you to film. This is particularly important with a space like Spyhop that can help you through the process.” Film, she insists, is a medium for everyone and especially useful to activists who wish to disseminate

Film is especially effective as an organizing tool because it directly impacts your audience in a short period of time

ACLU video series— filmed with intent to inspire

A

BY KATHERINE PIOLI

crowd of angry people stands outside of the city hall building in Hazelton, Pennsylvania. Some of them wave giant American flags. One holds a signs above his head that read “Proud Legal American.” These are the self-named “small town defenders” and they are on a crusade to pass legislation in their town that would target and penalize anyone hiring or aiding an illegal immigrant. This scene opens a documentary on the rights of immigrants in the ACLU video series “The Freedom Files,” which currently has nine 30minute episodes. Each covers a different issue concerning freedom and human rights—the death

penalty, the rights of gay families to parent, and other subjects. The documentary continues by following a number of respected community members, who are themselves legal immigrants or native citizens of Latino decent, as they fight unconstitutional legislation being passed in their own middle-American towns. Spyhop, a not-for-profit arts and media center for youth in Salt Lake City, together with the Utah Chapter of the ACLU, hosted a screening of the documentary last April, along with a lecture presented by Lisa Remington, a member of the production staff for “The Freedom Files.” “Film is especially effective as an

their message quickly. “We have such an interesting opportunity with technology these days. There are these little cameras that make it easy to take videos and to upload them onto the web and it can be very entertaining.” Never underestimate, Remington reminded her audience, the power of humor. Of course, not everyone is likely to be inspired to pick up a camera. For those less visually and artistically inclined, Remington also had some advice. “Something that the ACLU and the Office of Grassroots Organizers uses is the motto ‘Educate, Inspire, Act.’ For example, I educate myself and make a video, I then inspire you by showing you the video and from there you challenge your audience to do something.” Remington’s story held particular interest for her Utah audience, since she was born and raised in Salt Lake City. After growing up in Sandy and Holladay and studying acting at New York University, she moved to Los Angeles with the idea of pursuing acting as a career. “It is kind of a joke I tell now that in order to pay the bills I found an office job for a documentary filmmaker. Because everyone knows that filmmaking doesn’t pay the bills,” she says. More than just paying the bills, what attracted Remington to documentary work was her sense of equality. “I always had a sense of justice and of being the person to stand up for something even when there was no one else.” When the

Iraq War began in 2003, Remington joined a friend working on a documentary about war protesters. “I started shadowing him, shooting and going to protests. That is when I was first confronted with the question of my own beliefs. It was an interesting moment that through the process of documenting I had to ask myself, where do I stand.” After working on the war project, Remington continued to find jobs in film, but not always with a political slant. She found that she naturally gravitated to films with a purpose and a message that motivated people to action. The ACLU’s objective with the video series is to help initiate the process of education, inspiration and action. Individuals can purchase an episode to use as an inspirational and educational tool among friends. An activist information packet included with the video outlines how to organize a home screening and gives some ideas on how to effectively lead a postscreening conversation. Plus, the packet gives ideas on how to take that collective energy and turn it into action. In closing, Remington reminded her audience of the importance of taking action, and the power of film. Her words of inspiration remained short and to the point, just like the films she advocated. “Just do it,” she said, reading directly from the words on her PowerPoint presentation and chuckling a bit. “Just do it.”

About Spyhop Spyhop is located in downtown Salt Lake City. Since they began in 1999, the have provided hands-on mentoring and experience-based multimedia learning for thousands of youth. Upcoming classes in June include Intro to Filmmaking, Sound Engineering, Flash Animation and others. Check out the program schedule and find out how to apply online at WWW.SPYHOP.ORG.

About the ACLU Freedom Files “The Freedom Files” is now in its second season, covering new issues such as “Torture and Unlawful Imprisonment” and “School to Prison Pipeline.” To purchase the films, along with an activist’s toolkit, a teacher’s guide and other useful information, go to WWW.ACLU.TV. To contact the Utah chapter (355 North 300 West), go to WWW.ACLUUTAH.ORG or call 521-9862.


Discover the beauty waiting to be revealed • Experience state-of-the-art Oxygen Facial Treatment • Improve the quality of your skin • Erase the effects of Acne and Rosacea • Detoxify your body • Reduce the appearance of wrinkles

Call Nataliya today at

801.755.7679

for your free personalized consultation & complimentary detoxification treatment

870 East 9400 South • Suite 105 • Sandy Southwood Medical Plaza nataliyashealingcenter.com


26

FATHERS

June 2008 catalystmagazine.net

Throwing Dad A different kind of father-daughter dance BY SOPHIA NICHOLAS

Before I can throw him, the sensei claps his hands, indicating this technique is over. I feel disappointed that I couldn’t complete the move, making one more adjustment in the quest to perform it gracefully. Nonetheless, Dad and I stand up and bow to one other. The bow opens and closes each class and each technique, whatever the frustration or accomplishment of the day. It conveys a sense of appreciation for the opportunity to learn from each other. And so my dad bows to me and I to him. On these white, worn mats, we are equals. We started practicing aikido together when I was eight. What began as a playful way to take our love of Steven Seagal action movies into the real world ultimately

...a playful way to take our love of Steven Seagal action movies into the real world ultimately became a physical rendering of our father-daughter journey together.

I

do not remember the first time I actually threw my dad over my back. Or the first time he came at me with a wooden knife poised behind his leg. I do know that the ability to restrain his arm created a very different sort of relationship between us than most girls had with their dads. While my friends went to daddy-daughter dances, I was doing a different kind of two-step with my father. Sometimes he came at me with a loud “hi-ya!”; other times I pinned his hands behind his waist, my blond ponytail cutting through the air as he struggled in vain to break free. But always we took turns launching or rolling with the attacks coming at us, using bare hands, long leather-bound swords, and lots of flying, feet first, across the room. “You haven’t got me there,” my dad says, stepping away from the

throw I am just about to per form. I get up from my squat and let go of his arm. He’s not a small guy. Muscular and just over six feet, he moves quickly and lightly, but could still squash a 13-year-old girl if she weren’t careful. But I know that’s not the case with me and I’m eager to prove it. The sleeves on his creamcolored gi are damp, and his face is red from practicing in the heat of the coming summer. He reaches out to grab me again, strongly, powerfully: “Extend through your center, stabilize your feet. You need to do that before you can hold me up.” I exhale in frustration. Sometimes I think he gives me a harder time just because he’s my dad. But I try it again, moving into position, shooting the arm that is holding his up in the air, the other resting on my bent leg. I look up to see his face, which is focused and betrays only a bit of unease.

became a physical rendering of our father-daughter journey together. Throwing a punch, taking a pounding on the mat, coming at it again in a new way, bending the knees for greater stability—all of these dynamic lessons wriggled themselves far beyond the dojo and into our lives. Aikido itself originates from many converging disciplines—jujitsu, judo, samurai sword work, military training—all forged together in World War II era Japan by a man named Morihei Ueshiba. The militaristic culture of Japan before and during the war certainly shaped aikido’s development, but so too did the postwar reverberations of how violence and egoism can unleash devastation upon individuals and the society they inhabit. Because of these influences, aikido developed as a powerful, but ultimately peaceseeking practice. The point is not to injure your opponent, even though you have the capacity to do so, but to reach a point of mutual understanding and transformation. The transformative power of aikido certainly influenced me as I

thrust it, fully and from my center, into the crucible of growing up. I learned, from the power of experience on the mat, when to be assertive and make things happen, when to blend with the force of someone else, when to change places as easily as socks. These exercises kept my practice strong. They also kept me grounded throughout the tumult of junior high, when people began to explore and rebel in novel ways. I never needed to rebel against a father who understood how to take turns giving and receiving attacks from his daughter, when to “say uncle,” and when to push me a little further. Even as I changed and began playing soccer and wearing mascara, the connection between my wrist and my dad’s hand still existed with the same powerful authenticity and playful regularity that it always had. Each day saw the transformation of our lives bit by bit—a new job for him, a new grade in school for me—but still we came to practice together. As we got better, the techniques, grabs, and high falls got more complex and more fluid. We were equals there: taking falls, flying through the air, dancing in and around each other. The spirals of wrist movements became the spirals of a father-daughter evolution. Perhaps he could drive a car and balance a checkbook, but I could turn myself out of a hold quietly and roll like a leopard. Aikido not only provided a goal— training for my first kyu (brown belt) test—it remained a constant source of stability during the uncertainty of my adolescence. Rolling and blending with attacks, getting up again breathlessly, leaping into another series of techniques— always, always coming back to center and learning to extend through that place—such discipline helped anchor me as school became even more difficult, as friends came and went, as my teenage self-confidence waxed and waned according to the whims of fashion or the fleeting attention of a boy. My first kyu test happened after a flurry of preparation. I had practiced every day for six months to attain the technical skill of the wooden sword and the increasingly advanced arm pins and whole-body throws. Beyond demonstrating this technical expertise, I had to show that I could respond effectively in randori—the ultimate free-form practice of countering any attack


with any response—sometimes from only one person, sometimes from multiple. The minutes go by, person after person comes up to attack me, and the sensei calls out different techniques for me to demonstrate. I feel strong and capable but exerted as the test goes on. Soon it is randori. My dad comes up. Breathing deeply, I soften my eyes to take in everything around me equally. My dad’s gray hair and blue hakama blend into the background of the white dojo and people watching from all sides. His face is focused, his arms out of sight. The attack could spring from any angle, any direction, either hand—or a foot if he wants to throw me off guard. Finally it comes, a grab to the wrist, and the Father-Daughter Dance begins: The force of his hold, coming through his body to mine, pushes me back. I stumble and regain my balance. Grounding down, I concentrate on bringing my strength up from that point in my center—my place of power—through my hips, and extending it through my arm. Right then, with everyone watching us, it doesn’t matter that I am 14 years old and he is 48 or that he has 90 pounds and 10 inches on me. Raising the arm my dad holds, I edge into position, stabilize my feet, and extend up to him. I bend at the knees. Now he simply has to trust. Trust the form. Trust me. Slowly, I lower him onto my back. He leans in, knowing I had trained and practiced all this time just to hold him up right now. His feet lift off the ground. But instead of flipping him over right away, I pause to bounce him around a few times, upsidedown, his head poised toward the floor. The sound of laughter rises up from the room. I grin and hold my father on my back for a few more milliseconds. I’ve got him this time. Then—in a blink—I fling him over me, his turn now to streak through the air, much cooler than any action-figure movie star. We’ve both come this far together, holding each other up, learning to fly. ◆ Sophia Nicholas’ first story for CATALYST, “Working to Return From War,” appeared last month. Her “day job” is with HEAL Utah.

You can practice aikido with Rick Berardini Sensei at Utah Aikikai, 3474 South 2300 East, Suite 12. Ph (801) 272-0707. WWW.UTAHAIKI.COM

Limited Spaces available for our Elementary School Grades 1- 6 • • • • • •

Inspiring, Nurturing, Non-Competitive Academic Environment Maximum 12:1 Student Teacher Ratios Environmental Expeditions Program Peace Education and Conflict Resolution Skills Social Responsibility through Service Learning Music, Dance, Art and Spanish Classes

Currently accepting applications for the 2008/09 Academic Year

June 16 - August 15, 2008 Toddler, Early Childhood and Elementary Programs Session One: Our Human Family (June 16–July 3) Session Two: Our Beautiful Earth (July 7 - 23) Session Three: Exploring the Arts (July 28 - August 15) Swimming, Art, Dance, Cooking, Gardening, Field Trips & Much More!

Heirloom Organic Plants Come see our collection of quality herbs, seeds, flowers, soil, fertilizer, compost & more.

Annual Garden Party Story telling & art for children Local artists Local Musicians Trace Wiren

Sat. June Sat. June28, 3o,101oa.m.-5 a.m. - 5p.m. p.m. Coming late summer: Organic heirloom tomatoes, veggies, basil, edible flowers, etc...

1432 South 1100 East • 467-9544

Excellence in Montessori since 1985 2416 East 1700 South Salt Lake City 355-1555 www.montessorislc.com


28

June 2008 catalystmagazine.net

by Ed Huntsman:

RESTAURANT REVIEW

CATALYST

Café

caffé d’bolla 249 E. 400 S. Ste. B. 355-1398. caffé d’bolla features fresh roasted espresso and press pot coffee, artisan teas, authentic bubble teas, house-made gelato, and toasted bagelini. A welcoming atmosphere and free Wi-Fi make it a great place to enjoy a perfect cup. $, CC, V, P, TO.

That bird cafe returns to Salt Lake’s east side Not at all extinct, the Dodo is lookin’ good

O

nce a local favorite on 9th East, the Dodo now occupies a prime location on 21st South and 14th East overlooking the tall pines and cottonwood trees, flower gardens and wide green lawns of Sugar House Park plus a stunning sunset view of Mount Olympus. When the Dodo Bird in Lewis Carol’s novel told everyone wet and dripping to race around the lake until dry, the Dodo Bird was asked, “Who won?” The bird responded, “Everybody has won and all must have a prize!” At the new Dodo Restaurant everybody wins, and the prize is an extraordinary restaurant managed by new owners who have brought it back to life with new landscaping, an enlarged outdoor patio, and lots of onsite parking. The dining room features two large murals of dodo birds sipping pink champagne and celebrating life by local artist Darrel Barton. The new Dodo offers an extensive menu with an impressive variety of food items and affordable prices that can accommodate any dining budget. Many favorite items from the first Dodo, which opened in 1981, remain on the menu. The artichoke pie served with tangy lemon mayonnaise and the toasted sesame seed baked cream cheese served with slices of apple and Asian

pear can be ordered for $7. Lunch sandwiches and entrées vary from $8 to $11. Dinner salads such as spinach with cranberries, candied walnuts and gorgonzola cheese start at $9. The honeybaked salmon entree with grain mustard and herb glaze is just $17. And the popular smoked turkey sandwich with Dodo sauce is $9 at both lunch and dinner. Don’t forget to save room for the Dodo’s well-loved desserts: Tollhouse Cake, homemade apple pie, dark and white chocolate mousse pie, and my favorite, the coconut caramel coffee cake served warm with fresh whipped cream. The desserts are made fresh daily by in-house pastry chef Ramone, who has remained with the Dodo for the past 20 years. The restaurant’s owners are Byron Loveall and Brian Omera, who have been partners since they opened the Porcupine Grill at the mouth of Big Cottonwood Canyon 10 years ago. Executive chef Mike Corbett and restaurant chef Jim Colloch have both been with the Porcupine group since its early days. I asked what has kept them loyal employees for such an impressive duration. They both responded, in essence: “The owners are actually here, caring and supporting their large team of employees. They don’t just show up to

critique the profit and loss statements. They are an integral part of the Dodo family.” They also mentioned taking pride in making everything on the menu from scratch: soups, sauces, dressings, smoked meats and desserts. I tried the seafood soup du jour and noticed right away that the vegetables were cut by hand and the soup had an obvious homemade flavor. Their sauces, dressings, soups, and baked meats are all made “a la maison.” Their turkey and ham are smoked and sliced fresh from their own kitchen. This is rare in popular local restaurants. Why the extra expense and effort? Well, let’s say you can see and taste the difference. This location has been the home to numerous restaurants from the early days of Brattens, to the well-loved Bird’s Cafe, the not quite authentic French restaurant L’Avenue, and the soon forgotten Harry’s. Not to worry! The Dodo is not an extinct bird. It is very much alive. And it’s my bet that this Dodo is here to stay. N Ed Huntsman is a professional photographer and former restaurateur living in Salt Lake City.

The Dodo in Sugar House. 21st South at 14th East. Saturday and Sunday brunch: 9 am to 3 pm. During the week, the dining room is open from 11 am to 11 pm.

Caffé Ibis 52 Federal Ave. Logan. 435-753-4777. www.caffeibis.com. Caffé Ibis, open 7 days a week, is a 30-year-old award winning “Green Business” in historic downtown Logan. We feature triple certified coffees (organic, fair trade, shadegrown), along with teas and fine chocolates at our espresso bar. The WiFi equipped gallery/deli serves organic ethnic cuisine for breakfast and lunch. $, CC, V, TO. Coffee Garden 254 S. Main, inside Sam Weller’s Books and 900 E. 900 S. 355-4425. High-end espresso, delectable pastries & desserts. A great place to people watch. Mon-Sat6a-8p; Sun 7a-6p. $, CC, V, P, TO. Cucina Deli 1026 Second Ave. 322-3055. Located in the historic Avenues, Cucina offers a full menu of freshly made sandwiches, gourmet salads, specialty entrées and desserts. Daily specials include parmesan chicken, lasagna, and poached salmon. Enjoy the European atmosphere inside or relax under the umbrellas on the patio. Mon-Fri 7a-9p; Sat 8a-9p; Sun 8a-5p. $$, CC, V, P, TO, CAT. Evergreen House Café 755 S. State. 328-8889. Exclusively vegan, Evergreen House Café creates authentic Chinese and Vietnamese delicacies like black pepper soybean szechwan w/mushroom stem. The informal atmosphere and inexpensive menu are great for families and starving grad students alike. The $6.55 lunch menu includes your choice of 14 entrees, spring roll and brown rice. Hours: MonThur 12-5p. Fri-Sat 12-9p. Carry Out 5-6p. $, CC, V, TO.


Mazza Tasty falafels, yummy chicken sandwiches, kabobs made to order, hummus, tabbouli, baba ghannooj, selected specialties. Large selection of Middle East beer and wine. Mon-Sat, 11a-9p. Two locations: 1515 S. 1500 E., and 912 E. 900 S. 484-9259. MAZZACAFE .COM. $$, CC, V.

GALLERY DELI DELI - LICIOUS CUISINE TRIPLE CERTIFIED COFFEE ORGANIC • FAIR TRADE • SHADE GROWN

Open 7 days a week 52 Federal Avenue Logan Utah

435.753.4777 www.caffeibis.com

Nostalgia 248 E. 100 S. 532-3225. Salt Lake’s best-damn coffee, sandwiches, salads, soups and fresh pastries. A great destination for casual business meetings or a relaxed environment to hang out with friends. Local artists also find a home to sell their work in a new, hip environment. Free wireless Internet available. $, CC, V, TO, P, CAT.

RedRock Brewing Company Casual atmosphere with award-winning, hand crafted beers and sodas. Fresh, inspired menu with something for everyone. Valet, Patio Dining, Weekend Brunch, Full liquor & wine menu, take-out. Sun-Thurs 11am12am, Fri-Sat 11am-1am, Brunch SatSun 11am-3pm. 254 South 200 West, SLC, 801.521.7446, www.redrockbrewing.com $$, CC

Continued on next page

LOCAL

Experience the Art of Espresso

Win ne

Ser v

i

organic w ng

r6

years in

s ine

Red Iguana 736 W. North Temple. 322-1489. Red Iguana has been serving Salt Lake since 1985. The Cardenas family serves award-winning Mexican cuisine with specialties including homemade moles using recipes from the last two centuries, enchiladas, steaks, chile verde, carnitas and more. www.rediguana.com. MonThurs 11a-10p; Fri 11a-11p; Sat 10a11p; Sun 10a-9p. $$, CC, V, W/B, L, TO, CAT.

ORGANIC

A taste of heaven existing for a moment savor paradise.

a

- J. Piquet

row

One World Everybody Eats 41 S. 300 E. One World Everybody Eats serves fresh, organic cuisine that changes daily. To encompass our commitment to community, ending waste and eliminating hunger, we allow you to price your own meal according to your individual created plates. Open 7 days a week, 11a-9p. $, $$, V, TO.

FRESH

249 E. 400 S. (801) 355-1398 *FREE Wi-Fi*

Lunch, Brunch, Dinner Open 7 days a week 473 E. Broadway (300 So.) • 322-3790 • www.sagescafe.com

now accepting local art for display

Salt Lake City’s Newest Coffee House Coffee ~ Pastries ~ Deli Sandwiches ~ Beer Coffees ~ Pastries ~ Deli Sandwiches ~ Beer Mon-Fri 7am-11pm Mon-Thurs 6am-11pm Sat Fri 8am-11pm 6am-12pm SatSun & Sun 7am-12pm 8am-10pm

CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE DINING 18 WEST MARKET STREET

801.519.9595

248 East 100 South • slc • 532-3225

Symbol Sense

$.........Inexpensive: Entrees $8 or less $$................Moderate: Entrees $8-16 $$$............Expensive: Entrees $16-24 $$$$..............Pricey: Entrees over $25

RR...........Reservations Recommended CC............Accepts Major Credit Cards CL..................Private Club V..............Vegetarian Dishes Available

SUSHI • SAKE

W/B................Wine/Beer L....................Hard Liquor P.....................Patio TO..................Takeout CAT................Catering


Mazza Tasty falafels, yummy chicken sandwiches, kabobs made to order, hummus, tabbouli, baba ghannooj, selected specialties. Large selection of Middle East beer and wine. Mon-Sat, 11a-9p. Two locations: 1515 S. 1500 E., and 912 E. 900 S. 484-9259. MAZZACAFE .COM. $$, CC, V.

GALLERY DELI DELI - LICIOUS CUISINE TRIPLE CERTIFIED COFFEE ORGANIC • FAIR TRADE • SHADE GROWN

Open 7 days a week 52 Federal Avenue Logan Utah

435.753.4777 www.caffeibis.com

Nostalgia 248 E. 100 S. 532-3225. Salt Lake’s best-damn coffee, sandwiches, salads, soups and fresh pastries. A great destination for casual business meetings or a relaxed environment to hang out with friends. Local artists also find a home to sell their work in a new, hip environment. Free wireless Internet available. $, CC, V, TO, P, CAT. One World Everybody Eats 41 S. 300 E. One World Everybody Eats serves fresh, organic cuisine that changes daily. To encompass our commitment to community, ending waste and eliminating hunger, we allow you to price your own meal according to your individual created plates. Open 7 days a week, 11a-9p. $, $$, V, TO. Red Iguana 736 W. North Temple. 322-1489. Red Iguana has been serving Salt Lake since 1985. The Cardenas family serves award-winning Mexican cuisine with specialties including homemade moles using recipes from the last two centuries, enchiladas, steaks, chile verde, carnitas and more. www.rediguana.com. MonThurs 11a-10p; Fri 11a-11p; Sat 10a11p; Sun 10a-9p. $$, CC, V, W/B, L, TO, CAT. RedRock Brewing Company Casual atmosphere with award-winning, hand crafted beers and sodas. Fresh, inspired menu with something for everyone. Valet, Patio Dining, Weekend Brunch, Full liquor & wine menu, take-out. Sun-Thurs 11am12am, Fri-Sat 11am-1am, Brunch SatSun 11am-3pm. 254 South 200 West, SLC, 801.521.7446, www.redrockbrewing.com $$, CC

Continued on next page

now accepting local art for display

Coffee ~ Pastries ~ Deli Sandwiches ~ Beer Mon-Fri 7am-11pm Sat 8am-11pm Sun 8am-10pm

Symbol Sense

$.........Inexpensive: Entrees $8 or less $$................Moderate: Entrees $8-16 $$$............Expensive: Entrees $16-24 $$$$..............Pricey: Entrees over $25

RR...........Reservations Recommended CC............Accepts Major Credit Cards CL..................Private Club V..............Vegetarian Dishes Available

W/B................Wine/Beer L....................Hard Liquor P.....................Patio TO..................Takeout CAT................Catering


30

CATALYST

Support local eateries and

Café

CATALYST. Tell our advertisers you saw them here!

continued

801-519-2002

NOW CATERING SPECIALIZING IN ORGANIC MEATS, VEGETARIAN AND VEGAN CUISINE. 41 South 300 East , SLC. Open every day 11am - 9pm

*)BV^cHigZZi

• • • •



food, pastries & coffee 7 a.m. till midnight wireless internet since 1981

I]ZDg^\

h^YZHVbLZaaZg7dd`h +)"%,+-

.

320 E. on 400 S.& at library square

Offering a full menu of freshly made sandwiches, salads, specialty entrées and desserts. I I

Patio Seating Dine In or Take Out

I I

Catering Delivery

Mon- Fri 7 am – 9 pm Saturday 8 am – 9 pm Sunday 8 am – 5 pm 1026 EAST SECOND AVEUNE NU 801-322-3055

www.cucinadeli.com

Sage’s Café 473 E. 300 S. 322-3790. Sage’s Café serves the healthiest & freshest cuisine in Utah, without compromising the overall dining experience. Sage’s Café serves organic wines & beer, fresh pastries, triple-certified coffee & tea. Cuisine ranges from fresh pasta to raw foods. Sage’s Café sustains diversity, compassion, personal & environmental health, community & positive attitude. Hours: Mon-Thurs 11:30a-2:30p & 5- 9:30p; Fri 11:30a-2:30p & 5p-12a; Sat 912a; Sun 9a-9p. $-$$, CC, V, P, W/B,TO. Salt Lake Roasting Co. 320 E. 400 S. 363-7572. This downtown staple, known for its coffee by the cup and by the pound since 1981, also offers a unique dailyinfused lunch and dinner menu. Open late with free Wi-Fi, summer patio dining, fresh pastries and loose-leaf teas, it is a perfect place for a coffee on the go, casual dining or a late night jolt. Visit our 2nd location inside the SLC downtown library. Coffee without compromise and more! $, CC, V, P, TO.

FRESH ORGANIC

Cdl9dlcidlc

June 2008

Takashi 18 West Market Street. 519-9595. Renowned sushi chef Takashi Gibo has opened the doors to an incredible Japanese dining experience. Enjoy a beautiful presentation of classic sashimi or experiment with delicious creations from the extensive sushi bar. Savor the assortment of small plates (Japanese tapas), from the tantalizing menu prepared by Chef Morio Tomihara. Featuring premium sake, wines and Japanese and domestic beers. Open Mon-Fri from 11:30a. and Sat. from 5:30p. $$-$$$ CC V W/B TO. Vertical Diner 2280 S. West Temple SLC. 484VERT. Vertical Diner offers vegan versions of classic “American” fare, including biscuts and gravy and burgers. Hours: Mon.- Wed. 11a-3p. Thurs-Fri. 11a-10p., Sat 10a-10p. Sun. 10a-3p. $, CC, V, TO. W/B.


30

CATALYST

Support local eateries and

Café

CATALYST. Tell our advertisers you saw them here!

continued

June 2008

Sage’s Café 473 E. 300 S. 322-3790. Sage’s Café serves the healthiest & freshest cuisine in Utah, without compromising the overall dining experience. Sage’s Café serves organic wines & beer, fresh pastries, triple-certified coffee & tea. Cuisine ranges from fresh pasta to raw foods. Sage’s Café sustains diversity, compassion, personal & environmental health, community & positive attitude. Hours: Mon-Thurs 11:30a-2:30p & 5- 9:30p; Fri 11:30a-2:30p & 5p-12a; Sat 912a; Sun 9a-9p. $-$$, CC, V, P, W/B,TO. Salt Lake Roasting Co. 320 E. 400 S. 363-7572. This downtown staple, known for its coffee by the cup and by the pound since 1981, also offers a unique dailyinfused lunch and dinner menu. Open late with free Wi-Fi, summer patio dining, fresh pastries and loose-leaf teas, it is a perfect place for a coffee on the go, casual dining or a late night jolt. Visit our 2nd location inside the SLC downtown library. Coffee without compromise and more! $, CC, V, P, TO.

• • • •

food, pastries & coffee 7 a.m. till midnight wireless internet since 1981

320 E. on 400 S.& at library square

Takashi 18 West Market Street. 519-9595. Renowned sushi chef Takashi Gibo has opened the doors to an incredible Japanese dining experience. Enjoy a beautiful presentation of classic sashimi or experiment with delicious creations from the extensive sushi bar. Savor the assortment of small plates (Japanese tapas), from the tantalizing menu prepared by Chef Morio Tomihara. Featuring premium sake, wines and Japanese and domestic beers. Open Mon-Fri from 11:30a. and Sat. from 5:30p. $$-$$$ CC V W/B TO. Vertical Diner 2280 S. West Temple SLC. 484VERT. Vertical Diner offers vegan versions of classic “American” fare, including biscuts and gravy and burgers. Hours: Mon.- Wed. 11a-3p. Thurs-Fri. 11a-10p., Sat 10a-10p. Sun. 10a-3p. $, CC, V, TO. W/B.


DANCE

A curry-flavored funk rock musical about the om-holes of YogAngeles and their quest for Enlightenment Lite. Two acts with intermission. —SBDANCE.COM

I

f you are the sort of person who thinks that yoga is a deadly serious spiritual practice and not an appropriate subject for satire or hip-hop parody, then you should definitely avoid the new (or at any rate, upgraded) SB Dance show, “Revenge of Yoga the Musical.” On the other hand, if you are that sort of person you are going to miss some really fabulous musical theatre. SB Dance did a beta-version of this show last year (“Yoga: the Musical”) and it ended with standing ovation from the audience and a titillating cliffhanger: “to be continued in June 2008.” Now that it is June 2008, I for one can hardly wait to see Part II with the promised surprise ending. It’s going to be “a bigger, badder, boogier version,” says SB Dance director Stephen Brown. “It’s like last year was the pilot and this is the fully revved machine. We’ve taken last year’s show and rewritten about 70%, and that’s Act I. The other half is completely new.” Some of the original cast was not available, and most of the roles have been reworked to make optimal use of singing, acting, dancing and yoga talents. If you liked last year’s show, the new version has evolved into a show that is almost, but not quite completely different. It ought to be said that last y ear’s show really was good enough to be worth developing into a full-blown musical—the wickedly funny story has to do with rival yoga teachers scheming to take over America’s yogic psyche. There is an energetic funk/hip-hop/rock score by Ricklen Nobis, Jeffrey Price and Jimmy Fassler, comic lyrics by poet Sheri Zollinger and inventive dance numbers by Stephen Brown that blend elements of hip-hop, yoga postures and Bob Fosse.

When I dropped by the Rose Wagner studio to get a sneak preview, the cast went through a series of meditative yoga asanas and then got busy hamming it up for a number that is pur e Broadway. Stephen Brown passed out bamboo canes, and reminded everyone, “Remember, it’s not about originality, it’s about cheese!” He rejected one move as “too modern dance” and put the cast through their moves until the comic timing worked so well that even the dancers were laughing. Even if you don’t know the difference between downward-facingdog and Underdog, you’ve got to admit that there is something inherently funny about a spiritual practice that results in an ultrahot bod. In any case, yoga in this show is just a vehicle for universal themes about claiming higher consciousness in order to jockey for political power and using spirituality to sell a product. “It’s Monty Python with a message,” says Brown. “You can teach something by being satirical. It has a lot to say about the culture we live in, how America tries to eat yoga but it turns out yoga might eat America.” Stephen Brown should know, since when he’s not choreographing dance or writing musicals, he teaches at Centered City Yoga. He is well aware that a good teacher can weave the mental, spiritual and physical elements of yoga practice into something that is much more than simply a workout. But still, yoga in America has changed significantly from its origins in India. “There are inherent paradoxes,” says Brown. “Here in this country you cannot exist solely as a sadhu or spir itual teacher—you’ve got to make money. But then Madison Avenue gets involved and pretty soon we get diamond-studded ohm jewelry.” Or, he might have added, Revenge of Yoga trading cards (collect all six at the fine local businesses listed on the SB Dance website).

It’s exciting to see home-grown musical theatre with this level of ingenuity and talent. S tephen Brown thinks that “Revenge of Yoga the Musical” has potential to have a much lar ger appeal than just to SB Dance’s loyal but somewhat cultish

“It’s Monty Python with a message,” says Brown. “It has a lot to say about the culture we live in, how America tries to eat yoga but it turns out yoga might eat America.” audience. “Salt Lake City is an awesome place to create,” he says. “It’s crazy how much is going on here. The resources are incredible; SB Dance calls Rose Wagner our home. A lot of what we make is only possible because of that facility. But for something like this musical that has the potential to go to the next level, ther e is nobody in Utah to take it there. In terms of greater exposure this place is still isolated.” Nonetheless, Brown predicts that “Revenge of Yoga the Musical” will have special appeal to people who read CATALYST. “Greta [editor and publisher] is not in there per se,” he says mischievously, “She’s disguised.” Hint: look for the hair. (This makes Greta very nervous.) ◆

SB Dance: WWW.SBDANCE.COM/

Revenge of Yoga, the Musical. SB Dance. Opening night June 6: $30. Celebrate the opener with food, beverages & the always entertaining cast of artists. June 7, 13 & 14 @ 8pm; June 15 @ 4pm. Buy tickets at ArtTix: WWW.ARTTIX.ORG


32

June 2008

catalystmagazine.net

THE RADIO RIOTS

Give peace a chance KRCL’s new DJs are old volunteers

BY BARB GUY

COMMUNITY RADIO QUIZ Question: KRCL’s new weekday, daytime programming, hosted for the first time b y paid DJs instead of volunteers, is . . .

Answer: A. . . . a sign of the apocalypse that causes us to forego civility and leaves us railing hatefully until we’re purple and spitting B. . . . a reality that should be given a chance to thrill us in a new way, and an opportunity for us to practice personal diplomacy in difficult circumstances C. . . . other

It’s not my job to share my answer, just to introduce the three people who will be hosting KRCL weekdays from 6 to 6, and I’m happy to do it. But I will confess to a cer tain nervousness due to my closeness to the subject. I’ve worn a few hats at KRCL including on-air host, off-air volunteer, volunteer representative on the board of directors, and trainer of new volunteers. It’s been 17 years since I was on the air as a host, and KRCL has changed a lot since then. For many people, this new change brings much more drama than the

Ebay Jamil Hamilton: “Get up and mingle!”

Ann Larsen Residential Design Experienced, reasonable, references CONSULTATION AND DESIGN OF Remodeling • Additions • New Homes Decks and outdoor Structures

Specializing in historically sensitive design solutions and adding charm to the ordinary

Ann Larsen • 604-3721

When Ebay talks to me about KRCL, I notice his language is steeped in reconciliation. With 17 years at KRCL, Ebay is the most aware of what the change offers, but also what it has cost. He’s a little weary of everyone harping on the fact that he arrived at the station as a 13-y ear-old kid with a “lifetime” of KRCL listening already under his belt, but it’s true, and he’s been a charming presence at the station ever since. His longevity brings both unique perspective and perceived responsibility. He peppers our conversation with positive phrases: “I’m trying to find a way to make this okay for ever ybody . . . This is happening, so let’s just make the most of it . . . I’ m going to make sure KRCL succeeds . . . I believe w e are going to get there . . . I believe this will wor k . . . I can tell y ou it’s going to be good.” As music director, Ebay is working to ensure listeners will continue to enjoy unparalleled music and expertise, but with a more constant change-up during weekdays. He feels that moving away from “block” programming offers a practical way to increase listenership, a key reason for the change. He says, “Instead of tuning out for two or four hours, you may only have to get past one song.” That ability to build on listenership throughout the day rather than having people constantly tuning in and out should impr ove the health of the station. And it’s an opportunity for listeners to broaden their passions. He’s 30 now, but he makes an analogy based on his own experience as a Utah high school student of color. “Going into a school lunchroom where they say that it’s multicultural and diverse but everyone’s still sitting at their tables [by racial and ethnic divisions]. . . I want you to get up and play with each other . Just get up and mingle! As long as people are open to giving us a tr y, I think it’ll be fine.”

others. Three KRCL volunteers have become staffers at KRCL, the firstever paid programmers. They’ve navigated a traumatic transition, one that displaced at least 18 of their fellow volunteer program hosts. The change has brought these former volunteers into a world full of the angry purple people as well as people who are trying (or struggling) to keep open minds, trying to respect the reasons for the change, and trying to give peace a chance. In that spirit, meet the “new” hosts.

He continues, “If you are going to listen to the r adio, and you’re checking out the other stations, chances are you’ll find we’re doing something cooler than most, even around the country. We are all people from here at KRCL. This isn’t something from outside. I think most people’s concerns are being answered in the programming.” Aware of how high the stakes are to get this right, Ebay says, “I just want KRCL to be here for another shy little 13-year-old like myself.”

David Perschon: “I’m honored to be here.” David may have the broadest musical knowledge of the three hosts. He moves happily between virtually all genres with educated ease. He says, “I grew up listening to KRCL and that’s how I built my record collection back when I was 14 and starting to hear stuff on the station. S o I’ve been listening since I was a kid.” While he began as a volunteer only two y ears ago, his musical depth, extensive personal music library, pleasant on-air style and willingness to fill in for folks quickly made him a perennial favorite at the station, with both volunteers and listeners. I ask how he’s dealt with some of the comments generated when the changes were announced. He says, “Once people give it a chance and see what it sounds like, they can draw some conclusions. But for people to be so negative right off the bat was surprising, especially coming from such a tight-knit community of people who are open-minded. A lot of feedback before it even happened was so hateful and ver y negative. It was surprising to see how vicious some people were.” “It’s been a really difficult transition,” he admits. “It’s split the KRCL family in two. It’s hard to see people lose their shows, people who have been around


32

June 2008

catalystmagazine.net

THE RADIO RIOTS

Give peace a chance KRCL’s new DJs are old volunteers

BY BARB GUY

COMMUNITY RADIO QUIZ Question: KRCL’s new weekday, daytime programming, hosted for the first time b y paid DJs instead of volunteers, is . . .

Answer: A. . . . a sign of the apocalypse that causes us to forego civility and leaves us railing hatefully until we’re purple and spitting B. . . . a reality that should be given a chance to thrill us in a new way, and an opportunity for us to practice personal diplomacy in difficult circumstances C. . . . other

It’s not my job to share my answer, just to introduce the three people who will be hosting KRCL weekdays from 6 to 6, and I’m happy to do it. But I will confess to a cer tain nervousness due to my closeness to the subject. I’ve worn a few hats at KRCL including on-air host, off-air volunteer, volunteer representative on the board of directors, and trainer of new volunteers. It’s been 17 years since I was on the air as a host, and KRCL has changed a lot since then. For many people, this new change brings much more drama than the

Ebay Jamil Hamilton: “Get up and mingle!”

Ann Larsen Residential Design Experienced, reasonable, references CONSULTATION AND DESIGN OF Remodeling • Additions • New Homes Decks and outdoor Structures

Specializing in historically sensitive design solutions and adding charm to the ordinary

When Ebay talks to me about KRCL, I notice his language is steeped in reconciliation. With 17 years at KRCL, Ebay is the most aware of what the change offers, but also what it has cost. He’s a little weary of everyone harping on the fact that he arrived at the station as a 13-y ear-old kid with a “lifetime” of KRCL listening already under his belt, but it’s true, and he’s been a charming presence at the station ever since. His longevity brings both unique perspective and perceived responsibility. He peppers our conversation with positive phrases: “I’m trying to find a way to make this okay for ever ybody . . . This is happening, so let’s just make the most of it . . . I’ m going to make sure KRCL succeeds . . . I believe w e are going to get there . . . I believe this will wor k . . . I can tell y ou it’s going to be good.” As music director, Ebay is working to ensure listeners will continue to enjoy unparalleled music and expertise, but with a more constant change-up during weekdays. He feels that moving away from “block” programming offers a practical way to increase listenership, a key reason for the change. He says, “Instead of tuning out for two or four hours, you may only have to get past one song.” That ability to build on listenership throughout the day rather than having people constantly tuning in and out should impr ove the health of the station. And it’s an opportunity for listeners to broaden their passions. He’s 30 now, but he makes an analogy based on his own experience as a Utah high school student of color. “Going into a school lunchroom where they say that it’s multicultural and diverse but everyone’s still sitting at their tables [by racial and ethnic divisions]. . . I want you to get up and play with each other . Just get up and mingle! As long as people are open to giving us a tr y, I think it’ll be fine.”

others. Three KRCL volunteers have become staffers at KRCL, the firstever paid programmers. They’ve navigated a traumatic transition, one that displaced at least 18 of their fellow volunteer program hosts. The change has brought these former volunteers into a world full of the angry purple people as well as people who are trying (or struggling) to keep open minds, trying to respect the reasons for the change, and trying to give peace a chance. In that spirit, meet the “new” hosts.

He continues, “If you are going to listen to the r adio, and you’re checking out the other stations, chances are you’ll find we’re doing something cooler than most, even around the country. We are all people from here at KRCL. This isn’t something from outside. I think most people’s concerns are being answered in the programming.” Aware of how high the stakes are to get this right, Ebay says, “I just want KRCL to be here for another shy little 13-year-old like myself.”

David Perschon: “I’m honored to be here.” David may have the broadest musical knowledge of the three hosts. He moves happily between virtually all genres with educated ease. He says, “I grew up listening to KRCL and that’s how I built my record collection back when I was 14 and starting to hear stuff on the station. S o I’ve been listening since I was a kid.” While he began as a volunteer only two y ears ago, his musical depth, extensive personal music library, pleasant on-air style and willingness to fill in for folks quickly made him a perennial favorite at the station, with both volunteers and listeners. I ask how he’s dealt with some of the comments generated when the changes were announced. He says, “Once people give it a chance and see what it sounds like, they can draw some conclusions. But for people to be so negative right off the bat was surprising, especially coming from such a tight-knit community of people who are open-minded. A lot of feedback before it even happened was so hateful and ver y negative. It was surprising to see how vicious some people were.” “It’s been a really difficult transition,” he admits. “It’s split the KRCL family in two. It’s hard to see people lose their shows, people who have been around


for years and years. Change is hard, but sometimes it’s necessary. We’ll see down the road if it was the right thing.” David has good wishes for the displaced volunteers, many of whom have found a new home at Utah Free Media, UFM.ORG, where they do their shows on the Internet. “I really hope the whole UFM thing goes off and people tune into that as well. I’m hoping it succeeds and they find a niche there and they have support. There are shows I miss and I can stream those shows. It’s nice to have options, definitely.” As for his new gig, he says , “It’s fun to come in and provide a soundtrack to people’s mornings. I’m trying to do the best job possible and provide a really diverse mix of music. We don’t have

were going on in the state. Truman wanted to develop a feature called Blues News and he wanted me to be the blues newsman.” He’s been doing that for about 11 years, now. Eventually, KRCL called him to DJ. “I thought, well, I just call Truman on the phone! I work on 25th Street in a bar. My language might not be appropriate! But I just started doing it.” He says, “The station is an incredible thing. It has helped influence me to the idea of being a part of my community. I had never experienced diversity like this until coming here.” What’s this new situation like for him? “It’s totally being out of my comfort zone. It’s a huge responsibility—it’s massive. But the steeper the hill, the more excited I am.” Reflecting on the change, he

Three KRCL volunteers have become staffers at KRCL, the first-ever paid programmers.... The change has brought these former volunteers into a world full of the angry purple people. playlists; we aren’t being told what to play. We’re trying to create a consistent sound through drawing from albums we all agree upon, but we’re playing what we want to. It’s a blessing to be able to do that on a daily basis. It’s a dream job in a lot of ways. I’m honored to be part of the community here, doing what I do. We’re off to a good start.”

“Bad” Brad Wheeler: “The steeper the hill, the more excited I am.” Brad is the most genre-specific of the three, giving him a tough learning curve. But he’s a hard worker and he’s up for the challenge. Brad found the station at age 18, listening to KRCL’S Monday night blues shows. He discovered he had a gift for playing the harmonica. He says, “I would go to the Dead Goat Saloon, and I eventually got a job there. I would call [KRCL blues host] Truman every Monday night and tell him all the blues gigs that

says, “My hope for the station is that we increase our ratings so we become compliant to maintain our Corporation for Public Broadcasting status. “The way I kinda see it is KR CL was your friend who was out on an innertube at the beach and it was getting a little far out there and you could either, like, swim out and bring your friend back or you could just do nothing and watch your friend drift away. I would rather do whatever it takes, including put myself through all this... change, to keep KRCL around instead of watching it go.” ◆ Through the years Barb Guy has worn a few hats at KRCL including rabid all-genre listener, show host for 10 years, die-hard off-air volunteer, fouryear volunteer representative on the board of directors, and trainer of new volunteers. She also did a gig as a DJ on commercial radio simultaneous to her time at KRCL.

Resources KRCL: Tune in to 90.9 FM or visit KRCL.ORG for more information on the station, programming, podcasts and streaming. UTAH FREE MEDIA: Visit UFM.ORG to hear the DJs you miss and see how you can support this fledgling “alternative to the alternative,” internet radio station.


34 CatalystMagazine.net June 2008 Art, Health, Spirit, Natural World, Music, Events/Festivals, Meetings, Exhibits, Education/Workshops. See the full list of events and the ongoing calendar at www.catalystmagazine.net/events

CALENDAR BY ADRIANE ANDERSEN

Zion Canyon Native Art & Flute Festival: A Vacation with Music June 7-15. Zion National Park in Southern Utah provides the backdrop for the fourth annual Zion Canyon Art and Flute Festival. The festival fills the town of Springdale near the park’s south entrance with skilled native flutists carrying traditional handmade instruments and everyone else who appreciates the enchanting rhythms of the native flute. There’s a flute school, workshops, open-mic and concerts during the event. Browse through a variety of art, handmade flutes, crafts and food booths in the Springdale Town Center Park. Register online for school, workshops and concert tickets. Find your inner musician: WWW.ZIONCANYONARTANDFLUTEFESTIVAL.COM or Tel. 435-772-3434

Mark Holland & Autumn’s Child—See festival website for complete concert listing.

The Nomadic Project at Utah Artists Hands Thru June. On November 13th, 2005, artist Kristin Abraham and musician Alfonso Llamas set out on a yearlong journey across America. While living and working out of their

bright orange Honda Element, this husband and wife team explored and created in all 50 states. The artists had a very specific purpose for their grand excursion:

wishing to unite a divided nation through art. With the participation of 50 galleries, Abraham's work was displayed separately in each of the 50 states. The art-

Zion Canyon Native Flute School: New this year is the Zion Canyon Native Flute School, a cultural program focused on honoring and perpetuating the spiritual heritage of the traditional Native Flute. All levels of players from all backgrounds invited to open up to the inner musician that is in all of us. Learn basic, intermediate and advanced playing skills, history, healing and ceremonial applications of the Native Flute through lecture, demonstrations and experiential exercises from guest instructors. This three-day intensive is the first of its kind in the nation. Reasonably priced, the school has three tracks, beginning, intermediate and advanced, presented by great instructors from across the nation. Sign up online. Daily workshops in flute making are offered during the festival itself, June 13-15. Construct your own personal flute by hand, starting from scratch), or a drum, didgeridoo or beaded flute bag; children can paint and learn to play a child-size flute. Sharpen your piano skills in ‘The Creative Process’ workshop with acclaimed pianist David Lanz (pictured at right). The late song keeper and flute maker Hawke LittleJohn said, “Music is in all our spirits. If you sit in a quiet place and randomly play the flute—magic comes … magic comes when all doubt is cleared from the mind. It is so easy to play. It makes people peaceful, happy and more content. I am glad that Western people found our Native Flute.” work and music has now come together in a traveling exhibition to illustrate the journey, coined The Nomadic Project. That exhibit is displayed at Utah Artists Hands (WWW.UTAHANDS.COM) throughout June. 61 W. 100 South. To learn more about the Nomadic Project: WWW.THENOMADICPROJECT.COM/

“Tarantula” (1955)— Science Movie Night June 3 6:30-9:30p. If you’re looking for some scary fun, grab your favorite cuddle buddy and head to the Main Library for “Tarantula,” in which a mad scientist’s experiment—involving a spider, of course—goes horribly wrong. (Beware those irradiated

To be considered as a featured calendar in the print version, submit related photo or artwork by the 15th of the preceding mont h to GRETA@CATALYSTMAGAZINE.NET


CatalystMagazine.net 35

One World Everybody Eats First Annual Fundraiser June 11 5-10p. Come downtown for dinner tonight—an outdoor dinner with lots of friends, local music and organic food. Oh, and bring your checkbook, too, because in addition to the price-your-own meal, in true One World fashion, there’s a cash bar, raffle and silent auction (and you just might “win”). Funds from this event go to buying a mobile kitchen. Restaurant is located at 41 S 300 E. This fundraiser is at Gallivan Center, 36 E. 200 S. WWW.ONEWORLDEVERYBODYEATS.COM nutritional supplements.) Is it “real” science or “reel” science? Stay for the discussion afterwards and learn about the science behind the movie. This one’s led by Christy Bills, Utah Museum of Natural History entomologist. Free. 210 E 400 S, Main Library, 524-8200.

featured in exhibits by both up-and-coming local artists and renowned artists. Free. 410 Campus Ctr Dr. 581-7332, UMFA .UTAH.EDU.

The Stitch Effect

Free Day at the UMFA June 4 10a-8p. Thanks to Salt Lake County’s Zoo, Arts and Parks Program, the UMFA is able to open its doors FREE to the public on the first Wednesday of each month. Play Mary Poppins by doing a ”double blink,” and jump into works of art,

June 5 7pm. Knitters, crocheters unite! Come sit by the fireplace on the Main Library’s fourth floor and meet new friends who can assist you with or cheer you on in your projects. Each month we provide a nifty handout with resources geared toward a special stitch project. Bring your project and lots of questions! Free. Main Library, 210 E 400 S, 524-8200.

continued next page

SATURDAY•JULY 19 KINGSBURY HALL ~on sale now~

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT KINGSBURY HALL | WWW.KINGSBURYHALL.ORG | 581-7100 ALL SMIITH’S TIX OUTLETS | 467-TIXX | 1-800-888-TIXX | WWW.SMITHSTIX.COM


CatalystMagazine.net 35

One World Everybody Eats First Annual Fundraiser June 11 5-10p. Come downtown for dinner tonight—an outdoor dinner with lots of friends, local music and organic food. Oh, and bring your checkbook, too, because in addition to the price-your-own meal, in true One World fashion, there’s a cash bar, raffle and silent auction (and you just might “win”). Funds from this event go to buying a mobile kitchen. Restaurant is located at 41 S 300 E. This fundraiser is at Gallivan Center, 36 E. 200 S. WWW.ONEWORLDEVERYBODYEATS.COM nutritional supplements.) Is it “real” science or “reel” science? Stay for the discussion afterwards and learn about the science behind the movie. This one’s led by Christy Bills, Utah Museum of Natural History entomologist. Free. 210 E 400 S, Main Library, 524-8200.

featured in exhibits by both up-and-coming local artists and renowned artists. Free. 410 Campus Ctr Dr. 581-7332, UMFA .UTAH.EDU.

The Stitch Effect

Free Day at the UMFA June 4 10a-8p. Thanks to Salt Lake County’s Zoo, Arts and Parks Program, the UMFA is able to open its doors FREE to the public on the first Wednesday of each month. Play Mary Poppins by doing a ”double blink,” and jump into works of art,

June 5 7pm. Knitters, crocheters unite! Come sit by the fireplace on the Main Library’s fourth floor and meet new friends who can assist you with or cheer you on in your projects. Each month we provide a nifty handout with resources geared toward a special stitch project. Bring your project and lots of questions! Free. Main Library, 210 E 400 S, 524-8200.

continued next page


CALENDAR

36 CatalystMagazine.net June 2008

Toast to Good Health

31st annual Utah Asian Festival June 14 10a-6p. Head to South Towne Exposition Center, 9575 S. State (downtowners can take TRAX) for a day of shopping the Asian Market Place, eating ethnic foods, watching cultural shows, studying the Asian artists exhibit—and, what might be the highlight of the day: the Asian American Idol Singing Competition. Free admission. Donations accepted. All proceeds go to global disaster relief. Each contribution over $25 is eligible for a chance to win two round-trip tickets on Southwest Airlines. just isn’t your day, note that the garden is open daily through September 30, Monday-Saturday: 8am-8pm; Sunday: 12pm to 8pm. Tours offered every Wed. at 6:30pm. Conservation Garden Park, 8215 South 1300 West, West Jordan, 1-877728-3420, HTTP://JVWCD.ORG

June 16 67:30p, Fourth Street Clinic, a nonprofit that provides health care and support services for homeless Utahns is hosting ”A Toast to Good Health.” Join them for an around-the-world tour of wines and perfectly paired, premium hors d’oeuvres. Help support those who are supporting those among us greatest in need of care and attention. Tickets are $125; email JOSEPH@FOURTHSTREETCLINIC.COM. Tuscany Restaurant, 2832 East 6200 South.

Murder Mystery & Casino Fundraiser Harvard Glee Club June 10 8pm. Join the Harvard Glee Club, the oldest college choir in America, for a public concert at the Cathedral of the Madeleine, as part of the Glee Club’s national 150th anniversary tour. Free. Cathedral of the Madeleine, 331 E South Temple, MANAGER@HARVARDGLEECLUB.ORG.

June 14 6p. Finally, an occasion to dress up for: A night of mystery, magic, raffles, auctions, food, cocktails, gambling, awareness and murder. Come play craps, roulette, black jack and Texas hold’em. All proceeds go towards the anti-rape and sexism summer festival hosted by the Female Empowerment Movement. Alpine Ballroom, Hilton Hotel (255 S. W. Temple). $40 ($30 in advance). Formalwear required. WWW.FEM-UTAH.COM

4th Annual Swaner Nature Festival New Pedestrian Performance Artist Troupe June 20 6-9 p.The New Pedestrian performance artist troupe tours downtown every Friday evening during Galery Stroll. Their

Present Tense: A Post-337 Project opens

Jordan Water Conservation Park Garden Fair— Waterwise Plants June 14 8a-2p. Are you interested in having a water-wise landscape but don’t quite know how to go about establishing it? Here’s your opportunity to speak with experts. Discuss topics of water conservation and horticulture with other enthusiasts. There will be food, demonstrations, vendors selling water-wise plants, music and (we hope) fine weather. If you want to tour the garden but this

lively interactions with historical sites and hot-spots bring keen awareness to the city's cultural values, controversies, quirks and current issues. THE NEW PEDESTRIAN performance route: 1. Temple Square 2. Skybridge (proposed locations) 3. TRAX 4. Library Square 5. Broadway Centre Cinema 6. Plum Alley 7. Regent St. 8. Gallivan Center—water wall 9. Red Light Books

June 21 (exhibit through Sept 27) 6-9p. In late May 2007, 10,000 people stood in a line trailing up the block from a squat building on Fourth East in downtown Salt Lake City (pictured at right), waiting their turn to tour the abandoned old office/apartments owned by Adam and Dessi Price and recently commandeered by 143 area (welcomed) artists. Traveling the maze of murals, the narrow halls and stairwells led to... well, you had to see it to believe it. The murals and installations were heavily documented by armies of photographers. Then on April 5, 2008, as originally planned, the building was demolished. New works by 25 “337”artists have been created in the Salt Lake Art Center, for the Salt Lake Center, in a spirit similar to 337. Artists in the exhibition include: Trent Alvey; Hairy Baldwin (aka STRUT); Trent Call & Sri Whipple; Andrew Callis; Amy Caron & Margaret Willis; Craig Cleveland; Kier Defstar; Cara Despain; Dave Doman; Trinity Forbes; Lenka Konopasek; CJ Lester; William Lewis; Tessa Lindsey; Michael McGlothlen; Shawn Porter; Nick & Erin Potter; Dessi Price; William Robbins (aka Elmer Presslee); Shawn Rossiter; Zara Dawn Shallbetter; and, Benjamin Wiemeyer. Curated by Campbell Grey. If you come to the opening, you can meet the artists. Salt Lake Art Center, next to Abravanel Hall 20 So. W. Temple. Free.

June 21 11a-4p. Round up the family and walk, run, bike or carpool to the Nature Festival. A nice variety of nature walks are scheduled, so be sure to wear decent shoes. Plan to shop at the native plant sale. Join the Swaner EcoCenter and more than 50 partner organizations for a celebration of Utah’s great outdoors. Rain or shine. Free. Basin Recreation Field House, 1388 Center Dr., Park City. 435-649-1767, See map at WWW.SWANERECOCENTER.ORG.


CatalystMagazine.net 37

Rainbow,” and Groucho Marx’s signature song, ”Lydia the Tattooed Lady” from ”At The Circus.” Combine that with favorites from ”The Sound of Music,” ”Footloose,” ”Beverly Hills Cop” and ”Hairspray,” and you know there’s sure to be something fun for everyone. 1375 E Presidents Circle, U of U, 581-7000, WWW.SALTLAKEMENSCHOIR.ORG

GET YOUR TICKETS NOW!

“If you do nothing else this year with your kids, get tickets to this production!” –CHICAGO PARENT

Summer Camp: Celebrating the Body Erotic June 21-22 The 25-year-old Body Electric School returns to Salt Lake City with a workshop for men who want to be more comfortable in their bodies and for those looking to connect on a deeper level with others. Celebrating the Body Erotic is a full two-day clothes-off workshop (9am-7pm) for men who are ready to vigorously explore new levels of feeling, both within themselves and within a community of men. Location TBA. THOMASCONNOR@HOTMAIL.COM. Tel. 699-7044.

Ani DiFranco under the stars at Library Square Amphitheater June 21 7pm. Singer/songwriter Ani DiFranco and Martyn Joseph turn up the heat and, what do you know, spring turns into summer. Her music and lyrics poetically blend sass, sensitivity and thoughtful insight for a feast of kick-butt creativity. Her MySpace page reads: ”Folking you up since 1990.” Rain or shine. Festival seating—bring a blanket. No pets, highback chairs, umbrellas or outside food/beverages. “Adult” drinks available. A ticket (28-$35) gets you a 2for-1 voucher to the Utah Arts Festival (see back cover). Available at WWW.UAF.ORG or at Positively 4th St. Music, 531-8181. Library Square Amphitheater Stage.

Hooray for Hollywood June 21 7:30p9:30p. The 25th Anniversary season of the Salt Lake Men’s Choir closes with a celebration showcasing all the fun, fabulous, comical and powerful songs from some of Hollywood’s alltime greatest movies. Hear Judy Garland’s ”Somewhere Over the

Kirtan with Leraine Horstmanshoff June 22 6-7pm. Come prepared to sing. “Kirtan is part of an ancient form of Yoga known as Bhakti, or the Yoga of Devotion. It is the practice of singing over and over the many names of God and the Goddess, the multi-colored manifestations of the One. It is said that there is no difference between the name and that which is being named, and as the words roll off our lips in song, the Infinite is invoked, invited, made manifest in our hearts. Kirtan is for all people. There are no experts, no beginners. The practice itself is the teacher, guiding us to ourselves. Kirtan allows us to enter into a mystery world—a world where all the logic of our minds, all the conditioning and learning are left outside. And in this mystery, we create a temple inside of our hearts, a place of refuge, a place of love, a place of just being.” (From the Flow Yoga website.) $15 suggested donation. Flow Yoga, Sugar House Studio, 2065 E. 2100 S. To register: 485-5933. WWW.FLOWYOGASLC.COM

Traces Annual Garden Party June 28 10a-5p. A lovely old house on a very large plot full of a certain studied surprise: for instance, wrought iron bed frames supporting a burst of bloom, twisty paths leading to a disciplined expanse of trellised tomatoes. And on this day: music, art and story telling. It’s free. It’s fun. 1432 S. 1100 E.

s (Gabriella) Arielle Jacob

y Martin (Troy) & John Jeffre

A NEW STAGE MUSICAL BASED ON THE SMASH HIT DISNEY CHANNEL ORIGINAL MOVIE highschoolmusicalontour.com

2 WEEKS ONLY! • JULY 29–AUGUST 10 CAPITOL THEATRE CALL: 801-355-ARTS (2787) • ONLINE: ArtTix.org IN PERSON: The Capitol Theatre Box Office GROUPS (15 or more): 801- 355-5502 Photo by Joan Marcus

©Disney


38

THE GREAT CREATE

June 2008 catalystmagazine.net

more than a half-mile of brass musical wire. This Earth Harp will serve as an installation piece throughout the Festival, and on Sunday night, the audience will sit underneath the harp as it is played from the stage and feel the movement and vibration of the instrument throughout the performance. A second harp will string west down to The Round, and will be played in daily interactive performances with the public and nightly jam sessions—bring your instruments! Earth Harps have transformed many architectural sites into musical experiences, including the Seattle Space Needle and the Kennedy Center. Don’t miss this Salt Lake happening! Earth Harp Jam Sessions: Nightly 8-8:45pm at the Round with Bill Close, artistic director. Earth Harp Performance: Sunday, 9:30-11pm at the Amphitheater Stage. Yoga Workshop with Andrea Brook: Sunday, 9:30-11am, Amphitheater Stage area (advance registration required)

Help to create a collage with Jann Haworth

Utah Arts Festival Amazing goings-on at Library Square June 26-29 Earth Harps by MASS Ensemble Earth Harps are enormous musical instruments strung to buildings. Performers run their fingertips along the strings wearing rosin-covered cotton gloves to generate a vibration that literally pushes the music through the molecules

of the string, creating beautiful cello-like tones. For the Arts Festival, MASS Ensemble will make the Main Library at Library Square into two giant Earth Harps. Both harps will use the library’s wall as an anchor point with the largest attaching to the Amphitheater Stage using

Collagist Jann Haworth’s most well-known work is the album cover for the Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.” She also created a the mural on that theme in downtown Salt Lake City. Haworth’s contemporary work has been exhibited around the world, in dozens of Europe’s finest museums. Her exhibit “Pop Plastiques” will be shown inside the Main Library (“Nudie” appears is this month’s cover art) during the festival. In a rare opportunity, Jann will conduct a collage workshop based on the conceptual aspects of the friendship quilt, working with the public and several invited artists. See Jann’s work, watch her in action, and dialogue with her in the Special Collections Room, Level 4 of the Main Library. Jann Haworth in Residency Thursday through Saturday, noon-5pm and Sunday, 1-5pm. Collage Workshop: June 26-29, 1-3pm.

Get Kamikaze with Your Writing Muse BY MELISSA BOND nterested in getting your literary groove on this summer? The Utah Arts Festival is sponsoring the second annual Wasatch Iron Pen, a 24-hour literary marathon, set to take place right in the middle of the festival. That’s right, 24 hours to shake your groove thing all over the page. For those of you who need a little adrenaline to fuel your writing muse, the Iron Pen gives you from Friday, June 27 at 5 p.m. to Saturday, June 28 at 5 p.m. to set fire to that pen. It’s a kamikaze mission not for the faint of heart. It will require a full sprint of creativity that could leave you drinking cup after cup of existential coffee by the early morning hours. But this kind of sweat for the muse is nothing new. A quick trip into Google’s shiny realm of all things literary and inventoried turns up innumerable one- to three-day literary marathons. Writer’s Weekly, an online freelance writing ezine and Voices, a non profit organization of writers, have hosted literary marathons for years and participants sweat over everything from poetry to short stories to novels. In Utah itself, the Helper Arts Festival has, in years past, held a literary ultramarathon that encouraged writers of all genres to face off in a 24-hour battle of verbal brawn. The marathon typically starts with a visual cue of some sort. Last year, the Wasatch Ironpen hustled all the hungry writers and poets into one room and showed them a honeycomb filled with honey. The idea is to work the cue into the written work in a way that’s significant—thematic, even. This prevents previously fawned-over work from making its way into the submission pile. This year, writers will receive the cue at exactly 5 p.m. on June 27. The clock starts ticking at that point. Garrett Alberico, a winner in last year’s poetry category, says that the 24 hours wasn’t too daunting. “It was cool to narrow the focus,” he says. “And it gave me more incentive to write because of the time limit.” So, if incentive is what you’re looking for, or just a good jolt of muse, check out the Wasatch Ironpen. It’s just 24 hours, after all. ◆

I

Writers of all genres and experience levels can register for the marathon beginning June 12, in person or by phone at the SLCC Community Writing Center (located at Library Square; tel. 957-4992). Or register online at WWW.UAF.ORG. Registration fee: is $10. Six categories: Poetry, Fiction, Non-Fiction (Adult and Youth). Winners will be contacted Sunday, June 29, and are encouraged to read selections from their piece that afternoon at the Big Mouth Café tent. For more information, call 957-4992 or visit WWW.SLCC.EDU/CWC.


Fare Well & Hell O! will be danced by pioneering Washington, DC, choreographer Maida Withers—known internationally for her innovative choreography, her intensity as a dancer, and her interactions with other dancers and collaborators. The work also includes art video by Ayodamola Okunseinde, poetry and sound by Alex Caldiero and original music by Steve Hilmy.

at The University of Utah

Learn from seasoned instructors

%XLOGUHODWLRQVKLSVDQGVKDUHLGHDVDQGstrategies

 ‡ZZZFRQWLQXHXWDKHGXSURHG

Fare Well is a multimedia work that brings insight and vibrant critique to the contemporary issue of end time through movement, music, text, and visual installation (images and visual poems). Fare Well is as extreme as the weather in its moods and absurdities. As fires rage, volcanoes erupt, the Arctic melts, and the seas rise(“Did we do it?�) Fare Well draws the audience in through humor, irony and anti-narratives.

nonprofit academy for e xcellence

Fare Well and Hell O! – The End of the World As We Know It or Dancing Your Way to Paradise!

Join the

/HDYHUHDG\WRLPSOHPHQWQHZLGHDVQRZ Call for Applications! Submit by August 22 Fall classes begin September, 2008 Apply online at: www.continue.utah.edu/proed or call (801) 585-1780 for more information

Fare Well & Hell O: Main Library Auditorium, Saturday, 9:30pm and Sunday, 6:30pm.

WAR! What better word to rouse a crowd in a political year like this one? In 2008, we are certainly divided, undoubtedly conflicted, and desperately exhausted from our situation‌ And we’re not even talking about Iraq or Afghanistan‌ We’re talking about the politics we all share in identity and in being human. Throughout the festival, check out any of many short films in our juried Fear No Film festival. The films average 20 minutes apiece, so you can drop in and cool off in the library auditorium while getting captivated by these great creative works. Fear No Film festival, Nancy Tessman auditorium, inside library.

The Word Ecstatic

For a complete Utah Arts Festival schedule including national musical headliners, music clips and more, visit uaf.org.

GIFT CERTIFICATES YOGA CLOTHING

Check out our new web site: www.bikramyogaslc.com

36 classes per week

INTRO SPECIAL $ 20

Summer’s coming

get flexible TO X I N D U M P I N G FAT M E LT I N G

STRESS BUSTING LIFE CHANGING

TY BIKRA I C KE Give it days, you will be amazed.

30

*FIRST TIME UTAH RESIDENTS ONLY, DAYS MUST BE CONSECUTIVE

BIKRAM YOGA SLC

1140 E. Wilmington Ave. in Sugarhouse

Female Empowerment Movement gives you...

MURDER MYSTERY & CASINO FUNDRAISER

10 days unlimited yoga*

OGA MY

In partnership with the SLCC Community Writing Center, Salt Lake City’s Youth City Program and the Salt Lake Acting Company, the Utah Arts Festival offers The Word Ecstatic, a variety of opportunities to take workshops, enter a writing competition (see this page), participate in a Poetry Slam or just enjoy readings from local authors and poets. The Big Mouth Stage on the southeast quadrant of the City & County Building grounds will host poets, readings and performances. The SLCC Community Writing Center on the Library Plaza will feature workshops and readings, as well as the starting line for the second annual Wasatch IronPen writing competition. ◆

BIKRAM YOGA

SALT L A

Fear No Film

NamastĂŠ Spa full line Ayurceutics Health counseling Body Balance 801-488-HOT1 (4681) www.bikramyogaslc.com

Win prizes ranging from Kura Door massages to free sexual health services for women and men provided by Planned Parenthood (see website for details) Tickets: $30 online or by phone $40 at the door All proceeds benefit sexual violence awareness and prevention. Formal Wear Required

www.fem-utah.com 801-359-1058 June 14th 6 p.m. Alpine Ballroom, Hilton Salt Lake City Center (255 S. West Temple)


40

June 2008 catalystmagazine.net

White Tara Goddess of Compassion BY CAROL KOLEMAN

A

KA: Arya Tara, Jetsun Dolma, Divine Mother, Great Protector, Mother of All Buddhas, Mother of Liberation, Universal Mother of Compassion, Tara of the Turned Face, Tara of Seven Eyes, the Great Goddess, She Who Brings Forth Life, Star of Heaven, She Who is the Embodiment of Wisdom, The Great Compassionate Mother, The Faithful One, The Fierce Protectoress, One Who Saves Different Aspects: White Tara is one aspect belonging to a set of Bodhisattvas (a being that compassionately refrains from entering nirvana in order to save others or Buddha to be). Some other aspects are Green Tara (activity of compassion), Red Tara (magnetizing all good things), Black Tara (power), Yellow Tara (wealth and prosperity), Blue Tara (transmutation of anger) and Cittamani Tara. Mythology: Tibetan Buddhism (Mahayana, Vajrayana)

PROFILE OF A GODDESS Translation: Star (Sanskrit) Story & Symbolism: Tara originated as the Hindu goddess Parvati, the Mother Creator, before entering Buddhism around the third century BCE. A few stories speak of her origins in Buddhism. This one describes in words how we usually see Tara depicted: Avalokiteshvara, the Buddha of compassion, looked down upon the earth and was so moved by the extent of suffering he observed that tears of compassion flowed down his cheeks and created a pool. From this pool Tara was born, rising from a blooming lotus as the embodiment of lo ve and compassion. White Tara is seen with breasts uncovered, sitting in the diamond lotus position on a lotus flower. She has seven eyes (two in the usual place, one on each of her hands and feet and a thir d eye on her forehead) exhibiting that she sees all suffering in the world. Her white color portrays purity and radiance. Her right hand makes the boongranting mudra (hand position), her left hand is held in the protection mudra while also holding the Utpala (a three-bloomed flower that symbolizes Tara as the essence of the three Buddhas). AKA in other mythologies: Kuan Yin (China), Great Goddess Tara (Celtic), Tarahumara (S. America), Ishtar (Egyptian), Star Woman (Cheyenne), Tarani Bosatsu (Japan), Tara (Druids, Hinduism, Jainism, Tibetan Lamaism, Polynesian) Interpretation: An acquaintance who was struggling once asked me, “Is there a goddess of forgiveness that I can turn to?” I considered this for awhile until it occurred to me that one can not find forgiveness without compassion. Then I realized that if one truly feels compassion, there is no reason for forgiveness. If someone hurts you, their unconscious actions come from a story within themselves, a story where you are not really the object. So what is there to forgive? It may have nothing to do with you or everything to do with you; it doesn’t really matter. In either case,

Tara rises from a blooming lotus as the embodiment of love and compassion. they are suffering and you have the choice to feed that suffering or to transform it with compassion, thereby healing both of you. Like the half full/half empty glass metaphor, the reality is in our perception. We are all hurt by others and we all hurt others. You can live your life feeling unloved because you perceive that you lack love, or you can feel abundance with the love you have. Buddha describes compassion in the “Four Sublime States of Mind,” as the way to reduce suffering. The Path of Purification (fifth century CE) states the importance of understanding that first you must feel compassion for yourself before feel-

ing compassion for others. In the next stage, you find compassion for a loved one, which also is easy. In the third stage, focus your compassion on a stranger, and lastly, practice compassion for someone for whom you feel hostility. This is the most difficult stage, but consider this and it will help— we are all the same in this basic desire; we need to feel loved. You develop universal love and compassion when you see every individual that suffers as if she were your child, or as if he were your parent and that you want to end their suffering. I believe that the cessation of suffer ing is the result of compassion found through suffering. When you encounter a situation full of pain and suffering, it breaks your heart wide open. In this vulnerable period, you realize love is the most valuable thing you could ever have in your life. All those daily irritations and human infractions mean nothing in comparison. In this moment, you find compassion, because your healing heart has room only for love. Practice: Compassion is not a passive emotion and it does not occur arbitrarily. You create it by setting your intention and by practicing. During your meditation, try a mantra that Tibetan Buddhists called “Tara Practice.” A mantra is a syllable or poem used as spiritual conduit or vibration. Repeating this invocation of Tara helps focus your attention toward achieving compassion: Om Tare Tutare Ture Soha. Pronunce it ohm tahray tootahray tooray sohah. Om is the cosmic sound that keeps our universe together. Tare invokes Tara. Tutare translates as deliverance into individual salvation, liberation from fear, external dangers and internal delusions; these syllables activate the center of compassion within us. Ture is deliverance into the Bodhisattva path of universal salvation, the end of suffering, liberation from ignorance. Soha means let this be so or amen. A tangible object can also help y our practice. For example, I have a copper bracelet with this mantra etched into it. While wearing it, I often find my fingers running over the beautiful script, a constant reminder of my intention. During particularly challenging moments, just touching these words prompts me to exercise compassion. You may connect to a Tibetan prayer wheel, a necklace, a fetish or statue of Tara, a tattoo, or any other symbol that recalls your compassionate intention. Keep it with you for the times you need to call upon Goddess Tara. Listen to Tara’s Mantra: WWW.DZOGCHEN.ORG/CHANT/TARA.HTM Other reading: “In Praise of Tara” (Martin Wilson), “Tara the Feminine Divine” (Bokar Rinpoche), “The Cult of Tara” (Stephan Beyer), “How to Free Your Mind” (Thubten Chodron) In her spare time from teaching kindergarten, raising two mini goddesses and managing a band, you may find Carol Koleman Taiko drumming, shooting some photos, making talisman necklaces or spinning fire machetes in the desert.


COMMUNITY

June 2008

41

RESOURCE DIRECTORY

A network of businesses and organizations that are making a positive difference locally, nationally and globally.

To list your business or service email sales@catalystmagazine.net. P rices: 3 months ($150), 6 months ( $240), 12 months ( $360) . Listings must be prepaid in full and are non-refundable. W ord Limit: 45 words, We reserve the right to edit for grammar, style and length. Deadline for changes/reservations: 15th of preceding month.

ABODE cohousing, furniture, feng shui, garden, landscape & design, pets, home repair Dancing Turtle Feng Shui 801-755-8529. Claudia Draper, advanced certified feng shui practitioner. Free your energy, free your life! The result of blocked chi appears as clutter, lack of money, sickness, fatigue and overwhelm. I promise you that if you do any three of the suggestions I give you — your life will change! Exotica Imports 487-6164, 2901 S. Highland Dr. A vast array of affordable gifts, artifacts, exotic furniture & home accessories from around the globe, including incense, candles, lamps, brass, music boxes, carvings, feng shui items, exotic musical instruments, wind chimes, fountains & more. Garden Ventures 801-699-6970. Love your garden, not the work? Garden Ventures offers quality garden maintenance, creative design, and consulting services. We can provide a one-time clean-up or set up a regular maintenance schedule. Specializing in waterwise plants and landscapes. (Please, no lawn care.) Happy Paws Pet Sitting Plus 801-205-4491. Libbie Neale. Pet sitting in your home for your pets’ comfort and peace of mind. Providing vital home care services while you are away. Bonded and insured. Member, Pet Sitters International. Please call for pricing. www.happypawspetsittingplus.com. Interior Design in 2 Hours 971-2136. Help with selection of paint colors and other finishes, furniture placement or remix of existing pieces and accessories. A two-hour consult is just $125. Full interior design services

also available. Over 30 years experience with small and large commercial and residential projects. Rosine Oliver, IIDA. RHOdesigns, llc. RHODESIGNS@COMCAST.NET

Island of Light Landscape Artistry 971-7208. Specializing in complete nouveau garden design & installation or modest enhancement & maintenance. Featuring distinctive native stone patios, winding rock paths, steps, drystack walls & terraces—rustic elegance with water-wise beauty. Call for consultation. LifeAlign Classical Compass Feng Shui 272-8783. Valerie Litchfield. The Compass School of Feng Shui analyzes properties by combining precise compass readings and mathematical formulas that yield accurate, customized and amazing results. WWW.PRECIOUSLOTUS.COM Orchard Animal Clinic 296-1230. 755 N. Hwy. 89, Ste. D, N. Salt Lake. Alternative health care for dogs & cats. A holistic approach to veterinary care using acupuncture, chiropractic, homeopathy & herbal medicine. Shannon Hines, DVM. IVAS & AVCA certified. Practical Environments (435) 640-1206. Michelle Skally Doilney, Certified Feng Shui Consultant. Offering practical organization and design solutions using Feng Shui, budget-balancing and common sense, to homes and businesses in the Greater Park City and Salt Lake regions. You are the architect of your space… and your life! MICHELLE@PRACTICALENVIRONMENTS.COM. WWW.PRACTICALENVIRONMENTS.COM. Sugar House Plumbing I’m a licensed, insured professional plumber and I can fix your problem. You’ll be glad you called me. Jeff, 638-4705. Underfoot Floors 467-6636. 1900 S. 300 W., SLC. We offer innovative & enviro-friendly floors including bamboo, cork, dyed-cement, recycled hardwood, natural fiber carpets & wall coverings. Eric Cole will help you with your design options.

Free in-home estimates. Visit our showroom. WWW.UNDERFOOTFLOORS.NET, UNDERFOOTFLOORS@AOL.COM.

VIVID Desert Design 656-8763. Beautiful & lush landscape designs for Utah’s climate. Skilled landscape architect & stained glass artist. Affordable. The time for the planning phase is now! Wasatch Commons Cohousing Vicky 908-0388. 1411 S. Utah St. (1605 W.) An environmentally sensitive community promoting neighborliness, consensus & diversity. Balancing privacy needs with community living. Homes now available for rent or sale. Roommates wanted. Tours 4th Wed at 5p and 2nd Sat. at 1p.m. WWW.COHOUSING.ORG, WWW.ECON.UTAH.EDU/COHO DogMode 261-2665. 4010 S. 210 W., SLC. WWW.DOGMODE.COM Residential Design 322-5122. Icon Remodeling 1448 East 2700 South, SLC, UT 84106 (485-9209 WWW.ICONREMODELING.COM.

ARTS, MUSIC & LANGUAGES theatre, visual arts, galleries, pottery, bands, language classes Able to Speak French? 582-6019. Vive La France School promises you can. Learn French faster naturally. Now offering classes & tutoring in Salt Lake City and Utah Valley. All levels taught. Also yearly French tours. Director Catherine Thorpe is a Sorbonne (Paris) graduate. VIVELAFRANCESCHOOL@GMAIL.COM, WWW.VIVELAFRANCESCHOOL.COM Alliance Francaise of Salt Lake City 571-0723. P.O. Box 26203, SLC UT 84126. International cultural organization conducts French language classes. Beginners through advanced levels taught by experienced, native teach-

ers. Three semesters, 10 sessions each. Monthly social gatherings. We also sponsor French related concerts and lectures. WWW.AFSLC.ORG.

Artful Heart Center 467-7530. Jan Henderson. Sugar House. See your soul's desire with new eyes. Weekly classes with most materials provided. Reveal innate creativity and trigger therapeutic expressions. Open up to composition, color theory, shapes and techniques from a widely published artist and experienced instructor. Beginners welcome. Let me bring out the artist in you. WWW.JANHENDERSONART.COM. Huntsman Photo Design 808-5848. 925 E. 900 S., SLC, Utah. Specializing in artistic, natural-light portraits and weddings. Also enjoys photographing pets, head shots, fashion and commercial. Candid, photojournalistic black and white or traditional color with an emphasis on naturalistic images. 25 years experience. Wedding packages from $350. EHUNTSMANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM. Music Lessons in Your Home 801-797-9240. Violin, piano. Accepting students age 5 and up. Adult quickstart program. Utah Artist Hands 355-0206. 61 W. 100 S. Bringing together the artists' community of Utah. Fine art, photography, sculpture, pottery, glass, leather, wood, jewelry, unique crafts and more. Idlewild. 268-4789. Michael Lucarelli. Classical guitarist, 274-2845. Listen at WWW.LUCARELLI.COM

BODYWORK massage, chiropractic, structural integration (SEE ALSO: Energy Work & Healing)

Alternative Health Care 533-2464. Ardys L. Dance, LMT Practicing the art of therapeutic healing since 1988. Specializing in visceral manipulation: organ-specific myofascial release of scar tissue around internal organs damaged through surgeries, illness or accident. Craniosacral therapy, neural mobilization of the brain, an amazing new therapy. Advanced Visionary and Biodynamic Craniosacral work 414 3812. Linda Watkins, LMT, BFA, MEd. Going beyond still point to find the dynamic and profound stillness that resides there. Visa, MC, Amex. Body Alive! 414-3812. Linda Watkins, BFA, MEd, LMT. Offering the very real possibility of release from chronic or acute pain resulting from injury, illness or the aging process. Specialized work in deep tissue full body sessions, structural and visceral work, craniosacral therapy (Milne Certified), Jin Shin Jyutsu. Tailored to meet your specific needs. “The pain of everyday life” does not have to be your reality! Gift certificates available. Visa, MC, American Express, Discover. Holistic Chiropractic 230-0166. Dr. Bob Seiler. 715 East 3900 South; Suite 108. Integrating Eastern & western approaches to wellness by using my hands with laser therapies & herbs to relieve aches from auto-ski-sport injuries; neck-back-leg pain; headaches-stress-insomniadepression. Auto insurances, credit cards & selected insurances accepted. Visit DRBOBSEILER.COM Sibel Iren, MA, Certified Rolfer® 1569 South 1100 East, 520-1470, www.utahrolfing.com. Quantum Healing through Intuitive Rolfing combines structural integration, visceral manipulation and intuitive body reading for those seeking a deeper connection to the relationship of the body, mind and soul. Maya Abdominal Massage 595-6335. Lucia Gardner, LMT, NCTMB, midwife. An external, non-invasive, gentle technique to reposition abdominal organs and relieve PMS, infertility, menopause symptoms, emotional trau-


CLARITY COACHING When you’re ready for the change that changes everything.

801-487-7621 ClarityCoachingInstitute.com Transformation couldn’t be simpler, more powerful, and yes, even more fun!

CLARITY COACHING with KATHRYN DIXON

& The Work of Byron Katie “The root cause of suffering is identification with our thoughts. ‘The Work’ is a razor sharp sword that cuts through the illusion and enables you to know for yourself the timeless essence of your being. This is the key. Now use it.” Eckhart Tolle, author of The Power of Now

801-487-7621 THE WORK OF

Byron Katie

STOP HIDING FROM YOUR TRUTH Find My Truth Life Coaching Toll free 866-525-2012 Sign up for a FREE session @

findmytruth.com

42

June 2008 CatalystMagazine.net

RESOURCE DIRECTORY

ma, gastritis, etc. Ancient shamanic technique used for centuries by traditional healers. Profound & effective results. Also, SpiritBody work to transform and heal emotional trauma in the body.

Carl Rabke LMT, GCFP 671-4533 Somatic Education and Bodywork. Feldenkrais®, Structural Integration and massage. Offering a unique blend of the 10 sessions with Awareness Through Movement® lessons. Discover the potential for learning and improvement at any age, as you come to inhabit your body with ease, vitality and integrity. WWW.BODYHAPPY.COM. Rocky Mountain Rolfing® Becki Ruud, Certified Rolfer. 671-9118. “Expanding your potential for effortless living.” If you can imagine how it feels to live in a fluid, light, balanced body, free of pain, stiffness and chronic stress, at ease with itself and gravitational field, then you will understand the purpose of Rolfing®. Located in Riverton. WWW.ROCKYMOUNTAINROLFING.COM. Rolfing® Structural Integration Certified Rolfers Paul Wirth, 638-0021 and Mary Phillips, 809-2560. Rolfing improves movement, eases pain, and brings about lasting change in the body. Addressing structure together with patterns in movement and coordination, we help people find ease, resilience, efficiency and comfort. Free consultations. WWW.ROLFINGSALTLAKE.COM. Sensate Tools for Body Knowledge Ever wonder how you can influence the way your body feels? I combine myofascial/structural manipulation with Laban Movement Analysis to help you feel, understand, and re-pattern the movements that form your body every day. Matthew Nelson, CLMA, CMT, 897-7892 THEWNELSON@VERIZON.NET. Soma Libra, LLC Ingrid Bregand, LMT, KMI. 801-792 9319. Innovative Kinesis Myofascial Integration. Unfold into greater innate balance and alignment via a systemic manipulation of your body Anatomy Trains (groundbreaking myofascial meridians theory). Dynamic and attentive structural therapy. Lasting significant work with anatomical precision. WWW.ANATOMYTRAINS.COM SpiritWolf Healing Arts 870-5613. 1390 S. 1100 E., Ste. 107. Margaret Miller, LMT, Transformation Catalyst. Ignite your inner work! Create more joy now. Experience major shifts and lasting change through a full spectrum of body work, innovative energy work, and shamanic healing. Each session tailored and aligned to your needs. Utahna Tassie, LMT, EFT-ADV, Reiki Master, Energy Therapist 801.973.7849 Nurturing, deeply healing massage with or without EFT, Theta, Quantum-Touch, give you fast, easy relief from chronic pain, anxiety, dis-ease, injuries, addictions, and depression (in 3 sessions or less!). Intuitive healing classes available. Mon-Sat by appointment. Taylorsville area. Bill Wagner, LMT 582-2275, Bill Wagner, LMT. Therapeutic massage & bodywork integrating various modalities such as shiatsu, craniosacral, acupressure, reflexology & injury massage. Relax...repair...rejuvenate. Reasonable rates & discount packages available. Dr. Michael Cerami, Chiropractor. 486-1818. 1550 E. 3300 S. WWW.DRCERAMI.COM Healing Mountain Massage School. 355-6300.

An Easy and Progressive Way to Achieve Personal Growth

COMMUNITY

Time Out Associates. 530-0633.

BOOKS, GIFTS, CDS, CLOTHING

ENERGY WORK & HEALING

books, gifts & jewelry, imports, music stores

energy balancing, Reiki (SEE ALSO: Bodywork)

Ken Sanders Rare Books 521-3819. 268 S 200 E. Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner, B. Traven. Literary firsr additions. Out-ofprint books on Utah and the American West; travels, explorations, wilderness, the environment, national parks & Western Americana. Antique photography, prints, postcards, posters, all kinds of paper ephemera. Out of print searches. Hours: M-Sat. 10a- 6p. Golden Braid Books. 322-1162. 151 S. 500 E. The Vug Rock & Gem Jewelers. 521-6026. 872 E. 900 S. Twigs and Company. 596-2322. 1616 S. 1100 E. Blue Boutique. 982-1100. WWW.BLUEBOUTIQUE.COM Black Mountain Gemstone Jewelry 359-6262 WWW.BLACKMOUNTAINBEAD.COM

CERTIFICATION, DEGREES & SCHOOLS education/schools, vocational, massage schools A Voice-Over Workshop Scott Shurian, 359-1776. The Salt Lake City voice-over workshop teaches the art of voicing commercials and narrations for radio, TV, multi media and the World Wide Web. Personal coaching and demo production also available. WWW.VOSCOTT.COM Healing Mountain Massage School 355-6300. 455 South 300 East, Suite 103, SLC, UT 84111. Morning, evening, & weekend programs. Graduate in as little as 7 months. 8 students in a class. Mentor with seasoned professionals. Practice in a live day spa. ABHES accredited. Financial aid: loans/grants available to those who qualify. WWW.HEALINGMOUNTAIN.ORG Sego Lily School. 274-9555. WWW.SEGOLILYSCHOOL.ORG Elaine Bell. Art Instruction. 201-2496. Red Lotus School of Movement. 355-6375. WWW.REDLOTUSSCHOOL.COM

Lilli DeCair 533-2444 or 577-6119. Holistic health educator, certified Thought Pattern Management practitioner, coach, shamanic wisdom, Medicine Wheel journeys, intuitive consultant, mediator, minister. Usui Reiki Master/teacher offers all levels complete in 10 individual classes, certification & mentoring on request. Visit at Dancing Cranes Friday, Saturday and Sunday afternoons for psychic sessions. Cafe Alchemy and Mayan Astrology, nutritional nudges, stress relief hospital visits, fundraising. Send a psychic telegram. On the board of directors, Utah Mental Health Assn. Dynamic Touch Healing Arts Center 486-6267. 1399 S. 700 E. Elizabeth Williams, RN, MSN. Traditional Usui Reiki Master. Reiki is a gentle, easy technique with remarkable results. Offering a safe environment for healing/balance on physical, emotional, spiritual levels. Everyone can learn Reiki. Classes & sessions available. Supervised student sessions available for reduced rates. Integrated Quantum Healing 801-252-1556. Lynne Laitinen RMT, ECRT, MC. 25 years of experience. Access to unparalleled key guidance into your spiritual, emotional and physical challenges; releases stress naturally. Offering core emotional release techniques, cranial-sacral, polarity, Quantum-Touch, Reiki and workshops. Credit cards accepted. Morning Star Healing Circle We are a group of non-Native American healers who channel the great Northern Cheyenne hero, Morning Star. We provide: at-a-distance healing, soul rescue, spirit rescue, site clearing and spiritual emergency work. WWW.MORNINGSTARMEDITATION.NET Neuro Emotional Technique 364-5700 Ext 1. 1399 S. 700 E., Ste. 2, SLC. Jim Struve, LCSW. NET is a non-invasive mind-body technique that clears emotional blocks. By combining light touch, supportive dialogue, memory retrieval, and breathing, NET assists in “rebooting” disturbing emotional and behavioral patterns. Useful for adults with entrenched beliefs, unresolved trauma, or removing barriers to desired life transitions. WWW.MINDFULPRESENCE.COM Reiki & Karuna Reiki Master Teacher; Sound Healing and Meditation Teacher Carol A. Wilson, Ph.D., CHES. 359-2352 or INFO@CAROLWILSON.ORG. Registered, International Association of Reiki Professionals (IARP) and International Center for Reiki Training. Individual Reiki, Karuna Reiki and sound healing sessions. For more info or Reiki I, II, III/Master and meditation class schedules, see WWW.CAROLWILSON.ORG Sheryl Seliger, LCSW, Cranio-Sacral Therapy 556-8760. 1104 E. Ashton Ave. (2310 S.) Powerful healing through gentle-touch energy work. Infants and children: sleep issues, feeding difficulties, fearfulness, bonding, birth trauma, pre- and perinatal therapy. Adults and teens: head injuries, accident


CLARITY COACHING When you’re ready for the change that changes everything.

801-487-7621 ClarityCoachingInstitute.com Transformation couldn’t be simpler, more powerful, and yes, even more fun!

CLARITY COACHING with KATHRYN DIXON

& The Work of Byron Katie “The root cause of suffering is identification with our thoughts. ‘The Work’ is a razor sharp sword that cuts through the illusion and enables you to know for yourself the timeless essence of your being. This is the key. Now use it.” Eckhart Tolle, author of The Power of Now

801-487-7621 THE WORK OF

Byron Katie

STOP HIDING FROM YOUR TRUTH Find My Truth Life Coaching Toll free 866-525-2012 Sign up for a FREE session @

findmytruth.com

42

June 2008 CatalystMagazine.net

RESOURCE DIRECTORY

ma, gastritis, etc. Ancient shamanic technique used for centuries by traditional healers. Profound & effective results. Also, SpiritBody work to transform and heal emotional trauma in the body.

Carl Rabke LMT, GCFP 671-4533 Somatic Education and Bodywork. Feldenkrais®, Structural Integration and massage. Offering a unique blend of the 10 sessions with Awareness Through Movement® lessons. Discover the potential for learning and improvement at any age, as you come to inhabit your body with ease, vitality and integrity. WWW.BODYHAPPY.COM. Rocky Mountain Rolfing® Becki Ruud, Certified Rolfer. 671-9118. “Expanding your potential for effortless living.” If you can imagine how it feels to live in a fluid, light, balanced body, free of pain, stiffness and chronic stress, at ease with itself and gravitational field, then you will understand the purpose of Rolfing®. Located in Riverton. WWW.ROCKYMOUNTAINROLFING.COM. Rolfing® Structural Integration Certified Rolfers Paul Wirth, 638-0021 and Mary Phillips, 809-2560. Rolfing improves movement, eases pain, and brings about lasting change in the body. Addressing structure together with patterns in movement and coordination, we help people find ease, resilience, efficiency and comfort. Free consultations. WWW.ROLFINGSALTLAKE.COM. Sensate Tools for Body Knowledge Ever wonder how you can influence the way your body feels? I combine myofascial/structural manipulation with Laban Movement Analysis to help you feel, understand, and re-pattern the movements that form your body every day. Matthew Nelson, CLMA, CMT, 897-7892 THEWNELSON@VERIZON.NET. Soma Libra, LLC Ingrid Bregand, LMT, KMI. 801-792 9319. Innovative Kinesis Myofascial Integration. Unfold into greater innate balance and alignment via a systemic manipulation of your body Anatomy Trains (groundbreaking myofascial meridians theory). Dynamic and attentive structural therapy. Lasting significant work with anatomical precision. WWW.ANATOMYTRAINS.COM SpiritWolf Healing Arts 870-5613. 1390 S. 1100 E., Ste. 107. Margaret Miller, LMT, Transformation Catalyst. Ignite your inner work! Create more joy now. Experience major shifts and lasting change through a full spectrum of body work, innovative energy work, and shamanic healing. Each session tailored and aligned to your needs. Utahna Tassie, LMT, EFT-ADV, Reiki Master, Energy Therapist 801.973.7849 Nurturing, deeply healing massage with or without EFT, Theta, Quantum-Touch, give you fast, easy relief from chronic pain, anxiety, dis-ease, injuries, addictions, and depression (in 3 sessions or less!). Intuitive healing classes available. Mon-Sat by appointment. Taylorsville area. Bill Wagner, LMT 582-2275, Bill Wagner, LMT. Therapeutic massage & bodywork integrating various modalities such as shiatsu, craniosacral, acupressure, reflexology & injury massage. Relax...repair...rejuvenate. Reasonable rates & discount packages available. Dr. Michael Cerami, Chiropractor. 486-1818. 1550 E. 3300 S. WWW.DRCERAMI.COM Healing Mountain Massage School. 355-6300.

An Easy and Progressive Way to Achieve Personal Growth

COMMUNITY

Time Out Associates. 530-0633.

BOOKS, GIFTS, CDS, CLOTHING

ENERGY WORK & HEALING

books, gifts & jewelry, imports, music stores

energy balancing, Reiki (SEE ALSO: Bodywork)

Ken Sanders Rare Books 521-3819. 268 S 200 E. Edward Abbey, Wallace Stegner, B. Traven. Literary firsr additions. Out-ofprint books on Utah and the American West; travels, explorations, wilderness, the environment, national parks & Western Americana. Antique photography, prints, postcards, posters, all kinds of paper ephemera. Out of print searches. Hours: M-Sat. 10a- 6p. Golden Braid Books. 322-1162. 151 S. 500 E. The Vug Rock & Gem Jewelers. 521-6026. 872 E. 900 S. Twigs and Company. 596-2322. 1616 S. 1100 E. Blue Boutique. 982-1100. WWW.BLUEBOUTIQUE.COM Black Mountain Gemstone Jewelry 359-6262 WWW.BLACKMOUNTAINBEAD.COM

CERTIFICATION, DEGREES & SCHOOLS education/schools, vocational, massage schools A Voice-Over Workshop Scott Shurian, 359-1776. The Salt Lake City voice-over workshop teaches the art of voicing commercials and narrations for radio, TV, multi media and the World Wide Web. Personal coaching and demo production also available. WWW.VOSCOTT.COM Healing Mountain Massage School 355-6300. 455 South 300 East, Suite 103, SLC, UT 84111. Morning, evening, & weekend programs. Graduate in as little as 7 months. 8 students in a class. Mentor with seasoned professionals. Practice in a live day spa. ABHES accredited. Financial aid: loans/grants available to those who qualify. WWW.HEALINGMOUNTAIN.ORG Sego Lily School. 274-9555. WWW.SEGOLILYSCHOOL.ORG Elaine Bell. Art Instruction. 201-2496. Red Lotus School of Movement. 355-6375. WWW.REDLOTUSSCHOOL.COM

Lilli DeCair 533-2444 or 577-6119. Holistic health educator, certified Thought Pattern Management practitioner, coach, shamanic wisdom, Medicine Wheel journeys, intuitive consultant, mediator, minister. Usui Reiki Master/teacher offers all levels complete in 10 individual classes, certification & mentoring on request. Visit at Dancing Cranes Friday, Saturday and Sunday afternoons for psychic sessions. Cafe Alchemy and Mayan Astrology, nutritional nudges, stress relief hospital visits, fundraising. Send a psychic telegram. On the board of directors, Utah Mental Health Assn. Dynamic Touch Healing Arts Center 486-6267. 1399 S. 700 E. Elizabeth Williams, RN, MSN. Traditional Usui Reiki Master. Reiki is a gentle, easy technique with remarkable results. Offering a safe environment for healing/balance on physical, emotional, spiritual levels. Everyone can learn Reiki. Classes & sessions available. Supervised student sessions available for reduced rates. Integrated Quantum Healing 801-252-1556. Lynne Laitinen RMT, ECRT, MC. 25 years of experience. Access to unparalleled key guidance into your spiritual, emotional and physical challenges; releases stress naturally. Offering core emotional release techniques, cranial-sacral, polarity, Quantum-Touch, Reiki and workshops. Credit cards accepted. Morning Star Healing Circle We are a group of non-Native American healers who channel the great Northern Cheyenne hero, Morning Star. We provide: at-a-distance healing, soul rescue, spirit rescue, site clearing and spiritual emergency work. WWW.MORNINGSTARMEDITATION.NET Neuro Emotional Technique 364-5700 Ext 1. 1399 S. 700 E., Ste. 2, SLC. Jim Struve, LCSW. NET is a non-invasive mind-body technique that clears emotional blocks. By combining light touch, supportive dialogue, memory retrieval, and breathing, NET assists in “rebooting” disturbing emotional and behavioral patterns. Useful for adults with entrenched beliefs, unresolved trauma, or removing barriers to desired life transitions. WWW.MINDFULPRESENCE.COM Reiki & Karuna Reiki Master Teacher; Sound Healing and Meditation Teacher Carol A. Wilson, Ph.D., CHES. 359-2352 or INFO@CAROLWILSON.ORG. Registered, International Association of Reiki Professionals (IARP) and International Center for Reiki Training. Individual Reiki, Karuna Reiki and sound healing sessions. For more info or Reiki I, II, III/Master and meditation class schedules, see WWW.CAROLWILSON.ORG Sheryl Seliger, LCSW, Cranio-Sacral Therapy 556-8760. 1104 E. Ashton Ave. (2310 S.) Powerful healing through gentle-touch energy work. Infants and children: sleep issues, feeding difficulties, fearfulness, bonding, birth trauma, pre- and perinatal therapy. Adults and teens: head injuries, accident


recovery, PTSD, chronic pain, stress reduction. Enjoy deep relaxation and peace. Mon-Fri 8:00a12:30p. SELIGERS@GMAIL.COM

Theta Healing & EFT 435-843-5309 Theta DNA I & DNA II certified by Vianna’s Nature’s Path. Resolve physical & emotional pain. Limiting beliefs dissolved quickly. Leave your pains from years past & create lasting peace in your mind and body, call or e-mail today! HEALINGSWITHGENNA@COMCAST.NET

Considering the fact that Jesus had his doubts, why can’t you? If you believe in God, but still have doubts and questions, there’s plenty of room for you in the faith and fellowship of our church.

Theta Healing with Darcy Phillipps 916-4221. Are you free to be who you really are? Changing your beliefs changes your life. Doors open to instant healing. Love is unconditional. Dreams to reality. Come and play. DARCYPHILLIPPS.COM. Universal Abundance Reiki Master-Teacher: Distance Attunement 313-0692. Karen Burch, Reiki Master/facilitator. Specialized Reiki helps release limitations, promotes prosperity, insight. Easy to facilitate. No touch positions. Entire being activated, not just hands. Flows through intention, travels any distance. Only one Attunement needed. Manual/ certificate. $40. UA Reiki phone sessions also available. Kathryn Wallis 394-4577. Evenings 4-7. Be healthy regardless of your age and what you hear. Your body is a chemical lab reflecting formulas by thoughts, illnesses, aging, mindsets, lifestyle. Just living offsets chemical balance. I change your balance by remote only. 30 years experience. WWW.WHOLEBODYBALANCETUNING.COM

© 2002 ChurchAd Project

Sunday Worship at 8:00 a.m., 10:15 a.m., and 6:00 p.m. Adult programs of inquiry offered regularly on Sunday at 9:15 a.m.

GETAWAY outdoor suppliers, lodging, spas, outdoor education Canyonlands Field Institute 1-800-860-5262. P.O. Box 68, Moab, UT 84532. Authentic nature and culture. River and hiking trips and camps for schools, adults and families. WWW.CANYONLANDSFIELDINST.ORG Cliff Spa 933-2225. Cliff Lodge, Snowbird, UT. Relax, refresh, recreate. The Cliff Spa at Snowbird offers massages, wraps, facials, manicures, pedicures & a full service salon. Also a rooftop lap pool, whirlpool, eucalyptus steam room, dry saunas & exercise facility. WWW.CLIFFSPA.COM

This Month: “Spirituality and the Movies - ‘The Cider House Rules’” Motion pictures often have deeply spiritual and metaphysical themes. The viewing of “Cider House Rules” is the first of a three month series looking at major films and their deeper content. Each session will begin with 30 minutes of the film followed by engaged discussion.

All Saints Episcopal Church On the corner of Foothill Dr. & 1700 South Learn more at http://www.allsaintsslc.org Or call (801) 581-0380

S O O L AC U P U N C T U R E The majority of your illnesses come from disruption of your internal yin-yang. Through Acupuncture treatment, all your internal organs can be balanced and all your biologic functions can return to their normal states. If you have stomach cancer, pancreatic cancer, liver cirrhosis, and are currently receiving chemotherapy, suffering with aches, paralysis, or hemiplegia through stroke, call today! I can help.

HEALTH, WELLNESS & BODY CARE Ayurveda, beauty supply, birth services/ prenatal care, Chinese medicine/acupuncture, colon therapy, dentistry, health centers, health products, homeopathy, naturopaths, nutritionists, physical therapy, physicians, women's healthcare

Sool Y. Kim OMD Mon- Fri 10:00 am - 7:30 pm Sat 10 am - 4:00 pm We accept insurance

SOOL ACUPUNCTURE 4568 Highland Dr. #220, Salt Lake City, UT www.acupuncturesaltlake.com

Please call today!

801-277-3406

“Peace is a daily, a weekly, a monthly process, gradually changing opinions, slow eroding old barriers, quietly building new structures.” - JFK


recovery, PTSD, chronic pain, stress reduction. Enjoy deep relaxation and peace. Mon-Fri 8:00a12:30p. SELIGERS@GMAIL.COM

Theta Healing & EFT 435-843-5309 Theta DNA I & DNA II certified by Vianna’s Nature’s Path. Resolve physical & emotional pain. Limiting beliefs dissolved quickly. Leave your pains from years past & create lasting peace in your mind and body, call or e-mail today! HEALINGSWITHGENNA@COMCAST.NET

Considering the fact that Jesus had his doubts, why can’t you? If you believe in God, but still have doubts and questions, there’s plenty of room for you in the faith and fellowship of our church.

Theta Healing with Darcy Phillipps 916-4221. Are you free to be who you really are? Changing your beliefs changes your life. Doors open to instant healing. Love is unconditional. Dreams to reality. Come and play. DARCYPHILLIPPS.COM. Universal Abundance Reiki Master-Teacher: Distance Attunement 313-0692. Karen Burch, Reiki Master/facilitator. Specialized Reiki helps release limitations, promotes prosperity, insight. Easy to facilitate. No touch positions. Entire being activated, not just hands. Flows through intention, travels any distance. Only one Attunement needed. Manual/ certificate. $40. UA Reiki phone sessions also available. Kathryn Wallis 394-4577. Evenings 4-7. Be healthy regardless of your age and what you hear. Your body is a chemical lab reflecting formulas by thoughts, illnesses, aging, mindsets, lifestyle. Just living offsets chemical balance. I change your balance by remote only. 30 years experience. WWW.WHOLEBODYBALANCETUNING.COM

© 2002 ChurchAd Project

Sunday Worship at 8:00 a.m., 10:15 a.m., and 6:00 p.m. Adult programs of inquiry offered regularly on Sunday at 9:15 a.m.

GETAWAY outdoor suppliers, lodging, spas, outdoor education Canyonlands Field Institute 1-800-860-5262. P.O. Box 68, Moab, UT 84532. Authentic nature and culture. River and hiking trips and camps for schools, adults and families. WWW.CANYONLANDSFIELDINST.ORG Cliff Spa 933-2225. Cliff Lodge, Snowbird, UT. Relax, refresh, recreate. The Cliff Spa at Snowbird offers massages, wraps, facials, manicures, pedicures & a full service salon. Also a rooftop lap pool, whirlpool, eucalyptus steam room, dry saunas & exercise facility. WWW.CLIFFSPA.COM

This Month: “Spirituality and the Movies - ‘The Cider House Rules’” Motion pictures often have deeply spiritual and metaphysical themes. The viewing of “Cider House Rules” is the first of a three month series looking at major films and their deeper content. Each session will begin with 30 minutes of the film followed by engaged discussion.

All Saints Episcopal Church On the corner of Foothill Dr. & 1700 South Learn more at http://www.allsaintsslc.org Or call (801) 581-0380

S O O L AC U P U N C T U R E The majority of your illnesses come from disruption of your internal yin-yang. Through Acupuncture treatment, all your internal organs can be balanced and all your biologic functions can return to their normal states. If you have stomach cancer, pancreatic cancer, liver cirrhosis, and are currently receiving chemotherapy, suffering with aches, paralysis, or hemiplegia through stroke, call today! I can help.

HEALTH, WELLNESS & BODY CARE Ayurveda, beauty supply, birth services/ prenatal care, Chinese medicine/acupuncture, colon therapy, dentistry, health centers, health products, homeopathy, naturopaths, nutritionists, physical therapy, physicians, women's healthcare

Sool Y. Kim OMD Mon- Fri 10:00 am - 7:30 pm Sat 10 am - 4:00 pm We accept insurance

SOOL ACUPUNCTURE 4568 Highland Dr. #220, Salt Lake City, UT www.acupuncturesaltlake.com

Please call today!

801-277-3406

“Peace is a daily, a weekly, a monthly process, gradually changing opinions, slow eroding old barriers, quietly building new structures.” - JFK


44

June 2008

COMMUNITY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

A.I.M: Frequencies – Balance – Self-Healing DaNell 680-2853, David 558-9340. Stop surviving and begin thriving. The progression of the AIM (All Inclusive Method) technology is chronicled in the novel “Sanctuary: The Path to Consciousness” (Lewis & Slawson). Inherited predispositions, physical & mental imbalances, environmental toxicity–you can self heal 24/7 using this frequency tool. Pets too. WWW.INFINITECONSCIOUSNESS.COM. Alexander Technique Mindful Movement with Cathy Pollock, 230-7661 Re-educating the kinesthetic (movement) sense to replace harmful habit patterns of movement and mind with ease, balance, and coordination. Improve your musical performance, voice, dance, athletics, dressage, martial arts, workstation posture…and more! If you live and breathe, the Alexander Technique can help you. WWW.ALEXANDERTECHNIQUEUTAH.COM

Almarome® Organic Essential Oils 1.866.392.6909. Based in Sugar House and Provence, France. Home of The SHIELD™, unique blends of 100% certified organic essential oils to protect your health all winter long, reduce exposure to bugs and maximize immunity. WWW.ALMAROME.COM Lori Berryhill, L. Ac. MSTOM Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine 670 7th Avenue 355-3076 / 554-5913 Offering a full range of health/wellness care. The philosophy of my clinic reaches for healing, restorative and preventative therapies including all acute and chronic diseases, sports injury, pediatrics, and emotional issues. Cameron Wellness Center T.W. Cameron, BSN, ND. 486.4226. 1945 South 1100 East #202. You can enhance your healing potential! Naturopathic medicine with emphasis on treatment of chronic illness. Services include: education in mind/body connection, thyroid, adrenal and hormone balancing, diet and lifestyle counseling, neural therapy and intravenous nutrition treatment. Colon Hydrotherapy—Massage 541-3064. Karen Schiff, PT. Licensed physical therapist, certified colon hydrotherapist, I-ACT member, FDA approved system. Clear out old toxins & create the environment within you to realize your health goals. Gently soothe, cleanse, hydrate & tone your body’s primary elimination channel. Enhanced results with nutritional guidance & abdominal massage. This ancient work is a gentle, external method to relieve digestive distress, PMS, menopause, infertility, more! WWW.KARENSCHIFF.COM

Directional Non-Force Technique offers specific, gentle adjustments for longterm correction. No cracking or popping. TMJ, knees, shoulders and spine are addressed as well as previously hopeless concerns. This technique focuses on minimal visits. Enjoy your life now! POWERFULLIFECHIRO.COM. Uli Knorr, ND Eastside Natural Health Clinic 474-3684. Dr. Knorr, with 12 years of clinical experience, offers comprehensive naturopathic medical care. Focus on gastrointestinal health, endocrinology, detoxification and the cardiovascular system; Bioidentical hormone therapy along with adrenal and thyroid function support. Natural medicine/ herbal medicine focus. RBCBS/ ValueCare. EASTSIDENATURALHEALTH.COM. Maharishi Ayurveda 801.446 2999. Maharishi Invincibility Center of SLC. Enjoy Better Health Today. Maharishi Ayurveda herbal supplements are ancient, authentic, timetested formulas for promoting health and well being, without negative side effects. Produced with naturally organic wildcrafted herbs, these supplements are manufactured according to the highest international standards of purity. WWW.MAPI.COM Todd Mangum, MD, Web of Life Wellness Center 531-8340. 989 E. 900 S., Ste. A1. Dr. Mangum is a family practice physician who uses acupuncture, massage, herbs & nutrition to treat a wide range of conditions including chronic fatigue, HIV infection, allergies, digestive disturbances and fibromyalgia. He also designs programs to maintain health & wellness. WWW.WEBOFLIFEWC.COM Leslie Peterson, ND Full Circle Women’s Healthcare 746-3555. Offering integrative medical care for women of all ages. Natural hormone replacement therapy; annual exams; evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of many gynecological health concerns; natural medicine preferentially used. Gentle, safe, whole-person care. WWW.FULLCIRCLECARE.COM Planned Parenthood of Utah Call 1-800-230-PLAN to reach the Planned Parenthood nearest you. Affordable, confidential health care & family planning services for women, men & teens. Abstinence-based education programs for children 532-1586. Many volunteer opportunities 532-1586.

Dragon Dreams, a New Age Gift Boutique In the Web of Life Wellness Center, 989 E 900 S, 509-1043. Meditation and chakra CDs, ORGANIC skin care products and incense, books, crystals, local artist consignments and mystical things like magic wands, fairies and dragons.

Precision Physical Therapy 557-6733. Jane Glaser-Gormally, MS, PT. 4568 S. Highland Dr., Ste. 140. Licensed PT specializing in holistic integrated manual therapy (IMT). Safe, gentle, effective techniques for pain and tissue dysfunction. This unique form of therapy works to identify sources of pain and assists the body with self-corrective mechanisms to alleviate pain and restore mobility and function. BCBS and Medicare provider.

DNFT Chiropractic With Lacey Picard, DC. 505-8189

Wasatch Vision Clinic 328-2020. 849 E. 400 S. in Salt Lake across

from the 9th East TRAX stop. Comprehensive eye care, eye disease, LASIK, contacts and glasses since 1984. We accept most insurance. WASATCHVISION.COM

Acupuncture Associates. 359-2705. Natalie Clausen. Center For Enhanced Wellness 5969998. 2681 E. Parley’s Way. Millcreek Herbs, LLC. Merry Lycett Harrison, RH, CAHG. 466-1632, WWW.MILLCREEKHERBS.COM Millcreek Wellness Center WWW.MILLCREEKWELLNESS.COM 486-1818. 1550 E. 3300 S.

MISCELLANEOUS Space Available 596-0147 Ext. 41, 989 E. 900 S. Center for Transpersonal Therapy. Large plush space. Bright & comfortable atmosphere, available for workshops, classes, or ongoing groups. Pillows, yoga chairs, & regular chairs provided, kitchenette area. Available for hourly, full day or weekend use. Tracy Aviary 322-BIRD, WWW.TRACYAVIARY.ORG. An oasis in the heart of Salt Lake City with 350 birds and 150 species. Many are endangered or injured in the wild and unfit to be released. Guests enjoy Utah’s oldest standing industrial building – The Mill, used for event rentals and year-round bird programs. Volunteer Opportunity Adopt-A-Native-Elder is seeking office/warehouse volunteers in Salt Lake City every Tuesday and Friday 10:00 am noon. Come and join a wonderful group of people for a fascinating and gratifying experience. Contact Joyce 801-474-0535 or MAIL@ANELDER.ORG, WWW.ANELDER.ORG. Catalyst 363-1505. 140 McClelland, SLC. CONTACT@CATALYSTMAGAZINE.NET. KCPW—88.3 & 105.1FM. 359-5279 KRCL—91 & 96.5FM. 359-9191 KUED—TV 7. 581-3064 KUER—FM90. 581-6777

MOVEMENT & SPORT dance, fitness, martial arts, yoga


Suzanne Wagner AquaNia 801-455-6343 Jacqueline Fogel, Certified Nia Instructor. Experience the joy of movement in the water of a warm pool. AquaNia is movement that awakens body awareness and body wisdom to promote health and well-being. Adaptable to meet the needs of all fitness levels. JLFOGEL@COMCAST.NET Bikram Yoga—Salt Lake City 488-Hot1 (4681) 1140 Wilmington Ave. (across from Wild Oats) Bikram certified instructors teach a series of 26 postures affecting every muscle, ligament, organ & all of the body, bringing it into balance. 36 classes each week. All ages & ability levels welcome to all classes. The room is warm by intention, so come prepared to work hard & sweat. Check for new classes in Catalyst calendar. WWW.BIKRAMYOGASLC.COM Bikram Yoga—Sandy 501-YOGA (9642). 9343 S. 1300 E. Our south valley sanctuary nestled below Little Cottonwood Canyon provides a warm and inviting environment to discover or deepen your yoga practice. All levels encouraged, no reservations necessary. Certified teachers. Classes 7 days a week. Call for schedule. Introductory package is 10 consecutive days of unlimited yoga for $20. WWW.BIKRAMYOGASANDY.COM Centered City Yoga 521-YOGA. 918 E. 900 S. and 625 S. State St. Centered City Yoga is often likened to that famous TV “hangout” where everybody knows your name, sans Norm (and the beer, of course.) We offer more than 60 classes a week to keep Salt Lake City CENTERED and SANE. WWW.CENTEREDCITYYOGA.COM. Mindful Yoga 355-2617. Charlotte Bell, RYT & Iyengar certified. Public & private classes, workshops, retreats, river trips and teacher training since 1986. This form of yoga combines alignment awareness with mindfulness practice & breath-supported movement to encourage a sense of ease & balance in traditional postures. Classes include meditation and pranayama (breath awareness) instruction as well as physical practice. Bring comfortable clothing and a sense of humor. WWW.CHARLOTTEBELLYOGA.COM Red Lotus School of Movement 740 S 300 W, SLC, UT, 84101. 355-6375. Established in 1994 by Sifu Jerry Gardner and Jean LaSarre Gardner. Traditional-style training in the classical martial arts of T’ai Chi, Wing Chun Kung-Fu, and T’ai Chi Chih (qi gong exercises). Children’s classes in Wing Chun Kung-Fu. Located downstairs from Urgyen Samten Ling Tibetan Buddhist Temple. WWW.REDLOTUSSCHOOL.COM, REDLOTUS@REDLOTUS.CNC. NET. THE SHOP Anusara Yoga Studio 435-649-9339. 1167 Woodside Ave., P.O Box 681237, Park City, UT 84068. Certified & affiliated Anusara instructors inspire students to open their hearts & express themselves through the art of yoga. Exciting all-level classes taught in an amazing 4,500 sq ft. historic building in downtown Park City. Drop-ins welcome. WWW.PARKCITYYOGA.COM The Yoga Center 277-9166. 4689 So. Holladay Blvd. Hatha-based yoga classes 7 days a week, including vinyasa, slow flow, Anusara, prenatal, gentle and restorative. Workshops, corporate and private sessions available. All levels of experience welcome. WWW.YOGAUTAH.COM Body & Mind Studio. 486-2660. 1063 E. 3300 S. WWW.BODYANDMINDSTUDIO.COM

Erin Geesaman Rabke Somatic Educator. 898-0478. WWW.BODYHAPPY.COM DanceScene. 298-8047. Margene Anderson. RDT Community School. 534-1000. 138 W. Broadway.

Psychic, Lecturer and Author PsychicQuestions andAnswers session at the Golden Braid Bookstore

May 21 & June 18

Streamline. 474-1156. 1948 S. 1100 E. WWW.STREAMLINEBODYWORKS.NET

$15.00/person6:30-9:00PM Each person will be allowed to ask two to three questions of Suzanne

For information or to register: 322-1162 To schedule a private session with Suzanne or to order books, call (801) 359-2225 Email suzanne@suzwagner.com

Or visit www.suzwagner.com

PSYCHIC ARTS & INTUITIVE SCIENCES astrology, mediums, past life integration, psychics All About Your Life: Readings, Psychic Tarot 575-7103. Margaret Ruth. Listen to Margaret Ruth on X-96 FM on Friday mornings or book a private appointment or party. WWW.MARGARETRUTH.COM Channeled Full Spectrum Readings Direct From the Masters 347-5493, Marie. Tap into your highest potential by having readings brought forth in the highest vibration possible. Receive wisdom, counseling, life path, career, and love advice, entity healings, prayer work, ascension and path acceleration. Become the light. Channeled Readings through Spiritual Medium 968-8875, 577-1348. Deloris, as heard on the Mick & Allen Show (KBER Radio, 101.1), can help you with those who have crossed over and other paranormal activity. She can help bring understanding regarding past lives, life purpose and relationships. Available for parties and night clubs. DELORISSPIRITUALMEDIUM.COM

Lilli DeCair: Inspirational Mystical Entertainment 533-2444 and 577-6119. European born professional psychic, holistic health educator, reiki master /teacher, life coach, Mental Health Association in Utah Board Member, serves on Mayor’s Diversity Speakers Board, ESL I instructor, party entertainer. Featured radio magazine personality. Available at Dancing Cranes Fri-Sun, 486-1129 and Cafe Alchemy Sundays 5-9 p. One of 2005 Governor’s Commission on Families Women of the Year recipiants. Poet, singer, dancer, wedding planner/official, Shamanic 9 Day Medicine Wheel Journeys. Alyse Finlayson, Spiritual Artist & Psychic 435-640-6042. Trained artist uses her psychic gifts to paint portraits of your angels and guides. Offering soul retrievals and assists people in building and bringing awareness to their connection with their souls (higher selves) so as to develop their chosen soul paths. WWW.SOULINTERCONNECTION.COM;

Free Horary Charts: Practical Astrology Avani Vyas. 288-9354. Quick answers to your specific questions relating to day-to-day matters (relationships, purchases, job changes, relocation, travel etc.). Excellent aid to your decision making. No medical questions please.

Call (801) 359-2225 for more information. Integral Integral Channeling Numerology Class Tarot Class Class Aug 2-3, 2008 June 28-29, 2008 May 3-4, 2008 INTEGRALTAROT BOOK

$29.95

INTEGRAL NUMEROLOGY BOOK

INTEGRALTAROT CD

Treasure Chest-7 CDs $49.95

Meditation CD Set-2 CDs $39.95

$22.95 INTEGRALTAROT Get books from Golden Braid Bookstore, Amazon.com, or Suzanne’s web site.

PSYCHIC FAIR MelanieLake (801) 451-8543 Tarot, Kinesiology, Essential oils.

SuzanneWagner (801) 359-2225 Numerology, Palmistry,Tarot, and Channeling

Ross Gigliotti (801) 244-0275 Tarot, Past Life Regression, Intuitive Coaching, NLP, Hypnosis.

Wade Lake (801) 451-8543 Numerology and Tarot.

Adam Sagers (801) 824-2641 Tarot, Numerology, Astrology Art. Shawn Lerwill (801) 856-4619 Channeling, Intuitive Arts, Clairvoyant. Krysta Brinkley (801) 706-0213 Horary Astrology,Tarot Palmistry, Numerology. LarissaJones (801) 424-1217 Tarot, Intuitive Essential Oil Readings, Healing with Essential Oils.

Nick Stark (801) 394-6287 Tarot, Clairvoyance, Shamanic Counseling, Numerology.

June 17 & July 15 6-9 pm Golden Braid Bookstore $25 for 20 minutes First come first serve. Readings are meant to be introductory experiences only. Arrive early, space fills quickly.

For more info call the Golden Braid Bookstor e (801) 322-1162


Suzanne Wagner AquaNia 801-455-6343 Jacqueline Fogel, Certified Nia Instructor. Experience the joy of movement in the water of a warm pool. AquaNia is movement that awakens body awareness and body wisdom to promote health and well-being. Adaptable to meet the needs of all fitness levels. JLFOGEL@COMCAST.NET Bikram Yoga—Salt Lake City 488-Hot1 (4681) 1140 Wilmington Ave. (across from Wild Oats) Bikram certified instructors teach a series of 26 postures affecting every muscle, ligament, organ & all of the body, bringing it into balance. 36 classes each week. All ages & ability levels welcome to all classes. The room is warm by intention, so come prepared to work hard & sweat. Check for new classes in Catalyst calendar. WWW.BIKRAMYOGASLC.COM Bikram Yoga—Sandy 501-YOGA (9642). 9343 S. 1300 E. Our south valley sanctuary nestled below Little Cottonwood Canyon provides a warm and inviting environment to discover or deepen your yoga practice. All levels encouraged, no reservations necessary. Certified teachers. Classes 7 days a week. Call for schedule. Introductory package is 10 consecutive days of unlimited yoga for $20. WWW.BIKRAMYOGASANDY.COM Centered City Yoga 521-YOGA. 918 E. 900 S. and 625 S. State St. Centered City Yoga is often likened to that famous TV “hangout” where everybody knows your name, sans Norm (and the beer, of course.) We offer more than 60 classes a week to keep Salt Lake City CENTERED and SANE. WWW.CENTEREDCITYYOGA.COM. Mindful Yoga 355-2617. Charlotte Bell, RYT & Iyengar certified. Public & private classes, workshops, retreats, river trips and teacher training since 1986. This form of yoga combines alignment awareness with mindfulness practice & breath-supported movement to encourage a sense of ease & balance in traditional postures. Classes include meditation and pranayama (breath awareness) instruction as well as physical practice. Bring comfortable clothing and a sense of humor. WWW.CHARLOTTEBELLYOGA.COM Red Lotus School of Movement 740 S 300 W, SLC, UT, 84101. 355-6375. Established in 1994 by Sifu Jerry Gardner and Jean LaSarre Gardner. Traditional-style training in the classical martial arts of T’ai Chi, Wing Chun Kung-Fu, and T’ai Chi Chih (qi gong exercises). Children’s classes in Wing Chun Kung-Fu. Located downstairs from Urgyen Samten Ling Tibetan Buddhist Temple. WWW.REDLOTUSSCHOOL.COM, REDLOTUS@REDLOTUS.CNC. NET. THE SHOP Anusara Yoga Studio 435-649-9339. 1167 Woodside Ave., P.O Box 681237, Park City, UT 84068. Certified & affiliated Anusara instructors inspire students to open their hearts & express themselves through the art of yoga. Exciting all-level classes taught in an amazing 4,500 sq ft. historic building in downtown Park City. Drop-ins welcome. WWW.PARKCITYYOGA.COM The Yoga Center 277-9166. 4689 So. Holladay Blvd. Hatha-based yoga classes 7 days a week, including vinyasa, slow flow, Anusara, prenatal, gentle and restorative. Workshops, corporate and private sessions available. All levels of experience welcome. WWW.YOGAUTAH.COM Body & Mind Studio. 486-2660. 1063 E. 3300 S. WWW.BODYANDMINDSTUDIO.COM

Erin Geesaman Rabke Somatic Educator. 898-0478. WWW.BODYHAPPY.COM DanceScene. 298-8047. Margene Anderson. RDT Community School. 534-1000. 138 W. Broadway.

Psychic, Lecturer and Author PsychicQuestions andAnswers session at the Golden Braid Bookstore

May 21 & June 18

Streamline. 474-1156. 1948 S. 1100 E. WWW.STREAMLINEBODYWORKS.NET

$15.00/person6:30-9:00PM Each person will be allowed to ask two to three questions of Suzanne

For information or to register: 322-1162 To schedule a private session with Suzanne or to order books, call (801) 359-2225 Email suzanne@suzwagner.com

PSYCHIC ARTS & INTUITIVE SCIENCES astrology, mediums, past life integration, psychics All About Your Life: Readings, Psychic Tarot 575-7103. Margaret Ruth. Listen to Margaret Ruth on X-96 FM on Friday mornings or book a private appointment or party. WWW.MARGARETRUTH.COM Channeled Full Spectrum Readings Direct From the Masters 347-5493, Marie. Tap into your highest potential by having readings brought forth in the highest vibration possible. Receive wisdom, counseling, life path, career, and love advice, entity healings, prayer work, ascension and path acceleration. Become the light. Channeled Readings through Spiritual Medium 968-8875, 577-1348. Deloris, as heard on the Mick & Allen Show (KBER Radio, 101.1), can help you with those who have crossed over and other paranormal activity. She can help bring understanding regarding past lives, life purpose and relationships. Available for parties and night clubs. DELORISSPIRITUALMEDIUM.COM

Lilli DeCair: Inspirational Mystical Entertainment 533-2444 and 577-6119. European born professional psychic, holistic health educator, reiki master /teacher, life coach, Mental Health Association in Utah Board Member, serves on Mayor’s Diversity Speakers Board, ESL I instructor, party entertainer. Featured radio magazine personality. Available at Dancing Cranes Fri-Sun, 486-1129 and Cafe Alchemy Sundays 5-9 p. One of 2005 Governor’s Commission on Families Women of the Year recipiants. Poet, singer, dancer, wedding planner/official, Shamanic 9 Day Medicine Wheel Journeys. Alyse Finlayson, Spiritual Artist & Psychic 435-640-6042. Trained artist uses her psychic gifts to paint portraits of your angels and guides. Offering soul retrievals and assists people in building and bringing awareness to their connection with their souls (higher selves) so as to develop their chosen soul paths. WWW.SOULINTERCONNECTION.COM;

Free Horary Charts: Practical Astrology Avani Vyas. 288-9354. Quick answers to your specific questions relating to day-to-day matters (relationships, purchases, job changes, relocation, travel etc.). Excellent aid to your decision making. No medical questions please.

Call (801) 359-2225 for more information. Integral Integral Channeling Numerology Class Tarot Class Class Aug 2-3, 2008 June 28-29, 2008 May 3-4, 2008 INTEGRALTAROT BOOK

$29.95

INTEGRAL NUMEROLOGY BOOK

INTEGRALTAROT CD

Treasure Chest-7 CDs $49.95

Meditation CD Set-2 CDs $39.95

$22.95 INTEGRALTAROT Get books from Golden Braid Bookstore, Amazon.com, or Suzanne’s web site.

PSYCHIC FAIR MelanieLake (801) 451-8543 Tarot, Kinesiology, Essential oils.

SuzanneWagner (801) 359-2225 Numerology, Palmistry,Tarot, and Channeling

Ross Gigliotti (801) 244-0275 Tarot, Past Life Regression, Intuitive Coaching, NLP, Hypnosis.

Wade Lake (801) 451-8543 Numerology and Tarot.

Adam Sagers (801) 824-2641 Tarot, Numerology, Astrology Art. Shawn Lerwill (801) 856-4619 Channeling, Intuitive Arts, Clairvoyant. Krysta Brinkley (801) 706-0213 Horary Astrology,Tarot Palmistry, Numerology. LarissaJones (801) 424-1217 Tarot, Intuitive Essential Oil Readings, Healing with Essential Oils.

Nick Stark (801) 394-6287 Tarot, Clairvoyance, Shamanic Counseling, Numerology.

June 17 & July 15 6-9 pm Golden Braid Bookstore $25 for 20 minutes First come first serve. Readings are meant to be introductory experiences only. Arrive early, space fills quickly.

For more info call the Golden Braid Bookstor e (801) 322-1162


46

COMMUNITY

June 2008 CatalystMagazine.net

RESOURCE DIRECTORY

Horary: The Art of Cycles & Timing Victoria Fugit. 435-259-9417. Horary can answer questions about lost articles or animals, buying new cars or houses, signing contracts; it helps you decide about changing jobs, moving, getting married. If you are wrestling with a question, horary can probably shed light on it. Intuitive Coaching Ross Gigliotti. 244-0275. Intuitive guidance through life coaching. 2766 E. 3300 S., at the Gift of Touch.

Soul & Psyche 293-0484. Cynthia Hill, PhD. Astrological readings focused on energetic & cellular memory patterns of the ’mind-body’ system, personality strength & challenges; current & past life patterns & habits, relationship & family dynamics, soul purpose & spiritual intent, current & future cycles of growth, healing & empowerment through self-knowledge & understanding. 30 years clinical experience. Call for appt. & class info. Transformational Astrology Ralfee Finn. 800-915-5584. Catalyst’s astrology columnist for 10 years! Visit her website at WWW.AQUARIUMAGE.COM or e-mail her at RALFEE@AQUARIUMAGE.COM Amy Megan West, Professional Astrologer WWW.MOONGLIDE .COM. Astrology, Tarot and Psychic reader with over 20+ years experience. Astrologer for WWW.MYSTARLINES.COM. Call for appointment: 550-5353.

Anne Windsor, Professional Astrologer 888.876.2482. 1338 S Foothill #182 Salt Lake City UT 84108. KNOW NOW. Invest in a session with Anne Windsor and draw on her extensive experience to crack your own life’s code. Discover winning strategies to attract healthy relationships, establish financial security, achieve professional success, and find contentment. Private tutoring, gift certificates available. Visa/MC. WWW.ANNEWINDSOR.COM The Windswept Center 560-3761. We offer classes and workshops that teach you how to access your own clairvoyance and healing abilities. Learn simple tools to bring your life together—manage your job, family, future, relationships, creativity, health and spirituality. For more information about us, classes and workshops, please visit our web site or call our office. WWW.WINDSWEPTCENTER.COM Intuitive Therapy Suzanne Wagner, 359-2225. Trish Withus 918-6213. WWW.THEREISONLYLOVE.COM

PSYCHOTHERAPY COUNSELING & PERSONAL GROWTH coaching, consulting, hypnosis, integrated awareness, psychology / therapy /counseling, shamanic, sound healing

Avatar 244-8951. Avatar is a consciousness training course that teaches us to live deliberately. It

gives us tools for experiencing compassion and true cooperation on our planet and opens doors unimaginable. Rebecca Hunt is a new Avatar Master. Call regarding a free introduction. Barbara G. Babson, L.C.S.W. 567-3545 370 E. South Temple, #550. Psychotherapy for individuals, couples, and adolescents. Specializing in EMDR (eye movement desensitisation reprocessing). Barb uses EMDR from a position of empathy and understanding in treating trauma, loss, and relationship issues. Jeff Bell, L.C.S.W. 364-5700, Ext. 2, 1399 S. 700 E. Ste. 1, SLC. Specializing in empowering relationships; cultivating hardiness and mindfulness; managing stress & compulsivity; alleviating depression/ anxiety/grief; healing PTSD & childhood abuse/ neglect; addictions recovery; GLBT exploration as well as resolving disordered eating, body image & life transitions. Individual, couples, family, group therapy & EMDR. Center for Healing Arts 209-4404. Carol Littlefield, APRN/PP, psychiatric nurse specialist with prescriptive practice. 18 years offering natural alternative care. Awaken the soul by applying new science and technology to ancient wisdom practices. Metatronic healings. Soul therapy, the highest healing! Group meditation Thursdays 7-8:30. 1210 Princeton Ave., by appointment, insurance accepted. WWW.OURCOMMUNITYCONNECTION.COM. Center for Transpersonal Therapy 596-0147. 989 E. 900 S. Dana Appling, LCSW, Denise Boelens, PhD; Chris Robertson, LCSW; Lynda Steele, LCSW; Sherry Lynn Zemlick, PhD, Wil Dredge LCSW. The transpersonal approach to healing draws on the knowledge from traditional science & the spiritual wisdom of the east & west. Counseling orientation integrates body, mind, & spirit. Individuals, couples, groups, retreats, & classes.

Steven J. Chen, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist 718-1609. 150 S. 600 E. Suite 4A. Defeat depression. Eliminate anxiety. Heal trauma. Improve relationships. Are you sad... feel helpless... hopeless... or worthless? Steven specializes in helping you resolve emotional pain and live a happier and more successful life. Licensed since 1992. Expert help for adults, adolescents and couples. Visit our website: WWW.STEVENJCHEN.COM. Sue Connor, Ph.D. 1399 South 700 East #10. 583-7848. Improve your response to stress with effective self care strategies. Increase your relapse prevention skills and enhance your recovery. Mindful psychotherapy for relief from acute and post traumatic stress, addictions, disordered eating, chronic pain or illness, mood disorders. New book clubs starting in June. Check out info at WWW.MINDFULSLC.COM Stephen Emerson, LCSW 487-1091. 150 S 600 E, Ste. 7B Offering a transpersonal approach to psychotherapy that facilitates access to innate inner wisdom, strength, creativity and potential for individuals, couples and families dealing with life transitions, stress, emotional difficulties, low self-esteem, relationship issues, addictive behaviors and abuse issues. Treatment of performance anxiety for musicians, actors and other public presenters.

Emotions Anonymous Need a 12-step group? Call 359-HEAL (4325).

Marianne Felt, MT-BC, LPC 524-0560, EXT. 3. 150 S. 600 E., Ste. 7C. Licensed professional counselor, board certified music therapist, certified Gestalt therapist, Red Rock Counseling & Education. Transpersonal psychotherapy, music therapy, Gestalt therapy, EMDR. Open gateways to change through experience of authentic contact. Integrate body, mind, & spirit through creative exploration of losses, conflicts, & relationships that challenge & inspire our lives. Some lower fees available.

Robin Friedman, LCSW 599-1411 (Sugar House). Transformational psychotherapy for making lasting positive change. Discover effective ways of finding and expressing your deeper truth and authentic self. Relationship work, sexuality, depression/ anxiety, addictions, trauma recovery, and creative explorations of life-purpose and self-awareness. Individuals, couples, groups. Trained practitioner of Expressive Arts Therapy. Jeff Grathwohl, MA 403-5171. 336 E 900 S. The Synergy Center. Illuminate the luminous body! A luminous energy field surrounds us and informs our body and life. Release the wounds and contracts that keep you from choosing your own destiny. WWW.THESHAMANNETWORK.COM. Teri Holleran, LCSW Red Rock Counseling & Education, LLC 5240560. 150 S. 600 E., Ste. 7C. Transformational therapy, consultation & facilitation. Discover how the investigation of loss, trauma, body symptoms, mood disturbances, relationship conflicts, environmental despair & the questions related to meaning & purpose initiate the transformational journey. Hypnosis: Jolene Shields, C.Ht. 801-942-6175. Hypnosis is a naturally induced state of relaxed concentration in which suggestions for change are communicated to the subconscious mind, making change seem effortless and easy. Jolene is a medically certified hypnotherapist with 18 years of experience. Weight loss, HypnoBirthing®, stress reduction, smoking cessation, etc.

Law of Attraction Lynn Solarczyk 801.510.0593 or LYNNSOLARCZYK@MAC.COM. Teaching the law of attraction—what it is, and how to apply it to your life. LIVINGLOA.BLOGSPOT.COM Jan Magdalen, LCSW 582-2705, 2071 Ashton Circle, SLC. Offering a transpersonal approach to the experiences and challenges of our life cycles, including: individuation-identity, sexuality and sexual orientation, partnership, work, parenting, divorce, aging, illness, death and other loss, meaning and spiritual awareness. Individuals, couples and groups. Clinical consultation and supervision. Marilynne Moffitt, PhD 266-4551. 825 E. 4800 S. Murray 84107. Offering interventions for psychological growth & healing. Assistance with behavioral & motivational changes, refocusing of life priorities, relationship issues, addiction & abuse issues, & issues regarding health. Certified clinical hypnotherapist, NLP master practitioner & EMDR practitioner.

Sunny M. Nelson, MSW CSW 801-755-1229. Healing with the Higher Self. Interventions to assist Autistic and Indigo children and adults. Healing with assistance from the Higher Self to resolve trauma, addictions, grief/ loss, women's issues, emotional pain, gay/lesbian

/bisexual issues. This approach teaches the concept that one chooses life events for the purpose of soul growth and spiritual mastery.

privateREVOLUTIONS 232-6162. Online Coaching. Success Soundtracks. Strategic Plans. Revolutionize your life or business in 2008. We help you cross the finish line, mixing powerful right-brain tools like visualization with strategic coaching. Goal-focused packages or custom soundtracks – available completely online. Credit cards accepted. WWW.PRIVATEREVOLUTIONS.COM. Stephen Proskauer, MD, Integrative Psychiatry 631-8426. Sanctuary for Healing and Integration, 860 E. 4500 S., Ste. 302. Steve is a seasoned psychiatrist, Zen priest and shamanic healer. He sees kids, teens, adults, couples and families, integrating psychotherapy, meditation and soul work with judicious use of medication to relieve emotional pain and problem behavior. Steve specializes in creative treatment of bipolar disorders. STEVE@KARMASHRINK.COM. Blog: WWW.KARMASHRINK.COM. Jon Scheffres, MA, LPC 633-3908. 1550 E. 3300 S., SLC. Every life is a call to adventure. Offering an awareness-based approach for treating depression, anxiety, marital/relationship issues, adolescent behavior problems, domestic violence and addictions. Individual, family, couples, and groups. Stress reduction through yoga and meditation. Clinical consultation and supervision also available. Mike Sheffield, Ph.D. 518-1352. 1104 E. Ashton Ave (2310 S.) #112. Coaching and psychotherapy with adults and youth. Integrative approach to personal transformation, emphasizing process work with selfawareness, pattern change, transitions. Workshops and groups on mindfulness, creativity, emotional intelligence, transformational journeys, relationships, parenting.

Sierra Earthworks Foundation 274-1786. Holladay, Utah. Ramona Sierra, MSW, LCSW. Providing clinical services through integrated approaches utilizing traditional and indigenous healing practices to health/mental health and complementary medicine. Most insurances accepted. SIERRAEARTHWORKS@QUEST.NET Steve Seliger, LMFT 661-7697. 1104 E. Ashton Ave. (2310 S.) #203. Specializing in helping people develop healthy loving relationships, conflict resolution for couples, developing powerful communication skills, resolving parent-teen conflicts, depression, phobias, ending & recovering from abuse, conflicts & issues related to sexuality & libido in men & women, sexual orientation issues. Sarah Sifers, Ph.D., LCSW Shamanic Practitioner, Minister of the Circle of the Sacred Earth 531-8051. Shamanic Counseling. Shamanic Healing. Mentoring for people called to the Shaman’s Path. Explore health or mental health issues using the ways of the shaman. Sarah’s extensive training includes shamanic extraction healing, soul retrieval healing, psychopomp work for death and dying, shamanic counseling and shamanic divination. Sarah has studied with Celtic, Brazilian, Tuvan, Mongolian, Tibetan and Nepali Shamans.


Spiritual Coaching Marlise Cromar, Oceans Consulting. 815-3658; (MARLISE33@MAC.COM). Spiritual life guidance using a refreshing combination of wisdom traditions including Buddhism, the Tao, Shamanism, Mayan Calendar, A Course in Miracles, Numerology, Christian mysticism, and Eastern Indian consciousness. Focus is on bringing balance to life by harmonizing masculine & feminine energies and embracing your unique, creative role in the collective transformation. Outdoor sessions welcome!

15% off private & duet sessions.

Naomi Silverstone, DSW, LCSW 209-1095. Psychotherapy and shamanic practice, 989 E. 900 S. #B5. Holistic practice integrates traditional and nontraditional approaches to health, healing, and balance or “ayni.” Access new perceptual lenses as you reanimate your relationship with nature. Shamanic practice in the Inka tradition. Matt Stella, LCSW Red Rock Counseling & Education, LLC 5240560 x1. 150 S. 600 E., Ste. 7C. Psychotherapy for individuals, couples, families and groups. Specializing in relationship work, mens issues, depression, anxiety, addictive patterns, and lifemeaning explorations.

Daniel Sternberg, PhD, Psychologist 364-2779. 150 South 600 East, Bldg. 4B. Fax: 364-3336. Sensitive use of rapid release methods and EMDR to free you from unwanted emotions to allow you more effective control and happiness in your life. Individuals, couples, families, groups and businesses. Treatment of trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, tension, stress-related difficulties abuse and depression. Jim Struve, LCSW 364-5700 Ext 1. 1399 S. 700 E., Ste. 2, SLC. Specializing in life transitions, strengthening relationships, fostering resilience, healing from childhood trauma & neglect (including male survivors of sexual abuse), assisting partners of abuse survivors, addictions recovery, sexual identity, empowerment for GLBT individuals/ couples. Individual, couples, group therapy and NET (Neuro Emotional Technique) practitioner. Flexible times. www.mindfulpresence.com The Shaman’s Cave John Knowlton. 263-3838. WWW.THESHAMANSCAVE.COM TalkingWithChuck.com 542-9431. Chuck Davidson, M.A. Through a series of conversations I offer insight into helping you find rational, effective ways to set new direction for your life, and to help you find ways to reduce the barriers standing in the way of reaching your desired destination. POB 522112, SLC, UT 84152. CHUCK@TALKINGWITHCHUCK.COM, Patricia Toomey, ADTR, LPC 463-4646, 1390 S. 1100 E.,Ste.202 The Dance of Life—Transformation within a psychotherapeutic process of healing and spiritual growth using somatic movement analysis, dreamwork, psychoneuroimmunology, guided imagery & EMDR to support the healing process with stress, depression, trauma, pain, eating disorders, grief, addictions & life transitions. Individuals (children, adults), couples, groups, consultation & facilitation. True Self Recovery Tel. 712-6140. 455 E 400 S #410. Compassionate,

Inner Light Center A Metaphysical, Mystical, Spiritual Community Sunday Celebration & Children’s Church, 10:00 a.m. Weekly Offerings: The Way of Mastery, Prayer Circle, Insight Meditation, Oneness Deeksha Blessing, Kripalu Yoga, Qigong, Dances of Universal Peace, Dream Circle, Psych-K Practice, Healing Circle, Mystic Moon Cycles: Woman’s Meditation Circle.

4408 South 500 East Salt Lake City, UT 84107

801-268-1137 www.InnerLightCenter.net


48

June 2008 CatalystMagazine.net

COMMUNITY RESOURCE DIRECTORY

non-judgmental addiction support group employs evidence-based holistic healing and creative arts practices. Tuesdays 68pm, must pre-register; $50 ($75/couple.) Package discounts and financial assistance available. Call to register or email SHANNON@TRUESELFRECOVERY.COM. WWW.TRUESELFRECOVERY.COM.

Christiane Turner, NLP Trainer, Coach, Consultant 979-4799. CHRISTIANETURNER@ YAHOO.COM. Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP) is the art and science of human excellence that offers effective tools for creating lasting change. We offer NLP training, coaching and consulting—one-on-one and groups. Come to our monthly free seminars to learn more about NLP. WWW.QUANTUMNLP.NET Western Sand Play Associates (801) 356-2864. Jungian-oriented sand play therapy--children and adults. Training for healthcare professionals. Offices in Salt Lake and Utah Counties. Directors: Drs. Cliff Mayes and Pam Blackwell Mayes, C.G. Jung Fellowship of Utah. WWW.WESTERNSANDPLAY@COMCAST.NET.

The most important gift you can give a child is Childhood

Educating the Head, Opening the Heart, Inspiring the Hands.

Seven Canyons School

NOW ENROLLING FOR 2008-2009 Seven Canyons School 2150 S. Foothill Dr., SLC www.SevenCanyonsSchool.org 801.463.1360

Leslie Peterson, N.D.

Naturopathic Physician Since 1996 Full Circle Women’s Care Hormone Balancing Annual Exams Menopausal Support Chronic Illness Treatment Gastrointestinal Health

150 S. 600 E. Suite 6B Salt Lake City www.fullcirclecare.com • 801.746.3555

Elizabeth Williams, RN, MSN 486-4036. 1399 S. 7th E. #12. Lic. psychiatric nurse specialist offering a safe environment to heal inner wounds & process personal & interpersonal issues. Specializing in relationship issues, loss & grief work, anxiety, depression & selfesteem. Adolescents & adults, individuals, couples & group therapy. Barbara Jenson—Sound & Light 4668944. Clarity Coaching. 487-7621. WWW.KATHRYNDIXON.COM.

SPIRITUAL PRACTICE

journeywork, Kundalini principles, and Self-Stalking practices. INSIGHT@VELOCITUS.NET.

ASCENSION WORKSHOP Saint Germain presents his 3-day Dreamwalker Ascension workshop in S.L.C. June29-July1, Sept.7,8,9. Discover myths and facts of ascension from a Grand Ascended Master, informative, intense, class you'll never forget. $495 registration www.shaumbrashoppe.com questions call Colleen Sory 801-581-9444 Yvonne Jarvie 435840-1096 Goddess Circle 467-4977. Join us second Monday of every month for Wiccan ritual. Free, open, women & men, beginners, experienced & curious all welcome. 7:30pm at Central City Community Center, 615 S. 300 E. Rm. 35-36. Inner Light Center Spiritual Community 268-1137. 4408 S. 500 E., SLC. An interspiritual sanctuary that goes beyond religion into mystical realms. Access inner wisdom, deepen divine connection, enjoy an accepting, friendly community. Events & classes. Sunday celebration & children’s church 10am. innerlightcenter.net Kanzeon Zen Center International with Zen Master Dennis Genpo Merzel. 1268 E South Temple, 328-8414, WWW.GENPO.ORG. Salt Lake Buddhist Temple 363-4742. 211 West 100 South. Shin Buddhism for families. Rev. Jerry Hirano and the sangha welcome you to our services Sundays, 8:30 a.m. tai chi /qi kung, 9 a.m.meditation service, 10 a.m. dharma school service, 11 a.m. study class. Naikan (self-reflection) retreats for everyone. Please check our website for calendar of events. WWW.SLBUDDHIST.ORG. Salt Lake Center for Spiritual Living 307-0481. Elizabeth O’Day, Minister. A home for your spirit. 870 E North Union

meditation/study groups, churches/ ministry, spiritual instruction, workshops Antelope Island Spiritual Foundation 364-0332, 150 South 600 East Suite 1A. A community-based developmental spirituality program. Beginning level group support encouraging internal exploration, challenging the individual’s attachment to personal history; intermediate guidance for responsible use and discernment of transformative power through a series of initiations; advanced guidance and mentoring in community leadership with ceremonial Deathlodge, Purge-sweats, Dreamlodges, Shamanic

Peoney by Kate Edwards

Ave. (7150 S at 900 E), Midvale. Sunday celebration Services at 9:30 and 11am; childcare at both services, Youth Church at 11. “Empowered people sharing in spiritual growth.” WWW.SPIRITUALLYFREE.ORG.

Transcendental Meditation Program 635 8721 or 446-2999, WWW.TM.ORG. The easiest and deepest meditation, automatically providing rest twice as deep as sleep, most researched and recommended by physicians, for improved IQ, enhanced memory, better coordination, normal blood pressure, and reversal of aging, TM greatly deepens happiness and calmness, and is the bullet train to enlightenment. Urgyen Samten Ling Gonpa Tibetan Buddhist Temple 740 S. 300 W. 328-4629. Urgyen Samten Ling Gonpa offers an open environment for the study, contemplation, and practice of Tibetan Buddhist teachings. The community is welcome to our Sunday service (puja), group practices, meditation classes and introductory courses. WWW.URGYENSAMTENLING.ORG

Vedic Harmony 942-5876. Georgia Clark, certified Deepak Chopra Center educator. Ayurveda is the oldest continually practiced wellness enhancer in the world. Learn how it can help you harmonize your lifestyle and well being. Primordial sound meditation, creating health workshops, Ayurvedic wellness counseling, Ayurvedic oils, teas and books, Jyotish (vedic astrology). Georgia has trained in the US and India. TARAJAGA@EARTHLINK.NEt Work, Live and Practice Buddhist Community, Northern CA. Work-Study opportunity includes housing, vegetarian meals, living allowance, free classes in meditation, Tibetan yoga, Buddhist psychology and more. Work with projects of benefit to all humanity. Learn about us at WWW.NYINGMA .ORG or call 510-981-1987.


Web of Life Wellness Center

Salsa-Latin

Ballroom & Hip Hop Lessons & Dancing classes start new every month!

Todd Mangum, MD • Aymi Bennhoff, FNP for the treatment of:

stress • f atigue • toxicity weight issues • sleep disor ders hormone imbalances anxiety & depression gynecological concerns 989 East 900 Sout h, Ste. A1, SLC tel. 531.8340

www.weboflifewc.com

DF Latin Dance Studio

tZFBSTFYQFSJFODFBTB$IJOFTFNFEJDJOFFEVDBUPSBOEQSBDUJUJPOFS t"EWBODFEUSBJOJOHBU$IFOHEVBOE)FJ-POH+JBOH6OJWFSTJUZ  PG$IJOFTF.FEJDJOFJO$IJOBGPSQBJONBOBHFNFOUBOEQPTUTUSPLFDBSF t'PVOEFSGPS*OUFSOBUJPOBM*OTUJUVUFPG$IJOFTF.FEJDJOF **$.

 "MCVRVFSRVFBOE%FOWFSDBNQVT UVOOFM CPOFTQVS IFSOJBUFEEJTD TUSPLFSFIBCJMJUBUJPO .4 BTUINB BMMFSHJFT CSPODIJUJT  TJOVTJUJT DPME nV DISPOJDGBUJHVF XFJHIUDPOUSPM EJBCFUFT UIZSPJEEJTPSEFST QSPTUBUF EJTPSEFST EFQSFTTJPO TUSFTT BOYJFUZ JOTPNOJB DBODFS BEEJDUJPOBOEPUIFSIFBMUIDPODFSOT

Kids & Adults No Partner Required Beginners Welcome!

(801) 557-3648

Voted Best in Utah

New 9th & 9th location

Since 1989

%S3PCFSU;FOH 0.% -"D

3FMJFG'SPNBSUISJUJT *OKVSZ QPTUTVSHFSZ mCSPNZBMHJB NJHSBJOF TDJBUJDB DBSQBM

346 S 500 E, Ste 200 C, SLC

Register at: www.Salsainutah.com

"DVQVODUVSF$IJOFTF )FSCBM.FEJDJOF

Now Open!

%S-JO#JO 0.% -"D t.%BOE0.%JO$IJOB t4QFDJBMJ[FEJO$IJOFTF(ZOFDPMPHZBOEJOUFSOBMNFEJDJOF t1SBDUJDFEBDVQVODUVSFBOE$IJOFTFNFEJDJOFJOUIF64GPSZFBST t'BDVMUZNFNCFSGPS**$.BOE%BMMBT$PMMFHFPG0SJFOUBM.FEJDJOF 3FMJFG'SPNJOGFSUJMJUZ 1.4 JSSFHVMBSNFOTUSVBUJPO NFOPQBVTBMTZNQUPNT ZFBTU JOGFDUJPO mCSPJE FOEPNFUSJPTJT CSFBTUMVNQT PWBSJBODZTUT QSFHOBODZBOEBGUFSCJSUI DBSF IZQFSUFOTJPO DPSPOBSZIFBSUEJTFBTF IJHIDIPMFTUFSPM BSSIZUINJB TUPNBDIBDIF  DPOTUJQBUJPO DPMJUJT IFSOJBT VMDFST IFQBUJUJT VSJOBSZUSBDUJOGFDUJPOT JODPOUJOFODF BHJOH  GBDJBMSFKVWFOBUJPO IBJSMPTT

$FOUFSGPS&OIBODFE8FMMOFTT &1BSMFZT8BZ 5FM  

TWIGS FLOWER CO. 801-596-2322

1616 So. 1100 E. SLC, UT 84105 Delivery Available

Sun-Thurs 6am-11pm Fri-Sat 6am-Midnight

1JPOFFS$PNQSFIFOTJWF.FEJDBM$MJOJD 4'PSU4USFFU%SBQFS 5FM  


50

June 2008

catalystmagazine.net

BABYING THE BUDDHA

In their own words

sweet daughters, I feel very comfortable with this role of “protector” and although they are now 20 and 26, they still text and email me once in awhile with a pleading “dada!” The following is a song I wrote for my father which illustrates the inadequacy that he felt when I, as his first-born son, was born.

Father’s Lullaby

Rock a bye, Sweet Baby, in the treetop When threatening winds blow, the cradle will rock But when the bough breaks and the cradle does fall. Know this, my little one Trust me, my precious son. I’ll catch you cradle and all.

Part II

Soon all the king’s horses will tak e you away And into the battle to fight for the day But, when, in the moments of doubt and of fear Know this, my noble son Always, my special one I’ll catch you cradle and all

What it means to be a dad

So, slumber.....all the night through Peace abide Don’t hurry Tomorrow will come...too soon.

BY KINDRA FEHR

A

fter last month’s story and the huge response I received from many mothers about what it meant to be a mom, I got to thinking about how that might differ from the perspective of being a father. In honor of Father’s Day, I recreated the experiment and sent out emails to all the fathers I kno w. First difference—only two replied in the time frame I gave them (which was, by the way, three days instead of the 24 hours that I gave the moms). All it took was an additional “come on, guys” email (and holding a gun to my husband ’s head!) to receive the following. In some ways, many of the feelings are the same for both parents. But in others, they are very different. Hear what these fathers have to say and see the difference for yourself. I was an ancient 36 years of age when I became a father. That’s about 61 in Utah reproductive years. Though battling senility at 41 now, my wife and I are expecting our second child this month. Yes, I will be nearly 60 (114 Utah time) when this one graduates from high school. Up until I was a dad, I’d always felt like a fairly responsible guy. I owned a home, a business and even a vacuum. But on the day our daughter, Aria, was born, these words came to me (in the voice of Charlton Heston): Now... YOU. ARE. A. MAN. It felt good. I truly wasn’t afraid of the new responsibilities. In fact, I think most men wear their new mantle with pride. It provides a strong sense of purpose and an excuse for just about everything, good or bad: “I have to work hard and get ahead financially. I have a family to support.” “ I will not be attending your event. I have mouths to feed.” And, movies have taught me this one: “Please don’t kill me. I have kids.” In all, being a dad is great. Really. It’s the first thing to show me how much I need to pay attention to “the now” so that I have “a future” full of great memories for and of my family. Oh, after the voice of Moses declared my man-

hood that day, after I cooed and gooed, made faces and sang to my little daughter, I heard her tiny, telepathic cry: “No... YOU. ARE. STILL. A. DOOF.” John Hancock (the husband with the gun held to his head), dad of four-year-old Aria and “baby ” to be born this month My wife and I live the feminist dream. She works 40+ hours, including business trips, and I’m a stay-at-home dad. The only difference between genders we see in parenting our now-16-month-old son is that when he experiences physical trauma or existential panic he prefers to be comforted by my wife. This makes perfect sense, since she is the physical matrix he came from. Otherwise, we see no differences between mothers and fathers. We are just two human beings raising a child, and we see that our psychological strengths and failings have vastly greater impact on our child’s development than our respective genders. I never thought of or identified myself as a “father.” I’m just a parent. A human being trying to raise a child in the sanest most human way possible. The only benefit that traditional gender roles might bring to our family is to lessen the agony my wife goes through in leaving us every morning to go to work. But how much of that is personal psychology and how much of that is biology? Perhaps there is some of both, but if I had to leave my son every morning, I would suffer too. He’s a great little kid. Chris Thatcher Dad to 16-month-old Jack “Dada” It’s always been ironic to me that this is usually the first utterance from a child’s mouth. I would have expected it to be “mama,” “food,” “poop” or something else a little more germane to their brand-new existence. But according to studies in virtually every culture, “dada” wins the prize for first baby word uttered. Of course, when one considers the crazed cacophony that greets a newborn, perhaps they’re simply turning to dad first for protection. As I have mused over my worth as a father to two

As twilight approaches a star becomes dim And father to son, as he fades, calls to him. “The bough is now breaking and I’m soon to fall. Would you, my caring son, Now that my life is done Please catch me, cradle and all. Kurt Bestor Father of Kristen, 26 and Erica, 20

Having lost my dad at an early age makes my desire to be a great father the most important thing in my life. I want to be there to share their many first experiences, to teach and guide them in their many interests, to foster new ideas, and to reinforce who they are and who they will become.It is important for me to be there to share their joys and sorrows throughout our lives, but more importantly, for them to know that I will be there when and if they need me at any time for any reason. I am like a doctor—on call 24/7/365. Adam Torreano Dad to twin girls, Ella and Georgia Being a father is certainly more than “fathering” a child. I think it’s about choosing to be a certain way toward our kids. Parenting is teaching out of love and responsibility. Developing as a father only happens in collaboration with the needs of my family. What my family needs me to be, I try to be. I have to listen to what goes unsaid. I’m growing daily with my daughter. She teaches me about what she needs in me. Unbeknownst to her, she’s teaching me how to be her father. Of course, she doesn’t always like what that means. Being a father, being a parent, is improvisation. Voltaire wrote: “Doubt may be uncomfortable, but certainty is absurd.” Eric Handman Father of three-year-old Reya Before we had Daisy, I asked a lot of our friends what it was like to have kids. The most common response was that it was more work than almost anything they’ve ever done, but it was also the most worthwhile thing they had ever done. Mary Beth and I had always been projectbased, so we figured this would be another project, the


only difference being it was a bit more long-term than a new record or a photo assignment. Everything everyone’s said has been true—-how we can love somebody so quickly after we’ve first met them, how you don’t know what you did with all your “free time� before you had your kid, how they rearrange all your priorities. But the one thing that I didn’t expect was how Daisy is helping me be a better person. I find that when I’m with her, I act more like the person I’ve always wanted to be. We spend less time doing unimportant tasks because we want her to spend time doing meaningful things. I look around more on walks in our neighborhood because I want her to appreciate the little things in everyday life that I sometimes miss. Just two days ago we were on a walk and we spent about six minutes looking at a little pile of snow dissolve into a small trickling stream. I never would have noticed that preDaisy. I can’t wait to see what else she’s going to teach me. Mark Maziarz Father of Daisy (one year old) When my son was born, I dropped everything and focused on being with him. Now that he is older I feel that it’s important for him to see me doing what I love to do. Now that he is older I feel more important. Over the past six months, I’ve been guiding him in his explorations of fire; I bought him his first pocket knife and I’ve been teaching him how to not get hurt using it. I’ve been teaching him to drive; he’s been shooting a bow-and-arrow and soon he will receive a slingshot; and I’m going to pick up some small appliances at the thrift store so we can take them apart and see what’s in them. If I lose my patience, I apologize sincerely, but he does not get off the hook for whatever trouble he was in. Bill Kelley Dad of one son Being a father means that I still get to be a kid with my kids! We sure didn’t have all these great new toys when we were growing up! Of course, having kids can be expensive and has changed my life forever, but they

are the best investment I will ever make in this life, and a very welcome change indeed. No matter how hard life gets, I have been privileged with coming home each night to little outstretched arms rushing to have me hold them, and at that moment, nothing else matters, and nothing could be more perfect. Watching my children grow and learn, and knowing that I had anything to do with it, fills me with so much love and understanding that we are all God’s children, and that they are our little pieces of heaven on earth. And I’m just glad to be a part of it. Dana Freebairin Father of three girls Before I ever had children, I never knew how incredible being a dad could be. My children, I feel, are my greatest accomplishments. It is such an immense and important responsibility to shape a child’s life. I find you can’t really slack off on this great responsibility. You give your love and you get so much more love in return. It’s the kind of love you don’t experience in any other part of life. The kind of love that at a moment’s notice you would give your life for your child. I will measure my success in life not by the things I own or degrees I acquired, but by the happiness of my family. Scott Frogley Father of four! In every family, parents play different roles. I don’t think this is necessarily a “fatherly� trait, but in my family, I happen to be the one that “keeps the trains running on time.� That means, for example, waking my (now 12year-old) daughter up, having breakfast with her, and getting her to school on time. I’ve altered my schedule, so that to do these things I now wake up at 5:15 a.m. and go to the gym so I can be home by 7. I try to bring a sense of stability and reliability to our home. Hopefully, this will instill in her a sense of personal discipline, and the idea that life can and should be really fun, but also comes with responsibilities and obligations. As she is now entering the stage of life where she will need to start making her own decisions, I can only hope

.JOEGVM

that this sense of stability and reliability will help her make healthy life choices. Ira Rubinfeld Father of 12-year-old daughter Being a father is being in the throes of love.... I find the insight from observing and possibly (possibly not) serving the intelligence and life experience of my boys to be the greatest enrichment and joy. I see that children experience life to the fullest by default. What an opportunity and blast to join in with them. In this there is no duty, only joy and sorrow, beauty and compassion. Love. Yoni Gileadi Father of two-year-old Seuren and four-year-old Coen I love being a dad. The love for my daughter is bigger than I ever knew love could be. She is so important to me and my daily life. I have become a very paranoid parent. I am always worried about her, not just her safety when I am not around but also her feelings, her emotions. I hurt for her if she is unhappy, but on the other hand I feel great when she is happy. I guess to sum up, I love every part of being a dad. Lance Hancock Father of 10-year-old Lexie Guardian, provider, teacher, supporter, partner in crime, etc. How can I put into words the feeling I get when shyness brings them to clench onto my leg, when joy lights them up because the train set they saw in the store is suddenly in the living room, when ant begins with the letter “Aâ€?, when my shoulder is soaked in tears, when we sneak a bite of cake at 6:30 a.m., when “Love you daddyâ€? melts my heart‌ when I wake up every day knowing I have two beautiful boys who think I am the king. And with each day, I become a better father through the limitless love and support of their mother. Ben Quillinan Father of Markus (27 months) and Max (11 months) â—† Kindra Fehr is a mom (child #2 nearly here!) and artist. See her current work at Pilar’s Art in the Garden June 13-15, 5-9pm, 403 E. 8th Ave, SLC.

:PHB

TUESDAY  AM  PM WEDNESDAY  PM THURSDAY  AM  AMYOGANIDRA  PM sFRIENDLY NON COMPETITIVEATMOSPHERE sEACHCLASSDESIGNEDTOMEETSTUDENTSNEEDS sYEARSOFTEACHINGEXPERIENCE sPRIVATECONSULTATIONSAVAILABLE

$IBSMPUUF CERTIlEDBY "+3)YENGAR 9OGA!LLIANCE AUTHOROFTHENEWBOOK-INDFUL9OGA -INDFUL,IFE

#FMM

CLASSESHELDAT

&IRST5NITARIAN#HURCH 3OUTH%AST

WWWCHARLOTTEBELLYOGACOMs  

NONTRADITIONAL BOARDING AND DAYCARE SINCE 1999


52

May 2008

catalystmagazine.net

June 2008

Expect a fast-paced month of thinking, talking and traveling BY RALFEE FINN

Y

ou’re gonna need brain food— and lots of it—to match the quicksilver planetary pace of June 2008. Mercury, symbol of all intellectual processes, as well as transportation and treks, rules the month, which means all month long, we’re thinking, talking and traveling. It won’t be easy keeping up—the days and nights unfold in changeable patterns and the uncertainty factor is sure to challenge routines and aggravate nervous systems. Of course, some of us will thrive in this busy, brainy climate, while others will be taxed to keep up. And those who manage to sustain the pace, but aren’t enjoying it, are at risk for exhaustion, and that could turn moods cranky and crabby. The best way through is to find a comfortable personal pace that allows for sensitivity, flexibility and mental agility. The mind games begin with the Venus, the Sun, and Mercury conjunct in Gemini, one of two signs ruled by Mercury (on June 2, the Moon also enters Gemini, where it

stays until late afternoon on the 4th). Both Mercury and its home sign, Gemini, thrive on gathering and disseminating information. From the mundane to the profound and the ordinary to the extraordinary, we can expect to be inundated with material from a variety of

Mostly everyone will have more to say. If you have children, anticipate a thousand more “whys” than normal. sources. Mostly everyone will have more to say. If you have children, anticipate a thousand more “whys” than normal. If you are in a group therapy setting, expect everyone to take an inventory. Classes, business meetings, and conferences are sure

to run late. And you can also count on relationship discussions, personal and professional, to be packed with disclosures. Even those strong silent types—male or female—are inclined to talk about every detail. But while Mercury is happy in Gemini, it is also retrograde in Gemini until June 19, and its backward motion could translate into a lot of repetition, so try to be patient when someone gives you information about a certain situation for the umpteenth time. For those of you new to Mercury retrograde, here’s the skinny: Three times a year, Mercury appears to be moving behind instead of ahead (relative to Earth’s position), and when Mercury appears to move backward, all things related to its vast domain tend to move backward as well. Phones just won’t work. Voice mail and email get lost in a void—the same place socks go when they disappear in the dryer. Schedules liquefy. And travel delays and detours become the norm. Put simply, Mercury retrograde is a mess.

Which is why Mercury retrograde is not a good time to initiate new plans. But biding time won’t happen easily during this retrograde for two reasons. (1) From the 1st-7th, Uranus squares Mercury; from the 6th-21st, Uranus squares the Sun, and from the 8th-17th, Uranus squares Venus. Uranus signifies revolution and agitation; squares symbolize friction. But because Mercury, Venus, and the Sun are all benign and creative presences, these Uranian squares promise positive plot twists. Yes, there are sure to be sudden reversals of fortune, yours or others. And yes, there will be strong emotional reactions. But again, these are not necessarily negative interactions. The strongest probability is call to action because (2) Mars sextiles Venus, the Sun and Mercury, and because Mars must move when its energy collides with those Uranian bolts from the blue, so actionpacked adventures are probable. Mars is in Leo, a fire sign, and a position that feeds the innate

If you know your Ascendant and/or your Moon sign, read that too.

Aries

March 21-April l9

The challenge is creating the perfect blend of hindsight, foresight, and insight, and the key to success is learning how to feel with your mind without denying the facts or exaggerating the outcome. Be determined, and you will combine thought, word, and deed with dazzling skill.

Taurus

April 20-May 20

There are opportunities to improve your financial situation, but before you can make future gains, you have to be realistic about your current reality. Review your choices, organize your data, be honest about what you can accomplish, and then get to work actualizing those goals.

Gemini

May 21-June 21

You are the “go to” person all month long, and you are dispensing advice day and night. And

while I’m not advising you to withhold information, it’s very important to prioritize your time and energy. You won’t serve anyone if you’re exhausted, so plan a program of self-care, and above all, pace yourself.

Cancer

June 22-July 22

You are right, there is a lot to think about, especially as you contemplate your next step. Use this time to review certain circumstances from the past, and as you do, try not to brood over your mistakes. Instead, notice what you need to learn and then let go and move on.

Leo July 23-August 22 The roaring continues, but this month, family, friends, and even strangers are interested in your unique perspective. So don’t be shy about sharing your gifts and expressing your opinion. Not every word will be golden, but much of

what you say will stimulate and provoke a process in others.

Virgo

August 23-September 22

It will be easy getting lost in work, especially because there is so much to do and so many opportunities for you to display your talents. Just be careful not to neglect other areas of your life, especially relationships, where it may not be as easy to handle the demands.

Libra

September 23-October 22

You’re confronted and confounded by choice: On one hand, you can accept that status quo and enjoy the ride, but on the other, you feel the need for reformation and revolution. Unfortunately, there is no “right” logical choice, but if you listen to your heart, you’ll know what will make you happy.

Scorpio Oct 23-Nov 21 Make your mantra “I like change; change is good” and you’ll be in the perfect mindset for navigating a maze of unsettling situations. You don’t have to surrender your principles. You simply have to be willing to be flexible and able to make adjustments as each situation unfolds.

Sagittarius Nov 22-Dec 21 Discussions with partners, personal and professional, could land you in deep water. And while going beneath the surface of certain situations might produce beneficial consequences, it wouldn’t necessarily be wise to plunge into every detail. There’s no need to hurry this discovery process.

Capricorn

Dec 22-Jan 19

Try to avoid get-rich-quick schemes that offer fabulous returns but sound too good to be true because they are. Instead,

review your financial situation with an eye toward tweaking it toward a slightly more stable direction, and then trust your decisions.

Aquarius

Jan 20-Feb 18

You’re sorting through a hodge-podge of creative ideas looking for little nuggets that could deliver tangible opportunity. As you make your choices, keep in mind all that glitters is not gold. Notice the obvious, but also probe for substance.

Pisces

February 19-March 20

You are inspired, that’s true, but not everyone agrees with your choices. Rather than let dissent turn into drama, pay attention to the criticism. You may not agree, but your willingness to listen will open a closed system and that will have lasting transformational value.


Martian need to lead, as well as the determination to push forward against all odds. So, Mercury schmercury—the combined effort of Mars and Uranus definitely pushes ahead. Neptune also plays a strong role this month First, it trines Mercury from the 1st-4th, Venus from the 9th-18th, and the Sun, from the 7th23rd, all three positive configurations that promote empathy, sympathy, and extraordinary intuitive insight. Be prepared to be more than a little psychic, especially when it comes to knowing who’s on the phone, who will be late, and who will be a persistent pain in the ass . Second, a Mars/Neptune opposition from the 15th-28th has the potential to make many of us por ous with co-dependence. Just be aware, when you’re not busy trying to hold a boundary in place, you or someone you love could be irritable with hypersensitivity. Transform the stress of this opposition by using it to intensify spiritual aspirations and practices. Several non-Mercury related combinations also weave their influence through the month: (1) The ongoing Saturn/Pluto trine continues to stabilize the unstable. This positive, supportive interaction has provided the tolerance and stamina to withstand the plethora of changes over the last several months. (2) That overload of shift is directly attributable to the Jupiter/Uranus sextile, which also persists throughout the entire month and is the source of those sudden twists of fate. On June 14, Pluto retrogrades back into Sagittarius, where it will stay until November 26. And from June 14-28, a Sun/Pluto opposition has the potential to turn the air tense with power struggles. As Pluto retraces its path, we get one last chance to reexamine the meaning of its 13year cycle through Sagittarius, the Sign that symbolizes religion, philosophy and belief systems, as well as higher education, global communication, and the Higher Self. The shadow of Sagittarius is ignorance, fundamentalism, and an inability to embrace diversity. As this Pluto retrograde unfolds, try to become aware of how your perspective has shifted, particularly when it comes to a spiritual perspective that includes rather than excludes. Also try to notice where you have held on to ignorance or refused to let go of certain patterns even when you had the necessary information or knowledge to facilitate a change. From the 22nd-30th, a Mars/Pluto trine stimulates great ambitions and the desire to succeed at almost any cost. As y ou pursue your goals, think about the consequences of y our actions and remember, the ends don’t justify the means—the means are the ends. For the longest time when listening to “Mind Games,” I thought John Lennon was singing about “mind gorillas,” and while I know now he was singing about “mind guerillas,” I still can’t let go of the image of enlightened apes in sear ch of love, pushing the envelope of evolution. S o this month, as minds and souls ar e challenged to think about every detail of life, get in your gorilla suit and put your soul power to the karmic wheel. N Visit Ralfee’s website at WWW.AQUARIUMAGE.COM or email her at RALFEE@AQUARIUMAGE.COM.


54

PASSING

June 2008 catalystmagazine.net

On the passing of Utah Phillips Goodbye to the folksinger, songwriter, activist, iconoclast and all-around amazing human being BY KEN SANDERS, A FRIEND

The golden voice of the great southwest, U. Utah Phillips, will sing and story tell no more. At age 73, Bruce Phillips passed away in his Nevada City, California, home May 23rd from heart failure, after a lifetime spent on the r oad, speaking and singing out against injustice wherever he found it. U. Utah Phillips was born in Cleveland, Ohio, May 15, 1935, during the Great Depression. His military service during the Korean War in the 1950s was instrumental in shaping his political views and anti-establishment stance. Musically influenced by Woody Guthrie and the emerging folk protest movements of the ’30s and ’40s, he styled his moniker, U. Utah Phillips, after his musical hero, T. Texas Tyler. Phillips grew up in Salt Lake City and spent many years of his life here; he always had a lovehate affair with his adopted state. In Salt Lake he met Ammon Hennacy, a Catholic anarchist who founded the Joe Hill House, a “house of hospitality” which Phillips and Hennacy ran from 19611968. A card-carrying member of the Industrial Workers of the World (known as the Wobblies) for most of his life, he defended the rights of the working man, the homeless and the indigent. P hillips also had a lifelong passion for trains and hobos. Phillips ran for the U.S. Senate from Utah in 1968 on the Peace and Freedom Ticket against longterm U.S. Senator Wallace F. Bennett, father of current Republican Senator Robert F. Bennett. Phillips garnered over 2,000 votes, but was defeated in the race. Fellow singer-songwriter Rosalie Sorrels was the first to popularize and record songs by Phillips. They became lifelong friends and performed dozens of concerts together. His first recorded album was “Good Though” (1973) followed by “We Have Fed You For a Thousand Years.” More recently, he gained a new audience through his joint album with Ani D iFranco, “Fellow Workers.” Other musicians, among them Tom Waits, Emmylou Harris, Ian Tyson and many more, have recorded Utah Phillips songs, includ-

ing such classics as “Moose Turd Pie,” “Rock Salt and Nails,” “Green Rolling Hills,” “Daddy, What’s A Train” and “Goodnight-Loving Train.” For many years, Phillips hosted his own radio show in Nevada City called “Loafer’s Glory: The Hobo Jungle of the Mind” and was a well known community activist there. His story-telling abilities were legendary, and any Utah Phillips performance was likely at least three-quarters stories with a few tunes thrown in. He was an ardent student of history and had a lifelong passion for trains and hoboes. Rave On, Utah Phillips! RAVE ON! ◆ I first became aware of Utah Phillips as a youth in the ‘60s in Salt Lake through the old Cosmic Aeroplane, back when he was running for the U. S. Senate. I believe Bruce was also involved in the campaign at that time to get the national anthem changed to Woody Guthrie’s “This Land is Your Land.” Through the Cosmic Aeroplane in the ‘70s, I had the honor and privilege of getting to know Bruce as a friend and was involved in several concerts including an environmental fundraiser concert with Phillips and Edward Abbey, who although they had never previously met, became friendly after that concert. (The next day, Abbey tried to track Utah down to get him to show the exact spot in the old prison grounds where they shot Joe Hill.) Later, we Cosmic Aeroplane sponsored a concert with Phillips and Rosalie Sorrels at East High. Bruce hadn’t been to Utah in a few years, and before the concert, the police dusted off an old outstanding warrant for his arrest and threw him in jail. We had to bail him out so the concert could proceed. Several years ago, our paths crossed at the Gold Rush Book Fair in Nevada City, where he was the guest of honor, and we renewed our decades-old friendship. I last saw Bruce and his wife Joanne exactly a year ago, at the 2007 Gold Rush Book Fair, where Utah regaled my daughter Melissa with stories throughout the evening. Rock salt and nails, amigo, rock salt and nails. N

For more on Utah Phillips’ life and a memorial service, visit WWW.UTAHPHILLIPS.ORG.

OUTDOOR ART

Plein air Paradise Midway’s annual painting competition brings art and the great outdoors together

I

by susette gertsch

t’s cold, it’s early and what am I doing out of my cozy bed? OJ glass in one hand and field easel in the other, I’m loading the last of my painting gear in the Honda. Stop, think through the list: canvas panel, easel, paint and brush bag, turps, granola bars, plenty of water, miscellaneous, and oh yes, the umbrella. The sun will be up and o ver the Wasatch east hills in less than 15 minutes. Where is that sunscreen? At best I’ll get a terrific little 9x12

hummer for the gallery. At worst (depending on the season) I’ll deal with flies, pies, wind, rain, snow, or passing cattle and cowboys, which I experienced last August in the North Fields. Last summer, my friend Debbie T. reported a foul and strange smell while painting in the pines above Snake Creek, only to discover a rotting deer hide, dragged cheerfully to her side by her dog. On another occasion, while shooting photos for a potential site , I


sank into a three-foot hole of oozing sand. I’m off for a precious two-hour date with nature. Painting is my occupation, and painting en plein air is my outdoor passion. Most of us hardy plein air artists can thank (or, on cow pie days, curse) John G. Rand, who in 1841 invented the collapsible metal paint tube. Before this time, artists had used pig bladders to store their oil colors. What the Impressionists (who coined the phrase) encountered in the great outdoors challenged and fascinated them, and does the same for the modern plein air artist. Something remarkable happens when I abandon the studio, and stand, saturated in nature with all its variables and wonders. I become quiet, focused, intense... birds chirp from the trees, while the ambient light washes across the pasture or the river. Colors become brilliant, dazzling, as I connect with “the now of the moment” as Eckart Tolle might say it. This is really living. This is really connection. This is really me! So much time has passed since those first Impressionists went about inventing plein air with their dabs, dots, and the “painterly” quality of their impasto brushwork. The snarling insults of the early critics changed to envy and admiration, as the new unconventional paintings captured the public’s interest. Plein air painting has become a mainstream activity across the country and the world, complete with associations and competitions. Heber Valley has become one of the most popular rendezvous points for plein air painters in Utah. “Wasatch Plein Air Paradise

2008,” sponsored by the Midway Art Association, is the largest of Utah’s plein air competitions. Consequently I’m doing my “painting push-ups” for the next big competition in June. Competitive painting? Here’s how it works: Artists from all over Utah arrive at the Midway Town Hall on Thursday, June 26 to have painting surfaces “stamped.” That initiates the race against time to find the perfect plein air setting in Wasatch County, with framed entries due back at 5 p.m. on Saturday the 28th. When it’s all done, they and the public can enjoy the actual art exhibition and sale on July 3-4 amid traditional Fourth of July events. Two short “paint-out” competitions will also take place July 3 and 4. John Hughes, Steve McGinty, Bonnie Poselli, Kate Starling, George Handrahan and Ken Baxter are among the well-known plein air professionals who have participated in the competition either as jurors, painters or both. In 2007, over $10,000 in purchase awards and prizes went to winning entries and artists of all levels. I’ll probably be out in the north fields having the time of my life....in plein air paradise! ◆ Sue Gertsch is president of the Midway Art Association.

Contact: WWW.MIDWAYARTASSOCIATION.ORG; tel. 801-755-6730 Main Competition: June 26-28 July 3-4 : 5-hour Paint-out Competitions July 3-4: Art Exhibition and Sale, Midway Town Hall, 10a-7p on the 3rd, 8a-2 p on the 4th July 4 Artists Award Reception, 1 pm.

10 days in the jungle September 2nd through the 12th Experience the ancient tradition of Ayahuasca ceremonies with Peruvian shamans $1250 includes all meals, habitation, ceremonies, flight from Lima to Iquitos, Spanish-English speaking guide, jungle hike, boat trip on the Amazon and spiritual guidance; excludes flight to Lima, Peru Contact Josh by e-mail jstonemtn@yahoo.Com


56 June 2008

Open Hand

B O D Y W O R K Daniel J. Schmidt, GCFP, LMBT Feldenkrais Method & Structural Integration Pain Relief ~ Improvement of Function 150 So. 600 East ~ 919.357.0573

METAPHORS FOR THE MONTH

June

Honor discontent with limits set by mind

www.OpenHandSLC.com

BY SUZANNE WAGNER Arthurian Tarot: King Mark, The Salmon Mayan Oracle: Harmonic Resonance, Universal Movement Aleister Crowley: Truce, Hermit, Adjustment Medicine Cards: Grouse, Moose Osho Zen Tarot: Possibilities, Laziness Healing Earth Tarot: The Devil, Grandfather of Shields Ancient Egyptian Tarot: Hermit Words of Truth: No Movement, Source, Clarity, Sacred, Powerless, Ease

CLASSES, PREPARATIONS, CONSULTATIONS Feel your best every day with Thrive Tonic.® SEE YOU AT THE FARMERS MARKET!

www.millcreekherbs.com • 801-466-1632

T

his June you have the opportunity to see the world of possibilities opening to you. As you learn to become more loving to yourself, you also become more self-contained. This month, you are no longer looking for someone or something outside of you to fulfill you. When you are relaxed and at ease, you can see the limitless possibilities all around you. When you are in tune with your true nature, you trust that the universe is giving you exactly what you need in order to grow. When you constantly need to analyze things, over time you realize that mind will accept any boundary or limitation as the truth. But existence by its own nature cannot have boundaries. Your mind will try to tell you to be content. If you listen to that voice, then you will remain small. This smallness is your mind’s imposition upon your freedom, limiting your potential and possibilities. When the mind is in control, you become lazy and life becomes dull. You feel as if you are in a rut, and life becomes a bitter pill to take. When you experience the feeling that you have “arrived,” remember your mind is imposing a boundary and limit upon your experience. This does not mean that you have not achieved something fabulous that is to be celebr ated. But each of us is constantly growing and evolving. Enjoy each success and then reach beyond that known place toward more fulfillment, love, and joy. When you think that you have arrived, know that the mirror of that reality is cracking under your feet, and you are about to take a freefall into something new and unknown. Don’t worry or despair. This is just the natural progression that is life. There is always something new to explore or some way to expand love in your life in greater expanding circles of connection and honor.

Do not believe those who offer false flatter y and seduction. Whether they know it or not, they are keeping you small in order to validate that they do not need to grow further. Others will tell you that what you have should be enough, that you should be satisfied and content. I am not talking about financial satisfaction, but spiritual fulfillment and satisfaction. In this area, trust your own depth and discipline. Amazing levels of spiritual awareness, conscious clarity, and awakening are available to everyone. However, it does take discipline and the willingness to push beyond comfort into the hidden and resistant areas within you.

Allow joy to become the priority. That is why you must learn to listen to the intuitive self and the deeper soul awareness within. The mind is only one small and ver y narrow aspect of your being. You are much more than what you believe you are. Notice if you value doing but do not always value the mystical knowledge that can be found within the intuitive self. That intuitive self is asking for you to listen and open beyond the level of comfort that you have created up to this point. This month, be reluctant to take huge external risks. Let go of extravagant plans and the constant need to manifest extreme wealth. Allow stillness to invade your life. Go within and find your inner source of power and clarity. Take some time to dance into the passionate flow that is what makes life wor th living. The simple things in life are the memories we end up holding as sacred treasures—you do not remember the expensive holiday gifts you received as a child as much as you cherish the memories of rolling in the grass and playing with your family in hysterical giggles and laughter. Allow those simple pleasures to expand the childlike innocence back into your life. Allow joy to become the priority. Allow love to be the guiding light and principle in your work and family. Make choices that are not about getting what you want, but noticing and giving to others what will open their heart more fully to the love that is within them. After all, spirit is always present and guiding our lives, even if we do not always realize it. N Suzanne Wagner is the author of numerous books and CDs on the tarot. She lives in Salt Lake City. WWW.SUZWAGNER.COM.


June 2008

CatalystMagazine.net

57

DISPLAY ADS IN THIS ISSUE CELTIC AND EARLY MUSIC

Listed alphabetically A Course In Miracles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Acumen Biologics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 All Saints Episcopal Church . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Beer Nut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Bell, Elaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Berryhill, Lori, L.Ac.Mstom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Bikram Yoga SLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Blue Boutique. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Body & Mind Studio (Claudia Flores) . . . . . . . 47 Body Electric School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Caffe d'Bolla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Caffé Ibis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Carl & Erin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Center for Enhanced Wellness (Zeng) . . . . . . 49 Cerami Chiropractic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CG Sparks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Clarity Coaching. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Coffee Garden #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Coffee Garden #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Confluence Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Conscious Journey (Cathy Patillo) . . . . . . . . . 53 Cucina. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 D. F. Dance Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 DanceScene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Dog Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Dragon Dreams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Earth Goods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Evergreen House Café. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Female Empowerment Movement . . . . . . . . . 39 FindMyTruth.com (Becky Deans) . . . . . . . . . . 42 Five Element Acupuncture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Five-Step Carpet Care #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Flanigan's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Flow Yoga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Four Winds Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Full Circle Women's Healthcare. . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Gem Faire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Graham, Jan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Green Building Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Healing Mountain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Healing Mountain Gems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Home Caregivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Icon Remodeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Idlewild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Inner Light Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Jenson, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Kanzeon Zen Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Knead a Massage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 KUED. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Kula Yoga Studios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Long Okura Law Firm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Lucarelli, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Mazza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Millcreek Herbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Mindful Yoga (Charlotte Bell). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Moffitt, Marilyn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Montessori Community School . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Mulberry Grove Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Mythic Mountain Retreats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Nataliya's Healing Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 NewSpace Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Nostalgia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 One World Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 One World Café Fundraiser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Open Hand Bodywork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Pain Research Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Peruvian Journey with Josh Stone . . . . . . . . . 55 RDT #1/dance classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Red Iguana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Red Lotus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 RedRock Brewery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Residential Design (Ann Larsen) . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Sage's Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 SB Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Seven Canyons (Waldorf) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 SL Roasting Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Sool Acupuncture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Streamline (pilates/yoga). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Structural Integrity (Paul Wirth). . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Takashi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Traces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Twigs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 U of U/Nonprofit Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Underfoot Floors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 United Concerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Utah Arts Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Utah Arts Festival/Ani deFranco . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Utah Asian Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vertical Diner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Voiceovers (Scott Shurian) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Vug, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Wagner, Suzanne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Web of Life Wellness Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 White Light Chakra Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Withus, Trish. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Women's Music Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Yoga Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

HARP, FLUTE, DULCIMER & GUITAR WEDDINGS/LESSONS/CDs

Dragon Dreams

WWW.IDLEWILDRECORDINGS.COM

DAVE

& CAROL SHARP 1-801-268-4789

Gift Boutique 989 E. 900 South, SLC Anna Chapman: Astrology Karen Cottingham: Tarot Kim Terry: Medium

Come in and pamper your spirit HEALING and WELLNESS products. AUBREY ORGANICS, WAYNE DYER, DOREEN VIRTUE, AND MUCH MORE...

801.509.1043 www.DragonDreamsGiftBoutique.com

Michael Lucarelli

SCULPTING CLASSES Taught by Elaine Bell

Classical Guitarist

274-2845

www.lucarelli.com

bellecreations@msn.com

801-201-2496

Salt Lake’s Preferred Place To Discover and Practice Yoga 4689 South Holladay Blvd., Holladay

A Course in Miracles STUDY

Magic of Alignment with B.J. Galván

Fall Session: 1st & 3rd Monday, September-December Garden Center — 1602 E. 2100 S. (N.E. corner of Sugarhouse Park) 6:30-8:30 pm

An Anusara Weekend to take you to the next level!

RETREAT

Information on all classes & events available at WWW.YOGAUTAH.COM

June 20-22, 2008, The Edge Retreat Center, Fruitland, Utah www.theedgeretreat.com ~ 435.548.2479

SOCIAL BREAKFAST 1st Saturday of the month, 9am, M arie Callender’s, 1100 E. 3900 S.

801.244.0065 www.reconnecttospirit.com

info@reconnecttospirit.com

June 28-29 801.277.9166 4689 South Holladay Blvd., Holladay Email:

YOGACENTER@EARTHLINK .NET

BEST OF BEEHIVE AWARD

~ Salt Lake Magazine

FIRST TWO CLASSES FOR THE PRICE OF ONE


58

June 2008

URBAN ALMANAC

catalystmagazine.net

JUNE 14 As early season crops are harvested, plant warm-weather or cover crops in their place. JUNE 15 Many species of birds, including hummingbirds, line their nests with aromatic leaves to keep mosquitoes away, kill bacteria and act as a sunshield.

DAY B Y D AY IN THE HOME,GARDEN & SKY BY DIANE OLSON

JUNE 1 The Sun rises today at 5:58 a.m., and sets at 8:52 p.m. June’s average maximum temperature is 82°; the minimum is 63°. Average rainfall is .93 inches. JUNE 2 For a sweet, green lawn, mix dry organic fertilizer with four pounds of Epsom salts (makes it green) and a pound of confectioner’s sugar (gives the microorganisms in the soil energy). Let grass get 3.5 inches long before mowing, and mow only one-third of the leaf surface each time.

JUNE 4 Frogs and toads are singing and mating. The American bullfrog’s song carries so well because it uses its ears as amplifiers. JUNE 5 Plants got yellow leaves? Use Texas greensand to add iron. Don’t even think about using Ironite, which is made from hazardous waste. JUNE 6 Bright plants for shady areas: impatiens, begonias, geraniums, Iceland poppies, dianthus and Johnny-jump-ups.

JUNE 8 Galls on trees are caused by moth larvae, which feed by carving grooves, which then ooze resin. The resin forms igloo-like enclosures where the larva then dwell. JUNE 9 Butterflies love aster, cosmos, thistle and buttonbush. Their caterpillars prefer thistle, mallow, hollyhock and sunflower.

JUNE 17 Keep mulch thick; reapply if weeds or soil start showing through. Straw is the best mulch for vegetables; it keeps them cool and protects against soil-dwelling diseases. JUNE 18 FULL ROSE MOON. Plant roses where they’ll receive a minimum of five to six hours of full sun per day. Roses love alfalfa meal, good old guinea pig food. Spread a layer underneath. JUNE 19 Jupiter and the Moon rendezvous fabulously tonight in the midnight sky.

re eG

T

JUNE 3 NEW MOON. There’s still time to plant basil, beans, beets, carrots, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, kale, kohlrabi, melons, peppers, pumpkins, radishes, squash, tomatoes and turnips, and bachelor buttons, cannas, cosmos, dahlias, gladiola, marigolds, morning glory, sunflowers and zinnias. Plant successions of radishes, carrots, snap beans and corn every two weeks through July.

JUNE 7 Look for the waxing Moon hanging close to Mars tonight and Saturn tomorrow night.

JUNE 16 Shred spare plants and damaged leaves around the perimeter of healthy vegetables to sacrifice to slugs and snails, which go for wilting foliage first.

all JUNE 10 FIRST QUARTER MOON. Vines for sunny walls: cat’s claw, coral vine, grapes, lady banks rose and trumpet vine. Vines for afternoon shade: asparagus bean vines, hyacinth beans, and jasmine.

JUNE 11 Before cooking, give fresh broccoli a quick salt water bath to coax out the perfectly disguised (and no-so-tasty) cabbage worms. Italian immigrants first brought broccoli to the Americas in the early 1800s. An ingredient found in broccoli has antiviral, antibacterial and anticancer properties. JUNE 12 Plant rue to keep cats out of garden beds. You can also spray rue tea on furniture to keep them from scratching. To keep out dogs, mix one part cayenne pepper, two parts mustard, and two parts flour. If needed, escalate to pure cayenne pepper. JUNE 13 It’s time to prune spring-flowering shrubs like Ru e forsythia and lilac, and divide phlox and other early-blooming rock garden plants.

JUNE 20 Summer Solstice. Summer officially begins at 9:59 p.m., when the Sun is directly overhead at the Tropic of Cancer. Big party at Stonehenge tonight. JUNE 21 The best compost is the most complex; use kitchen waste (but no meat or cooked foods), spent annuals, weeds (unless they’ve gone to seed), grass clippings, leaves and manure. Keep it moist and aerated and turn weekly, if possible. If you can’t turn it, just shred whatever you add. JUNE 22 Safe, cheap weed killer: Mix 1 quart water and 1 to 5 tbsp. rubbing alcohol in a spray bottle. Spray offending plants during the hottest part of the day. JUNE 23 Tonight is Midsummer Eve (called Litha by Wiccans), the midpoint of the growing season. Our Pagan ancestors believed that plants harvested on Midsummer Eve had special powers. Much of the world still celebrates the occasion with bonfires, feasts and libations. JUNE 24 Painted lady butterflies see more patterns, a wider range of color and more shades of green than people do.

JUNE 25 Keep tomato plants staked as they grow, and pinch off the suckers. JUNE 26 LAST QUARTER MOON. Wind-pollinated plants cause the most allergy problems. They generally have small, inconspicuous flowers that produce huge amounts of pollen. Wind pollinated trees include fruitless mulberries, olives, ash, privets, cottonwoods and mesquites. Shrubs include pampas grass, fountain grass, ragweed, Russian thistle, pigweed, saltbrush, rabbit brush and bursage. Ground covers include Bermuda and Johnson grass. If you suffer from allergies, either stay inside in the evening, when the pollen settles back to the earth, wear a hat, or shower before going to bed. JUNE 27 Bumblebees vibrate their burly flight muscles to shake pollen loose from flowers. Flying bees build up an electrostatic charge, which discharges when they land on grounded flowers, and spreads the pollen they are carrying. JUNE 28 A 50/50 solution of baking soda and water takes the itch out of mosquito bites. JUNE 29 After the “June drop,” thin closely clustered fruit. There should be six inches of space between apples, pears, peaches and nectarines. JUNE 30 The Sun rises at 5:58 a.m. and sets at 9:03 p.m. Water early in the morning, rather than at night, for maximum growth and minimum disease. And this our life, exempt from public haunt, Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, Sermons in stones, and good in everything. —William Shakespeare Diane Olson is a freelance writer, proofreader and wanna-be fulltime naturalist.


Pledges are $1 for one mala of prayers, which is 108 mantras. All donations are tax deductible.

Urgyen Samten Ling Gonpa Tibetan Buddhist Temple

You may bring your donation in person, where we invite you to sit with us as we do Puja and mantras. Or, you may give your donation online at www.urgyensamtenling.org where you will find a more detailed schedule of our events. You can also call us on the phone 801.328.4629. We accept cash, checks and credit cards. everyone is welcome!

Urgyen Samten Ling gonpa 740 South 300 West Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 801.328.4629 urgyensamtenling.org


LIBRARY SQUARE JUNE 26-29, 2008 UAF.ORG ADMISSION $10 SENIORS $5 CHILDREN 12 & UNDER FREE

Ride Trax or your bicycle to the Festival!

FEAR NO FILM FESTIVAL, DEMONSTRATING ARTS, POP ART EXHIBIT, URBAN ARTS, POETRY, STREET PERFORMERS AND MORE!

GROOVE TO THE MUSIC ON 6 STAGES

MAKE SOME MUSIC IN THE TARGET ART YARD FOR KIDS

SHOP THE ARTIST MARKETPLACE Noon to 10 PM daily

CATALYST June 2008  

CATALYST June 2008 issue

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you