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CASTLEGAR NEWS Thursday,february  • 

SHSS students perform Les Miserables See Page13

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Craig Lindsay photo After sweeping the Spokane Braves on the weekend, the Castlegar Rebels are ready for their first round play-off series against arch-rival Nelson. Above, Rebel forward Dylan Sibbald goes for the deke on Spokane goalie Branden Amatto during Friday’s game at the Castlegar Complex.

IHA rep apologizes to council over ER closure CRAIG LINDSAY Castlegar News Reporter

At Monday night’s Castlegar city council meeting, IHA Community Area Director Linda Basran apologized to council for the Castlegar Health Centre Emergency Room closure on Feb. 4. “I want to be clear - none of this was intentional,” she said to council and about a dozen spectators in-

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cluding a few dressed as wounded patients. “The reality was we had a situation in Castlegar that we weren’t prepared for. We have never had an emergency room closure in Castlegar before and when we did on Feb. 4, a number of steps failed along the way. Basically, the right information did not get to the right people in a timely manner. This

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Linda Basran of IHA spoke to Castlegar city council on Monday. Craig Lindsay photo

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to the closure of the ER and talked about what Interior Health has done to address the shortfalls made clear by the incident. “Interior Health became aware of a vacant shift on Friday evening, Feb. 3, when one of the two RN shifts had inadvertently not been scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 4,” she said. “At that point, calls were made to try and

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Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

www.castlegarnews.com 3

News

City council grills IHA representative Continued from P. 1

came clear we didn’t have a second RN available, the decision was made to close the site,” she said. “Unfortunately, information did not flow to all key personnel within Interior Health including communications who would have supported the distribution of this information to the community.” After her presentation, Basran

took questions from council. Sue HeatonSherstobitoff asked how many full time RN’s Castlegar had and if IHA planned to hire any more. “We have 14 casual staff and our regular staff includes 2.5 FTEs, which is fulltime equivalent,” answered Basran. “So we have two RNs on for 12 hour shifts, plus another half-time person.” “Do you think two and a half full-time RNs is enough in

case one of them gets sick?” asked HeatonSherstobitoff. Councillor Russ Hearne asked Basran: “Who’s decision was it to close the ER? Who ultimately made the decision?” “I would think a number of people did from the medical staff that were on, the nursing staff, and the frontline people who were there,” she said. Hearne pressed for a name of a high ranking IHA official who made the

final decision on the closure but was rebuked. “In this particular case there wasn’t clear communication to the administrator on call,” said Basran. “In all fairness, we were in the wrong in terms of how this closure was handled. I hope we have done our due diligence to make sure that everybody ever to be associated with what goes on in this community knows their roles, knows where

to take it, and knows all the numbers. I hope that helps without divulging individual staff member’s names because I don’t think that ever buys us anything.” In an interview with the Castlegar News, Hearne said he was disappointed at not being able to talk to the person at IHA responsible for the closure decision. “I thought it was nice that someone came and offered the apology,” said

Hearne. “It’s disappointing that we didn’t get to talk to the person who made the decision to explain their rationale. So we would have a chance to ask the tough questions for them. I thought it was a bit disrespectful in that the decision makers weren’t here. We weren’t even provided with the name of who it was. I didn’t expect much more than an apology. I know they can’t go back in time

and redo it. We have to work to make sure in the future we don’t get this again. I think IHA has to do a better job to make sure they can cover it. With hospitals in Trail and Nelson and a health centre in Castlegar, we should be able to find the staff to do it. I respect that people get sick and injured and aren’t able to be there. But they have to have coverage. I think not having it is unacceptable.”

Cab company given repreive by transportation board CRAIG LINDSAY Castlegar News Reporter

Castlegar Taxi and sister company Champion Cab in Trail have received permission from the Passenger Transportation Board to raise fares. The end result is that both cab companies will stay in business. “They’ve given us an increase - so we’ll keep on going,” said John Foglia, owner

and operator of both companies. The Passenger Transportation Board ruled that Foglia could raise the flag (starting) rate by 10%, the waiting rate by 3%, and the regular rate by 22%. Currently, the rates for the local cabs are: Flag = $3.15, Rate 1 (waiting) = $2.06, Time (per hour) = $43.66. “We’re going to monitor to see if there is any left over to see

if we can pay drivers more,” said Foglia. “We cannot get drivers. So we’re hoping once we figure out where we stand with this increase. Hopefully there’s enough left over that we can advertise that it’s not minimum wage.” Foglia has owned Castlegar Taxi for six years and Champion Cab for 12. The cab rates are set by the Transportation Board, which is an

independent tribunal in B.C. established under the Passenger Transportation Act. All the cab drivers are paid hourly. There are no owner/operators in Castlegar or Trail. “We felt that by paying a straight hourly way it would be easier for us,” said Foglia. “When we took over the Castlegar Taxi company some of the drivers were owner/ operators. We gave them the choice and

they all chose hourly wages.” Foglia would still like to sell the businesses. “I personally want out,” he said. “I’ve been trying to sell for the last five years. I’m doing it because I believe we can’t afford to lose it. I strongly believe if it went down, it would be another nail in the coffin of our area. I’m glad they finally saw the light.” Castlegar city coun-

cillor Russ Hearne is glad to see the cabs in Castlegar up and running. “Clearly, taxis are important, especially to seniors and the after hours crowd,” he said. “It’s important that we have that service there.” Hearne, like many in town, would like to see steadier service. “It’s disappointing in that we don’t have more offered,” he said. “When a bar or

pub closes at the end of the night and you have one cab available and they pick up a passenger and head off to Pass Creek or Genelle. By the time they return, everybody is gone. In a perfect world I’d like to see more. I understand it’s a business thing and it’s about profits and losses. I’m very happy that we haven’t lost what we have.”

Bus mix-up leaves kids out in the cold TIMOTHY SCHAFER Trail Daily Times Reporter

Six-year-old Lexi gets scared when her mother is a few minutes late in picking her up from the school bus stop in Tarrys. There are a lot of strangers in the area around the Glade Esso where her rural school bus drops her after school and she doesn’t always

feel safe, she told the School District 20 (Kootenay-Columbia) board of trustees Monday night in their regular meeting. But Lexi and 19 other students have fallen through a crack in the school district, living at the edge of the SD20 boundary, but attending a nearby School District 8 (Kootenay Lake) school in Brent Ken-

nedy Elementary — 40 minutes closer than the nearest SD20 school. The crack is the bus service. Lexi and other students are now dropped off at the Glade Esso, a busy hub of the Tarrys and Glade rural areas, where their parents usually come to pick them up. Some students have to walk along the shoulder of

busy Highway 3A to access the bus stop at the gas station. On Monday a group of 18 concerned parents appeared before the SD20 board and asked if they would consider allowing SD8 buses to cover a requested route extension from the Esso through to Jenisa and Loff roads (1.5 kilometres or a threeminute drive).

“I would feel safer on Loff Road because if something bad happened to me, I would know which house would be safe to run to,” Lexi said. Discussion surrounding the proposed extension had been ongoing over the past few months, said one of the parents, Jen McMillan, but the area parents were requesting an

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immediate resolution to the situation. They were asking for an agreement effective immediately through to the end of June 2012 to permit SD8 to transport children attending Brent Kennedy and Mount Sentinel Secondary School through to Jenisa and Loff roads. “We understand that the boards are going to need time to

meet to consult and look at all of the bus routes, but this would be an interim agreement,” McMilla said. The goal would be to have the extension solidified without reservation or concern by September 2012 for the start of the new school year, McMillan added. Currently, there is an agreement in place

Continued on P. 7


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MLA Conroy reacts to budget CRAIG LINDSAY Castlegar News Reporter

B.C.’s Liberal government released their 2012 budget on Wednesday. Minister of Finance Kevin Falcon touted increased spending for health, education, and social services. “Funding for the Ministry of Health will increase, as it has every year since 2001,” said the report. “In 2014/15, the budget will be $17.3 billion — $1.5 billion higher than it is today. Health care is projected to account for more than 42 per cent of total government spending by 2014/15.” Falcon also touted a $4.7 million a year funding for school districts, “We will also invest an additional $165 million over three years to establish a fund to deal directly with issues of class composition.” Falcon also detailed that the government is on track to eliminate

the HST by April 1, 2013. “Fiscal discipline is fundamental,” said Falcon. “That’s what we’re hearing from the international investment community. They know that a decade of sound fiscal management has given the government of British Columbia seven successive credit rating upgrades taking us to our current triple-A rating — the highest possible. We can all be proud of that.” Kootenay West MLA Katrine Conroy, speaking from Victoria, said she and her fellow NDPers were not convinced the budget addressed the major problems facing families in the province. “What we heard today - it just confirms a government that has no vision and it just continues to get its priorities wrong,” she said. “People in this province are struggling and they’ve put up with the liberals for

Katrine Conroy, Kootenay West MLA. File photo

11 years and I think people were hoping for a budget that might give some hope for a better future.” Conroy says the budget does not properly address inequality throughout B.C. “There’s nothing to address the fact that one in four children live below the poverty line which is one of the highest rates in Canada,” she said. “There’s no poverty reduction plan anywhere in the budget that I could see.” Conroy is also concerned about the lack of support for education and skills training. Another hot button item in the budget

is an increase to the Medical Services Plan (MSP) premiums. “The minister made a point that ‘It’s not going to cost much. It’s only $5 a month.’ But for some families, an additional $5 can be significant,” said Conroy. “In addition, they’re going to be paying for HST for another year. So those add up. For low income families those add up quickly. So that’s a concern.” With a provincial election coming up in a year, Conroy said the Liberals are trying desparately to balance the budget. “There’s a 3% increase in health - I don’t even think that will cover the cost of living increases,” she said. “There’s nothing for post-secondary education. It looks like there will be a cut to that ministry. What does that mean? Selkirk College is already struggling. How will they deal with that?”

Celgar found guilty in pollution CASTLEGAR NEWS STAFF

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Zellstoff-Celgar Pulp Mill in Castlegar has been found guilty of several charged related to a pollution spill from November of 2008. Judge Lisa Mrozinksi delivered her verdict in Castlegar court on Feb. 16. She convicted the mill of depositing effluent that was lethal to trout in the Columbia River. She also found the company guilty on two other counts related to their permitted effluent levels. “Celgar submitted that though it exercised all due diligence, it could not avoid having committed these offences,” said the judge in her summary. “I am not satisfied on the evidence that Celgar has discharged its onus with regard to the defence of due diligence

Zellstoff-Celgar Pulp Mill in Castlegar.

with respect to these counts and therefore I have convicted Celgar of these offences. Though I found that Celgar failed to maintain its spill ponds in good working order contrary to ss. 120(6) and (7) of the EMA, I am satisfied Celgar exercised due diligence in attempting to avoid these offences and as such I have acquitted Celgar on counts 5 and 6 of the Information. Celgar is hereby convicted on counts 2, 3 and 4 of the Informa-

tion as charged.” The sentencing date for the case will be Mar. 30 in Nelson Provincial Court. According to court documents, on November 18, 2008, material identified by Celgar as dilute weak black liquor in excess of 1000 m3 overflowed a tank and spilled into the mill’s general sewer. From there, it made its way directly into Celgar’s effluent treatment system (ETS). A much smaller amount, approximately 33 m3

File photo

spilled over a roadway at the mill. Some of that spill material entered the Columbia River. Celgar reported the spill on November 18, and took the steps necessary to contain the spilled material in the River. Celgar admitted that on November 20, 21, 23, 24 and 25, its treated effluent exceeded its prescribed TSS permit level of 6000 kg/day. Calls from Castlegar News to Celgar were not returned.


Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

www.castlegarnews.com 5

News/Opinion B.C. budget taxes business, caps spending

Finance Minister Kevin Falcon reviews his government’s budget performance in the last decade, including the deficit forecast that quadrupled to $2 billion after the 2009 election. TOM FLETCHER Black Press

The B.C. government is restricting spending increases and keeping its small business income tax alive to meet its balanced budget target before the 2013 election. Finance Minister Kevin Falcon presented his first budget Tuesday, with a deficit of $969 million for the fiscal year starting April 1, as B.C. pays to end the harmonized sales tax. His threeyear plan predicts a $154 million surplus in 2013-14 and $250

million surplus the following year. To do that, the budget aims to hold government spending growth down to two per cent for three years, with most of it going to health and education. That leaves most other ministries with little or no increase for inflation, a restriction that is expected to reduce overall B.C. government staff from about 27,000 this year to 25,000 by 2014-15. Falcon also reversed course on business taxes. The government has been promising for years

that it would eliminate the small business income tax this spring, after lowering it to the current 2.5 per cent. Now it will continue at 2.5 per cent until B.C.’s financial picture improves. Falcon is also considering a one per cent increase in the general corporate tax rate to 11 per cent, but not for another year depending on financial conditions. That move positions the B.C. Liberals politically for an election against NDP leader Adrian Dix, who has called for a corporate tax increase.

Tom Fletcher photo

Canadian Federation of Independent Business spokesperson Shachi Kurl said business people understand the need for government revenue, but the extra tax burden will affect investment. The last scheduled carbon tax increase will go ahead on July, from 5.56 cents on a litre of gasoline to 6.67 cents. The budget holds that level while a review of the carbon tax program looks at the rate and offsetting income tax cuts. Falcon promised carbon tax relief soon for greenhouse opera-

Film collection on environment to be preserved SUBMITTED

One of the largest private film collections in Canada, which provides a fascinating document of rural B.C., will be housed and preserved by UBC Library thanks to a generous donation from the Halleran family and the support of community partners including Columbia Basin Trust (CBT). The Halleran Collection, valued at $750,000, consists of about 250 nature-oriented video programs produced in British Columbia over the decades – first by Mike Halleran and then by his son Terry. These shows, known collectively as

the Westland series, were broadcast by the Knowledge Network from 1984 to 2007. They examine a broad range of issues associated with forestry, fresh water fishing, endangered species and ecosystem restoration. The donation also includes an extensive library of 2,000 source tapes. Terry Halleran donated the bulk of the collection to UBC Library, and the remainder was purchased. Halleran was introduced to the Library by Don Laishley, a UBC alumnus and member of the Library’s Advisory Board. “We took a lot of pride in what we did. It wasn’t always easy,

but we believed in environmental education,” says Halleran. “UBC Library was the obvious choice for us, considering the longstanding relationship between our series and the expertise UBC faculty and students brought to the table.” Halleran notes that the Westland programs have been used as teaching tools in classrooms at UBC and elsewhere since the 1980s. The programs also feature some former UBC faculty members. “We anticipate that with increasing interest in natural resource management, environmentalism and sustainability, this collection will be of con-

siderable interest to a variety of researchers at the University and the broader community,” notes Chris Hives, University Archivist. Columbia Basin Trust is providing $100,000 to support the acquisition and digitization of the Westland series tapes. “We’re delighted to contribute towards preserving the collection and making it available to all to study, reflect on and simply appreciate,” says Neil Muth, CBT’s President and CEO. “Thanks go to UBC for organizing this and to Terry Halleran for donating a huge portion of the collection.” Other community

partners that provided funds to support the purchase of the collection include the Okanagan Region Wildlife Heritage Fund Society, the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation and the Regional District of Central Kootenay. Halleran would like to recognize the Kootenay Wildlife Heritage Fund and the British Columbia Conservation Foundation for their support with the preservation and management of the Westland series in advance of its transfer to UBC. University Archives staff have begun preparing an inventory to enable access to the Halleran Collection.

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tors, and hinted at additional help for other farmers. The cash-strapped government is putting surplus provincial assets up for sale starting next year, including a seven-hectare property north of Kelowna that was proposed for a new Okanagan correctional centre before a new site near Oliver was chosen. Another sixhectare parcel in Surrey is to be sold, along with about 100 others around the province, many of them school properties. The budget also reveals a plan to sell B.C.’s liquor distribution system and warehouses to a private operator. Falcon called the move “an opportunity to get out of a business we don’t have to be in,” as well as a way to raise money. Falcon said the deal will protect union workers in the transition to a private wholesaler. Government retail liquor stores are not affected. Liquor and tobacco taxes will be adjusted to keep prices the same once the HST is phased out.

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Editorial

Editor: Jim Sinclair Publisher: Chris Hopkyns Unit 2 - 1810 8th Avenue, Castlegar, B.C. V1N 2Y4 Publication Mail Agreement Number 40012905

Go Rebels Go Craig here, once again filling in for the vacationing Jim. As I am a big-time sports fan I’m going to talk sports here. Of course, the big ticket item in town is the KIJHL’s Castlegar Rebels. The Rebels once again finished off a great regular season, finishing tied for second overall in the entire league with a 37 win - 11 loss record good for 78 points. Only Beaver Valley finished with more points (87). The Rebels improved throughout the season. The coaching staff brought in scoring in Scott Morisseau, size on defence in Riley Henderson, and clutch goaltending with Jordan Gluck. Add in the improvement of the returning players and you’ve got another contending team. Of course, locals remember the impressive play-off run the Rebels had last year. Sports, especially amateur sports, tend to be cyclical. So to be able to stay on top is always difficult. Returing to the KIJHL championship won’t be easy though. The Neil Murdoch division is easily the strongest in the league. Right out of the gate, the Rebels have to face arch-rivals Nelson. The Leafs have been surging lately, winning eight of their last nine games. The return of Patrick Martens has solified an already potent offence up. Another series subplot will be the Rebels’ top scorer Stuart Walton going up against his brother, Nelson goalie Andrew Walton. Last year, the two teams went to six games in the division final before Castlegar won. Expect a similar type of gritty, entertaining series this year that’s sure to go just as long.

We want to hear from you.

Letters Policy The Castlegar News welcomes letters to the editor intended for publication but reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity, legality, accuracy and topicality. Letters should typically be in the range of 300 words in length. Anonymous letters will not be published. To assist in verification, name, address and telephone number must be supplied, but will not be published. E-MAIL LETTERS TO: newsroom@castlegarnews.com DROP OFF/MAIL: Unit 2 - 1810 8th Avenue Castlegar, B.C. V1N 2Y4 Phone: 250-365-6397 Fax: 250-365-6390 The Castlegar News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to bcpresscouncil.org.

Is a subsidiary of Unit 2 - 1810 8th Avenue, Castlegar, British Columbia Phone (250) 365-6397

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newsroom@castlegarnews.com production@castlegarnews.com

Off The Line - Karen Havilland

The best gifts are free A friend and I were talking the other night and we discovered that we both come from families with five children. With that in common, we soon turned to talking about what it was like growing up with four siblings. One of her comments struck a note with me. She told me about being a member of the Clean Your Plate Club, you know, the club where everything, and I mean everything, on your plate had to be finished before leaving the table. That led into similar such talk including the fact that we both felt we had to pile the food on our plate and eat it as fast as we could in order to get our fair share of the meal. In those days hamburger was evident in almost every supper we ate, with the exception of Sunday dinner when we all sat down as a family and chowed down on roast beef complete with mom’s delectable Yorkshire pudding with all the trimmings. Because of the cost of feeding five growing children, hamburger casseroles ruled at our house and so it was always a treat when we went camping or on a road trip. That meant cold chicken wings wrapped in wax paper. Mom made the best chicken wings, and in those days wings weren’t considered elevated gourmet food. It was Craig Lindsay Reporter

Jim Sinclair Editor

simply a part of the chicken which was going to be thrown away and thus (in the 1960s) it was offered for just pennies a pound. We loved those chicken wings. I still do to this day. It brings back such fond memories of days when children were children and not electronically connected to the computer, cell phone or iPod. Despite our parents’ struggle to feed, clothe and house five children, they never scrimped on education or helping us gain valuable life experience. They didn’t have lots, but our parents made sure that when we were in public we knew which utensil to use, how to conduct ourselves and how to speak properly. They put their money where their mouths were when they subscribed to a set of encyclopedias sold by a traveling salesman. Every month, like clockwork, they made their payments to Rand McNally so their children would have a better foothold in real life. I loved reading those books and looking at the pictures of far away places and people. Mom and dad made us use those books too! Without fail, our parents would direct us to the dictionary or encyclopedia when we had a question. They never told us the answer to the question, they simply pointed Chris Hopkyns Publisher

Cindy Amaral Production Manager

to the books and told us to look it up. Then we were required to report back to them with the correct answer. I detested that then, but now I understand their reasoning and I’m very grateful for those moments. You see, our parents gave us the best gifts of all. They gave us the tools to help us grow into healthy adults. They couldn’t afford fancy electronics, designer clothes and expensive gifts. Instead, their real gift was their desire to have their children grow into the very best they could be. Sometimes, as a parent, it’s easier to pacify a child with a store bought gift and that’s okay at times. But the gift which counts most is the one with pure, loving intent. Just for the fun of it, I have listed below the cost of some things in 1960. Cost of a new home: $16,500.00 Cost of a first-class stamp: $0.04 Cost of a gallon of regular gas: $0.31 Cost of a dozen eggs: $0.57 Cost of a gallon of milk: $0.49 (Courtesy of http:// www.1960sflashback.com/1960/ economy.asp)

Sandy Leonard Production

Theresa Hodge Office Manager


Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

Safe Patient Care a Priority for Emergency Nurses

BC Nurses Union members continue to be concerned about the closure of the Castlegar Emergency services on February 4. We want the community of Castlegar to know that our priority is to provide quality and safe patient care. The nurses at Castlegar Hospital will continue to advocate for improvements so that high quality care will be there for you. The Castlegar emergency nurses have been highlighting concerns regarding access to staffing resources for some time. The need to recruit and retain nurses with the appropriate level of training to work in a small rural emergency department is a symptom of the nursing shortage. Nurses have been working overtime in this unit for 10 years. They have done shift swaps, have had their vacations cancelled, and work overtime to maintain two registered nurses on shift for the 12 hours a day, seven days a week coverage. These nurses perform end of shift overtime on a regular basis to provide the public with quality care. As the health care system is interlinked and interdependent on so many systems, the nurses in the Castlegar Emergency department are seeking to examine the root causes of the February 4 closure. They are seeking a comprehensive approach to understanding all the systems that led to the closure. The issues are more than not enough nurses. Meetings are scheduled with management to seek solutions and explore the systems that failed. Internal processes are being utilized and led by the BCNU members. The nurses are strong and committed advocates to ensure Emergency Services

www.castlegarnews.com 7

Letters are provided to the community of Castlegar. The BCNU members seek correction to the system failures that occurred. As the public is demanding answers the nurses are seeking inclusion into the process, they want to be heard. There are solutions and the BCNU members want to provide them and have them implemented. The nurses appreciate all the support that the community is providing. Be assured BCNU members will continue to utilize our ethical duty to advocate as professionals speaking out for you so that safe patient care can be achieved! Ensuring you have safe care when you arrive at the Emergency department is the BC Nurses Union member’s priority! Tina Coletti RN BC Nurses Union Chairperson West Kootenay Region The Renewal of Relay For Life Castlegar has hosted the Canadian Cancer Society’s Relay For Life for 6 years. The event has provided the community with an opportunity to come together and support those battling cancer and to show support to people who have lost loved ones to the disease. It is a day of solidarity against cancer. It is an event that happens because many volunteers come together with a united goal. These volunteers do not require any special skills or talents-they simply care enough to make it happen! 2012 marks the Renewal of Relay For Life. Many who have volunteered countless hours over the past 6 years would like to “pass the torch” - new volunteers are needed! Cancers greatest ally is apathy- If we stop caring –cancer wins.

• I know that the residents of Castlegar have not stopped caring • I know those that have participated have experienced the “community hug” that happens at a Relay For Life Event • I know that the funds raised change lives for the better-by providing programs including; the Cancer Information Service, the Cancer Connection Peer Support program, the Financial Support program, welcoming Lodges to stay in while undergoing treatment away from home, and Camp Goodtimes for kids and teens. • I know that the funds raised saves lives- by educating citizens in cancer prevention strategies, advocating to government for healthy public policies, and by funding cutting edge research. • I know that many people, each doing a small task, can make a really big difference. Please help us continue the tradition of caring in Castlegar. Volunteer for the Canadian Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. Please contact me to find out about the variety of ways Relay can use your help (whether you can spare one hour or fifty!). Most sincerely, Stacey Semenoff 250-364-0403 ssemenoff@bc.cancer.ca Order of British Columbia Honours Excellence The Order of British Columbia offers British Columbians a golden opportunity to take part in the public recognition of individuals who demonstrate outstanding achievement, excellence and distinction in their particular fields of endeavour. Nominations are now being received for the 2012 Order of British Columbia. If you know anyone in

this community who has truly led by example, I encourage you to nominate them for the Order of British Columbia. The deadline for nominations is 5 p.m., March 10, 2012 but nominations will be accepted up to 5p.m, March 12 due to March 10 falling on a weekend. An independent Advisory Council, chaired by the Chief Justice of British Columbia will consider nominations. Since 1990, 317 British Columbians from all walks of life and many regions of the province have received the Order of British Columbia, the Province’s highest award. Nomination forms are available from the Honours and Awards Secretariat in Victoria (250-356-1105), the Order of BC web site at www.orderofbc.gov. bc.ca, or your nearest Government Agent. Honours and Awards Secretariat, P.O. Box 9422, Stn. Prov. Govt Victoria, BC V8W 9V1 phone: (250) 3871616 fax: (250) 3562814 Here is your opportunity to participate in the appointment of deserving British Columbians to the Order of British Columbia. The process begins with a nomination. Thank you for making it happen. Katrine Conroy, MLA Kootenay West Kudos to local Les Mis production I had a wonderful experience last Friday night. I love Broadway shows and have seen many in my travels throughout the years. My favourite show is Les Miserables and I have been fortunate enough to have seen it seven times in five different countries. On Friday night my husband and I went to the Stanley Humphries Secondary School

production of Les Miserables. I was sure I would enjoy it if only for the music but I was absolutely amazed at the professionalism of the whole show. The acting was excellent as was the singing and all characters were well portrayed. I am always intrigued by the wicked character Thenardier, the thieving Inn Keeper. His character is more open to individual interpretation and creativity and I was fascinated by the acting of Rachael Sykes. She was brilliant! However, I am not totally surprised at that as I had the chance to see her father as the Scarecrow in last year’s Rossland Light Opera Players production of the Wizard of Oz! Acting is obviously in the genes of the Sykes family. Thank you to everyone who was involved in the production of Les Mis. You gave many citizens of the Kootenays a great deal of pleasure. I can now happily say I have seen Les Miserables eight times in five different countries. Bravo! Kay Jones

Buses

Workplace Violence Prevention

Feb 23

Canadian Firearms Safety: Unrestricted and Restricted

Feb 25

OFA Level 1

Feb 25

Learn to Draw in 18 Hours

Feb 26

Excel Level 1

Feb 29

Castlegar News Carrier of the Month

Jake Sali Jake received a gift certificate to the Castlegar Rec Centre.

Jake has been delivering newspapers for 2 years. He has fun and likes the people who come and talk to him. Jake is saving for ski’s and a truck. Congratulations Jake!

Continued from P. 3

between the school districts to permit busing from SD8 to Glade Esso. The agreement is in place as the SD8 bus is considered to be traveling into a different catchment area (SD20). “Safety is a concern for all of us, we are all parents,” SD20 trustee Mark Wilson told the parents. “It’s good that you brought that here to us, but it’s really going to be a situation where the superintendents have to get together and hammer this out.” Wislon was in favour of a change and thought it could be resolved soon. McMillan noted the same presentation would be made to SD8 this week.

Look at all those electronics you bought South S of the Border. Figure F you got a good price p on that home theatre, t eh? Well, the real r price you pay, is having h to watch your friends f leave town to find work.

Keep jobs at home. Shop local.

Sponsored db by


Thursday, Feb. 23, 2012 Castlegar News

8 www.castlegarnews.com

Community Calendar Tell us about your upcoming event, email: reporter@castlegarnews.com

Upcoming

FEB. 20 - 29 - THE CASTLEGAR & DISTRICT HOSPITAL AUXILIARY TREASURE SHOP SALE - located

downtown at 210 - 11th Avenue is having a terrific $7.00/bag sale on all our winter clothing starting Monday, February 20th until February 29th, 2012. Hurry on down for the choicest of selections while they last. The Castlegar Hospital Gift Shop will be offering 10% off all infant sleepers with sale dates coinciding with the Treasure Shop bag sale. Take advantage of great savings in order to help our Community survive the final days of winter.

FEB. 28 - FALL FAIR / BLUEGRASS JAMBOREE / PCRES ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING - 7:00 p.m. at the

Castlegar Complex. Inviting youth organizations to attend and submit their application for fund raising from Fall Fair parking lot. For more information 250-365-7273

MAR. 1 - APR. 26 - NEED A HAND WITH YOUR TAXES? - Trained

volunteers can help you complete your income tax return for 2011at Castlegar Community Services, 1007-2nd. St. Castlegar Call 250-365-2104 for appointment. Income level:single $25,000.00 or less, couples families $35,000.00 or less, add. Child $2000.00. Program runs Mar.1Apr.26,2011, Tue, & Thurs., 9:30noon & 1:00-3:30 p.m. Remember to bring all your tax papers and forms with you.

MAR. 2 - WORLD DAY OF PRAYER -

At the Castlegar United Church at 1 p.m., 809 Merry Creek Road. Written by the women of Malaysia. All welcome.

MAR. 2 AT 7 PM AT THE CASTLEGAR UNITED CHURCH -Come and see

Ed and Hazel Beynon’s slides on their recent visit to the Galapagos Islands and learn more about this fascinating place.

MAR. 3 AND 4 - KOOTENAY HOME AND LIFESTYLE EXPO - The Castle-

gar & District Chamber of Commerce presents the annual Kootenay Home & Lifestyle Expo at Selkirk College Gym, Castlegar. This two day jam packed event

will showcase the latest and innovative products and services for your home, garden, leisure and much more. Big or small business this expo is for you. Maximize your business exposure while consumers view your products and services. Enter the draws and see the demonstrations. To book your space or for more information contact Castlegar Chamber 250-3656313 or tourism@castlegar.com. MAR. 4 - SCRABBLE FOR LITERACY TOURNAMENT - from 1-4 pm at

the Castlegar Public Library. This is a fun event with good food and great prizes. Come out and play! Bring a friend! All players are welcome and will be matched according to ability. All proceeds from the tournament will go directly to support literacy programs in Castlegar. To register call Alana Murdoch at 250-304-6862 or email at amurdoch@cbal.org. MAR. 6 - CASTLEGAR FRIENDS OF PARKS AND TRAILS SOCIETY - Open

House 5pm to 9pm at Recreation Complex. Learn about local trails and provide your ideas. Everyone welcome. MAR. 6 - THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF BATS PRESENTED BY CASTLEGAR GARDEN CLUB & FISH & WILDLIFE COMPENSATION PROGRAM. Castle-

gar Complex - 7:00 p.m. Everyone Welcome. Free Admission. Features great photographs and information on a variety of species from around the globe, including those native to the West Kootenay. Learn more about the history and biology of bats - from the world’s smallest weighing in at about two grams to the largest boasting a two-metre wingspan. Thomas Hill has spent many years searching for, tracking, monitoring and documenting local bat species, particularly the blue-listed (vulnerable) Townsend’s Big-eared bat found here in the Kootenay region. Information: Rose Cheveldave: 250.365.9600 or castlegargardenclub@shaw.ca.

MARCH 7 - TOASTMASTERS MEETING - Want to be a better commu-

nicator? The local Toastmasters club, the Sentinel Speakers, will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Fireside Inn Castlegar. Learn speaking skills, gain confidence and

have some fun! Guests warmly welcomed. For more information please call Diane Cushing at 250-365-8336. MAR. 8 - CASTLEGAR AND DISTRICT LIBRARY ASSOCIATION ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING - 6 p.m. drinks,

6:30 p.m. dinner, 7 p.m. meeting. At the Legion Hall. RSVP Cheryl by phone at 250-365-7751 or email cheryl@castlegarlibrary.ca by Feb. 22. A vegetarian option is available.

MAR. 31 - 13TH ANNUAL WINE FESTIVAL - Presented by the Castlegar

Sunrise 2000 Rotary Club at the Castlegar Community Complex from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets available at Oglows Paint, Bubblee’s Liquor, and Sound West (Trail).

Ongoing ONGOING: VENDORS NEEDED FOR CASTLEGAR GARDEN AND NATURE FEST, on May 19. Garden related

only please. Contact: 250-3994439 or email castlegargardenfest@shaw.ca

ONGOING: CASTLEGAR & DISTRICT HOSPITAL FOUNDATION LIGHT UP CAMPAIGN - The Foundation is

raising money to purchase three Space Lab cardiac monitors, Life Pak 15 crash cart monitors/defibrillators, and CADD Prism pump. call 250-304-1209 or mail cheque to 709 10th Street, Castlegar, BC V1N 2H7 to donate. ONGOING: CASTLEGAR GARDEN CLUB MEETS THE FIRST TUESDAY OF THE MONTH 7:00 p.m. at the

Castlegar Community Complex, Kootenay Room. New members are always welcome. Share your love of gardening with other garden enthusiasts and expand your gardening horizons. Information: Pam Johnston: 250-3044701 or castlegargardenclub@ shaw.ca. ONGOING: DOUKHOBOR CENTRE WRITING CONTEST - Doukho-

bor Discovery Centre Village Museum is holding a writing contest open to children, teens and adults. The subject matter is Doukhobor migration and must be based on actual time lines. Work submitted can be poetry or short story (fact/fiction) and must be original. The

deadline for submissions is May 6, 2012. Winners and prizes to be announced June 2012. Please bring or send your entries to the Doukhobor Discovery Centre Village Museum 112 Heritage Way, Castlegar B.C., V1N-4M5. Phone 365-5327 for more information. ONGOING: CASTLEGAR JUDO CLUB MEETS MONDAYS, THURSDAYS at

6:15-8 p.m. At Twin Rivers Elementary for Sept. 12 to May/ June. Male or Female, ages eight years and up. Registration at any meeting. Call senior sensei John Gibson 250-5763 or sensei James Welychko, 250-365-4920. ONGOING: CASTLEGAR ART WALK 2012 CALL FOR ARTISTS - Castle-

gar’s 16th Annual Art Walk will be on display from June 26 to September 16. Artists interested in being a part of this event need to apply before March 28, 2012. For an application package please contact the Castlegar Arts Council at castlegararts@gmail. com or pick one up at Biznet in the Columbia Plaza ONGOING: TWIN RIVERS CHORALE REHEARSALS are held every

Thursday at 7 p.m. at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church (713 4th Street, Castlegar, BC, V1N 2B7). If you love to sing and want to sing both classical and contemporary music, come join the Twin Rivers Chorale. The registration fee is $30 for the entire season and you do not have to be able to read music to join the chorale. FMI contact Sarah Currie at 250-3042529 or curries@ymail.com.

ONGOING: CONVERSATION CLUB.

Mondays 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. If Canada is your new home, come and meet others who have immigrated to Canada and spend time chatting and learning. At Kootenay Family Place (behind Chopsticks)

ONGOING: STUDY GROUP, “BEAUTIFUL OUTLAW”, experience the

playful, disruptive, extravagant personality of Jesus. at the New Life Assembly. Call 250-365 5212.

ONGOING: THE WEST KOOTENAY FAMILY HISTORIANS SOCIETY meets

at 7 p.m. on the first Monday of each month (September to June) at Stanley Humphries Senior Secondary School in Castlegar.

New Members are welcome. For further information, contact Grace DeBiasio at 250-364-1426 or Ingeborg Leavell at 250-3670076. ONGOING: SHARING DINNER POT -

Every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Cadet Hall on 8th Avenue. No charge.

ONGOING: SR. ACTIVITIES @ COMPLEX - Mon. 10 a.m. Darts 1 p.m.

Whist. Tues. 9:30 Floor Curling & Carpet Bowling, 1:00 Crafts 7:00 Pool. Wed. 9:30 Floor Curling 7:00 Rummoli. Jan. 18 10:00am Raspberry Reunion. Thur. 9:30 Floor Curling, Jan. 5 2 p.m. Feb. 2 General Meeting, 2 p.m.; 1 p.m. Bingo (not on meeting day). Fri. 9:30 a.m. Floor Curling, 1 p.m. Crib & Bridge. Sat. Feb. 11 5 p.m./6 p.m. Dinner/Dance with music from Don Hollis. TOASTMASTERS MEETINGS

-The local Toastmasters club, the Sentinel Speakers, meets from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Fireside Inn Castlegar on the first and third Wednesday of the month. Learn speaking skills, gain confidence and have some fun! Guests warmly welcomed. For more information please call Diane Cushing at 250-365-8336.

ONGOING: BEAUTIFUL BEGINNINGS.

Pre and postnatal program 10:30 - 1:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, includes lunch, supplements, resources, workshops at Kootenay Family Place.

ONGOING: CASTLEGAR A.A. MEETINGS AT THE PIONEER ARENA. Sun.

at 10 a.m. (phone Mike at 3658302), Tues. at 7 p.m. (phone Dennis at 365-2738), Thurs. at 8 p.m. (phone Jim at 365-6216) and Sat. at 8 p.m. (phone Leonard at 365-7805.)

ONGOING: MEAT DRAW - EVERYONE WELCOME. Every Saturday. Royal

Canadian Legion, 248 Columbia Ave. First draw starts 4 p.m. Free pool. Bring your friends and have an afternoon of fun. ONGOING: USCC CULTURAL INTERPRETIVE SOCIETY meets every

Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Doukhobor Arts and Crafts Centre, 820 Markova Rd., beside the Brilliant Cultural Centre.


Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

www.castlegarnews.com 9

News SLO PITCH RDCK offers wood stove exchange program REGISTRATION SUBMITTED

For the third year in a row, the Regional District of Central Kootenay (RDCK) is collaborating with local municipalities to deliver a Wood Stove Exchange Rebate Program. The program offers residents a financial incentive to replace their old, inefficient wood stove with a new, cleaner-burning

heating appliance. The RDCK is one of twelve organizations across BC to receive funding from the Province and the BC Lung Association to run a local wood stove exchange program. All RDCK electoral areas and municipalities have also committed ‘top-up’ funding, bringing the total value of each rebate to $350. One hundred re-

bates are available on a first-come, first-served basis. In order to qualify for the rebate, residents must replace an old (pre-1994), uncertified wood stove with a new, EPA- or CSAcertified wood stove, gas stove, pellet stove, or insert. The stove must be in active use for home heating. Old stoves must be dismantled and brought

to a local landfill or transfer station for disposal. Government organizations across Canada and the US have implemented wood stove exchange programs with the goal of improving air quality in rural areas. In the RDCK, air quality conditions are often worst during the winter months when wood stove use is at its peak.

Wood smoke contains fine particulate matter, which is associated with respiratory problems and heart disease. New wood stoves reduce smoke by up to 70 per cent and burn up to one third less wood. For more information on the program, or for a copy of the rebate application, visit www.rdck.bc.ca/ wood_stove.

Local pair receive U of Alberta scholarships SUBMITTED

Over 305 of 1,000 University of Alberta Augustana Campus students have been awarded scholarships and awards for the 2011-2012 academic year. Among those receiving awards were: Brittany Arabia, of Castlegar, a first year Bachelor of Arts student, was awarded a total of $1,500 for Non-Alberta Residency and Honours, funded by An Augustana Non-Alberta Incen-

tive Entrance Award and An Augustana Faculty Honours Entrance Scholarship. Linnea Barisoff, of Castlegar, a second year Bachelor of Science student, was awarded a total of $1,250 for Academic Achievement, funded by The Inanda Hoyme Memorial Scholarship and A University of Alberta Undergraduate Scholarship. More than $560,000 was provided to UAlberta Augustana Campus students in schol-

arships and awards recognizing excellence in Academics, Fine Arts, Athletics, and Leadership. Support comes from generous donors, investment earnings on endowments, and from Faculty funded awards. As the premier public liberal arts and sciences campus of UAlberta, Augustana Campus offers four year Bachelor Degree Programs in Humanities, Social Sciences, Sciences, Fine Arts, Management and

March 7th 7:00pm Castlegar Complex

For more information Tom at 304-9055 or castlegarslopitch@hotmail.com

ŽŶŐƌĂƚƵůĂƟŽŶƐƚŽ ŽƵƌEĞǁĞƐƚDĞŵďĞƌƐ The Association of BC Forest Professionals would like to welcome its newest members who have all passed the rigorous registration exam. These new Registered Professional Foresters (RPFs) and Registered Forest Technologists (RFTs) have the extensive knowledge, experience and skills to manage BC’s forests on behalf of the public.

CASTLEGAR

Alexandre Saumure, RFT

^Khd,^>KE

Karen Schening, RPF

Brittney Arabia

Linnea Barisoff

Submitted photo

Submitted photo

combined Science/ Education. Located in Camrose, Alberta, UAlberta’s Augustana Campus remains com-

mitted to providing students with a high quality, undergraduate education.

Crystal Kereiff Insurance Broker

Ernie’s does its part for the environment SUBMITTED

Did you know your vehicle is the largest and most recyclable item you own? A professional vehicle recycler or dismantler can ensure that up to 80 per cent of an end-of-life vehicle is reused or recycled, while the remaining 20 per cent is disposed of responsibly. Vehicles contain a wide range of materials that need to be managed once they are decommissioned or reach the end of their useful life. Fuels, oil, coolants, batteries and heavy metals such as mercury all need to be removed by a professional to ensure there is no environmental impact. Local recycler Ernie’s Used Auto Parts has demonstrated their commitment to preventing hazardous materials from entering our environment

by participating in the Switch Out, a mercury switch removal program. Vehicles are no longer being manu-

ules and convenience lighting assemblies under the hood and trunk of the car. It is important to remove these mercury

Travis Rodrigues and Whitney Rodger from Ernie’s Used Auto Parts do their part to help the environment. Submitted photo

factured with mercury, however, some vehicle makes and models built before 2003 contain small amounts of this heavy metal. The mercury is contained in metal casings or “mercury switches” that can be found in the antilock braking system (ABS) sensor mod-

switches before a vehicle is crushed, shredded and recycled into new steel to prevent the mercury from being released into the environment. Switch Out is an award-winning national program designed to remove, collect and manage

mercury switches from end-of-life vehicles. The program was launched by Summerhill Impact in 2001, and since the time Switch Out has recovered and properly managed over half a million mercury switches. That’s equivalent to 425 kilograms of mercury, or the weight of an adult male polar bear. Switch Out would not have been able to reach this milestone without the dedication of program participants like Ernie’s Used Auto Parts. In 2011, Ernie’s Used Auto Parts collected 86 mercury switches which is equivalent to 73.10 grams of mercury. Even a small amount of mercury can have a significant environmental impact, so the team at Ernie’s Used Auto Parts should be congratulated for doing

their part to keep the environment mercury-free. The success of the Switch Out program has not gone unnoticed. In the fall of 2011, Summerhill Impact won a Minister’s Award for Environmental Excellence for work on the Switch Out program. This award from the Ontario Ministry of Environment recognizes initiatives that show excellence in pollution prevention, stewardship and environmental community building. For more information on the Switch Out program, please visit www.switchout.ca Ernie’s Used Auto Parts is located at 4801 Minto Road Castlegar, BC. For more information about their products and services, please call (250)365-6225 or visit them online at www.euap.com.

Q A

Do I need to change my ICBC insurance if I have a new driver in the house?

If this is the first time you have an inexperienced driver in your household, you more than likely have a restriction on your insurance that states “[the] owner, lessee, principal operator and their household members driving [this] vehicle must have held a valid driver’s licence for 10 years.” Once there is a new driver in your house, or someone with less than 10 years of driving experience, you need to have this restriction removed to allow for this driver to use your vehicle and be properly insured. This may result in an increase to your yearly premium. The additional amount is different for each person based on the vehicle, its use, your discount level and many other variables. Only once the new driver has achieved 10 years cumulative driving experience, or is no longer a member of the household, can the restriction be put back on the policy. If a new driver is away at school but still uses your address as their primary residence they are still considered a member of your household. An inexperienced driver who lives with you on a part time basis (i.e. every other weekend) would also be considered a member of your household. It’s also a good idea to think about increasing your Third-Party Liability. Liability coverage is very affordable and with multi drivers with various levels of experience operating your vehicle, there may be an increased potential for a claim. For more information on the 10 year experienced driver discount, or any other concerns regarding your insurance needs, please contact any one of our eight locations.

RHC Insurance Brokers Ltd. 605 Columbia Avenue Castlegar BC V1N 2M9 Phone: (250) 365-3392 Fax: (250) 365-7199 Email: castlegardowntown@rhcinsurance.com


Thursday, February 23, 2012 Castlegar News

10 www.castlegarnews.com

Opinion/Community Time for federal leadership on health care, says Atamanenko ALEX ATAMANENKO BC Southern Interior Member of Parliament

Across our country, no other public social service is cherished as much as our healthcare system and its underlying principles set in the Canada Health Act. Canadians appreciate knowing that whatever health problem they have, help is available to them, regardless of their abil-

ity to pay. But our system is not perfect. There are still improvements needed to ensure Canadians get proper value for money and at the rate at which costs are increasing, the current status quo is not sustainable. We need to start building the next generation of health care in our country. We need to look at how we can control costs and move for-

ward on many of the reforms included in the Romanow Report and the 2003-2004 Health Accords to improve our system. While many of the tools for improving service delivery are under provincial and territorial jurisdiction, the federal government also has a key role to play in providing proper leadership. Unfortunately, this is not the direction

BC JOBS PLAN: FORESTRY

British Columbia has traditionally been synonymous with forestry and today this industry is still one of the cornerstones of our economy, especially in many rural communities which strongly value and support timber harvesting. With over two-thirds (60 million hectares) of the provincial land mass covered in forest we can count on a healthy industry for many more years B.C. has more than 110 lumber mills, over 70 with a capacity of more than 40 million board feet per year; 27 veneer, plywood and OSB (oriented strand board) mills, eight pellet mills, 18 pulp mills (six of which are also paper mills) and over 80 other primary processing mills such as chips, shake and shingle, pole, and log manufactures. The forestry sector has a deep pool of skilled professionals and a highly trained workforce. Altogether the industry employs well over 50,000 well paid employees, often the life-blood of small towns. B.C.’s forest sector is definitely starting to recover from the last decade’s downturn. Since 2009, over two dozen mills have announced they are reopening or adding shifts. The importance of this industry to B.C. is demonstrated by the fact that 40% of the province’s regional economies are based on forestry activities, in more than 7,000 businesses. Structuriam, developing a method to produce Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), received approximately $3.2 million in federal contributions and $2.5 million in provincial to support innovation and to help commercialize this new wood product. The company also invested more than $7.5 million in cash and in-kind contributions to produce CrossLam, the new line of CLT. The opening, in 2008, of a state of the art value-added wood facility in Okanagan Falls, which is the largest laminating facility in Canada with a production capability of over 60,000 board feet per day, speaks loudly to the success of the investment. One reason for growth in the industry is the Asian market. International buyers know that B.C. is a stable supplier of high-quality wood products; we can provide timber supply security. This secure supply, coupled with the fact our spruce, pine, fir, hemlock and balsam fibre baskets are among the richest in the world makes B.C. extremely attractive.

The B.C. brand of wood products is well established globally with market-leading shares in key countries such as China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. B.C. is also looking to be the first major country that deals in softwood lumber to establish its products in the India marketplace. Working with the federal government and industry, the Province has strengthened and diversified the B.C. forest sector by increasing market demand for softwood lumber throughout Asia. The global demand for bio-products from the forest is predicted to reach $200 billion a year. Renewable fuels, plastics, and chemicals for the pharmaceutical and food industries can potentially be manufactured by running wood fibre and residues through bio-refinery. B.C. has taken steps to make it easier for the non-lumber sector to source supplies of lower quality fibre. This includes fibre supply licences to cut to use logging debris that is left behind on landings and roadsides. Taking care of this natural abundance is critical. An amazing statistic is the fact B.C. has planted more than six billion trees since reforestation programs began in the 1930’s, and is on track to plant its seven billionth tree in 2013/14. We plant an average of 200 million trees each year. B.C. produces more wood products certified to environmental standards than any other region in the world and has 53 million hectares certified to one of three internationally recognized sustainable forest management certification standards. Growth now and in the future requires a solid foundation. B.C. created the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations to deal with increasing demands and pressures on the land base by taking a more integrated approach to managing B.C.’s natural resources. B.C. Hydro launched a two-phase Bioenergy Call for Power. Phase one has helped advance bioenergy development in Kamloops, Castlegar and Prince George, while phase two has done the same for Chetwynd, Fort St. James, Fraser Lake and Merrit. B.C. has also passed the Wood First Act to promote and encourage a cultural shift that will make wood the first choice for construction in the commercial and institutional sectors as well as residential. The future looks very bright for this most iconic of British Columbia industries.

While some say this government is taking. After failing that more privamiserably at imple- tization is needed menting the commit- to control costs in ments in the 2003-2004 Health Accords, Stephen Harper recently put forward a plan to unilaterally reduce the federal contribution to healthcare. At a time when the differences between Alex Atamanenko p r ov i n c i a l File photo health care systems in Canada healthcare, evidence are growing, federal points to the conleadership is required trary. While total now more than ever. spending on health During the recent care has grown from Premiers’ confer- about 7% of GDP to ence on health care around 12% today, sustainability held in that number hides Victoria, the NDP that the components held its own event to covered by Medicare hear from key health have remained becare advocates and tween 4 and 5% of researchers. We re- GDP since the mid ceived the same mes- ‘70s, while the othsage from the Pre- er components not miers and citizens covered by Medicare alike: don’t privatize has grown from 3% healthcare; continue to 7% of GDP. Pubto expand it in inno- lic delivery has been an important cost vative ways.

container. Therefore, a sustainable health care system delivering quality healthcare services should rely on more, not less, public coverage. There are three key areas outlined in the Health Accords that we should immediately start with: better drug coverage, home care, and primary care reform. Over the past 10 years, prescription costs have increased at a rate of 10% per year. The 2004 Health Accord included a pharmaceutical strategy aimed at reducing the cost of medications. Such a plan would not only save our health care system billions of dollars each year, it would also help Canadians have better access to more effective drugs. We also need to adjust to the 21st century reality of offering more services in the community. For example, new healthcare delivery models such as home care and palliative care have proven

to be less expensive than hospital beds. Establishing a comprehensive care strategy will save costs in the long-run and improve the health of millions. Finally, primary health care reform is the key to efficient and cost-effective use of health care resources. It would lower costs while supporting timely access to health care services, particularly for the delivery to remote and rural Canadians and Aboriginal people. What our healthcare system needs today is leadership to put in place the much needed reforms that have been talked about for over a decade. The provinces want a federal partner that’s committed to improving Medicare, who seeks accountability by linking spending to clear health care improvements. The hands-off approach of the Conservative government simply does not work.

Chocolates for a cause Kullen Benbow and West Kootenay Bantam Wildcat players Molly Benbow, Jessica Harris, and Faithe Harris were out at the Castlegar Rebels game Friday night selling chocolate bars to raise money to go to Provincials in Victoria. The Wildcats are a female all-star team with players from Nelson, Trail, Castlegar, Rossland, and Kaslo. Craig Lindsay photo


Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

www.castlegarnews.com 11

LIVE .S

ITY

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The next West Kootenay Women in Business Event will be held on Thursday, March 8th from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 pm at the Fireside Inn in Castlegar. We are very excited to introduce this networking opportunity designed just for women. Whether you are a business owner, manager, employee or dream of running your own business one day, a local network is an invaluable asset. And

EGAR AND AREA • L T S A C •

As customers, we have the power to shape our community by shopping local! Isn’t that an amazing thought?

THINK LOCAL FIRST

One of the touches that makes the Uptown Subway unique is the coffee bar. “We have specialty coffees like lattes,” he said. “Chai Tea lattes are really popular. We’re the only Subway around here that does it. We also have fruit smoothies. We have several different flavours that people can mix and match like wildberry, mango, strawberry. We also have iced mochas that are very popular all year round.” The Uptown Subway also features a breakfast bar where the sandwich artists make eggs with onions, green peppers and more in front of the customer. “Another thing is that at this store we do breakfast all day long,” said Raval. “A lot of people come around later in the

day and want breakfast and we have it.” The location has also just added personal pizzas and offers cheese pizza, pepperoni pizza, and more. “We get the pizza shell and then for $4.99, customers can add whatever toppings they want,” said Raval. “Onions, greenpeppers, olives, whatever. We toss it in the oven and it’s ready in two minutes.” The store is open early in the morning at 5:30 a.m. to accommodate the morning mill crew. “We have extended hours,” he said. “Most Subways are open at 7 a.m. but we open at 5:30. Weekdays we are open until 12 midnight. On the weekends we open until 2:30 a.m. for the bar rush.” Raval owns the store along with his

parents. “We bought this location four years ago, in 2008,” said Raval. “Our whole family moved down here from Edmonton.” Raval finished his Bachelor of Administration at the University of Alberta and was looking for something to get into. “I just finished my studies there,” he said. “My parents decided to buy a business and get me practical knowledge. So they got me hooked up here.” Raval enjoys working with customers and helping people out. “I like the whole customer experience and meeting with all kinds of different people,” he said. “It’s a good opportunity to meet people and build up my knowledge in my field.”

Women in Business meeting March 8 SUBMITTED

AY.LIVE.SH P.PL OP

When you support local business, those businesses in return support local organizations and causes who depend on local business support for their success. Local businesses provide in-kind donations, OR U cash donations and indispensable contributions to many M TY O UR C O M organizations within our communities. Locally owned businesses build strong neighbourhoods by sustaining communities, linking neighbours and by contributing to local causes.

Castlegar News Reporter

With two Subways in Castlegar, plus many other eateries, it takes something to stand out. For uptown Subway (across from Canadian Tire) co-owner and manager Jwalant Raval that something extra is great customer service and a few other extras such as a coffee bar and one of the only drive-through locations around. “Business is excellent,” said Raval. “We have the best location in town here with the highway and the (Castlegar Community) Complex in the back.” The uptown Subway is a big supporter of local sports in the community. “We usually sponsor the teams,” he said. “We offer 20 per cent discount for all the athletes and 10 per cent discount for students. So everybody comes around here.” Of course, Subways are known for their healthy menus, which is great for feeding young athletes. “People love to do healthy choices,” said Raval. “We also have different menu items. Right now we have egg salad sandwiches, which is a new addition for Subway.”

HO

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CRAIG LINDSAY

LIVE SHOP PLAY A .PL

Business Healthy options at uptown Subway

an investment of your time to attend a regular networking event will allow us to grow that asset as we create business relationships and share ideas and experiences to mutual advantage. These meetings will provide us with the opportunity to share ideas, chat, and learn from each other. Our speaker for March is Deb Burnett who is a certified Life Coach at Pathway Life Coaching and has been in practice for over 4 years in

Nelson. Deb will be presenting a session on Empathy, an element of her course that she offers at Selkirk College called Embracing Imperfection. Working from the three basic principles of Brene Brown's work, an exploration of connection, compassion and ordinary courage will be explored and break-out sessions will create an enriching experience of how empathy helps us overcome our fears and gives us a touchstone to embracing our authentic

selves, both at home and in the workplace. Our women’s networking group provides us with an empowering environment where we can feel comfortable to discuss our business issues and offer solutions to each other. Together we will build our own success. Please RSVP Rebecca by Friday, March 2nd at rebecca@kfsinc.ca if you will be joining us for the luncheon on Thursday, March 8th.

The local businesses pay taxes to clear your roads, maintain your infrastucture and keep your schools open. Local business provide the support for your hockey and soccer teams. We supply the door prizes of your favorite events. We are the ones dealing with your last minute crisis. We are the ones solving your problems. We are here for you. The complaints I hear of no neighborhood shops or cafes makes me wonder how long those same people have been shopping out of town. If locals make it viable for a business, more businesses will come and all of a sudden we have a thriving interesting community with all the shops desired. Continue to shop afar and people will start to move away to find those elusive jobs, and that home you bought becomes worthless and you are stuck in a ghost town with no equity to support your out of town shopping. As far as lighting is concerned, be careful when you shop in the States or online. The great deals may not be certified for Canada. We’ve had a number of people in a mad rush to buy Something because their electrician refused to install that fan/light that isn’t certified. Heck of a deal indeed. We make sure that when an order is placed you have all the necessary parts and pieces to make your item work in your space. Are you dealing with a high ceiling, or perhaps a slanted one? If you come for advice on your problem, show respect and pay for that answer in that local store. Otherwise, you may find you have no store to go to with your questions. The advice you get here is given with care and consideration as we are dealing with neighbours. I also get a kick out of tourists, popping into our shop and commenting that they have never seen our lighting choices in their big cities. The city doesn’t offer everything – sometimes the sweetest deals, the most interesting items, are found right in your backyard.

Big City Selection….Locally!

301-11 Avenue Castlegar, BC • (250) 365-0500

LIVE

WELL

WITH

PHARMASAVE C apsule C omments

Phil Angrignon

At this time of year, coughing is all around us. If we aren’t doing it, others around us are. It’s a good idea to keep least three feet away from a cougher to reduce the risk of being sprayed with germs and viruses. If you are the cougher, try not to get too close of other people. As people age, they start to worry about challenges that lie ahead. The five top concerns are: loss of independence, declining health, not having enough money, not being able to live in their own home and isolation and loneliness. These are very real fears. Taking good care of our bodies and keeping socially engaged will help keep us a healthier longer. A century and a half ago, people in a more rural agricultural society, worked hard physically and walked home from work.Today, we’ve exchanged our legs for cars as our main method of movement. Our bodies are designed to walk a lot and it’s been proven that walking daily is good for us. Have you had your walk today? Some people avoid eating carrots because they supposed to contain “a lot of sugar”. Actually, one pound of boiled carrots contains about 3 teaspoons of sugar. The sugar does enter enter the bloodstream quickly but normal portion sizes of carrots doesn’t make this a problem. Rumors abound in the world of health. Our pharmacists keep up to date to what’s going on in this world and can help you separate truth from fiction.

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Thursday, February 23, 2012 Castlegar News

12 www.castlegarnews.com

Community

Rebels help out at Kinnaird Elementary

Castlegar Rebel players such as Erik Alden(dropping the puck) and Kody Disher (taking the face off) have been out in the community. Recently, they were out at Kinnaird Elementary School scrimmaging at lunch-time and signing autographs for the kids. “For the past three months, every Tuesday at lunch, players from the Rebels hockey team have been volunteering their time playing floor hockey with the kids at our school, and then afterwards signing their agendas and answering questions. The kids are beyond thrilled on Tuesdays when they come, and have so much fun with them. Not to mention the fact that the Rebel players are amazing with the kids. They set such a good example, and are really looked up to,” said teacher Ashley Reid. Submitted photo

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Expo Hours

Saturday 9-6 • Sunday 10-3

• Enter the Draws! • Expert Advice! • Demonstrations! • Adults: $4 • Seniors: $3 • Students with ID $3 Kids 10 & under free with adult

Checkout the 2012 line up of new innovative products and services for your home, garden, leisure and you!

Chance to win $500 Expo Reward Dollars! Sponsored by Kootenay Savings!

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Vendor information contact 250.365.6313 or tourism@castlegar.com


Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

www.castlegarnews.com 13

Entertainment

Les Miserables first SHSS production in 30 years

Student actors from SHSS perform “Master of the House” during Friday’s performance at the school. CRAIG LINDSAY Castlegar News Reporter

Students from Stanley Humphries Secondary performed the classic play “Les Miserables” on Fri-

day, Saturday, and Sunday at the school’s activity room. Not only did students perform all the key parts of the play but they also produced the whole play

O C

with limited teacher/ parent supervision. “Les Miserables” , based on the book by Victor Hugo, follows the lives of several people following up to the June Rebellion,

a student uprising in France. Casey Gray starred as ex-convict Jean Valjean, Jackson Berry played Javert, and Helena Smith played Madame Thenar-

Craig Lindsay photos

diers. According to sources, the play is the first major production at SHSS in 30 years.

Casey Gray (standing, as Jean Valjean), Jackson Berry (as Javert) and Christina Postnikoff (as Fantine) perform in Les Miserables.

Y T H I A N R U V M ES M

Food Bank

T

Would like to thank everyone who supported & donated in 2011.

We look forward to your support in 2012


Thursday, February 23, 2012 Castlegar News

14 www.castlegarnews.com

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It started in September 2007, when two forms – verbally, teens at a Nova Scotia high school stood socially, physically up for a younger student. and online (cyber bulwww.pinkshirtday.ca David Shepherd and Travis Price, both in lying), says Tuckwell. www.pinkshirtday.ca Grade 12, heard about a Grade 9 student “By wearing pink, people show e show at their school who had been bullied and they’re making that commitment, remain horrific. threatened for wearing a pink polo shirt to not let bullying happen,” she says. The provincial government has taken on his first day of school. In 2009, 20,000 pink shirts were sold steps to address bullying in recent They decided they and in 2010, 30,000 years, including a Ministry of Education should do somehelped the effort. resource brochure for parents in 14 lanthing about it and ‘It isn’t just a rite of passage. Last year, 46,000 guages that can be found online at www. went to a discount T-Shirts were sold It doesn’t have to happen.’ and this year we bced.gov.bc.ca/sco. store, where they Net proceeds benefit the CKNW bought 50 pink hope to sell 60,000. Orphans’ Fund in support of the Boys shirts and tank tops Tuckwell and & Girls Clubs of South Coast BC. Boys to wear to school others emphasize & Girls Clubs of South Coast BC: BGC the next day. They that the pink shirt programs foster self-esteem, social enalso went online to is secondary to gagement, academic success, inclusion, round up support raising awareacceptance, respect for self and others, for their anti-bullying cause, which they ness about bullying and getting people and connection to community – all dubbed a “sea of pink.” involved. of which are key elements of bullying It worked. The next day, dozens of stuB.C. is no stranger to tragedy related prevention. CKNW Orphans’ Fund: The dents were outfitted with the discount to bullying.From Surrey’s 14-year-old CKNW Orphans’ Fund is committed shirts, but even better – hundreds of Hamed Nastoh, who jumped off the to enhancing the lives of children with students showed up wearing their own Patullo Bridge and killed himself after physical, mental and social challenges pink clothes, some from head to toe. leaving a note behind blaming the conliving in BC communities. The fund The bullies were reportedly never heard stant bullying he endured at school, to includes children who are bullied under from again. Mission’s Dawn-Marie Wesley, 14, who the scope of the funds work, because This year, Feb. 29 is Pink Shirt Day in committed suicide by hanging herthese children will need extra support B.C. and other parts of Canada, an anself after relentless bullying, there are for their development. nual anti-bullying event that started countless told and untold stories that after the now-famous 2007 “sea of pink” campaign. Q Has trouble sleeping or has frequent Possible warning signs that a child The need for awareness and action bad dreams is being bullied include: against bullying remains as strong as Q Experiences a loss of appetite ever, say those involved in the pink Q Appears anxious and suffers from low Q Comes home with torn, damaged, or missing event, including local radio station self-esteem pieces of clothing, books, or other belongings CKNW, Black Press, the Boys and Girls Q Has unexplained cuts, bruises, and scratches Possible warning signs that a child may Clubs of Greater Vancouver, and London Q Has few, if any friends, with whom he or she be a bully include: Drugs, where people can buy the official spends time Q Positive views towards violence ‘Bullying Stops Here’ pink shirts for Q Seems afraid of going to school, walking Q Often aggressive towards adults – including 2012. to and from school, riding the school bus, or teachers or parents taking part in organized activities with peers “Awareness of what bullying is and unQ Marked need to control and dominate others (such as clubs) derstanding that it hurts is important,” and situations Q Takes a long, “illogical” route when walking says Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Q Boy bullies tend to be physically stronger to or from school Vancouver president and CEO Carolyn than their peers Q Has lost interest in school work or suddenly Tuckwell. Q Hot-tempered, impulsive, easily frustrated begins to do poorly in school “It isn’t just a rite of passage. It doesn’t Q Often test limits or break rules Q Appears sad, moody, teary, or depressed Q Good at talking their way out of difficult have to happen. And it’s relevant to evwhen he or she comes home situations eryone, whether in school, after school Q Complains frequently of headaches, Q Show little sympathy toward others who are or in the workplace.” stomachaches, or other physical ailments bullied According to www.bullyingcanada.ca, as many as 25 per cent of children in Grades 4 to 6 have been bullied and apFor more information and resources on bullying: proximately one in 10 children have bulwww.pinkshirtday.ca lied others, while a 2004 study published in the Medical Journal of Pediatrics www.mychildsafety.net found that about one in seven Canadian www.bced.gov.bc.ca/sco/ children aged 11 to 16 are victims of www.healthlinkbc.ca/kb/content/special/uf4870.html bullying. It is important to recognize what bulwww.bullyingcanada.ca lying is, and that it happens in many

2012 201

Battle bullying on Pink Shirt Day February 29

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Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

A

new survey about bullying from Harris/Decima sheds light on why Canadians are so steadfast about stopping the abuse. The survey revealed that the extent of bullying and its harmful effects is staggering. Half of Canadian adults polled said they were bullied as a child or teen. And nearly a third (30 per cent) of those think the abuse they suffered caused lasting harm. Commissioned by Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada (BBBSC), the survey also found that Canadians stand ready to get personally involved in the war on bullying. The national poll also examined attitudes about volunteer adult mentors and the role they play in turning bullies away from abusive behaviour; helping victims regain their conďŹ dence and selfesteem, and ensuring kids intervene when they witness acts of bullying.

Key Findings • 95 per cent of adults surveyed believe people have a responsibility to take action to reduce bullying. • 85 per cent feel that providing children and teenagers who abuse others with a volunteer mentor is an effective way to reduce bullying. • 62 per cent of those who were bullied as children or teens believe they would have beneďŹ ted from having a volunteer adult mentor. • 87 per cent of those surveyed agree that action to reduce bullying strengthens communities over time.

Why y Should We Try To Stop Bullying? Bullying is bad for both the bully and the victim. Victims suffer by: r'FFMJOHVOIBQQZ r'FFMJOH UIBU i* DBOU EP BOZUIJOHu r' FFMJOH MPOFMZ BOE SFKFDUFE r-BDLJOH FOUIVTJBTN GPS TDIPPM BOE UIFJS DMBTT XPSL r/PUQBSUJDJQBUJOHJOTDIPPM BDUJWJUJFT

HALF OF ALL CANADIANS ARE BULLIED AS CHILD OR TEEN Mentors seen as effective force against bullying: survey Toronto, February 15, 2012 – Half of all Canadians adults were bullied as a child or teenager according to a new survey. Moreover, an overwhelming majority of Canadians (85 per cent) believe that providing children and teenagers who bully others with a volunteer mentor is an effective way to reduce bullying. Conducted by Harris/Decima for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada (BBBSC), the poll examined attitudes about bullying. The survey also studied the value of mentoring as a way to prevent abusive behaviours and help those who are bullied to rebuild their conďŹ dence and self-esteem. The Harris/Decima survey shows clearly that the frequency of bullying is widespread and that Canadians are both deeply concerned about bullying and ready to act against this damaging form of abuse.

Key Findings • 89 per cent believe bullying poses a serious threat to the long-term well-being of children and teenagers. • 50 per cent of Canadian adults surveyed were bullied as a child or teenager. • Nearly a third (30 per cent) think the abuse they suffered had a lasting harmful effect. BBBSC commissioned the survey to mobilize Canadians to take action to reduce bullying in their communities. From February through April, Big Brothers Big Sisters agencies across Canada will be holding fundraising

www.castlegarnews.com 15 bowling events that offer people a powerful way to reduce bullying and its hurtful effects in their communities. Called Bowl for Kids Sake, this unique fundraising campaign challenges individuals and businesses to “step up to strike outâ€? bullying in Canada by supporting the work of volunteer Big Brothers and Big Sisters. “Canadians universally understand that the friendship and guidance of a mentor is one of the most effective ways to prevent abusive behaviours and help those who have been abused,â€? says Bruce MacDonald, president of BBBSC. “By giving children and teenagers the guidance they need to become the positive and caring individuals they are capable of being, we can steer them to a positive path in life.â€? The one-on-one and in-school youth mentoring services provided by volunteer Big Brothers and Big Sisters have proven to be instrumental in reducing bullying and other related negative behaviours such as lack of interest in school; truancy; low self-esteem and drug and alcohol abuse. “We are doing the best we can to stop bullying, but more volunteers and ďŹ nancial resources are needed to get the job done,â€? says MacDonald. “Mentoring programs can signiďŹ cantly contribute to reducing bullying and its harmful effects. We invite Canadians to take a stand by participating in the Bowl for Kids Sake event nearest them.

information about local Bowl for Kids Sake events. BBBSC’s Step Up to Strike Out Bullying Survey was conducted by Harris/ Decima via their telephone omnibus between January 5 and January 8, 2012, with a national random sample of 1,034 adult Canadians aged 18 years and over and is considered accurate to within ¹ 3.1 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

About Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada For nearly one hundred years, Big Brothers Big Sisters has been making a positive difference in the lives of our nation’s youth by developing and implementing a wide range of mentoring programs. Serving as role models, our mentors teach by example the importance of giving and giving back, of staying in school, and of having respect for family peers and community. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada provides quality mentoring services for more than 33,000 children and teenagers. Big Brothers Big Sisters currently has over 25,000 volunteer mentors working at 123 agencies that serve children in over 1,000 communities across the country. Learn how you could start something at www.bigbrothersbigsisters.ca.

“People who accept this invitation will help local kids today and make their communities stronger tomorrow.� People and businesses can donate to the Bowl for Kids Sake campaign or volunteer to fundraise by visiting www.bigbrothersbigsisters.ca. Canadians who want to stop bullying can also contact their local Big Brothers Big Sisters agency for

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Thursday, February 23, 2012 Castlegar News

16 www.castlegarnews.com

Sports

Tell us how your team is doing, e-mail: newsroom@castlegarnews.com

IT’S RADON TESTING TIME! WINTER IS THE PERFECT TIME TO TEST FOR RADON LEVELS IN YOUR HOME OR CASTLE. DONNA SCHMIDT LUNG CANCER PREVENTION SOCIETY

IS SUPPLYING FREE RADON DETECTORS AT: GOLDER ASSOCIATES – 201 COLUMBIA AVENUE CITY HALL – FRONT DESK If you have specific questions contact Dana Schmidt 250-365-0344

Soccer Fun - Several youngsters from Castlegar and the area have been coming out to Selkirk College’s gym on Wednesday evenings to work on their soccer skills and have some fun. “We have about 18 kids that are practicing indoor soccer with the Castlegar Minor Soccer association,” said coach Rob Fogal (top right in picture). “The ages run from 10-14. We run once a week . We’ve been doing it all winter and we plan on going right through until April.” The soccer drop-in is still open for any boys or girls that are interested. The cost is $5 and it goes from 6 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. Derek Sherbinin 250-365-9499

Wayne Leggett 250-231-4966

Kamele Davies 250-355-0008

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Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

www.castlegarnews.com 17

News/Health Fractured hips can result in death if not treated within 48 hours SUBMITTED

It’s a situation that many baby boomers are facing: The phone rings and they find out a parent has fallen, forcing them both into a sudden introduction into the often-confusing world of accessing emergency hip fracture surgery. Yet very few people know that hip fractures can be fatal and there is an established timeline

Skiers found on Kootenay Pass NELSON STAR STAFF

Two missing skiers were located this morning after spending a chilly night on the Kootenay Pass. The pair — and man and a woman from Nelson, both 29 — were located hiking in an area near the Ministry of Highways works yard. They became disoriented late yesterday in foggy conditions as they were trying to return to their car. Both were cold and wet but otherwise in good health. They were taken to the highways office by snowmobile, checked over by a doctor, and have since left. Murray Springman of Nelson Search and Rescue says they received a call last night that the pair was overdue. They were expected to return at 4:30 p.m. Monday after backcountry skiing towards Ripple Ridge cabin at the top of the pass. The couple spent the night in a snow cave they built for themselves. “They were a bit hypothermic,” Springman says. “But they had a shower, dried their clothes, and everybody’s happy.” Springman says they didn’t have a map or compass, and were only prepared for a day trip. They did, however, have probes, beacons, and shovels.

for surgery that is often ignored in many hospitals in Canada, according to leading orthopaedic surgeons in their National Hip Fracture Toolkit released last year. This best practices report emphasizes the vital importance of getting the necessary surgery within 48 hours of the injury and the appropriate care afterwards. If a patient

is forced to wait any longer for surgery, the health outcomes become considerably worse, leading to increased complications and chances of death, says Dr. James Waddell, an orthopaedic surgeon at St. Michael’s Hospital and professor at the University of Toronto, as well as the toolkit’s project lead and editor. But what happens to many patients

with fractured hips is that they get stuck in hospital waiting for surgery as seemingly more urgent cases get priority. “Hip fractures tended to be bumped down the list because they are lying quietly in bed without looking like there is any urgency about them - compare that to a bleeding patient brought in by paramedics - but we know that the longer the delay,

the more likely they are to die and to have other major complications,” says Dr. Hans Kreder, head of the orthopaedic division and program chief of the Holland musculoskeletal program at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. There is also evidence suggesting that elderly patients, over the age of 80, require surgery within 24 hours if they are to avoid fatal out-

comes. Canadian hospitals are in the process of implementing these new national hip fracture guidelines developed by Bone and Joint Decade Canada in strategic partnership with The Canadian Orthopaedic Care Strategy Group (COCSG), Health Canada and other expert agencies, but it may take some time, says Dr. Wad-

Castlegar’s Sculpturewalk is entering its third year, and what a success it has been! This exhibit of original outdoor sculptures, displayed year-around in downtown Castlegar, has been drawing interest and participation from across the country. From June through September the public votes for The People’s Choice sculpture which is then purchased by the City of Castlegar for the permanent display and enjoyment of its citizens.

&RPPXQLW\*LIWLQJ2SSRUWXQLWLHV SPONSORSHIP PROGRAM For $1500 you can sponsor one sculpture for one year. 2012 sculptures will be placed in May. You will enjoy year long advertising with your name as the sponsor. Your name will be engraved on the nameplate and your business logo will go on the website (with a link) and in our annual brochure. Community recognition will be provided at events.

PURCHASE PROGRAM Purchase a sculpture and place it where you want (including your own backyard!). Prices range from $3000-$25,000. Leave a business or family legacy to the community to brighten up the city or your neighbourhood. Recognition will be provided in the annual brochure.

LEASING PROGRAM After the sculptures have been up for a year, those sculptures not purchased can be leased for $1000 @ year. $750 goes directly to the artist and $250 goes back to Sculpturewalk to help support next year’s costs. Sculptures can be leased and moved to locations of your choice. Individual businesses or combinations of people can collectively lease these pieces. The leased amount goes towards the purchase price of the sculpture, and payment can be over time. Recognition will be permanent advertising for a year at a location of your choice.

*From left to right: Wheel of Life by Christina Nick, High and Dry by Kyle Fokken, Road Apples by Cameron Douglas, Reflections by D.E. McDermott, Guitarist by Osamede Obazee, Plunge by Deb Zeller , Dawn by Denis Kleine, Jack’s Story Time by Gregory Johnson, and Three Ring Circus by Tamara Schweigert

*AVAILABLE

FOR PURCHASE OR LEASE BEFORE

APRIL 1ST. PLEASE

CONTACT

CASTLEGAR SCULPTUREWALK.

&ROXPELD$YH_FDVWOHJDUVFXOSWXUHZDON#JPDLOFRP_VFXOSWXUHZDONFDVWOHJDUFRP

dell. Armed with the knowledge that best practices exist in hip fracture surgery, families of patients should now be able to advocate on behalf of the patient, who is often in shock and unable to make clear-headed decisions. It is your right to insist that surgery takes place within 48 hours to meet the toolkit’s guidelines. Your parent’s life may depend upon it.


Thursday, February 23, 2012 Castlegar News

18 www.castlegarnews.com

NHL Hockey Pool Results

Unit#2, 1810 8th Ave. Castlegar, BC V1N 2Y2 Ph. 250.365.6397 Fx. 250.365.6390

2011 - 2012 SEASON Place

Team

Score

Place

Team

Score

Place

Team

Score

Place

Team

Score

1

H.Byers (3 )

1075

T67

Logan Voykin (3 )

981

T134

Ken Woodward

945

205

Leela

895

2

Mac McHenry (2 )

1071

T70

Doug Morisseau (4 )

980

T138

Andy Evin (3 )

944

206

Ryan Coville #3 (3 )

894

3

Deep Dhillon

1067

T70

Puckhog2 (4 )

980

T138

Alexandra Shrieves (2 )

944

207

Jessee Morisseau (2 )

893

4

P. J. Kin

1057

72

dkaa14 (2 )

979

T138

JT. Johnson

944

T208

Joe Piller (3 )

889

5

Leah Biln (2 )

1044

T73

Shirley Hubel (2 )

978

T141

Dennis Ferris (2 )

943

T208

Al. K (2 )

889

T6

Elenn Conacher (4 )

1040

T73

Mike Dmytruk (2 )

978

T141

Joe Chernoff (2 )

943

T210

Kinso (3 )

888

T6

David Wah (2 )

1040

T73

Grabrielle Jangalu (2 )

978

143

Paul Rodrigues (3 )

942

T210

Alups Rogues (3 )

888

8

John Zarikoff

1038

T73

Regan Bryers (2 )

978

144

Pool Slayer (2 )

941

212

Alley Kat

886

9

Puckhog (2 )

1037

T77

Tim Allen

977

T145

Marilyn Morisseau (2 )

940

213

Pozzy#1 (3 )

885

T10

Rose Rilkoff (4 )

1032

T77

Make It Sausage

977

T145

Hockey Sucks (3 )

940

214

Rod Harshenin

883

T10

880

C Luongo (3 )

1032

T77

Mama Pozzy (2 )

977

147

99 High Score (3 )

939

T215

Francis Five (2 )

12

Wyatt R Daniels (4 )

1030

T80

C. Mercer (4 )

976

T148

Jacob Streleoff

938

T215

Dave Loukianow (2 )

880

13

Kevin Olesen (4 )

1028

T80

Doug Fellman (2 )

976

T148

Dave Muir (3 )

938

217

Gary Fodor (2 )

879

14

Ron Matthews (2 )

1027

82

Kevin Carlson (4 )

975

T150

kmgfisher

937

218

S. Harris

878

15

Nadine Chernoff (2 )

1024

T83

Pete Postnikoff (3 )

974

T150

Amber Walsh

937

219

Mert Hubel (2 )

869

T16

Zoes LMS

1022

T83

Ryan Coleville1 (4 )

974

T150

Ryan Sookorukoff (2 )

937

T220

Emily C

867

T16

ADAM CRAWFORD (3 )

1022

T83

Sophie's Sprinners

974

153

Yellow Weasel (4 )

936

T220

Kelly Keraiff #2

867

B. Markin -2

1021

T86

Lynn Opperman

973

154

Chelsea Markin (3 )

934

T222

Shawn Walsh

866

Fubar Hubel (2 )

1020

T86

Winning Woman

973

T155

Spring Fever

933

T222

Danie McTaggart (3 )

866 865

18 T19

R.Keith Beck (4 )

1020

T88

Blair McCavley (4 )

972

T155

Phil Markin (4 )

933

T224

MooMoo (2 )

21

Shamim Pourmokhtari

1018

T88

Grover99 (3 )

972

T157

Brittney Soobotin

931

T224

Brayden Biln (3 )

865

22

Kimberly Sookorukoff

1016

90

R Evdokimoff (2 )

971

T157

Walter Swetlishoff (5 )

931

226

Brett Chernoff (2 )

862

23

Tasie (2 )

1013

T91

Gus & Lila (3 )

970

T159

Sausage Links (2 )

930

227

Robert Mason (2 )

853

24

Playsetter 2 (2 )

1012

T91

Long Shot (3 )

970

T159

Sausage Patties (4 )

930

228

Nolan (3 )

852

P Markin (3 )

1011

T91

Quick Pics (4 )

970

161

Kim Keraiff (4 )

928

229

Silverdollars (2 )

848 847

T19

T25 T25

Gratnt Matthews

1011

94

PicsPic (2 )

969

T162

Dion Resicini

926

230

Joshua K (3 )

T27

Jake Cutts (2 )

1009

95

Mysterious #1

968

T162

Brenda Balyk (3 )

926

231

60 Cents (3 )

844

T27

Helen Zarikoff (2 )

1009

T96

Scott Morisseau (2 )

966

164

Nat Hipwell

925

232

Tamso H.

840

T27

Russ Daniels (3 )

1009

T96

Stacy Donald (2 )

966

T165

Mac's attackers (4 )

922

233

Evan Poznikoff (3 )

791

T30

Kennady Keraiff (2 )

1008

T96

Suzie Chernoff (2 )

966

T165

Long Shot Poole (3 )

922

T30

Pam Zemp (2 )

1008

T99

Doug Henderson (3 )

965

T165

Baloney Heads

922

T32

James Wozney (2 )

1003

T99

G R Hoover "Hoov"s" (2 )

965

T168

Schneider For #1

921

T32

Lou Bouliane (2 )

1003

T101

Dani Wah (2 )

963

T168

John Jackman

921

T32

D Hartson (2 )

1003

T101

Shawn Williams (3 )

963

T170

Teasm Kanigan (4 )

920

35

John Ratcliffe (3 )

1002

T103

Mamma Barry (5 )

962

T170

Patti Kabatoff

920

36

Pozzy #2

1001

T103

Alana Markin (2 )

962

T170

Camron Jmaeff (2 )

920

T37

Ryan Coville #2 (4 )

998

T103

Nadine Evin (3 )

962

173

Sausage Rounds (3 )

919

T37

Wayne Kuzyk (4 )

998

T103

Bev George

962

T174

Me like pancakes (2 )

918

T39

Pmar (4 )

997

T107

David Lindsay (3 )

961

T174

Ex Coach (2 )

918

T39

UP IN FLAMES (3 )

997

T107

Kristy Daniels

961

T174

Nancy Donald

918

T39

Len Donald (3 )

997

T107

Nelson Sousa (2 )

961

T177

Cindy Conacher (2 )

916

42

Steve Scott (2 )

996

T107

Hoover's (2 )

961

T177

Matt Roberts

916

T43

Al Soobotin (2 )

995

111

Tazman Devils (2 )

959

T177

Tyler Maddocks (5 )

916

T43

Gordon Bos (2 )

995

112

Sophie Streleoff

958

T177

Marnie Pettit (4 )

916

T43

George Pipke (2 )

995

T113

James Watson (3 )

957

T181

Vertical Acres

915

T46

Papa Barty (2 )

994

T113

Kyle Morisseau (3 )

957

T181

Rhonda Jackman (3 )

915

T46

B. Mercer (5 )

994

T115

B.Markin-1 (3 )

956

T183

Liz Markin (2 )

914

T46

Tickle My Fancy

994

T115

Kelly Keraiff (2 )

956

T183

Mike Tarasoff

914

T49

Clint...

993

T117

Harry Lebedeff (4 )

955

T185

Joe Gauthier (3 )

913

T49

Pappa Pozzy (3 )

993

T117

Deb Matthews (4 )

955

T185

Tyrone Anderson

913 913

T49 52 T53

C's Crew

993

119

Thomas Bare (3 )

954

T185

Luba Stouchruoff

One more try

992

T120

Tom Mitchell (3 )

953

T188

Mysterious Percs

912

JohnnyK

991

T120

Ron Orton (4 )

953

T188

Playsetter (3 )

912

Shane Young (2 )

912

June Bos (2 )

991

T122

Daryl MacAskin (2 )

950

T188

55

Pat Biln

990

T122

All The Way

950

191

56

Teemka (4 )

989

T124

Ron Postinkoff (2 )

949

T192

57

T53

Jangles (5 )

911

Hawkeye

909

Joan Gratton (2 )

909

Claire Hingley

988

T124

No Chance

949

T192

T58

Light Em Up (2 )

987

T124

Skweezer (3 )

949

194

T58

Rod Scheltens (4 )

987

T124

Warren Chernoff (4 )

949

T195

60

Terry Balyk

986

T124

Keith Stevens (2 )

949

T195

21 Tops (4 )

906

61

Sheldon Knutson (3 )

985

T129

Marie Waite (3 )

947

T195

Pack Leader

906

Mike Dampier

906

REdSox9 (3 )

907

Sausage Muffins

906

T62

Firenewt

984

T129

Mark A Lisinsky (2 )

947

T195

T62

Killer Christ (4 )

984

T129

HAB-A-DABA-DOO (2 )

947

199

Lynn Lewis (2 )

905

T62

It's all relative (4 )

984

T129

Darryl Flasch (4 )

947

200

Pennie Pipke

901

65

L. Terava

983

133

p.k.pups (3 )

946

201

Ted Healey (2 )

899

66

Soap & Suds (3 )

982

T134

Garry Williams (3 )

945

202

Wally Verigin

897

T67

Bill Verigin

981

T134

Finny

945

T203

Ryan Matthews (2 )

896

T67

Austin Shrieves

981

T134

Vi Krest (2 )

945

T203

Al Kuffert (2 )

896

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CASTLEGAR NEWS


Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

www.castlegarnews.com 19

Community

A teenager’s viewpoint on growing up The Rollercoaster of adolescence by SHSS student Theresa Thoms Being a teen can be one of the best times of your life, but it can also be a constant struggle. Juggling extra-curricular activities, high expectations from parents, the media, and even just from ourselves, boyfriends/ girlfriends, drama, homework, school grades, work, and just the stress of it all including trying to find the perfect balance. It can be extremely difficult at times and make our day to day life less enjoyable and more stressful which can wear us down until we cannot function anymore, but there are also times when we are care-free and enjoying every little thing in our lives. Basically, high school and adolescence is a rollercoaster of making mistakes and decisions that help shape our futures and determine who we are and

who we will become. These are supposed to be some of the best times of our lives— when we are children, we want to be older, and when we are adults, we wish we could be young again. Even though us teens sometimes wish to be older so we can be taken a little more seriously and have a little more power or go back in time and be young children again when life was filled with less drama and our only cares were getting the biggest cookies and learning how to share them. But it really is one of the best times of our lives because we don’t have to worry about life-changing responsibilities like bills, taxes, feeding our families, and aches and pains. We don’t have to worry so much about the little things that make up adulthood like finding a good spouse, a decent house, a reliable vehicle, a job that will support us. We don’t concern our-

selves with trying to stay healthy and wondering what our benefits cover, or making sure those leftovers from the other night will last until our next pay cheque. Our teen years represent our prime time in life where we have enough responsibilities but not anything that depends on us too much. These are the years that we decide who we would like to be and figure out how we are going to become our ideal selves. Our lives as teens can be pretty demanding. With extracurricular activities, parental influences, friends, drama, dating, the stress of school and everything else us teens have to deal with, there is a lot to think about and a lot of decisions that we have to make in order to find our perfect balance. Some of us teens try to jam pack our lives full of things like sports, clubs, and many other things because we are

trying to keep ourselves busy, keep our doors open, and help ourselves grow to be the best well-rounded people we can be! The only problem is that we don’t stop filling up our schedule so that we can have some time to recover from our busy lives and take a moment for ourselves. For those of us who are in this position, we need to slow down

every once in a while just to take some “metime”. Others choose to leave more time open to hang out with friends, and have selftime which is maybe even the better route to take because they actually have time to relax and find themselves whereas sometimes people like me over-schedule themselves too much and leave no time to really figure out who

they truly are. These people who don’t overbook themselves might have already found their perfect balance between their extra activities and everything else, and are one step ahead of people like me, but everyone works differently and it is important to acknowledge that and take that into account. To sum up, being a teen has its highs

and lows, its advantages and its disadvantages, its obstacles and its challenges that we have to face. Sometimes our vision becomes a bit foggy, but once we take a moment to clear our heads, we can see more clearly the obstacles in our way, and can figure out what we want to do with our lives, and who we want to become.

ARE YOU A JOB SEEKER? A CAREER CHANGER? A HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT? Take advantage of this great education and employment opportunity. Selkirk College faculty and staff will be on hand to talk about our programs and how they open doors to various careers. Make valuable face-to-face connections with employers and find out which companies are hiring right now!

2012 Selkirk Career, Job & Education Fair

For further information contact Selkirk’s Educational Recruitment Coordinator at akinakin@selkirk.ca or call 250.505.1396.

11:00 AM – 6:00 PM, MARCH 7, 2012 CASTLEGAR CAMPUS

exceeding expectations | selkirk.ca

Trail nurse running for BC union president TRAIL DAILY NEWS STAFF

A Trail registered nurse has set out on a race against long-time nurses’ union president Debra McPherson, starting off on his campaign trail this month. Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital’s Paul Terpstra is lending his rural voice to the electoral process, with tele-voting opening up next month, because he believes in the democratic process and feels the British Columbia Nurses’ Union (BCNU) is ready for a new leader. “To me, I think it’s the voice of nurses on the frontline that need to determine the direction of the union and I also believe that the union’s strongest voice is a frontline member,” he said.

“Our current president came out through the ranks and was a very empowered frontline nurse and her voice to me was quite credible and it’s still credible but I think the longer you’re in office, the more distance you put between yourself and being a frontline nurse.” If elected, Terpstra hopes to sway some of the union’s focus toward challenges rural nurses face, including on call work, threats to surgical services and skill-mix challenges. “When wards are getting more full than capacity, nurses are having a difficult time getting more help to deal with that patient load,” he said. “What that means to people is that usually more mistakes happen, usually people stay in the hospital for longer

periods of time, usually they end up being sicker as opposed to getting better so you really have to have that right staffing mix.” Terpstra said the temporary shutdown of Castlegar’s emergency room this month points to an underlining poor human resources plan but also the difficulty of attracting professionals to a region that relies heavily on casual and on-call coverage. “We could have a strong pool if you short-circuit the sort of casualization of the nursing force and actually offer full-time jobs,” he said. He is hopeful his campaign will encourage fellow nurses to cast a vote, a simple procedure that still manages to attract only about 5,000 of the over 30,000 members.

? E N E C S E M I R IS THIS A C No one should ever be pressured, forced or tricked into giving money — even to loved ones. If someone you trust is taking advantage of you, help is out there. Learn the signs of financial abuse to protect yourself and the people you love.

To find out more from the Government of Canada about preventing elder abuse, visit www.seniors.gc.ca or call 1 800 O-Canada (1-800-622-6232) TTY: 1-800-926-9105


20 www.castlegarnews.com Sports Reporter Craig Lindsay wants to hear about your sporting event Call Craig at 250-3656397 or email reporter@ castlegarnews.com

Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

Sports

Rebels win twice over Spokane in regular season finale CRAIG LINDSAY Castlegar News Reporter

The Castlegar Rebels were in fine form in the final weekend heading into the KIJHL play-offs, sweeping Spokane in a home and home series. “I thought our team played well,” said Rebel forward Scott Morisseau. “Spokane was shortbenched, but I thought we came out with some energy getting ready for the play-offs.” Saturday night the teams were in Spokane, where the Rebels won their final regular season game 5-2 over the Braves. “They came out harder against us and had a few chances early to take a lead on us,” said Morisseau. “I thought we played a disciplined game there. We played a little more defensively, trying to gear things up for the playoffs.” The Rebels pushed ahead to a 3-0 lead after the first period in Spokane with goals from Anthony Delong, Tyler Jones, and Morisseau. The Braves got on the scoreboard at 12:25 of the second period with a goal from Guiseppe Dippolito. Stuart Walton and Connor Bowen gave the Rebs leads of 4-1 and 5-1 late in the second period. Spokane’s Thomas McNevin scored the last goal of the game at the four minute mark of the third period. On Friday night, the Rebels crushed the Braves 12-2 in at the Castlegar Community Complex. Morisseau led all scorers with four goals and three assists, while Anthony Delong chipped in with a hat-trick and two

assists. Other scorers for Castlegar were defenceman Tyler Jones with a pair, and Stuart Walton, Brenden Heinrich, and Tyler Robinson with singles. Gil Givens and Uriah Machuga were the scorers for Spokane. Connor Beauchamp was in net for Castlegar stopping 20 Brave shots. “Everything was clicking,” said Morisseau. “They came out really show and fell behind early. Our team just kept feeding off it. Everything went well for my line out there. Everything I touched seemed to go in. It was a fun night but we know we’ll expect more from Nelson.” Morisseau expects a tough first round series against Nelson. The Rebels host the first two games, Friday and Saturday, at the Castlegar Community Complex. The best of seven series then switches back to Nelson for games three and four on Monday and Tuesday. “Nelson’s one of the top teams in the league,” he said. “Maybe their record doesn’t reflect it, but they’ve just gotten bet-

ter from the start of the season. They beat Beaver Valley on Friday and lost in overtime on Saturday. So it’s going to be a tough series.” The Leafs are one of the quickest teams in the league and the Rebels will need to be ready to skate hard. “They’re a fast team and we have to be ready for that,” said Morisseau. “They have a lot of forwards that can really skate the puck. They have a lot of speed. You give them a couple of goals and they don’t look back.” Morisseau says he and the other veterans have been talking with the young players on the team on what to expect in the KIJHL play-offs. “It’s a lot grittier,” he said. “The goals aren’t going to come easy. It’s a lot more work. It’s who wants to take it to the net more. You’re going to get hit. You’re going to get hurt. The younger guys have to learn to stay disciplined. Their’s going to be cheap shots. Their’s going to be high emotions out there. Whoever wants the puck more and plays the smart game is going to win.”

— KIJHL FINAL STANDINGS — Kootenay Conference NEIL MURDOCH DIVISION TEAM

GP 52 52 52 52 52

Beaver Valley Castlegar Nelson Spokane Grand Forks

W

L 7 11 17 28 49

42 37 30 21 1

T 0 1 0 1 0

OTL 3 3 5 2 2

PTS 87 78 65 45 4

GF

GA

323 255 259 192 106

154 133 167 254 455

Kootenay Conference EDDIE MOUNTAIN DIVISION TEAM Fernie Kimberley Creston Valley Golden Columbia Valley

GP 52 52 52 52 52

W

L

T

35 36 30 21 3

12 14 17 25 48

0 1 0 1 0

OTL 5 1 5 5 1

PTS 75 74 65 48 7

GF

GA

237 279 247 176 119

148 162 188 186 369

Okanagan/Shuswap Conference DOUG BIRKS DIVISION TEAM GP Revelstoke 52 Kamloops 52 North Okanagan 52 Sicamous 52 Chase 52

W 37 35 35 22 5

L 11 10 16 28 45

T 0 1 0 1 1

OTL 4 6 1 1 1

PTS 78 77 71 46 12

GF 275 236 202 188 123

GA 165 166 165 189 319

Okanagan/Shuswap Conference OKANAGAN DIVISION TEAM

GP 52 52 52 52 52

Osoyoos Princeton Penticton Kelowna Summerland

W

L

31 28 25 26 15

18 19 19 22 35

T 1 1 1 0 0

OTL 2 4 7 4 2

PTS 65 61 58 56 32

GF

GA

244 217 170 221 197

172 196 170 208 300

— REBEL FINAL SCORING — PLAYER Stuart Walton Anthony Delong Scott Morisseau Tyler Robinson Arthur Andrews

# 7 16 15 24 25

Pos. F F F F F

GOALIES # Connor Beauchamp 1 Jordan Gluck 31 Brenden Heinrich scores his 14th goal of the season against Spokane on Friday night at the Complex.

GP 29 26

GP 49 48 37 51 20 W 18 18

L 9 7

G

A

33 39 29 17 19

54 43 39 22 31

T 1 1

GA 75 72

PTS 87 82 68 39 50 SO 2 3

GAA 2.62 2.86

PIM 71 132 34 119 67 SV% .898 .898

Statistics updated Tuesday, Nov. 29

Craig Lindsay photo

PLAYOFF SCHEDULE FR 24-Feb-12 7:30P Castlegar Rebels SA 25-Feb-12 7:30P Castlegar Rebels

www.castlegarrebels.com

Nelson Leafs Nelson Leafs

Castlegar Complex Castlegar Complex • We are always looking for volunteers to help with our organization.


Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

www.castlegarnews.com 21

Thursday

Sports

2 Beef ‘n Cheddars g p & Regular Pepsi

$$

. 7.00

A tale of two Saints - Selkirk splits with Thompson Rivers

Craig Lindsay photo

Selkirk goalie Todd Hoodicoff, with the help of defenceman Sandro Moser, makes the save on Thompson Rivers University forward Lucas Daoust during Sunday’s game at the Castlegar Complex. CRAIG LINDSAY Castlegar News Reporter

The Selkirk College mens hockey team split a weekend series at the Castlegar Commu-

nity Complex this weekend against Thompson Rivers University (TRU) from Kamloops. The games were the last home games of the 2011-12 season for Selkirk.

On Friday, the Saints beat TRU 6-4 led by a hat-trick from high scoring forward Jordan Wood. Also scoring for the home team were Scott Traverse, Graham Proulx, and

Caleb Georgetti. Spenser Wong was solid between the pipes for Selkirk, stopping 29 of 33 Wolfpack shots. On Saturday, the Saints struggled mightily as they fell 9-3 against the same team. Sandro Moser opened up scoring at 19:26 of the game. It was all Thomson Rivers after that as the visitors rattled off five unanswered goals to go up 5-1. Scott Jago scored at 14:19 of the second period to cut the Wolfpack lead to three at 5-2. Another three goals from TRU put the game out of reach at 8-2. Roman Payne finished the scoring for the Saints at 18:07 of the third period.

The Saints are in last place in the B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League standings with a five win - 18 loss record after 23 games. The team is two points behind Trinity West-

ern University with one game left. Selkirk’s last game of the season is Mar. 3 in Cheney against Eastern Washington University. One of the few bright spots for the

tlegar Minor s a C

Soccer

Castlegar Minor Soccer Association’s 2012 Soccer Registration is now open. • Early Bird Online Registration has been extended to Feb 29,2012 at www.kootenaysouthsoccer.com • Final Registration ends March 6, 2012 No Registration will be accepted after March 6, 2012.

Building a Healthy Community Castlegar Recreation Complex 2101 - 6th Avenue, Castlegar, BC 250-365-3386

Castlegar & District Recreation Department Winter Drop In Fitness Schedule

Palmer leads SHSS grade 8’s to win over Salmo

team this season has been rookie Jordan Wood. With 22 goals and 19 assists, Wood is third among league scorers. Teammate Scott Jago is ninth with 11 goals and 17 assists.

Monday & Wednesday

WEEKEND PUBLIC SKATE SATURDAY FEBRUARY 25 2:00-3:45PM SUNDAY FEBRUARY 26 4:15-5:45PM

9:00-10:00am Circuit Strength or Deep Water Workout 10:15-11:15am Fabulous 50+ 5:30-6:30pm Ultimate Kickbox

STICKS & PUCKS TUESDAY/THURSDAY/FRIDAYS 10:00-11:30AM

Tuesday & Thursday

MON/WED/FRI

9:00-10:00am Step to It or Health & Recovery 6:00-7:00pm PM Aqua-Fit or Body Blast/Core & More

Friday

9:00-10:00am Circuit Strength or Deep Water Workout 10:15-11:15am Fabulous 50+

Saturday

9:00-10:00am Saturday Fit

ADMISSION TO ALL DROP IN FITNESS CLASSES IS BY: 1 -2 – 12 month Membership Passes Fitness Tickets: - 10 passes / $50.00 + tax - drop in fee $6.50

LHH

12:00-1:00PM

CASTLEGAR REBELS VS NELSON LEAFS PLAYOFF GAMES • FRIDAY FEBRUARY 24TH • SATURDAY FEBRUARY 25 7:30PM COME OUT AND CHEER ON YOUR HOME TOWN REBELS.

SPRING BREAK DAY CAMPS

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING FOR YOUR KIDS TO DO SPRING BREAK MARCH 13-23. WE WILL BE OFFERING DAY CAMPS TUES/WED/ THURS FOR 6-8YRS & 9-12YRS. REGISTER ON LINE AT WWW.RDCK.BC.CA/CASTLEGAR.

BRONZE MEDALLION COURSE

MARCH 12 – 16

RED CROSS BABYSITTING

MARCH 12 & 13

Winter Public Swim Schedule

SPRING BREAK OUT IN THE POOL GAMES & ACTIVITIES

MARCH 12 – 16 & 19 – 23

Monday

10:00-12:00pm; 2:00-4:00pm & 7:00-9:00pm

Tuesdays

2:00-4:00pm; 7:00-9:00pm

Wednesday 10:00-12:00pm; 2:00-4:00pm & 7:00-9:00pm

Ashley Kooiman of SHSS rips the ball away from Salmo’s Haley Gould in the third quarter of the teams’ game on Monday. SHSS guard Nicole Palmer, with 13 points, led the Bulldogs to a 41-12 league win over Salmo at home on Monday. Craig Lindsay photo

Thursday

2:00-4:00pm; 7:00-9:00pm

Friday

10:00-12:00pm; 2:00-8:30pm

Saturday

1:00-6:00pm

Sunday

1:00-6:00pm

Community Events CASTLEGAR SKATING CLUB YEAR END FINALE “LET’S GO TO THE MOVIES”

FRIDAY MARCH 2ND • 6:00PM ADMISSION BY DONATION Notice to all Community Groups and Organizations. If you would like you event mentioned in this event calendar please e-mail the information to Castlegar Recreation Department at casrec@rdck.bc.ca or call 365-3386 ext 0.

Castlegar Recreation Department Spring Leisure Guide Registration starts March 12th View on line February 27th. Lots of great upcoming Activities.

Did you know that you can register for CDRD recreation programs ON LINE. Go to www.rdck.bc.ca and hit the RECREATION CONNECTION BUTTON and all the programs are at your fingertips.


Thursday, February 23, 2012 Castlegar News

22 www.castlegarnews.com

Sports

Tigers top Legion Bowling Tournament Bill Clark & staff would like to introduce you to the West Kootenay Advanced Planning Representative, Holly Pender-Love. Please call either location to discuss your pre-arrangment questions, or drop by to meet her at the Kootenay Home & Lifestyle Expo, March 3rd & 4th, Selkirk College, Castlegar. Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Services 1298 Pine Ave, Trail BC, 250-368-8080 Castlegar Funeral Chapel 411 - 9th Ave, Castlegar, BC, 250-365-3222

Open BY APPOINTMENT FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE •Gift Cards •Green Fees •Memberships •Clothing •Clubs •and More

please phone

250-365-5006

www.golfcastlegar.com

The Tigers - Left to Right: Doug Bonin, Velma Nyman, Cory McCreight, Michelle Cleaver, Frank Vines - battled against tough competition but came out on top of the Castlegar Legion Fun Bowling Tournament. The tourament was held on Submitted photo Feb. 18 and was followed by a dinner at the Legion lounge.

Castlegar Pee Wees extend series with Nelson BOB HALL Nelson Star

The Nelson Pee Wee Rep Leafs had a chance to seal a ticket to the tier 3 provincials on Tuesday night at the NDCC, but Castlegar wouldn’t give up. Having won the first game of the West Kootenay final on Monday night, Nelson needed a win Tuesday to clinch the first-tofour-points series. The game started well for Nelson when they grabbed a 1-0 lead late in the first period. Less than 30 seconds after the puck dropped in the second period,

Bob Hall photo

Castlegar notched the score at 1-1. Midway through the second period Nelson again gained

the advantage, a lead they would hold until late in the third period. With 1:41 left in the game, Castlegar

 < $ '    < / 1 2 5 2 6.,)

scored to tie the score and the game ended in a 2-2 tie. The tie means the two teams will tangle

once again Thursday night in Castlegar. If Castlegar wins, it will force a fourth and final game on the weekend.

250-352-5331

February Feb. 22nd - Chali 2Na of Jurassic 5 Tickets on sale now!

Feb. 23rd - Abstract Sonance Feb. 24th - Rococode Feb. 25th - Funkanomics (Ghetto Funk, Germany) with Freddy J (Calgary)

MARCH Mar. 2nd - Deekline with Soup

Only an hour south of the border awaits something special. 2900 acres of unspoiled terrain, over 750 cm of annual snowfall and Canadian cash at par. That’s just part of the Schweitzer Difference. Scan the QR code to order online, or visit schweitzer.com/canfriends 877.487.4643

Mar. 3rd - Violin vs. Vinyl feat. Kytami formerly Delhi 2 Dublin

Mar. 8th - International Women’s Day Celebration feat. Avalon Alumni

Mar. 9th - The Funkhunters Mar. 10th - Sweatshop Union

www.visitsandpoint.com

Mar. 17th - A Wakcutt St Patty’s

facebook.com/spiritbarevents


Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

www.castlegarnews.com 23

DIRECTORY C A S T L E G A R Professionally Trained & Certified Groomer Specializing in Dogs only

Toby’s Doggy Do

(Sorry Pussy Cats)

For your Appointment or Free Consultation call today

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DR.BRANDY GRANTHAM

8am to 1pm on Saturday & Sundays • homemade hollandaise • fresh farm eggs • home-smoked salmon • 3 egg omelet • freshly squeezed OJ

KK

We carry a selection of AG & Scruples products. Book an appointment with Lanette, Alexa or Colleen. Evenings by appointment.

Walk-Ins Mon 9:30 - 1:30 | Tues -Fri 9:30 - 5 | Sat 9:30 am Welcome! 2327 6th Ave. | 250-304-6933

Two Grey’t Grams Pet Pampering

• Grooming • Petcare Products • Holistique Cat & Dog Food 2243 6th Avenue Castlegar / Ph. 365-5605 Across from RONA

Ely’s Bridal Boutique & Gift Shop NEW Grad Dresses HAVE ARRIVED!

CASTLEGAR TAILORING Offering full alteration & custom sewing services

www.castlegartailoring.com 259 Columbia Ave

250.365.0085

Help Wanted: Seamstress

JUANS FLOORING Canadian Flooring at Wholesale Antique, R.Oak - Maple 31/2 x 3/4 Pref $4.59 sf Pre Order $4.29 sf Pallet Canadian Stair Tread R.Oak, Maple - Big Selection. Eng 8 Ply Super Stable. Up To 7”1/2 Wide. Urban Carlton - NAF. 25 Years Guaranty

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Chiropractic care for the entire family, gentle and effective. BACK IN BALANCE

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RENTALS t SALES t DELIVERY 10’ 20’ 40’ 48’ Units Available

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A & L Construction

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Supporting you manage:

• Anxiety • Examination Stress & Fear • Depression • Failure • Personal Growth • Relationship Problems

Helping you prepare Forms:

• Government or Company • Completing Appeals & Applications

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A24 www.castlegarnews.com

Thursday, February 23, 2012 Castlegar News

Your community. Your classifieds.

250.365.6397 fax 250.365.6390 email classifieds@castlegarnews.com

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The Board of the Kootenay Doukhobor Historical Society is requesting expressions of interest for the 2012 operations of the Village Bistro Restaurant 112 Heritage Way Castlegar B.C. Scope of operations will be the autonomous operation of the Bistro restaurant from May 1 - Sept 30, 2012 within the guidelines as set out by the K.D.H.S. board of directors

CITY OF Yellowknife Lifeguard/Instructor. We are seeking an experienced individual to be a Lifeguard/Instructor. Refer to: www.yellowknife.ca for the required qualifications. Submit resumes by February 29, 2012, quoting competition 602-107U to: Human Resources Division, City of Yellowknife, P.O. Box 580, YK, NT, X1A 2N4. Fax to: (867)669-3471. Email: hr@yellowknife.ca

250.365.6397

Call Or Drop by our office at Unit #2, 1810 8th Ave. Castlegar, BC 8:30-5:00 Monday - Friday Classified Deadline 10am Monday

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Automotive

Glade Recreation AGM March 7th 7:00 pm at Glade Hall

FULL Time Certified HEAVY DUTY MECHANIC with Certified Commercial Vehicle Inspection Certificate with current MVI Inspector Certification, required for well established Logging Truck Company (Kurt LeRoy Trucking LTD.) on Vancouver Island. Good wages & benefits. Please fax your resume and drivers abstract to 250-287-9914. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!!!

Personals

DATING SERVICE. LongTerm/Short-Term Relationships, free to try!!! 1-877-2979883. Live intimate conversation, Call: #7878 or 1-888-5346984. Live adult 1on1. Call: 1866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877804-5381. (18+).

Be Your Own Boss! Attention Locals! People req. to work from home online. Earn $500$4500+ P/T or F/T. Toll Free 1.877.880.8843 leave mess. BE YOUR own boss with Great Canadian Dollar Store. Franchise opportunities now available. Call today for details 1-877-388-0123 ext. 229 or visit our website: www.dollarstores.com. EARN EXTRA cash! - P/T, F/T immediate openings for men & women. Easy computer work, other positions are available. Can be done from home. No experience needed. www.HWC-BC.com MONSTER Industries, a rapidly growing construction and maintenance company servicing northwestern B.C., in now accepting resumes for the following positions: Certified “B” and “A” level welders with fabrication experience, Certified CWB all-position welders and Certified Millwrights. Please send resume with attached cover letter to office@monsterindustries.ca. Unfortunately we are not accepting applications for laborers at this time.

In Memoriam

doukhobor.museum@gmail.com Closing date for submissions will be March 05, 2012

EXCLUSIVE “THINKBIG” Mechanic Training. GPRC Fairview Campus. $1000. entrance scholarship. Paid practicum with Finning. High school diploma and mechanical aptitude. Write apprenticeship exams. 1-888-999-7882; gprc.ab.ca/fairview. September 2012.

Celebrations

Celebrations

Send your proposals to

In Memoriam

CENTRE Helping women make informed decisions. Free pregnancy tests and information on all options in caring, confidential environment. 250-354-1199

Found in Glade, Keyless Entry for VW Call 250-399-4738

Found Set of Keys on 1500 block of Columbia Ave, Phone to id Call 250-365-0747

Travel

Timeshare

CANCEL YOUR Timeshare. No Risk Program. Stop mortgage & maintenance payments today. 100% Money back guarantee. Free Consultation. Call us now. We can help! 1-888-356-5248.

Travel

BRING THE family! Sizzling specials at Florida’s best beach! New Smyrna Beach, Florida. See it all at: www.nsbfla.com/bonjour or call 1-800-214-0166.

HAWAII ON the Mainland, where healthy low-cost living can be yours. Modern Arenal Maleku Condominiums, 24/7 secured Community, Costa Rica “the most friendly country on earth”! 1-780-952-0709; www.CanTico.ca.

TAYLOR, LILY born in Trail B.C. on April 1, 1931 passed away in Victoria B.C. on February 11, 2012. Lily was predeceased by her parents Herb and Rose Johnson, and sisters Nancy Eastcott and Barbara Schellenberg. She is survived by her son Randy (Michele) and daughter Bonnie (Barry), grandchildren Sarah, Carley, Andrea, and Alexandra, great grandchildren, and nieces and nephews. Lily possessed a kindness, compassion, and inner strength that will always be remembered and admired. She will be greatly missed by her family and very dear friends of Victoria, Castlegar, and Robson, B.C. Thank you to the staff at Oak Bay Lodge who extended a warmth and kindness that truly brightened Lily’s day. Thank you to all the doctors involved in Lily’s care, with a special thank you to Dr. Argouash for your care, compassion and support. There will be no funeral service at Lily’s request. In lieu of flowers donations to the BCSPCA, or Canadian Lung Association would be appreciated.

Book Your Classified Ad Now!

NELSON CRISIS PREGNANCY

Lost & Found

Taylor, Lily

250-365-6397

www.castlegarnews.com

We, the family of the llate Paul Oglow, would like lik to express our heartfelt gratitude to all the family and friends who supported us in so many ways during the loss of our dear Dad and Grandpa. We give thanks to Reverend Ann Pollock of the Castlegar United Church for the lovely service, to pianist Lori and the Church Choir for your beautiful hymns, and to the hardworking catering group at the church who prepared the delicious lunch. We extend a special thanks to the Kootenay Men’s Choir as we were honoured and grateful to have you sing at Dad’s service. Thanks Brenden, Auntie Shirley, Lola, Jerry, Ev, Gene, Ernie and Elmer for your wonderful words of remembrance. Thank you to Sarah Greenwood of the Castlegar Funeral Home and to our cousin, Wally Dann, for his guidance and thoughtfulness. Thank you also for the memorial donations received in Paul’s memory to the Castlegar Aquatic Centre, 2101 6th Avenue, Castlegar, BC V1N 3B2 and to the CNIB – Kootenay Branch, Unit #11, 1691 Hwy 3A, Nelson, BC V1L 6J8. From the bottom of our hearts…thank you. Tom, Dave, Gail, Ken, Carol and Families.

William Sam Kalesnikoff

Shout it from the top of the mountain Or Our Classified Section Birth announcements, engagements, anniversary, graduations... and everything else that you’d like to share with the world.

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The Castlegar News the month of offers low classified February! rates and great readership. You can choose the area of coverage in the West Kootenay and we are always happy to assist you to make your advertising as economical as possible. Deadline is Monday at 10.00 am.

In Memoriam

Roberta Cawte February F ebruary 221, 1, 22011 011 We who loved you sadly miss you, As it dawns another year; l h h k In our llonely hours off thinking Thoughts of you are ever near. Love George and Family

Book you ad today 250-365-6397

There’s something for everyone in the

With sad hearts, the family of William Sam Kalesnikoff of Raspberry Village wishes to announce his peaceful passing, with his loving family by his side, at the Castleview Care Centre on Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2012, blessed with 82 years of life. William was born at Champion Creek, BC on July 26, 1929 to parents Tina and Sam Kalesnikoff. Bill spent his lifetime raising a family in the Kootenays and working for Kalesnikoff Lumber Company. In 1951, Bill married Elizabeth Tamelin and they began their life together in Champion Creek. A few years later they moved to Robson and later to Raspberry Village, where they raised their family. Throughout his life he enjoyed playing ball, fishing, woodworking and gardening. Bill is survived by his loving wife of 60 years, Elizabeth, daughters Betty (Robert) and Jeanette (Peter), and son Willy (Darlene), grandchildren Brian (Michelle), Shawna (Isa), Jaclyn, Jaime (Greg), Jeffrey, Meghan, and Logan, great grandchildren Drayden, Ethan, Leandro, Sofia and Alice. He is also survived by his brothers Sam and John (Pearl), and sister Emma (John). A traditional Doukhobor Funeral Service, with Peter Zaytsoff officiating, was held at the Brilliant Cultural Centre on Feb. 13, 2012 and Bill was laid to rest at the Brilliant Cemetery. The Kalesnikoff Family extends our heartfelt thank you to Dr. Merritt and the Castleview Care Team. We would like to thank Peter Zaytsoff for his support and leadership of the service and Bill Strilaeff and Sid Malakoff from the Castlegar Funeral Chapel. Mae Popoff and the ladies cooking group and all the ladies who prepared and served our delicious lunch, from our hearts, thank you. To the friends and family for baking and bringing their delicious desserts to share with our meal, to the psalm-singing group who came and prayed with us, to Walter Holuboff and his men for preparing Bill’s final resting place, to the Staff of the Brilliant Cultural Centre and to Kalesnikoff Lumber Co. for their ongoing support and contributions to our community, we extend of heartfelt gratitude. It warms our hearts to see so many friends and family supporting us and sharing our grief with our loss. Bill will be missed and will stay forever in our hearts.


Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012

www.castlegarnews.com A25

Employment

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Career Opportunities

Education/Trade Schools

Help Wanted

GO TO your next job interview with 2nd Year Heavy Duty Mechanic Skills. GPRC, Fairview Campus. Heavy Equipment Certificate program - Less than one year apprenticeship opportunity. Hands-on training. Safety courses. On-campus residences. 1-888-999-7882; gprc.ab.ca.

SPEND YOUR hours working on ATV’s, Snowmobiles, and Watercraft. GPRC Fairview Campus, Alberta. Learn to repair small engines, recreational vehicles. Apprenticeship opportunity. On-campus residences. 1-888-999-7882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

TWO WHEELIN’ excitement! Motorcycle Mechanic Program, GPRC Fairview College Campus. Hands-on training street, off-road, dual sport bikes. Challenge 1st year Apprenticeship exam. 1-888-9997882; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

WEBCO LEDUC - division of Sun Media, requires Full-time Heatset/Coldset 1st & 2nd Pressmen. 15 unit Goss Community. Competitive rates and benefits. Email resume: et@webcoleduc.com.

AIRLINES ARE Hiring- Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783. Become a Psychiatric Nurse - train locally via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements and some regional classroom delivery. Wages start at $30.79/hr to $40.42/hr. This 23 month program is recognized by the CRPNBC. Gov’t funding may be available. Toll-free 1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR SCHOOL Locations in Alberta & BC. Hands on real world training. Full sized equip. Job placement assist. Funding Avail. www.iheschool.com 1-866399-3853

HHDI RECRUITING is hiring on behalf of Baker Hughes Baker Hughes Alberta based oilfield services company is currently hiring;

An earthmoving company based in Edson Alberta requires a full time Heavy Duty Mechanic for field and shop work. We require Cat Dozer/Deere excavator experience. You will work a set schedule for days on and off. Call Lloyd @ 780-723-5051

DRIVER EQUIPMENT OPERATORS & SERVICE SUPERVISORS

Career Opportunities

SUPPORT SERVICES ASSISTANT I SOUTHERN MEDICAL PROGRAM UBC Okanagan (Location: Trail) The University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus is currently accepting applications for a Support Services Assistant I in the Southern Medical Program. This position will provide administrative program support to Year 3 of the Southern Medical Program as it pertains to the Integrated Community Clerkship (ICC) in Trail. The incumbent, working with the Clinical Education Program Manager and ICC Site Director, Trail, will liaise with faculty and staff of the Southern Medical Program. For application instructions and a detailed job description, visit the website: www.hr.ubc.ca/careers UBC is one of BC’s top 55 employers. Find out why we’re an employer of choice for more than 19,000 faculty, staff and student employees at www.ubc.ca. We wish to thank all applicants for their interest. Only those applicants selected for further consideration will be contacted.

www.ubc.ca

Help Wanted

DIRECT SALES REPRESENTATIVES. Canada’s premiere home automation and Security Company is NOW hiring AprilAugust. No experience necessary. Travel Required. E-mail resume: kkurtze@vivint.com Visit: www.vivint.ca

Help Wanted

Traffic Control training for dates call 1-866-737-2389 or www.roadsafetytcs.com

Career Opportunities

ARE YOU EXPERIENCING FINANCIAL DISTRESS? Relief is only a call away! Call Shelley Cameron Estate Administrator at 877-797-4357 today, to set up your FREE consultation in Nelson. Donna Mihalcheon CA,CIRP 31 years experience. BDO Canada Limited Trustee in Bankruptcy, #200 -1628 Dickson Avenue, Kelowna, BC. V1Y 9X1

Help Wanted

FINANCE MANAGER NEEDED!

TON OF S FUN

THE SKY IS THE LIMIT Be part of the biggest dealer group in Canada! HUGE Pay Plan. $80,000 up to $150,000 PLUS!

$40,000 yearly up $100,000 plus The harder and smarter you work the more you make. Bonus plans, Incentives, and FUN!! F&I stands for Fun & Income! Must display a youthful exuberance and be clean cut! Man or Woman welcome! Please reply for your chance at an exciting career! asinclair@nelsonfordsales.com

Experience the NEW

Class 1 or 3 License required.

Drivers

HD MECHANICS 3rd or 4th apprentice or Journeyman Heavy Duty Mechanics with their Red Seal and CVIP License to work in Red Deer & Hinton. Please call 250-718-3330 or Fax: 1-888-679-0759 For more information or send your resume & current drivers abstract to: driverclass1@shaw.ca JOE’S AUTOBODY REPAIR in Prince Rupert, BC. Currently has an opening for a Collision Technician and Certified Painter. Must be a team player for this relaxed and friendly,but hard working atmosphere. Wages and moving expenses negotiable. Email resume to: joesauto@citytel.net Fax: 250627-4702. Call: 250-624-1795 Joey’s Restaurant is looking for a Cook 30 to 40 hours a week, Must have 3 years minimum Breakfast experience. Drop off resume Skilled Millwrights, Welders and Carpenters required for sawmill & mining construction. Pls fax or email resume to: 250-825-9687 timberlinemill@shaw.ca THE NELSON ADVOCACY CENTRE SPECIALIZED VICTIM SUPPORT WORKER. Provides emotional support, referrals, information and advocacy to victims of violence in relationships, abuse and sexual assault, criminal harassment and childhood abuse of any gender. 7 hrs/week; wage based on experience. For details, go to www.advocacycentre.org or contact Amy Taylor advocacycentre@nelsoncares.ca 250-352-5777. Closing date Feb 29, 2012.

Houses For Sale

Services

Merchandise for Sale

Rentals

Income Opportunity

Financial Services

Misc. for Sale

Apt/Condo for Rent

HOME BASED Business. We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com

IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1.800.587.2161. M O N E Y P R OV I D E R . C O M . $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

STEEL BUILDINGS for all uses! Spring Deals! Make an offer on sell-off models at factory and save thousands NOW! Call for free Brochure - 1-800668-5111 ext. 170.

CASTLEGAR Bright 2 Bdrm Townhouse, Conv Located W/D, F/S, N/S, N/P, $850/mth + Utilities Avail Feb 15st Phone 250-304-4373 CASTLEGAR, Clean bright 1 Bdrm Apt, Furnished, fully equip, utilities, TV, Internet included, Close to bus stop shopping & parks, N/S, N/P quiet Bldg, $675/mth Phone 250-365-7400

Employment

Professional/ Management

CRIMINAL RECORD? Don’t let it block employment, travel, education, professional, certification, adoption property rental opportunities. For peace of mind & a free consultation call 1-800-347-2540.

Trades, Technical

CRIMINAL RECORD?

EXPERIENCED DRILLERS, Derrickhands, Motorhands and Floorhands. Seeking full rig crews. Paying higher than industry rates and winter bonus. Send resume c/w valid tickets. Fax 780-955-2008; info@tempcodrilling.com. Phone 780-955-5537.

MILLWRIGHT (DIESEL MECHANIC) Meadow Creek Cedar Ltd. is hiring for Millwright (Diesel Mechanics) - $29.93/hr, 40 hrs/wk. Send resume by mail Box # 970 Kaslo, BC. V0G 1M0. Fax 250-366-4241.

Services

Health Products

TRUCKS & VANS TRUCK FOR SALE FOR SALE 1980 truck good for 2000 GMC Truck Runs great, winter tires parts must sell. Call to view Call for more info... TRUCKS & VANS TRUCK FOR SALE 1980 truck good for parts must sell. Call to view TRUCKS & VANS FOR SALE 2001 Ford F 150 $5,000 Call.... $5 000 OBO Call

TRUCKS & VANS FOR SALE 2001 Ford F 150 $5,000 OBO Call.... TRUCKS & VANS

Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

SAWMILLS FROM only $3997 - Make money & save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT.

Real Estate Business for Sale BAKERY for sale in one of the larger & fastest growing areas in Kelowna BC. Well equipped & priced to sell. For more info call 250-763-5794

Medical Health AIDAN’S FOOT CARE. Mobile qualified foot care nurse. $40./treatment. (250)231-9945

Houses For Sale

OREGA-FIRST Organic Oregano Oil

Buy One Get One

FREE

15ml

Downtown Castlegar 250.365.7750 GET PAID to lose weight. $5,000 For Your Success Story. Personal Image TV Show. Call to Qualify: 416-730-5684 ext 2243. J o a n n a @ m e r t o n t v. c a . www.mertontv.ca. HERBAL MAGIC - With Herbal Magic lose up to 20 pounds in just 8 weeks and keep it off. Results Guaranteed! Start today call 1-800854-5176.

Financial Services DROWNING IN debts? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid Bankruptcy! Free consultation. www.mydebtsolution.com or Toll Free 1 877-556-3500 GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

Houses For Sale

TRUCKS & VANS

TRUCKS & VANS TRUCK FOR SALE FOR SALE 1980 truck good for 2000 GMC Truck Runs great, winter tires parts must sell. Call to view Call for more info... TRUCKS & VANS TRUCK FOR SALE 1980 truck good for parts must sell. Call to view TRUCKS & VANS

FOR SALE 2000 GMC Truck FOR SALE Runs great, winter tires 2001 Ford F 150 info... Call for more info $5,000 Call.... $5 000 OBO Call

TRUCKS & VANS FOR SALE 2001 Ford F 150 $5,000 OBO Call.... TRUCKS & VANS FOR SALE 2000 GMC Truck Runs great, winter tires info... Call for more info

Call us to place your ClassiÀed Ad

250-365-6397

CASTLEGAR, Selkirk Manor & Cedar Manor now accepting applications 250-304-3026

MOUNTAIN VIEW

Available now 2 bdrm, laundry, parking, patio, $850 incls utils. 604-688-0830

Duplex / 4 Plex CASTLEGAR, 3 Bdrm, 2 bath attached heated garage, lrg rec & storage, N/S, N/P, Ref required, $1,200/ mth + utilities, Avail immed Call 250-365-0122 or 304-9054

Pets & Livestock

Mobile Homes & Pads

Livestock

ROBSON 3 Bdrm Mobile Home for rent Refer required, Call 250-304-3430

BULLS For Sale: Luing Registered 2-year old and yearling bulls for sale. Telephone: 250346-3100. Delivery available.

Homes for Rent CASTLEGAR 3 Bdrm House 550 - 9th Ave, $1,200/mth + utilities, Ph 250-365-7867 CASTLEGAR, 3 Bdrm House lrg fenced yard, N/S, N/P $1050/mth + utilities, Avail April 1st, 250-687-4971 CASTLEGAR, South End 3 Bdrm House, N/S, N/P, W/D $925/mth + utilities Phone 250-304-3026 GENELLE Cozy 2 Bdrm House, N/S, References required $875/mth + utilities 250-304-7686

Pet Services

Sell it here. TRUCKS & VANS

Legal Services

SERVICE MANAGER - Hanna Chrysler Ltd. (Hanna, Alberta). Opportunity in a perfect family environment. Strong team, competitive wages, benefits, growth potential. Fax resume: 403-854-2845. Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

Tools

Female Havanese Bichon with family intentions, seeks same or similar breed stud to accommodate goal, (9lbs) Call Serenity 250-365-8442 for a good time

Pets LOVE ANIMALS? - Love your Career! Animal Health Technology diploma program. GPRC Fairview Campus. Oncampus working farm. On-site large and companion animals. On-campus residences. 18 8 8 - 9 9 9 - 7 8 8 2 ; www.gprc.ab.ca/fairview.

Shared Accommodation CASTLEGAR 1 Fully Furnished Bedroom in large Quiet Home, $475 includes utilities. & internet, clean quiet person who works or goes to school full time. 250-304-4814

Merchandise for Sale

Appliances Fridge $350 & Stove $300 or $550 for the pair, brought new 2007, Washer top Load & Dryer $400/pr, brought new 2002, Phone 250-365-0391

Auctions Auction Water/Wine Bottling Line, Bottling Line, s/s tanks, filtration system, restaurant equipment & more. Feb 25, 11AM, West Kelowna, BC, View photos at (Special Auction) doddsauction.com 1-866-545-3259

Heavy Duty Machinery A- STEEL SHIPPING STORAGE CONTAINERS / Bridges / Equipment Wheel loaders JD 644E & 544A / 63’ & 90’ Stiff boom 5th wheel crane trucks/Excavators EX200-5 & 892D-LC / Small forklifts / F350 C/C “Cabs”20’40’45’53’ New/ Used/ Damaged /Containers Semi Trailers for Hiway & StorageCall 24 Hrs 1-866-528-7108 Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

Medical Supplies CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-9815991

Misc. for Sale HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper? Pool Table 8x4, Exc condition $450, Ping Pong Table top $100, Love seat Exc cond, powder blue $50, White self clean oven $100. 250-365-7400

WATERFRONT SALE Only 3 Lots Left 0.7 ac lot - $169,000 Sub Dividable 1.5 ac & House - $595K Near par 3 Golf Course www.WaterlooLanding.ca www.nelson-homes.com Custom Plans, Engineered Homes from $53,000 Call 250-365-6267

Mobile Homes & Parks FACTORY DIRECT WHOLESALE modular homes, manufactured homes, and park models. New homes starting as low as $37,209, 16 wides $49,183, and double wides $70,829. www.hbmodular.com or 877976-3737 The Home Boys.

Real Estate LAND OF Orchards, Vineyards & Tides in Nova Scotia’s beautiful Annapolis Valley. Live! Work! Bring Business! Free Brochure - Website: www.kingsrda.ca Email: mmacdonald@kingsrda.ca Toll - free: 1-888-865-4647 NAPLES FLORIDA area! Bank Acquired Condos Only $169,900. Same unit sold for $428,895. Own your brand new condo for pennies on the dollar in warm, sunny SW Florida! Walk to over 20 restaurants/100 shops! Must see. Ask about travel incentives. Call 1-866-959-2825, ext 15. www.coconutpointcondos.com

Suites, Lower

AVAIL NOW 1brdm suite uptown. F/s, w/d, n/s, n/p. $700mth + utilities. Call 3044910 CASTLEGAR, 2 Bdrm Full Basement $900/mth + utilities Call 250-304-7490 CASTLEGAR SOUTH 1 Bdrm Basement Suite in quiet 4 plex. Clean, spacious & bright. Laundry available. N/S, N/P, $600/mth includes utilities. Ph 250-354-9804 NEWLY RENOVATED, bright 1 bdrm basement suite with den. Available March 1st. High ceilings, fireplace, new appliances, shared w/d. $850/mo incl utilities, cable & wi-fi. N/S, N/P. Call Samantha at: 250608-0517 to view.

Suites, Upper Castlegar 2 bdrm Apartment Bright & Spacious F/S, Laundry on site, close to amenities, N/S, N/P $725/mth + utilities Call 359-7819

Transportation

Auto Financing DreamCatcher Auto Loans “0” Down, Bankruptcy OK Cash Back ! 15 min Approvals

1-800-910-6402

www.PreApproval.cc

YOU’RE APPROVED Poor, Good, OR No Credit at AUTO CREDIT NOW Details and APPLY online autocreditwithbarrie.com OR TOLL FREE 1-877-356-0743


A26 www.castlegarnews.com

Thursday, February 23, 2012 Castlegar News

Sell it here. TRUCKS & VANS FOR SALE 2000 GMC Truck Runs great, winter tires Call for more info... TRUCKS & VANS TRUCK FOR SALE 1980 truck good for parts must sell. Call to view TRUCKS & VANS FOR SALE 2001 Ford F 150 $5,000 Call.... $5 000 OBO Call

TRUCKS & VANS TRUCK FOR SALE 1980 truck good for parts must sell. Call to view TRUCKS & VANS FOR SALE 2001 Ford F 150 $5,000 OBO Call.... TRUCKS & VANS

TRUCKS & VANS FOR SALE 2000 GMC Truck Runs great, winter tires Call for more info... TRUCKS & VANS TRUCK FOR SALE 1980 truck good for parts must sell. Call to view TRUCKS & VANS

FOR SALE 2000 GMC Truck FOR SALE Runs great, winter tires 2001 Ford F 150 info... Call for more info $5,000 Call.... $5 000 OBO Call

Transportation

Transportation

Auto Financing

Auto Financing Auto Financing Drive Today!

Need A Vehicle! UapplyUdrive.ca

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Loan. Apply Now, 1.877.680.1231 www.

TRUCKS & VANS TRUCK FOR SALE 1980 truck good for parts must sell. Call to view TRUCKS & VANS FOR SALE 2001 Ford F 150 $5,000 OBO Call.... TRUCKS & VANS FOR SALE 2000 GMC Truck Runs great, winter tires info... Call for more info

Call us to place your ClassiÀed Ad

250-365-6397

www.castlegarnews.com 250.365.6397

Transportation

Transportation

Cars - Domestic

Moorage

1999 Chrysler Concord Green, 250,000 kms, needs water pump, $600/OBO 250-365-8292

Scrap Car Removal SCRAP BATTERIES WANTED We buy scrap batteries from cars & trucks & heavy equipment. $4.00 each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Call Toll Free 1.877.334.2288

Book Your Classified Ad Now

250-365-6397 www.castlegarnews.com

Rare opportunity to own one of the very popular Nelson boathouses. This boathouse has had numerous recent upgrades, including new front and back doors as well as new decking. This is a great boathouse for some family fun and a great way to take advantage of all of the fun opportunities Kootenay Lake has to offer. $30,000. For more info contact Bev at 250-505-5744 or by email at taillon@shaw.ca.

Place Your ClassiÀed Ad Here!

250.365.6397

www.castlegarnews.com


Castlegar News Reporter

For grade 12 players Laura Monsen and Marissa Evdokimoff, the last game of the season couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have gone much better. With only five senior players at Stanley Humphries School, the team relied on junior players playing up to have enough players to hit the court. The team played a limited schedule this season with games against local teams

  

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CHROME DAYS

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EXPERIENCE THE INNOVATION AT YOUR GMC DEALER TODAY.

CHROME MIRROR CAPS

bcgmcdealers.ca

   

PROFESSIONAL LOOK

Call Kalawsky Chevrolet Buick GMC at 250-365-2155, or visit us at 1700 Columbia Avenue, Castlegar. [License #8917]

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  L.V. Rogers, Rossland and Salmo. In their last game of the season, and for the careers of the grade 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the SHSS Bulldogs faced the Salmo Falcons at home and pulled out their first ever win. The Bulldogs started

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Monsen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We kept going up and they kept tying it. We kept playing strong.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a really close game,â&#x20AC;? added Evdokimoff, who led the Bulldogs with 16 points. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The team played strong right until the end.â&#x20AC;? Both girls, and their senior teammates, were grateful to junior coaches Gord and Kim Matson. The Matsons were able to schedule several games for the senior team and encouraged the older players to practice regularly with the junior team at the school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been great,â&#x20AC;? said Monsen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had a season for two years. We actually got to play - itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been really awesome that the Matsons and all the assistant coaches have come out and help us to have a season this year.â&#x20AC;? SU

For the latest information, visit us at gmc.gm.ca, drop by your local Pontiac Buick GMC Dealer or call us at 1-800-GM-DRIVE. */x/â&#x20AC; Offers apply to the purchase of a 2012 Sierra EXT 4WD (1SF) equipped as described. Freight included ($1,495). License, insurance, registration, PPSA, administration fees and taxes not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Offer available to retail customers in Canada. See Dealer for details. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to change without notice. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in the BC GMC Dealer Marketing Association area only. Dealer order or trade may be required. GMCL, Ally Credit or TD Financing Services may modify, extend or terminate this offer in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See GMC dealer for details. x$8,250 manufacturer to dealer delivery credit available on 2012 Sierra EXT 4WD (tax exclusive) for retail customers only. Other cash credits available on most models. See your GM dealer for details. â&#x20AC;  Variable rate financing for 84 months on 2012 Sierra EXT 4WD on approved credit. Bi-Weekly payment and variable rate shown based on current Ally Credit prime rate and is subject to fluctuation; actual payment amounts will vary with rate fluctuations. Example: $10,000 at 3% for 84 months, the monthly payment is $132 Cost of borrowing is $1,099, total obligation is $11,099. Down payment and/or trade may be required. Monthly payments and cost of borrowing will also vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Biweekly payments based on a purchase price of $29,495 with $1,999 down on 2012 Sierra EXT 4WD, equipped as described. â&#x2C6;&#x2020; Chrome Accessories Package offer available on light duty 2012 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra extended cab and crew cab trucks (excluding Denali crew cab) equipped with the PDJ package (â&#x20AC;&#x153;PDJ Packageâ&#x20AC;?). Dealer order or trade may be required. Offer available to retail customers in Canada for vehicles delivered between February 3, 2012 and April 30, 2012. Customers who opt to forego the PDJ Package may apply a $500 credit (tax exclusive) to the vehicle purchase price. This offer may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See your GM dealer for details. **Credit valid towards the purchase or lease of an eligible new 2011 or 2012 model year Chevrolet, GMC, Buick or Cadillac vehicle, excluding Chevrolet Volt, delivered between January 6th 2012 and April 2nd 2012. Customers must present this authorization letter at the time of purchase or lease. All products are subject to availability. See Dealer for eligibility. Only one $1,000 Bonus may be redeemed per purchase/lease vehicle. This offer may not be redeemed for cash. The credit amount is inclusive of any applicable taxes. As part of the transaction, dealer may request documentation and will contact GM to verify eligibility. The $1,000 Bonus is not compatible with the Employee New Vehicle Purchase Program or the Supplier Program New Vehicle Purchase Program. Void where prohibited by law. $1,000 offer is stackable with Cardholderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current GM Card Earnings, subject to Vehicle Redemption Allowances. For complete GM Card Program Rules, including current Redemption Allowances, transferability of Earnings, and other applicable restrictions for all eligible GM vehicles, see your GM Dealer, call the GM Card Redemption Centre at 1-888-446-6232 or visit TheGMCard.ca. Subject to applicable law, GMCL may modify or terminate the Program in whole or in part with or without notice to you. Subject to Vehicle Redemption Allowances. For complete GM Card Program Rules, including current Redemption Allowances, transferability of Earnings, and other applicable restrictions for all eligible GM vehicles, see your GM Dealer, call the GM Card Redemption Centre at 1-888-446-6232 or visit TheGMCard.ca. Subject to applicable law, GMCL may modify or terminate the Program in whole or in part with or without notice to you. Primary GM Cardholders may transfer the $1,000 Bonus to the following eligible Immediate Family members, who reside at the Primary Cardholderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residence: parents, partner, spouse, brother, sister, child, grandchild and grandparents including parents of spouse or partner. Proof of relationship and residency must be provided upon request. The $1,000 Bonus is not transferable to Immediate Family residing outside of the Primary Cardholders residence. WBased on GM Testing in accordance with approved Transport Canada test methods. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. ^2012 GMC Sierra, equipped with available Vortecâ&#x201E;˘ 5.3L V8 engine and 6-speed automatic transmission and competitive fuel consumption ratings based on Natural Resources Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 Fuel Consumptions Guide and WardsAuto.com 2012 Large Pickup segment. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. Excludes hybrids and other GM models.

Castlegar News Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.castlegarnews.com 27

Y O UR C O M M

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Ready for summer? We are. Improve your swimming skills with the Castlegar Aquanauts

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60,000 km LONGER POWERTRAIN WARRANTY THAN FORD AND DODGE


Thursday, February 23, 2012 Castlegar News

28 www.castlegarnews.com

Home Solutions Home Audio Installations TV Mounting Residential Commercial Pre-Wiring Home Automation Home Delivery * additional charges may apply

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Feb 23 2012