Page 1

ASI

a history of

THE CHIPPEWAS OF RAMA FIRST NATION POWWOW growing every year this

annual event continues to draw thousands.

the

GREAT

BUTTERTART THROW DOWN rich dessert, rich rewards

up a creek Explore one of the favourite pastimes in Ontario’s Lake Country


Stay & T U O K C RO T A E R G AT THE ORS! INDO

This package is so rock star sometimes it’s your pass to getting in to sold out shows!

Make the night so epic your Instagram blows up with this incredible package that includes premium floor seats to the show of your choice! #RockOut@GreatIndoors

what you get:

• DELUXE SUITE

• (2) PREMIUM CONCERT TICKETS • FREE VALET PARKING • $10 IN FREE SLOT PLAY • REFUELING CREDIT – we’d call it breakfast, but is it really if you sleep past noon? Prices vary based upon selected concert Some restrictions apply Some blackout dates apply.

Spring/summer packages at


Play!

GIRLS JUST WAN N A HAVE FUN ! what you get:

• DELUXE SUITE

• $100 SPA CREDIT PER PERSON!

Grab your BFFs and come explore the Great Indoors with a package that pampers the princess in all of us!

• $65 RESORT CREDIT PER PERSON! • IN-ROOM MOVIE AND MUNCHIES • $10 IN FREE SLOT PLAY • FREE VALET PARKING FOR ONE

FOR TWO BESTIES over $160 in resort credits each!

• $250 PER PERSON (WEEKDAYS) • $320 PER PERSON (WEEKENDS)

SAVE MORE WITH FOUR! over $160 in resort credits!

• $210 PER PERSON (WEEKDAYS) • $250 PER PERSON (WEEKENDS) Some restrictions apply Some blackout dates apply.

CALL 1-800-832-7529 TO BOOK.

VISIT CASINORAMA.COM/PROMOTIONS FOR MORE DETAILS.

PLAYERS PASSPORT CLUB DISCOUNTS:


THE HOLY GRAIL OF SLOT MACHINES

Check out the latest slot additions, including Monty Python and the Holy Grail Black Knight! More than 2,500 slots on the gaming floor, from classic reels and progressive jackpots to the latest in slot technology including video reels, transmissive screens, multi-denomination and video poker slots. We truly have it all!

*Note, games themes are subject to change and based on availability. Must be nineteen (19) years of age or older with government issued photo identification. Those who have been trespassed and/or self-excluded from Casino Rama Resort or any OLG property and/or fail to meet Casino Rama Resort’s conditions of entry may not visit, participate in promotions and/or redeem offers. Offers do not apply to employees of Casino Rama Resort. Casino Rama Resort reserves the right to cancel or change this program without notice.


meet the

CONTRIBUTORS

ANDREW HIND

GABRIELLE TIEMAN

LYNN OGRYZLO

Andrew is a freelance writer specializing in travel, history and lifestyle. He has a passion for new adventure and experiences, and also for exploring little known stories. Andrew is never without a book or three in hand and some obscure historical fact at the tip of his tongue. You should follow him @discoveriesAM

Gabrielle is a writer for REV Publishing and passionate about the written word. A newcomer to Niagara, Gabrielle is a graduate of the University of Ottawa’s Journalism program and has written for a number of newspapers and publications across Canada. Her passion lies in profiling members of the community and uncovering the hidden gems within a city. When she is not writing you can find her on her bicycle - most likely with a large coffee in hand.

Lynn is a food, wine and travel writer, author of three international award-winning cookbooks and regular contributor to REV Publications. Lynn specializes in culinary tourism covering regional cuisine destinations, slow food, culinary holidays, wine, spirits and “la dolca vita”. She can be reached for questions or comments at lynnogryzlo.com.

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 5


At Casino Rama Resort we treat guests like friends and friends like family! Come be part of the club! Becoming a Players Passport™ Club Member is simple. Collecting points, even more so! Use your Club Card while playing your favourite slots or table games, and you can earn free concert tickets, complimentary meals and hotel stays, invitations to parties and so much more! It easy to play and membership is absolutely free. It’s just our way of thanking you for coming. Visit any Player Services desk at Casino Rama Resort or casinorama.com to sign up today. Already a member? Take it one step further and sign up for Players Passport CONNECT to get the most timely information and access to email-only special offers. Get even MORE when you join our Facebook Fan Club including offers for the spa, hotel, dining, entertainment, gaming and more! Membership is free and new offers become available monthly. Get social with us:

Must be nineteen (19) years of age or older with government issued photo identification. Those who have been trespassed and/or self-excluded from Casino Rama Resort or any OLG property and/or fail to meet Casino Rama Resort’s conditions of entry may not visit, participate in promotions and/or redeem offers. Offers do not apply to employees of Casino Rama Resort. Casino Rama Resort reserves the right to cancel or change this program without notice.


GET SOCIAL. GET MORE! FOLLOW US CASINO RAMA RESORT Like us! Win tickets to concerts before you can even buy ‘em with our Beat-The-Box-Office contests! Plus, you’ll find exclusive presale codes so you can pick the seats you want before they go on-sale to the public.

#RAMAROCKS #GREATINDOORS #CASINORAMARESORT

@CASINORAMALIVE Stay connected! Be one of the first to know about new concerts, promotions, events and contests! If it’s happening at Casino Rama Resort, you’ll hear about it here.

CASINO RAMA RESORT Watch it! Relive some of your favourite concerts and watch special content on our YouTube channel made ready just for you!

FACEBOOK

FAN CLUB Get more! Every month, you’ll get sweet deals on stuff like dining, spa, hotel and concerts! Why? Well, it’s our way of saying we ‘like’ you too! Look for the Fan Club tab on our page and start redeeming your offers today!

SELFIE STATION

@CASINORAMARESORT Follow us! You’ll catch a glimpse of the 24/7 excitement found at the Great Indoors ---you might even win a chance to experience it yourself! Make sure to tag us in your pics!

TAKE A SELFIE! Pssst… when you’re here, make sure to check out our Selfie Station for free, photo taking fun!

NOW ON

ISSUU Can’t get enough of Today Magazine? Enjoy easy access to all our editions on the Issuu app. Not on Issuu? You can still read us on: todaymagazine.ca

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 7


PUBLISHER PRESIDENT & CEO GENERAL MANAGER

Reach Toronto, Niagara and Muskoka all in one place. Advertise with us and you won’t need lady luck.

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

Daniel A. Pasco Candace LeBlanc Alexandra Mills, Sheryl Hutton, Lucy Colangelo, John Fillion, Megan Leblanc, Jessica Trapini David Mace

EDITOR

Megan Pasche

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Tina Lanzillotta

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Rachel Bertrand, Sarah Meissner

IT/WEB DEVELOPER

Justin Soungie

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

TO ADVERTISE PLEASE CALL WEBSITE

Andrew Hind, Lynn Ogryzlo, Gabrielle Tieman 905.356.7283 or 1.877.888.2825 todaymagazine.ca

facebook.com/RevPublishingInc @revpublishing @todaymagazine www.revpublishing.com

the

GREAT

BUTTERTART THROW DOWN rich dessert, rich rewards

UP A CREEK time to discover lake country’s favourite summer past time

POW WOW

CASI

GET RECOGNIZED.

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Rev Publishing Inc.

Rama First Nations 31st Annual Event

Casino Rama Resort by Today Magazine is published by Rev Publishing Inc. All opinions expressed in Casino Rama Resort Magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of Rev Publishing, it’s employees or owners. Reasonable care is taken to ensure that the information contained in this magazine is as up-to-date and accurate as possible, as of the time of publication, but no responsibility can be taken by Casino Rama Resort Magazine for any errors, omissions or comments made by writers or interviewees that are contained herein. Furthermore, responsibility for any losses, damages or distress resulting from adherence to any information made available through this magazine is not the responsibility of Casino Rama Resort Magazine. All unsolicited manuscripts and/or photographs submitted are assumed to be intended for publication or republication in whole or in part. The right to alter, edit or refuse photos and/or manuscripts intended for publication is assumed. All unsolicited material submitted to Casino Rama Resort Magazine are submitted at the author’s risk. Manuscripts and or photographs intended to be returned must be accompanied by sufficient postage. Casino Rama Resort Magazine does not assume any responsibility for any claims of our advertisers and reserves the right to refuse any advertising.

LET US HELP PUT YOUR BEST FACE FORWARD. To advertise in our next issue* or for more information call one of our account executives @ 905.356.7283 or 1.877.888.2825 *CASINO RAMA RESORT MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED QUARTERLY.


// INSIDE FOOD & DRINK

LIFESTYLE & CULTURE

ACTIVE TRAVELLER

HERE. SEE.DO.

11

25

32

41

Some sage advice for planning your new flavour forward vegetable garden.

Whether you book yourself into a salon (and pronto!) or are taking matters into your own hands, be sure to keep to a regular routine to maintain supple glowing skin at any age.

Whether you’re a local looking for a fresh perspective on your own familiar backyard or a visitor exploring the region with fresh eyes, the road less traveled is navigated by paddle.

A guide to upcoming festivals and events happening in Ontario’s Lake Country.

38

From George Thorogood and The Destroyers to Santana, see what Casino Rama Resort’s new summer lineup has in store for you!

SUMMER FRESH SALADS

15

BUTTER TART THROW DOWN Runny or firm, sweet or savory; the great Canadian debate doesn’t usually extend beyond the personal preference between plain versus raisins versus nuts – unless you are in Ontario’s Lake Country.

19

WHILE YOU WERE OUT Two of the casino’s popular restaurants have undergone a renovation recently, and Executive Chef John Cordeaux tells us what to expect.

22

HOW SWEET IT IS Orillia has long been known for its farm to table homage to cooking. And after a long winter season of packaged produce, flash frozen veggies and fruit from a bag, nothing tastes more like summer than a fresh Ontario berry.

SAY HELLO TO SUMMER SKIN

27

ROAD TRIP INTO HISTORY 2017 marks the 150th birthday of our nation, so what better time to connect with our past and explore what it means to be Canadian. Here are five National Historic Sites in and around our region, each one worthy of an afternoon daytrip.

31

MORE THAN GAMING

Tradition forms the backbone of a community that continues to bring travellers to Rama and draws strength and inspiration from the past while preparing for its future.

UP A CREEK WITH A PADDLE

RAMA FIRST NATIONS ANNUAL POW WOW Over the years, Rama First Nation has witnessed an expediential growth of the Powwow, which was once mainly a small event where about a dozen community veterans would attend along with guests from Walpole, Wiky, Sarnia, and even Milwaukee. Now a competition Powwow, the event has grown substantially, hosting between 3,000-5,000 visitors each year.

ONTARIO’S LAKE COUNTRY EVENTS

53

FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT

MUSKOKA SPOTLIGHT

57

TIME CAPSULE Since its opening, the living history museum has been transporting people for centuries into Ontario’s past, to a time when Sainte-Marie was the only European settlement in Ontario. The site is not only among the province’s most historically important locations, but also one of its most engaging.

62

HIKING MUSKOKA Whichever trail you choose, there is something special about heading out and exploring Muskoka’s natural landscape.

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 9


Luxury meets Mother Nature

Restore and rejuvenate at Spa Rosseau. Separate men’s and women’s facilities, Vichy room, hair salon, aesthetic services, relaxation lounges. Private outdoor pool exclusively for spa guests (seasonal). Call 705-765-7000 or go to sparosseau.com to reserve your restorative experience. Or, delight with the gift of a Spa Rosseau experience. Call Spa Rosseau to ask about customized gift certificates.

1050 Paignton House Road, Minett, Ontario P0B 1G0 705-765-1900 I jwrosseau.ca


// FOOD & DRINK

SUMMER FRESH

salads BY LYNN OGRYZLO

We are so connected to the seasons. As the weather becomes warmer, I just can’t wait to spend more time outside and when it comes to food, I crave fresh garden salads. Hey wait it’s garden planting season! No one knows this more than Casino Rama Resort’s chef James Simpson. “I had no garden last year,” laments Simpson, “the rabbits ate the entire garden in one day.” This year, armed with enough fencing to surround his entire garden, Simpson is once again planning his garden. To a chef like Simpson his planning takes into consideration some of his favourite dishes, more to the point, some of his favourite salads. He likes the refreshing, bitter edge of

Italian salads and the savoury, sophistication of a French Niçoise, so he plans accordingly. This means he’ll be planting some chicory and radicchio for his Italian moods and some Frisée and string beans when he’s looking to make a French dish. From French to German, Italian to Oriental, you too can tailor your garden plantings to make this a year of satisfying your food moods. Before you put a shovel into the ground, Chef Simpson wants to encourage you to plan your garden based on what you want to eat, not what you traditionally plant and to help you, he has some sage advice for planning your new flavour forward vegetable garden. >>

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 11


PLANTING A FRENCH GARDEN The French harvest their greens early and petite for fresh, vibrant, almost sweeter flavours. Some of the greens to plant for a French garden include endive, baby beet greens, watercress, Lambs lettuce (Mache) and arugula (Rocket). French vegetables like carrots, string beans (Haricot vert), summer squash (Pattypan), heirloom baby tomatoes and sweet peas are also harvested early and so are more delicate and cook up quicker. For a real French influence, no garden is complete without herbs such as French tarragon, marjoram and thyme. Few people understand the French influence of the Simcoe Yard House signature salad of baby kale, rocket, frieze, with candied walnuts and fresh pear slices. Even the dressing includes the perfect amount of Dijon mustard. Overall, the French honour their onions so any French garden must include a variety of them. The French use the common onion (for spectacular French onion soup), scallions, shallots, leeks (brilliant in tarts) and chives. Leeks have their own special taste, buttery, mild and oniony. They’re not used merely as invisible flavouring ingredients like other members of the onion family, but are served alone as a salad with vinaigrette. The baby ones are served hot with a cream sauce or cooked into a rich soup and all leeks can be used as a filling for tarts, quiches or pastry squares.

PLANTING A MEXICAN GARDEN Not a lot of lettuce grows in the hot Mexican climate but they’re big on vegetables like tomatoes, onions, green peppers, squash and sunflowers. These are often the same or similar varieties as grown in Ontario. Mexican ingredients include amaranth, lima beans, runner beans, tomatillos and hundreds of different kinds of chili peppers. Hot Serrano peppers are the most popular and are used in fresh salsa, guacamole and chili to spice it up. For a milder dish, jalapenos are used. You may try to seek out the variety called “Early Jalapeno” as it grows best in Ontario’s shorter growing season or the “Texas A & M”, which is a milder variety of pepper. Smoked jalapenos are called chipotles and when they’re prepared in a tomato sauce they’re called chipotles en adobo. But don’t think you can grow one variety of chili peppers and grind them into chili powder. Mexican chili powder is actually a blend of many dried, powdered chilies with cumin and oregano. It’s frequently used as seasoning for meats and vegetables and has a mild spiciness. Tomatillos are related to the tomato, it has a paper-like husk that is removed before eating. You can stew tomatillos with chilies and onions. The combination complements their tart, slightly tomato-like flavour. Probably the most popular way to serve them is in salsa verde and in a sauce for enchiladas verdes. Cilantro is not just for Thai dishes, in Mexican cuisine it’s commonly found in salsa and guacamole and sprinkled over a dish as a garnish. Coriander is the seed of the cilantro plant and it’s what gives chorizo (sausage) its super distinctive flavour.


PLANTING AN ITALIAN GARDEN Most of the salad greens planted in an Italian garden include radicchio, chicory, escarole and like the French, rocket. Unlike the French, they’re not traditionally harvested early for a tender, sweet flavour, the Italians like their greens fully grown and bitter. Interestingly, Casino Rama Resort has their signature blend of salad greens custom blended with the Italian influence of bitter frizee and radicchio along with the more tender French elements of baby spinach and lambsleaf. It’s available in almost every restaurant on the resort. An Italian garden is heavy on the vegetables like meaty tomatoes, banana peppers, beans and zucchini. Italians grow cluster tomatoes for salads and Roma to make sauce. Sweet peppers are frequently long (also known as banana peppers) rather than short and blocky and the small, hot Pepperoncini is dried, crushed and used dried or preserved in oil to flavour all sorts of dishes from pizza to pasta. It is the red pimento variety that Italians love to char on the barbecue to make the succulent roasted red peppers. Beans lean on the side of lima and fava instead of the more elegant French string beans and are traditionally boiled and dressed with lots of garlic and olive oil. Other Italian vegetables that are easily grown in an ethnic garden include eggplant, broccoli rabe, rapini, sweet fennel and garlic. Italian herbs include the large, flat leafed variety of parsley, basil and small-leafed oregano bushes.

PLANTING AN ORIENTAL GARDEN The countries of the Orient encompass diverse climates so it is not surprising that the vegetables and herbs grown throughout are an extremely varied lot. Oriental gardeners grow such familiar vegetables as eggplants, carrots, onions, cabbage, sweet potato and cauliflower. Chinese mustard is a blanket term used to cover a whole range of mustard plants from mild to strong that can have a slightly bitter or hot bite. Some greens in general include Mizuna, spider mustard, Bok Choi and Tatsoi (spoon cabbage). They’re most often combined with ginger and used in soups or blanched and served with oyster sauce or stir-fried with meat and bean sauce. Daikon refers to a wide range of winter radishes. These are sliced or grated for stir-fries of pork, shrimp or shellfish, in soups, stews and sauces but rarely eaten raw. The tops of Oriental radishes are also enjoyed braised or added to soups. Coriander (Chinese parsley) is mostly found in Southern Chinese and Thai dishes such as soup, chutneys and salads. It’s most often added to a dish just before serving to reflect the refreshing nature of the herb. The roots of the coriander plant are commonly used in Thai curry pastes and soups. Lemongrass is an aromatic grass-family herb with a rich lemon flavour. The leaves are used as a seasoning in Thai dishes, sparingly in light soups and as a wonderful refreshing tea. t

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 13


the great butter tart throw down BY GABRIELLE TIEMAN

The butter tart, the quintessential Canadian

treat. For years it has warmed our hearts and stomachs, brewing nostalgia for hot sunny picnics gone by. Maybe it’s the ooze of that sweet sticky centre, the melt in your mouth butter pastry, or simply the pure Canadian-ness of the favourite dessert that makes us yearn for them when the weather warms up. But a long running debate has yet to be settled when it comes down to the homegrown recipe. The earliest known printed recipe dates back to the 1900 edition of the Royal Victoria Hospital’s Women’s Auxiliary cookbook in Barrie, Ontario. That simple recipe in that little publication launched a quest for perfection that persists to this day. Runny or firm, sweet or savory; the great Canadian debate doesn’t usually extend beyond the personal preference between plain versus raisins versus nuts – unless you are in Ontario’s Lake Country.

For the fifth year running, the town of Midland, Ontario has dedicated one day a year in an attempt to solve this age-old question of what makes a phenomenal butter tart. On June 10, Ontario’s tart aficionados will gather together to transform the small town into a festival dedicated to all things butter tart with one single goal: to prove that their recipe is the best. “It started as a small butter tart throw down,” says Angela Bird, Festival Manager at Ontario’s Best Butter Tart Festival. “The lady that came up with this used to sell butter tarts out of her shop downtown and she thought they were pretty darn special; so she invited people to bring their tarts in for a contest.” What started as a local contest held in the lobby of the Cultural Centre has now grown to a provincially acknowledged street festival. The small town of only 17 thousand people annually draws over 40 thousand tourists – crowding into the streets to savor butter tarts baked by professional and amateur bakers from across the province. >> TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 15


Today an average 15,000 butter tarts are sold in a single day of the festival, transforming Midland into the host of the biggest one-day festival in the region by far. “The first year, approximately 1,200 butter tarts were sold,” said Bird. “In 2014, that grew to 52,000; then 80,000, then 127,000. It just kept growing and more people kept coming.” The contest features two class divisions – one

overload the judges. The audience also gets a chance to sample the butter tarts after they are quartered and tried by the judges. Past winning butter tart flavours in the freestyle category have included cheesecake, pumpkin, rhubarb, Niagara Ice Wine and butter rum raisin to name only a creative few. The winner is also given a spot to compete

children affected by childhood cancer. A midway is also looking to return this year, but a location for the attraction is still in discussion. With the popularity of the festival continuing to grow each year, Bird said the size of the festival must try to grow in tandem. The festival continues to expand – they opened up another block of downtown last year to help with the crowds – and

I have basically reached the physical limit of where I can put people so it is now a matter of making it a two-day festival which is in the plans for future years. each for both professional and amateur bakers – and two flavour divisions. This year the flavour categories challenge both divisions in baking a traditional butter tart as well as an All Ontario Butter Tart – a freestyle tart challenge that does not limit the bakers’ creativity, but forces bakers to utilize exclusively Ontario produced ingredients. “It is going to be more difficult than some imagine,” said Bird. “It is not easy to find an Ontario raisin. Contestants are going to have to get creative.” The butter tarts are then judged and evaluated on appearance, texture, runniness, flakiness and overall taste. Each tart will be tasted blindly, without knowing which tart came from which baker; with butter tarts being separated into groups and tasted in waves as to not sugar

in the Canadian Food Championships Dessert Category in Edmonton and a travel voucher to help get them to the competition. This free family centric festival also features concerts, food trucks and vendor booths selling everything from clothes, candles, gift items and more. A Butter Tart Trot will also be held during the festival. The run will offer optional routes for those who wish to participate including a one-kilometre kids fun run, 5-10 kilometre routes and a half marathon that will loop runners through the picturesque waterfront. The run is orchestrated by mother/daughter duo Irene and Courtney Parker who will donate 100 per cent of the funds raised to Camp Quality Southern Ontario – a not-for-profit charity that provides uplifting experiences for

the hope is to transform the one-day event into a weekend-long festival in the future. “We did a survey last year and polled people on whether or not they would return next year… and over 95 per cent of people said they would come back,” said Bird. “I have basically reached the physical limit of where I can put the people so it is now a matter of making it a two-day festival which is in the plans for future years.” But one thing they request of all attendees for the time being: be patient. “If you see something you like you have to be patient,” said Bird. “People return every year in order to get their favourites; so trust me, it is worth the wait.” For more information on the festival visit the festival’s website buttertartfestival.ca. t


Take Their Breath Away

Your Guests Will Remember This Destination Forever Trust the experts at JW Marriott The Rosseau Muskoka Resort & Spa to make your destination wedding flawless.

Speak to our Wedding Specialist 705-765-1900 Ask if your winter wedding qualifies for a $15 per person rebate

1050 Paignton House Road, Minett, Ontario P0B 1G0 705-765-1900 I jwrosseau.ca


FIND YOUR FAVE SPOT ONTARIO IS FULL OF FLAVOURS - EXPLORE THEM ALL! BE THE FIRST TO DISCOVER A NEW CRAFT BREWERY, RESTAURANT OR CAFE. DOWNLOAD THE APP TODAY!

ASIAN OFFERINGS

DISCOVER MORE ABOUT THE APP @ FLAVOURPASSPORT.COM

Willow, now an รก la carte only restaurant has revamped their menu to include dishes from Thailand, Singapore and Hong Kong.


WHILE YOU WERE OUT If you haven’t been to Casino Rama Resort lately, you are in for a pleasant culinary surprise. Two of the casino’s popular restaurants have undergone a renovation recently, and we caught up with Executive Chef, John Cordeaux to chat about what diners can expect from these reimagined spaces!

THE WILLOW Can you tell me about the changes at Willow and what people can expect from the new a-la-cart menu? John Cordeaux: We are still a Cantonese restaurant but we have given the menu a new twist adding some Thai, Hong Kong and Singapore dishes. We have added a small East meets West menu for lunch having some fun with plays on Asian pasta dishes and Asian style burgers using Bao as the bun. Why was the decision made to renovate Willow? JC: We wanted all of our guests to experience the delights of our Asian buffet consequently creating an expanded Asian buffet in Couchiching and making the Willow restaurant only an á la carte has become a win-win. >>

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 19


HERE’S WHAT’S NEW AT COUCHICHING COURT… New expansive redesign SEATS 120 ADDITIONAL GUESTS. OVER 100 FOOD ITEMS to choose from: • over 50 hot food items • 50 cold salads and toppings • over 40 varieties of dessert & toppings.

COUCHICHING COURT BUFFET Can you tell me about the live action cooking stations? What kind of things will be happening? JC: We have introduced a smoker with a capacity to smoke up to 300Lbs of product at one time. This will mean that we will add to our existing beef carving station an additional smoke carved item, beef brisket, pork belly, beef ribs or coil sausage for example. We will be grilling shish kebabs of beef, pork and chicken that will have been seasoned with authentic Middle Eastern marinades. On the dessert station in the evenings we will be baking cookies live on the station and serving them warm. As well, we have a lovely stone pizza oven where we will bake our pizzas, baked pasta dishes and other Mediterranean roast items. On the Asian station we have a Teppanyaki cooking table serving beef chicken and shrimp teppanyaki style. What change are you most excited about? JC: I am very excited about the whole experience that we are going to offer. Why was the decision made to renovate Couchiching Court? JC: We are always looking to elevate the dining experience here at Casino Rama Resort. This renovation was also undertaken to not only elevate the dining options but also to improve the guest experience in reducing time spent waiting to get into this very popular restaurant and also to make the ability to access all the offerings as easy and hassle free as possible.   Anything else regarding the renovations you want to mention? JC: We will be offering for a limited time the addition of Canadian prime rib of beef carved on the weekends. Also, our dessert offering has now been modified to give the guest an increased selection of smaller bites giving our guests the opportunity to taste a varied selection of items. We have also increased our ice cream selection from one flavor of ice cream to two flavors of ice cream and two flavors of sorbet. t

LIVE ACTION cooking stations. NEW BBQ SMOKER. FRESH STONE HEARTH OVEN PIZZAS. BAKED POTATO OVEN. NEW & ENHANCED FOOD STATIONS; ASIAN, FAR EAST AND MIDDLE EASTERN: • Interactive teppanyaki • Hot pot station • Tempura • Sushi & Dim Sum • Middle Eastern Shish-kebobs • Curry of the Day • Samosas/Pakoras/Daal SOUP & SALAD STATIONS: • Two build-your-own salad stations • Two homemade daily soups • Two Asian soup selections NEW DECADENT DESSERT BAR with live cookie baking station, soft serve ice cream & sorbet machine and our famous bread pudding. PLUS ALL YOUR CLASSIC FAVOURITES like southern fried chicken, liver and onions, fresh catch of the day and fresh salmon.


From beers and burgers to steak and lobster, you’ll never go hungry at the Great Indoors, with 8 unique restaurants to choose from


how sweet it is LOCAL BERRY FARMS By Gabrielle Tieman


a

fter a long winter season of packaged produce, flash frozen veggies and fruit from a bag, nothing quite tastes like summer has arrived like a fresh Ontario berry. That plucked straight off the vine pop of a sun warmed strawberry, ready to burst blackberry or spicy tart currant can elevate any meal from basic to restaurant worthy. The Orillia area has long been known for its farm-to-table homage to cooking. Local restaurants repeatedly choose to embrace their local farms – instead of shying away from the produce cultivated in their very own backyard. By choosing to utilize these homegrown ingredients as the driving force behind their renowned seasonal menus, both locals and tourists alike continue to return to these restaurants season after season for another taste.

St. Germain’s Steakhouse

at Casino Rama Resort offers an unforgettable fine dining experience in the heart of Ontario’s Lake Country. Dimly lit dining rooms and plush leather booths join to create a welcoming ambiance and offer front row seats to the exposed kitchen’s world class cooking show. St. Germain’s presents diners with a diverse yet timeless menu: featuring an evolving selection of both fresh surf and turf classic combinations alongside signature dishes with local twists. St. Germain’s head chef Todd Marshall proves that the key to elevating flavor and creating a show stopping menu is to utilize both local and Ontario grown produce; from write home worthy proteins like the Grilled Ontario Lamb Rack Chops and Newmarket King Cole ducks, to Niagara stone fruit chutneys and desserts featuring local fruit, the menu boasts the best and finest ingredients from Ontario farmers. “We use local produce in St. Germain’s as much as possible to showcase the bounty of great produce that Ontario has to offer,” says Chef Marshall. “This allows us to promote local farms and contribute and encourage farm to table cooking. Any time I get the opportunity to use local ingredients I take full advantage.” Marshall said the menu continues to evolve twice a year – once in May for the spring and summer season and then again in November for the fall and winter – as to best reflect the seasons and fresh produce available at both times of the year. “Inspiration primarily comes from the seasons and many past experiences within the restaurant industry,” said Marshall. “We do have some staple items that stay on [the menu] but I change up several appetizers and main courses to reflect the time of year: such as lighter salads and raw

applications in the summer and heavier braised items like Beef Short Ribs and Ontario Duck Confit in the fall.” During the peak summer months Marshall said he likes to source a variety of produce and berries from local farms, Barrie Hill Farm in Springwater, Ontario and Thunder Beach Berry Farm in Tiny, Ontario.

Barrie Hill Farm

is Southern Ontario’s leading farm destination for berry picking and farm fresh food. A staple in the region for over 40 years, this family owned and operated farmstead offers visitors the option to purchase farm fresh seasonal fruits and vegetables from their store or get their hands dirty in one of their pick-your-own fields – ripe with strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, pumpkins and more – depending on the season. Barrie Hill Farm also features an on-site café and bakery so pickers can cool down and share a treat before heading back out into the fields to fill another basket.

Thunder Beach Berry Farm welcomes pickers and berry fans of all ages to immerse themselves in a day at the farm. This third generation family owned and operated self-proclaimed You Pick berry farm boasts its produce as 100 per cent pesticide free so that families can feel confident in allowing their children to eat the fruit right from the bush. Strawberries are available for picking starting in mid-June and blueberries may be picked between the end of July and beginning of August – with all fruit priced per basket.

Ego’s Garden Centre and Farm Market in Coldwater, Ontario is a one-stop shop for all of your produce and outdoor needs; housing both a garden centre, plant nursery and seasonal farm market shoppers can pick up both their season’s plants as well as groceries simultaneously. Ego’s farm market operates from April to December and features a variety of seasonal farm fresh produce for purchase as well as pickyour-own strawberries, raspberries, peas and tomatoes.

McArthur’s Berry Farm in Oro Station has been a resident of the area since the mid-1800s. Focused solely on strawberries, McArthur’s farm offers pick your own options as well as pre-picked strawberries available for purchase. Visit their website for operating hours as they tend to fluctuate. t

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 23


Get in touch with the beauty, relaxation and tranquility of the Great Indoors. All spa and hotel guests have access to the indoor salt water horizon pool and hot tub, eucalyptus steam room, sauna and adult only fitness facility


// LIFESTYLE & CULTURE

SKIN All winter you’ve been anticipating ditching that coat and swapping boots for sandals. And every year it seems that day comes by sooner and faster (not that anyone is really complaining) and it tends to catch the most diligent of beauty regimen keepers off guard. Whether you book yourself into a salon (and pronto!) or are taking matters into your own hands, be sure to keep to a regular routine to maintain supple glowing skin at any age – and be sure to follow throughout the winter so that next year you are ahead of the game!

exfoliate It’s important to buff off that dry winter skin so you

can achieve a nice, summer glow. Any kind of body scrub that is rough (be it salt, sugar or baking soda) will do the trick! You can even DIY some exfoliating scrubs, just look for some inspiration on Pinterest. In a hurry? Get yourself a pair of exfoliating mittens or use a dry brush pre shower to encourage cell turnover (be warned - skin may be a bit sensitive when using a dry brush at first but your skin will quickly adapt). As an added bonus, exfoliating stimulates your skin to produce more collagen for younger tighter skin.

hydrate The one thing your skin needs a lot of in the hot summer months is moisture. Make sure to drink lots of water, and get your fill of healthy fruits and veggies. If you’re like me and get bored by water consider adding some fresh fruit or cucumber slices and reduce the amount of caffeinated drinks.

treat yourself Massage, rest, repeat. Besides boosting colla-

gen production, massage therapy has been shown to reduce headaches, anxiety and help with insomnia - and we all could use a little more beauty sleep.

protect Yes you’ve heard it several times before - wear sunscreen. But what is the point in indulging in a vigorous skin care routine when UV exposure can deplete skin’s collagen and is the leading cause of skin cancer? Use an SPF 15 or higher and don’t forget to put on those shades.

exercise Get moving, as increased activity can also help with

your summertime glow. Exercise gets the blood moving, which helps with circulation, as well as helps detoxify your system. t TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 25


PUT YOUR BUSINESS IN THE HANDS OF YOUR CUSTOMERS

CLAIM YOUR

FREE GOLD PROFILE

LEARN MORE AT

SAVEABUCK.COM/CLAIM


The 168 National Historic Sites managed by Parks Canada are places of profound importance to Canada. Each one tells its own story, representing an illustration of where Canada came from and where we are today. They reflect the identity, the very soul of Canada. 2017 marks the 150th birthday of our nation, so what better time to connect with our past and explore what it means to be Canadian. Here are f ive National Historic Sites within our region or a close drive away, each one worthy of an afternoon daytrip.

into history

BETHUNE MEMORIAL HOUSE in Gravenhurst Bethune Memorial House in Gravenhurst (297 John Street, phone 705-687-4261) was the childhood home of Dr. Norman Bethune, a man recognized as a hero both in Canada and China for his medical advances and dedication to providing medical care even in the face of personal danger to himself. The house was the manse of the Knox Presbyterian Church. Bethune was born here in 1890 while his father, a reverend, was preaching at the church. Bethune lived here for three years, until his father was assigned another ministry and the family moved. Bethune studied medicine at the University of Toronto, but suspended his studies to enlist in the Canadian Army Medical Corps as a stretcher bearer when World War One erupted. Wounded, he returned to Canada and finished his medical degree, then re-enlisted and rose to become the first chief medical officer of the newly formed Royal Canadian Air Force by 1919. After the war, Bethune became an advocate for the accessible medical care system for which Canada is famed today and pioneered new techniques and treatments for fighting tuberculosis (an illness he himself had contracted). When the Spanish Civil

War erupted in 1936, Bethune offered aid to the Nationalist side. There, he put together the world’s first mobile, battlefront blood transfusion service. After Spain, Bethune travelled to China in 1938 to render medical assistance to Chinese forces fighting the invading Japanese. He designed a mobile medical facility that could be carried on mules, published booklets to educate the Chinese about first aid and sanitation, and began training dozens of doctors and nurses. Tragically, Bethune died a year later of blood poisoning contracted from treating a wounded soldier. Because of his tireless work done in their country during the war, Norman Bethune is still revered in China. The Bethune House has been returned to its turn of the century appearance to reflect how it would have looked while the Bethune’s lived there. Visitors can tour the house on their own, or as part of guided tours during the summer. The twohour guided tour, which begins with a Chinese tea welcome, is the most comprehensive. As visitors are led through the house, exhibits and artifacts illustrate the life and accomplishments of Bethune. An adjoining visitor centre interprets the site, plays a biographical video on Bethune, and offers guests the opportunity to handle historic objects, such as period medical artifacts. Chinese delegates still visit the Bethune Memorial House bearing gifts; many of these tokens of appreciation are on display.>>

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 27


MNJIKANING FISH WEIRS in Orillia The Narrows—the neck of land that divides Lake Couchiching from Lake Simcoe—has always been a place of vast significance for Ontario’s First Nations. The Huron called it ‘the meeting place of the trails’, and gathered here to make treaties, engage in trade, and conduct ceremonies. They also praised the region for its abundant fishing. Indeed, Indigenous Peoples had been fishing here thousands of years, evidence of which exists in the form of ancient wooden stakes driven into the bottom of the Narrows. More than 5,000 years old, these wooden stakes are some of the earliest evidence of early fishery techniques in Canada and are the only ancient wooden weirs known to exist in Canada. Here, late Archaic Indigenous Peoples guided fish toward the stakes, which were woven with a latticework of brush and branches, to be caught in nets or speared. The weirs were still in use by the Huron-Wendat up until the 17th century. When Samuel de Champlain first saw these unusual weirs he described them as ‘claies’, and therefore the French referred to Lake Simcoe as Lac aux Claies. Today, Rama First Nation takes seriously their role as stewards of these ancient weirs.

SAINT-LOUIS MISSION in Tay In the early 1620s, many Jesuit missionaries came to the Huronia area to live among the Huron people and bring to them their Christian religion. They established a mission known as SainteMarie, which grew into a large self-contained village with two churches, a hospital, bakery, blacksmith, carpenter, cookhouse, and granary. This mission became a central headquarters for several smaller missions, including one known as St. Louis. The Jesuits gave the name St. Louis to a village established by the Ataronchronon, who were part of the Huron Confederacy, beside the Hogg River. It was to have a tragic history. In 1649, the Iroquois, traditional enemies of the Huron, attacked St. Louis. The Huron fought for a day but were overpowered and two Jesuit priests, Jean de Brebeuf and Gabriel Lalemant, were captured and tortured to death. In the face of the Iroquois assault, St. Marie was abandoned and most of the Huron abandoned their homeland. Today, the site of St. Louis is just a field surrounded by pine and mixed hardwood forest. A stone cairn explains the site’s significance as the place where the two missionaries—who were canonized by the pope in 1927—were killed, an event that marked the end of the Huron nation in Ontario and Jesuit influence in the area.

TRENT-SEVERN WATERWAY PETERBOROUGH LIFT LOCK Peterborough The scenic Trent-Severn Seaway winds 386 km (240 miles) through central Ontario. Connecting Lake Ontario at Trenton with Lake Huron at Port Severn, the waterway comprises lakes, rivers, and stretches of dug canal. First Nations have used the Trent-Severn watershed since at least 9000BC, as evidenced by petroglyphs and burial mounds along its length. In the 17th century, it served as a major route in the fur trade. But it was industrial and lumber concerns in the 19th century that compelled construction of a formal route capable of handling barges and larger watercraft. The first lock, a small wooden one, was built at Bobcaygeon in 1833. Many additional locks were added over the years. Though originally intended for industry, the waterway was also used for tourism and recreation, with steamships carrying tourists to resorts in the Kawarthas as early as the mid-1800s. Though certainly not the first, the most impressive lock is the Peterborough Lift Lock (220 Hunter Street E, phone 705-750-4953). Completed in 1904 and able to lift boats nearly 20m (65 feet) in length, the Peterborough Lift Lock is the world’s highest hydraulic lift, and one of only two in North America. The lock operates on an ingenious balance system that moves water between two chambers, lifting and lowering vessels travelling the waterway. Though the lock, along with the entire TrentSevern Waterway became obsolete to commercial travel after the opening of the Welland Canal in 1932, it continues to serve recreational craft and remains a marvel to watch. If Peterborough is too far of an excursion, head instead to Kirkfield. The Lift Lock there (the smaller of North America’s two hydraulic lift locks) is almost as impressive, and the mechanics operate the same. Or head west to Lock 44, the Big Chute Marine Railway, near Coldwater. Here the Severn River has carved a narrow chute out of solid granite, which proved impossible to navigate. To overcome this obstacle, engineers designed North America’s only marine railway which portages boats in a 100-ton open-carriage over an 18m (60ft) ridge between the Severn River and Gloucester Pool on Georgian Bay. Watching the skilled staff scramble up and down ladders to operate the slings and carriage that lift boats is pretty amazing. t


Come Bask In Our Sun Nestled on the shores of Lakes Simcoe and Couchiching, Orillia has

small town charm with big city

conveniences and offers an abundance of recreational, cultural and educational amenities for the entire family. Come visit our beautiful downtown for six blocks of shopping, dining and experiences which are only steps away from our picturesque waterfront and Port. Start your weekend with a visit to our popular Farmers’ Market, take a stroll down historic Mississaga Street and shop your way towards Couchiching Beach Park and the new Orillia Waterfront Centre. Come experience summer in Orillia!

orillia.ca ontarioslakecountry.com


A magical wedding at a magical price… at a magical destination! Overlooking sparkling Lake Joseph, Rocky Crest Resort is a true Muskoka getaway. We offer an array of accommodations from charming one- and two-bedroom guest rooms to fabulous dual-level loft suites. Each is fully equipped with all the modern comforts and conveniences you would expect from a premier resort.

Your special day will be extra-special at beautiful Rocky Crest Golf Resort in Muskoka

PHOTOS: JENNIFER COLBORNE, SAMANTHA ONG

BOOK YOUR WEDDING FOR JULY 22, 2017, AUG 19, 2017, OCT. 7, 2017, MAY 5, 12, 19, 20 OR 26, 2018 OR OCT. 6, 7, 13 OR 20, 2018 AND RECEIVE THE FOLLOWING FOR • • • • • • • • • • • •

JUST $10,000!

The services of our professional wedding planner Up to 70 guests* A three-night stay in a one-bedroom premium suite Marquee tent rental including Chivari chairs, white linens, and votive candles Armishaw Lake ceremony rental Champagne reception with chef selected hors d’œuvres Set three-course menu with coffee station Non-alcoholic punch 100 cupcakes ALL THIS Three-hour after-dinner bar service FOR Late-night coffee service station ** Late-night Muskoka-style bonfire

$10,000!

Please contact Melissa Felton at 705-375-2240 ext. 302 or mfelton@clublink.ca *Additional guests are welcome for $125 per person. **Subject to applicable tax and 18% administration fee. $1,000 DJ fee is additional. This offer is good only for July 22, 2017, Aug 19, 2017, Oct. 7, 2017, May 5, 12, 19, 20 or 26, 2018 or Oct. 6, 7, 13 or 20, 2018. This offer represents a significant discount off our standard rate of $170 per person. This offer can not be combined with any other package or promotion.

/ C lub Link We dding

w w w. m yc l u b l i n k we d d i n g . c a


RAMA FIRST NATION IS OPEN FOR GAMING ...and so much more! Photo Credits: Robert Snache, Spirithands Photography at spirithands.smugmug.com

T

he Chippewas of Rama First Nation (Rama) has been known as ‘the gathering place’ throughout history, where travellers journeyed to trade, seek counsel or medicines, and attend great meetings. Today, it is home to Casino Rama Resort, a tourism attraction that brings thousands of visitors to the area daily for gaming, shows, conventions, shopping and fine dining. Rama radiates with the spirit that has made us a thriving community. For centuries, the people have been leaders, entrepreneurs, artisans and harvesters. The Seven Grandfather teachings passed down from the Creator are at the centre of community culture. These traditions form the backbone of a community that draws strength and inspiration from the past while preparing for its future. The community is approximately 90-minutes north of Toronto on almost 2,500 acres of land. Guided by long-term community visioning which has built a sustainable economic foundation, this provides members and area residents with employment close to home and services for family living and recreation. Rama was chosen as the site for a First Nation casino after a comprehensive site selection process in 1994. With strong regional support and external partnerships in place, Rama was uniquely positioned to take on the challenge. Chief Rodney Noganosh is part of a leadership that continues to work towards a community vision that makes Rama the proud progressive First Nation it is today. Having served as a member of Council for 19 years since 1996 when Casino Rama Resort first opened its doors, he is serving his second term as Chief.

“In the early days, no one imagined the success that the Casino would become,” Chief Noganosh said. “As a member of Council, I have worked with the OLG and the operator to ensure that our mutual interests are served in the continued development of Casino Rama Resort.” Over the past 20 years, employment, business opportunities and local services have all grown in response to the tourism generated. Rama First Nation and Casino Rama Resort make social responsibility a priority supporting local institutions and charities, including the recent Orillia Soldiers’ Memorial Hospital expansion. Casino Rama Resort sees an estimated 3-million visitors yearly. It employs approximately 2,500 employees. Highlights from Rama’s business portfolio includes: • Two GTA Bingo facilities owned and operated by Rama Gaming, used as pilot sites under Ontario Lottery and Gaming’s modernization program for BINGO facilities

• St. Eugene Golf Resort and Casino in B.C., a three-way First Nation partnership • Rama’s Property management portfolio includes retail and professional office space. These businesses are among those managed by Rama’s Chief and Council, who are responsible for economic development. A trip through the community reveals the rewards of successful business planning and a clear vision. The Seniors Complex provides apartments and extended care for members in their golden years. Rama’s Health Clinic hosts visiting doctors and

health care specialists while Social Services provide counselling and support groups for members. Rama’s Emergency Services are supported with leading technology and highly trained crews, ensuring that members and Casino Rama Resort patrons receive prompt professional response and quality care. Rama’s elementary school provides cultural programming and education from Early Childhood to grade 8. Increased student success in secondary and post-secondary education, resulting in the largest per capita graduation rate in Ontario. “Every year, we hold a community graduation ceremony to celebrate student achievement. This year’s event will be held on First Nation’s day, June 21st, bringing a national cultural event together with the pride of educational achievement.” Rama was invited to sit on the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board, comprised of First Nations, Inuit and Métis business and community leaders from throughout Canada. The Board advises the federal government on strategies to increase the participation of Aboriginal people in the Canadian economy. “We’ve always been involved in business and have a mixture of entrepreneurs on Council, reflecting the nature of our ancestors,” said Chief Noganosh. Rama’s commitment to community and gaming management expertise remain focal points for the future. With long standing local and regional relationships flourishing, the Chippewas of Rama First Nation is poised to take the next step in solidifying itself as a leader in gaming. t TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 31


Village of COLDWATER

New Tarion Builder Turn key Home Prices starting at $335,000 Beautiful treed gently sloping lots to the rear. 13 lots to choose from on Quiet street in Village of Coldwater. Great village/town to raise your family. Town has schools, arena, curling rink and legion. Golf at Bonaire, ski 10 mins at Mt St Louis or Horseshoe Valley. Grocery store on main street with all the amenities in this artsy town, where life is still lived like you would imagine Mariposa Sunshine Village to be. Tarion builders and qualified owner builds welcome. Lots starting from 80,000 to 150,000

Michael J. Preston | Broker of record lakeview realty inc. Office: 705-325-3600 Cell: 705-309-1747 www.lakeviewrealty.ca | mjpreston@lakeviewrealty.ca

CRUISE LAKE MUSKOKA AT SUNSET a delicious dinner is optional.

TO BOOK SUNSET CRUISE TICKETS

Online – www.realmuskoka.com By phone - 1.866.687.6667 In person - Muskoka Wharf, Gravenhurst, ON TICKETS GO ON SALE MAY 1, 2017 SUNSET CRUISES BEGIN JUNE 17, 2017


// ACTIVE TRAVELLER

CREEK PADDLE UP A

WITH A

By Gabrielle Tieman

Housing a range of the most captivating natural settings and collection of scenic waterways in Ontario, there is no better way to explore Ontario’s Lake Country than by setting out onto the water. Connecting picturesque towns and tourist destinations throughout Simcoe County, this four season playground boasts a variety of open water lakes, quaint rivers and meandering streams all which provide the perfect backdrop for a day spent breathing in fresh air and enjoying some of the best paddling opportunities, recreational boating and water sports in Canada. Whether your preferred mode of paddle involves a kayak, canoe, SUP board or engine powered boat, Ontario’s Lake Country guarantees a waterway perfect for your skill level; from the family that is new to the water looking to reconnect with nature, the young group in search of a challenging activity for the day or the avid paddling enthusiast on a multi-day trek. “The beauty of this area is that you can

do a basic paddle or you can do an extensive paddle for a number of days across a number of waterways because a lot of the water is connected,” said Jennifer Whitley, Executive Director of Ontario’s Lake Country. “You can really customize the paddle for whatever people are looking for.” Ontario’s Lake Country has developed a user friendly Paddling Guide that features various routes that are geared towards all levels of experience – from beginner to intermediate and from five to 15 kilometers. Each route features a map, launch location details, a description of the area and historical points of interest along the way. Whether you’re a Lake Country local looking for a fresh perspective of your own familiar backyard or a visitor exploring the region with fresh eyes, the road less traveled is navigated by paddle. This is called Ontario’s Lake Country – come in and enjoy the lakes! >>

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 33


ORILLIA’S CULTURAL ROUTE Lake Couchiching | Easy

Travel back in time along the shores of Lake Couchiching. This 10 kilometer amateur level route is about discovering the rich history of the city of Orillia and its important ties to the water; paddlers will traverse cultural landmarks and navigate their way around famous monuments and historical buildings found along Lake Couchiching’s shoreline. Paddlers enter the water at the second beach in Couchiching Beach Park. The park is connected to Downtown Orillia and located on the grounds of the original village plot and industrial waterfront where steamboats carried lumber and passengers throughout the watershed – along the famous 383 kilometer long Trent-Severn Waterway canal – which is granting free access and lockage for the 2017 season along the famous canal in celebration of Canada’s 150 Anniversary. From the water, paddlers will see the historic Champlain Sailing Club as they enter tranquil Old Brewery Bay; then you will arrive at the Stephen Leacock Museum, the summer home of the famous author. Continue along to Tudhope Memorial Park where you can see a bronze statue of singer and poet Gordon Lightfoot and a memorial to the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald. More experienced paddlers can give the open waters a try; Whitley suggests heading away from the shorelines and crossing Lake Couchiching for a more challenging trek. Free parking is available at the park and the loop takes approximately 3-4 hours to complete. This route can be completed in either direction and has the opportunity to connect with great walking and cycling trails.

PATH TO THE FISH WEIRS

Lake Couchiching, Narrows & Lake Simcoe | Intermediate Paddle through a National Historical Site of Canada as you witness nature and history in tandem along the Path to the Fish Weirs route. This 13 kilometer paddle navigates travelers on a fairly advanced journey through Lake Simcoe and Lake Couchiching and into the Mnjikaning Fish Weirs. Located just below the surface in the Narrows – the connection of the two lakes – the weirs are considered to be one of the oldest human developments in Canada – dating back to approximately 3300 B.C. They were officially declared a National Historical site in 1982. Ojibwe for fish fence, the Mnjikaning weirs are the largest and best-preserved wooden fish weirs in Eastern North America. This system of wooden stakes were used to catch fish entering Lake Couchiching and were once rich in food – with the seasonal harvest providing sustenance to the First Nations and settler communities. The weirs were also known as a very important site of gathering and healing for First Nations people. Paddlers will also pass a number of small islands which connect with a multi-use trail and offer parks, picnic stops and beaches.

LAKE SIMCOE SHORES Lake Simcoe | Easy / Intermediate

This paddle is a destination for the fishing enthusiast looking for a quiet day spent out on the water. Pack a lunch, and your gear and drop a line in the well-known fishing hole of Lake Simcoe – the largest lake in Central Ontario. The lake offers opportunities for all individuals to fish; though with its close proximity to Toronto, you’re likely to not be alone – it receives heavy fishing pressure throughout the season, although it is most popular for ice fishing during the winter. For those wishing to simply paddle and enjoy the scenery, paddlers are encouraged to launch at McRae Point Provincial Park and hug the shoreline of the sparkling waters. Be sure to keep an eye out for herons, hawks and ospreys as they love to catch their next meal on the bountiful lake. This lake can be made as difficult as desired, pending how far you would like to journey in either direction.

BLACK RIVER TO WASDELL FALLS Green & Black River | Easy

Renowned as the most scenic route in all of Ontario’s Lake Country, this eight kilometer looping paddle in the township of Ramara features natural marvels you must witness. The paddle begins in the meandering Green River –a true hidden gem in the area for beginner paddlers and aptly named after the green tint of colour in the water – and then watch as the water changes before your eyes to a deep black as you connect with the Black River. “You can see the line where these two rivers meet,” said Whitley. “You see the green tinge to the water so clearly and then when you meet at the Black River it completely turns black. We have tried to capture it by drone before and you just can’t capture it accurately; you have to see it with your own eyes.” Tucked away within nature and surrounded by a stillness only found in the remote wilderness, Whitley said this route is great for new paddlers because it is easy to navigate and too shallow and narrow for motor boats to enter – so you’re almost guaranteed very little traffic and calm waters. “Everything about this route makes for a perfect, calm and serene paddle through these waterways for beginners,” said Whitley. “And for more seasoned paddlers, it is an ideal route for taking in nature and serenity.” Meander through beaver lodges, pass marsh areas filled with herons and fish and witness other wildlife in their natural habitats. Paddlers can also head towards Wasdell Falls where they will be able to view the first generating station constructed by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission in 1914.

SERENITY OF MACLEAN LAKE MacLean Lake | Easy

Pack your fishing rod and definitely your binoculars; this route is a must paddle according to Ontario’s Lake Country. The 15 kilometer MacLean Lake water trail is famous for its beautiful natural setting and almost guaranteed wildlife sightings. “There is a section of the river that goes through a marshy piece of land and it is beautiful,” said Whitley. “There is plenty of wildlife: Beavers, otters, ducks, fish, turtles, blue herons – lots of wildlife can be spotted along this route.” A perfect, cottage-country lake, this scenic paddle is also perfect for the property lover. Dotting the shoreline is a number of picture perfect private homes and cottages. The lake also connects to the notably serene Otter Lake, Gloucester Pool and Little Lake which can take paddlers all the way into Port Severn for those wishing to make a day of it and go for a more advanced trip. >>


GROUP BOOKING BONUS OFFER

Your year round Authentic Muskoka retreat on beautiful Lake Joseph. 49 rooms and cottages nestled among century old towering pines. Muskoka inspired cuisine with exemplary service. Wireless high speed internet throughout property, even on docks and beach.

BOOK YOUR NEXT MEETING WITH ACCOMMODATIONS AT SHERWOOD INN AND RECEIVE THE FOLLOWING AS OUR WAY OF SAYING “THANK YOU” FOR YOUR BUSINESS! BOOK 20 TO 50 ROOM NIGHTS Two certificates valid for two night’s accommodation for two at Sherwood Inn or Rocky Crest Golf Resort.

BOOK 51 TO 80 ROOM NIGHTS Two certificates valid for two night’s accommodation for two at Rocky Crest Golf Resort or Sherwood Inn, includes one complimentary breakfast, dinner for two, and a bottle of wine upon arrival.

BOOK 81+ ROOM NIGHTS Five night Sunday to Thursday stay in best room available at Sherwood Inn (excluding cottages) OR seven-night stay for two at Rocky Crest Golf Resort. Two certificates valid for two night’s accommodation for two at Sherwood Inn or Rocky Crest Golf Resort, includes one complimentary breakfast, dinner for two, and a bottle of wine upon arrival. Golf package including two foursomes at a ClubLink Muskoka course of your choice (not including cart).

To check availability and secure your exclusive Muskoka getaway, please call 1-866-252-5330 or email sisales@clublink.ca

Photos: Brent Long, Bry Morrow Photography, Marc Rochette

Quote RevPublishing17. Pricing based on paid room nights at end of event. Bonuses are valid after event. Cumulative room nights. Certificates valid to May 31, 2018. New business only Blackout dates apply. Golf restrictions apply.

1090 Sherwood Road, Port Carling, ON P0B 1J0 | sherwoodinn.ca

/SherwoodInnMuskoka

@_SherwoodInn


BASS LAKE SHORELINE Bass Lake | Easy

Located in the township of Oro-Medonte, this 11 kilometer looping route takes you around the quaint Bass Lake. Comprised of shallow, clear waters, this is the perfect lake for children and those getting into a boat for the first time. The shorelines have remained fairly undeveloped, creating a sense of seclusion and a chance to reconnect with nature. Keep your eyes sharp though, wildlife is likely to be spotted along the undeveloped west shoreline that includes a marsh area. This little lake is home to one of Ontario’s Provincial Parks and includes on site facilities such as camping, picnic areas, a beach, a playground, a retail store and rentals on site; you can also stop along the route to rest and grab a quick bite at a nearby restaurant. There are various locations to access the lake, but it is recommended that you launch in Bass Lake Provincial Park.

PADDLE OF NORTH COUCHICHING Lake Couchiching | Easy / Intermediate

The perfect route for a short family outing, this five kilometer route is a great paddle for young families or individuals looking to sneak in a quick workout during their day. A gateway route, this paddle connects to a number of picture perfect small inlets and picnic areas. It also lends a great opportunity to tie in the use of Washago Centennial Park – which has a great sandy beach perfect for swimming, relaxing, picnicking and playing. The village of Washago is also only a short distance from the park and a perfect day trip or a quick bite to eat. This route can be easily expanded by paddling further into Lake Couchiching or connecting into the Severn River.

MATCHEDASH TO GEORGIAN BAY

Matchedash Bay & Georgian Bay | Easy to Advanced A diverse and versatile route, this is known as a great activity spot for both new and experienced paddlers – especially those who love to kayak. These diverse interconnected bodies of water offer a range of conditions for the new paddler looking to practice on more open waters; spanning from Matchedash Bay to Green Island – an anchorage located in the Georgian Bay 30,000 Islands National Park. Paddlers can enjoy the crystal clear waters of Georgian Bay, experience the rugged beauty of the rock formations along Green Island and paddle through the beautiful scenic backdrop. Paddlers can also connect to the Coldwater River Route [See Coldwater River Voyage] through the opposite end of Matchedash Bay. For those with more experience, they can travel out further into the vast open water of Georgian Bay and explore further. But be forewarned: Ontario’s Lake Country notes that winds can blow out of nowhere along the Bay and transform those calm clear waters into extreme waves in the matter of minutes – so make sure you are a confident paddler before venturing away from the shoreline.

Visiting Ontario’s Lake Country? Don’t own your own equipment? Looking for a fresh, innovative workout to reawaken your love for the water? Check out these fantastic retailers located throughout the region! Bass Lake Provincial Park | Orillia

The provincial park currently offers a small fleet of canoes, paddle boats and kayaks for rent on a first-come first-served basis from the end of June until Labour Day. Each rental comes with all necessary equipment including Personal Floatation Devices, emergency kits and oars.

Breath of Fresh Air | Couchiching Beach

Breath of Fresh Air removes all of the hassle from renting equipment. Offering both kayak and SUP rentals, the rental kiosk will deliver to your location and pick it up after you are done so you do not have to worry about transporting the equipment. Breath of Fresh Air as well offers a mapped out scenic route for those new to the water.

Kayak-ity-yak | Tudhope Park KIOSK

More than a store and rental service, Kayak-ity-yak has made a name for themselves for offering lessons and guided tours of the lakes. Kayak and SUP rentals can also be made online with ease and then either picked up at a location or delivered straight to you, at an extra charge, ready to set out on the water.

Narrows Canoe and Kayak | Lake Simcoe

Combine fitness with nature and expand your vessel experience to try something new! Narrows Canoe and Kayak offer not only canoe and kayak rentals but also includes paddle boats and stand up paddle boards in their fleet. Pick-up and delivery is also available to private campgrounds and cottages as well as nearby Provincial Parks McRae Point Provincial Park, Mara Provincial Park and Bass Lake Provincial Park.

Sunrise Yoga Studio | Lake Couchiching / Lake Simcoe

Sunrise Yoga takes their poses into the sunshine, with classes held outdoors by the water for a truly zen experience with nature. Aside from traditional classes, Sunrise Yoga also hosts a number of unique special events throughout the warmer months; with past events including glow in the dark evening stand up paddle boarding and yoga on the water. Private classes can also be booked for families, bachelorettes or special events for a more intimate practice.

Swift Canoe and Kayak Outdoor Centres Georgian Bay

Situated at the entrance to Georgian Bay, Swift Canoe and Kayak features a large kayak and canoe rental fleet, on site test paddling and a fully equipped store for a one-stop shop before heading out on Georgian Bay. The staff is also avid kayakers and canoeists and knowledgeable in all aspects of the Bay – so renters are encouraged to ask as much as they would like about routes and equipment before heading out on their own adventure. t


10% OFF regular green fees only. Not valid with other specials or packages offered. Must mention this ad at time of booking! Promo code “Muskoka Resort�. For more on Clevelands House visit www.clevelandshouse.com

1185 Juddhaven Rd., Minett, ON P0B 1G0, Canada | (705) 765 7625 | therockgolf.com


THE CHIPPEWAS OF RAMA FIRST NATION POWWOW As far back as we can remember the Chippewas of Rama First Nation has been a meeting place for visitors. A community that is known for its hospitality; from the earliest explorers, to the fall fairs in the 1920’s. From the powwow under the big tent at the Rama Ball Field, to the competition powwows at the MASK arena, our community continues to enjoy being a host to the many guests who frequent the community on a daily basis. In the early 1970’s there was no song and dance happening in Rama First Nation and no sign of local powwows in the surrounding area. Emerson Nanigishkung, Co-founder of the Chippewas of Rama First Nation Thanksgiving Powwow, was working at the Native Canadian Centre in Toronto and had been surrounded by drumming and dancing on a weekly basis. Being inspired to bring back tradition in his own community, he said “I’m from the area, there’s nothing going on, so hey let’s try it”. Emerson also recalls how Rama had always been noted for its hospitality. In 1977, with the support of Rama First Nation band members, the community held its first annual Thanksgiving Powwow at Victoria Park. “It was a real community event [and] there was a lot of volunteerism at that time.” For generations people have gathered at Rama particularly in the autumn or harvest months to celebrate, socialize, eat, and have fun together. The following year, the entire community got involved in what was then a non-competition powwow held every Thanksgiving weekend. The Old Mall, which now houses Casino Rama Resort Administrative Offices, Victoria Park, the ball field at Rama, and also the Orillia Roller Skating Place were all used as venues for the annual Powwow. In 1986, the Rama Powwow again made another transformation as a result of a ‘Social Recreation Needs Assessment’ (SNRA) which began in 1983 and extended into 1985. The community was canvassed in what was referred to as ‘Kitchen Dialogue’ by former Chief Ted Williams who held leadership during this time. This was where members of the SRNA committee went to each household to ask a series of questions and sit in the kitchen (a place of comfort) to discuss the people’s dreams and aspirations


// HERE. SEE. DO.

that they had for the community. “Many of the success’s we find we have today have come from these kitchen table discussions.” relates Ted Williams, “Powwow was part of that talk and some members of the community built on this”. James Simcoe and Emerson Benson were both prominent and influential in rejuvenating the powwow at the time. Over the years, Rama First Nation has witnessed an expediential growth of the powwow, which was once mainly a small event where about a dozen community veterans would attend along with guests from Walpole, Wiky, Sarnia, and even Milwaukee. Now a competition powwow, the event has grown substantially, hosting between 3,000 - 5,000 visitors each year. It is an honour to have so many guests visit Rama to partake in the event which has been part of the community’s culture for several decades and continues to evolve. Had it not been for the indomitable will of a few individuals in the 1970’s, we would not be celebrating so many years of powwow at the Chippewas of Rama First Nation. The Chippewas of Rama First Nation 2017 Powwow will take place on August 19th and 20th at the John Snake Memorial Multi-Purpose Grounds located at 6030 Rama Road, Rama, Ontario. The community celebrated the unveiling of the grounds in honour of the late John Snake, Rama’s Cultural Coordinator for many years, who was instrumental in the early planning stages for the site. For more details contact the Chippewas of Rama Culture and Research Department at (705) 3253611 or email benc@ramafirstnation.ca. Miigwech (“Thank you”). t

COMPETITION POWWOW: A dance and drum contest event for prizes. These powwows give dancers and singers the opportunity to be the best that they can be, much like the Olympics. Categories for dance contests are determined by age and dance style. Rama First Nation recognizes all tiny tots (0-5) as winners. As such, we do not have a competition for them. Instead, they receive an honourarium for their participation and are encouraged for their interest in dancing as a leisure activity. Any dancers who do not wish to enter into contests are still welcome participants during all intertribal songs. TM

Photo Credits: Robert Snache, Spirithands Photography located at spirithands.smugmug.com

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 39


EVENTS in ONTARIO’S LAKE COUNTRY THE SPIRIT OF MARIPOSA MAY 1 - DEC 31 ORILLIA MUSEUM OF ART & HISTORY An exhibition celebrating 150 years for Orillia & Canada! Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town illustrates that Mariposa can be any small town in Canada, universal yet incomparably local. As landscape, people & stories grow, identity & sense of place grow. Stephen Leacock, Gordon Lightfoot, Elizabeth Wyn Wood & Arthur Shilling told their stories through different mediums, making art for all time. With a lens to our community, The Spirit of Mariposa explores our past & illuminates the future to inspire others to compose stories of their own! Orillia Museum of Art & History, Downtown Orillia, 705-326-2159.

35TH ANNUAL SPRING AUTOMOTIVE FLEA MARKET JUNE 1 - 4 BURL’S CREEK EVENT GROUNDS A car lover’s dream! Collectibles, classics, hard to find parts, car sales corral, show & shine, auto auction, hundreds of vendors, great food & more! Burl’s Creek Event Grounds, 180-8th Line South, Oro-Medonte, just off Hwy. 11, half-way between Orillia & Barrie, 705-487-3663 or info@thebafm.com (Thurs. - Sat: 7:00 am - 7:00 pm / Sun: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm) >>

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 41


SPRING BOAT, COTTAGE & OUTDOOR SHOW JUNE 9 - 11 Great in-water selection of new & pre-owned private & dealer boats, cottage & outdoor product displays, marine safety demonstrations, artists & artisans, variety of vendors & more! Port of Orillia & waterfront parks, Centennial Drive, Lake Couchiching, 705-326-4424 or 1-888-326-4424 (Fri: Noon - 8:00 pm / Sat: 10:00 am - 7:00 pm / Sun: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm).

STREETS ALIVE! OUTDOOR ART: MAPLE MASTERPIECES KICK-OFF CELEBRATION JUNE 17 | DOWNTOWN ORILLIA Orillia’s incredible 2017 Streets Alive! Outdoor art project, Maple Masterpieces, is unveiled! City streets come alive with a display of fifty 5’ tall maple leaf sculptures, featuring unique & exciting works by area artists, in celebration of the 150th birthdays of Orillia & Canada! Live entertainment, meet the artists, juried evaluation & beginning of People’s Choice voting. Downtown Orillia, 705-327-5093 (Winners to be announced at Starry Night Gallery & Studio Tour, Downtown Orillia, August 26)

NEW SUNSHINE FESTIVAL THEATRE: A DOG PARK JAMBOREE! JUNE 20 - JULY 29 A musical comedy for folks who love their pets! Dogs celebrate in an off-leash park on the eve of the summer solstice, when the star Sirius, patron saint of dogs, shines most brightly. A Jack Russell who thinks he’s Mick Jagger, a pair of Corgis who tell how to keep The Royals in line, & a Schnauzer pup with a tennis ball perform in a talent contest presided over by a down-on-his-luck, Springer Spaniel TV star! Presented by New Sunshine Festival. Book & lyrics by David Fanstone, music by Birds of Bellwoods. OCC Theatre, 64 Colborne St. East, Downtown Orillia, 705238-2236 or newsunfest@gmail.com (Tues. & Wed: 2:00 pm / Thurs: 2:00 & 7:30 pm / Fri. & Sat: 7:30 pm / No Show July 28)

CHRISTMAS IN JUNE JUNE 24 A festive day at the Port of Orillia! Large boater rendezvous & fabulous decorated boat contest, free to viewing public! Port of Orillia, Centennial Drive, Lake Couchiching, 705-326-4424 or 1-888-326-4424

ORILLIA CANADA DAY CELEBRATIONS! JULY 1 | COUCHICHING BEACH PARK

A fun-filled day celebrating Canada’s & Orillia’s 150th birthdays! Parade, giant birthday cake, live entertainment, fabulous fireworks at dusk! Buy a button & support the celebrations! Couchiching Beach Park, 705-2591948 or info@orilliacanadaday.ca

SUMMER THEATRE: BAREFOOT IN THE PARK JULY 5 - 21 | ORILLIA OPERA HOUSE A romantic comedy by Neil Simon. A newly-minted, straight-laced lawyer & his free-spirited bride move into a tiny, 5th floor, walk-up apartment in Manhattan. Contending with a lack of heat, leaking skylight, interfering mother & eccentric next door neighbour, they hilariously confront the challenges of love & marriage! Orillia Opera House, 705-326-8011 or 1-888-674-5542 (Tues: 2:00 pm / Wed. & Thurs: 2:00 & 7:30 pm / Fri: 7:30 pm / Group rate & Season Flex Pac available)

ONTARIO FAMILY FISHING WEEK JULY 1 - JULY 9 Licence-free fishing week throughout Ontario for Canadian residents! Local fishing events, festivals & derbies across the province. A great opportunity to connect with conservation through the enjoyment of fishing! Presented by Ontario Federation of Anglers & Hunters. 705-748-6324, Ext. 254 or offe@ofah.org (Anglers required to abide by Conservation Licence limits set out in current Ontario Recreational Fishing Regulations Summary)

MOVIES IN THE PARK VARIOUS DATES FROM JULY 5 - AUGUST 22 | COUCHICHING BEACH PARK Free screenings courtesy of Thor Mortors will be held at the Aqua Theatre at Couchiching Beach Park. Each film will begin at dusk or approximately 9:30 p.m. Concessions and washrooms will be open for this event. Arrive early for Aqua Theatre seating or bring a lawnchair of your own. For a list of all screenings and dates visit orillia.ca/en/visitorillia/MoviesInThePark. asp

MARIPOSA FOLK FESTIVAL JULY 7 - 9 | TUDHOPE PARK, DOWNTOWN ORILLIA The Mariposa Folk Festival was founded in 1961 in Orillia. The name ‘Mariposa’ was taken from Stephen Leacock’s book Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town, in which the ‘little town’ of the title, a thinly disguised Orillia, was called Mariposa. Incredibly, in its inaugural year, Orillia-native Gordon Lightfoot was deemed to be not talented enough to perform. 56 years and a great number of famous star performances later (including Lightfoot—invited back in later years—and Bruce Cockburn), the event is bigger than ever, with 25,000 people expected to watch more than 100 artists in a number of musical styles performing on ten stages. Most of the action takes place in Tudhope Park, but a special stage will be set-up in downtown Orillia as well. This summertime tradition in the Sunshine City is something every music fan simply must experience once in their life. For more information mariposafolk.com.

7TH ANNUAL RAMARA CLASSIC CAR SHOW JULY 8 As many as 150 classic cars, each one a stylish blending of function and art the likes of which is rarely seen in modern automobile design, line the waterfront. Many have their hoods raised, displaying the chrome of


UNCOVER THE

MYSTERIES OF GAMBLING... WITHOUT LOSING THE THRILLS PlaySmart is a new player education and support program designed to provide all players - new and seasoned - with facts, tools and advice to help them make better gambling choices. Whether a slots player or a fan of the lottery, PlaySmart’s tools and resources help players better understand key gambling concepts, how games work, and what resources are available in Ontario. Simply put, PlaySmart helps players make smart choices to keep their play fun! It’s always more fun to be in the know, and with PlaySmart it’s easy…

Visit PlaySmart.ca, or check out the PlaySmart Centre at your favourite gaming location.


souped-up engines that make grown men—and to be fair, a number of women—drool. It’s impossible not to admire the suggestion of pent-up power, the graceful lines, and artistry in every vehicle on display. It’s like the old line says, ‘they don’t make them like this anymore.’ When it comes to cars it’s not just wistfulness, it’s the literal truth.   If this sounds like your version of heaven, head to Pride Marine in Lagoon City, Ontario for the 7th annual Ramara Classic Car Show. Here, wander amongst and admire the classic, antique and performance cars and trucks on display. There’s more to the event than one-of-a-kind autos, however—more than two dozen vendors, a barbecue, 50s and 60s music by DJ Wild Willy, and more, all alongside the beautiful shores of Lake Simcoe Best of all, admission is free. ramarachamber.com

LEACOCK SUMMER FESTIVAL JULY 20 - 23 LEACOCK MUSEUM NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE A literary festival featuring award-winning authors & emerging writers. Readings, book signings, dinners & special events, including Feast of Thrones, a Cosplay dinner experience! Leacock Museum National Historic Site, 50 Museum Drive, 705-329-1908

WAYHOME MUSIC & ARTS FESTIVAL JULY 28 - 30 BURL’S CREEK EVENT GROUNDS A celebration of music, food, art & film! A place for people who love one or all of these things to come together to make a kaleidoscope of sound, smell, colour & spectacle! Burl’s Creek Event Grounds, 180-8th Line South, Oro-Medonte, just off Hwy. 11, half-way between Orillia & Barrie, info@wayhome.com

DOWNTOWN ORILLIA SUMMER BLOCK PARTY AND MURAL REVEAL! JULY 29 A street festival like no other! A fusion of art, music, food, sizzling sales, children’s activities, contests, giveaways, & the unveiling of a public art mural at 178 Mississaga Street East, celebrating Orillia’s 150th Anniversary! 9:00 am - 6:00 pm, Downtown Orillia, 705-325-3261

40TH ANNUAL ORILLIA SCOTTISH FESTIVAL JULY 14 - 16 | ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION Whether you’re a highlander or an outlander, everyone is a little Scottish during the weekend-long Orillia Scottish Festival. Currently in its 40th season, the festival is Orillia’s longest continuously running event. Its enduring appeal lies in the colour and spectacle that comes with Scottish culture—the kilted revelers, the lilt of the bagpipes, the exuberance of dancers performing timeless steps. Even if you’re not Scottish you’ll find much to enjoy, including a parade throughout downtown Orillia, pipe and drum competitions, and numerous vendors and entertainment at Couchiching Beach Park all-day Saturday. The Orillia Scottish Festival is a wee bit of fun on a summer’s day; check it out. facebook.com/orilliascottishfestival.

HERITAGE DAY COLDWATER JULY 16, 10:30 AM - 4PM CANADIANA MUSEUM A visit to the Coldwater Canadiana Museum is like emerging from a time machine into 19th century Ontario, with its historic buildings (including a 1840s-era log homestead), pioneer artifacts, and costumed staff. But at no time is the experience more immersive than during the annual Heritage Day festival. Visit the museum and experience life as it must have been in Coldwater over 100 years ago with pioneer craft demonstrations, a number of living history re-enactors bringing pioneer existence to life, and vintage farm and fire equipment displays. Special guests include musician Terry Connolly, paleobotanist Rudy Fecteau, and Dorothy Duncan, author and culinary historian. coldwatermuseum.com

ROTARY-LIONS ANNUAL FUNFEST AUGUST 4 - 7 COUCHICHING BEACH PARK Midway, games & a variety of vendors! Great fun for the whole family! Proceeds to local charities. Couchiching Beach Park, orillia@12lions.org

BOOTS & HEARTS COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL AUGUST 10 - 13 BURL’S CREEK EVENT GROUNDS A country music celebration & camping festival! Over 30 performers, from global superstars to emerging artists, including Keith Urban & Luke Bryan! Great food, merchant & craft vendors! Burl’s Creek Event Grounds, 180-8th Line South, Oro-Medonte, just off Hwy. 11, half-way between Orillia & Barrie, info@bootsandhearts.com >>


Must be nineteen (19) years of age or older with government issued photo identification. Those who have been trespassed and/or self-excluded from Casino Rama Resort or any OLG property and/or fail to meet Casino Rama Resort’s conditions of entry may not visit, participate in promotions and/or redeem offers. Offers do not apply to employees of Casino Rama Resort. Casino Rama Resort reserves the right to cancel or change this program without notice.


THE BIG FEASTIVAL! AUGUST 18 - 20 | BURL’S CREEK EVENT GROUNDS A feel good festival of food & music for all ages, originally conceived by chef & restaurateur, Jamie Oliver! Incredible entertainment includes American rock band Weezer, Ben Harper & the Innocent Criminals, The Strumbellas, & Fred Penner, Paw Patrol & Splash’n Boots for kids! Top chefs Chuck Hughes, Rob Gentile, Derek Dammann & more; cooking school, producers’ market & gourmet street food. Big Top, Little Dude’s Den, Fun Fair & Action Station for kids! Burl’s Creek Event Grounds, 180-8th Line South, Oro-Medonte, just off Hwy. 11, half-way between Orillia & Barrie. Children under 12 are free.

19TH ANNUAL CLASSIC CAR SHOW AUGUST 19 | DOWNTOWN ORILLIA 7TH ANNUAL COLDWATER STEAMPUNK FESTIVAL: VINTAGE CANADIANA! AUGUST 10 - 12 Canada’s 150th Steampunk’d Birthday! Step through the looking glass into Canada’s history, experience 1867 & meet characters from the past as they time travel to Coldwater. Vendors, artisans, buskers, musicians, duelling knights, vintage vehicles, old fashioned circus sideshow & more! Downtown Coldwater, Coldwater Mill & Canadiana Museum, 705-715-6950 or szybrtnshw66@gmail.com (Thurs: 6:00 - 8:00 pm / Fri: 10:00 am - 9:00 pm / Sat: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm / Free shuttle between Mill & Museum)

ORILLIA WATERFRONT FESTIVAL AUGUST 11 - 13 Orillia began its life as a port community on spectacularly scenic Lake Couchiching, and as a result the lake is very much a part of the town’s character. It is therefore fitting that Orillia’s premier summer festival is centered around and inspired by Lake Couchiching. The weekend-long Orillia Waterfront Festival is three days of fun activities and entertainment at the beautiful Port of Orillia and waterfront parks. Boating aficionados will take note of the in-water boat show featuring new, dealer trade, select brokerage and private owner boats, including everything from kayaks to cruisers. Over 100 vendors and exhibitors offer boating accessories, water sport equipment, cottage and outdoor products, summer fashions, good food, and unique hand-made crafts. Entertainment comes in the form of art exhibits, dog agility trials, a dock dogs diving contest, water ski shows and, on Sunday at noon, the beloved and hilarious cardboard boat race. Over 20,000 people attend the Orillia Waterfront Festival each year and it’s not hard to see why. orillia.com

LEGENDS AT THE LEGION: TRIBUTE ARTISTS WEEKEND! AUGUST 11 - 13 | ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION A celebration of Elvis, rock & roll, & country music legends! Artist warm-up Friday night, competitions & evening showcase Saturday, gospel show & finals Sunday. Great cash prizes & delicious BBQ steak! Everyone welcome! Royal Canadian Legion, 215 Mississaga Street East at waterfront, 705-325-8442

A dazzling collection of over 400 classic cars line Orillia’s downtown streets! The largest car show in the region! Live entertainment, excellent dining & great shopping. Downtown Orillia, 705-325-3261 (Free parking in downtown lots)

32ND ANNUAL CHIPPEWAS OF RAMA FIRST NATION POW WOW AUGUST 19 - 20 | JOHN SNAKE MEMORIAL MULTIPURPOSE GROUNDS A powwow is an ages-old tradition among many different First Nations communities. A joyful social gathering, its marked by singing, dancing, drumming and in general, honouring of their unique cultures. At the Chippewas of Rama Powwow, currently in its 31st year, everyone’s invited. It’s particularly appropriate that the Rama Chippewas host such a popular public event as their territory around Lake Couchiching is known as ‘the gathering place’ where great meetings were held between tribes and important agreements signed. During the event, you’ll witness some of Ontario’s finest Powwow singers and dancers as they compete against one another in this competition Powwow. Don’t miss the grand opening, a parade of dancers entering the arena one at a time in line and then twist and twirl in colorful spectacle in a big circle around the field as drummers and singers perform traditional music. In addition to the entertainers, the Powwow includes dozens of arts and crafts vendors, and plenty of great food. facebook.com/ramapowwow. >>


PLAN ON EXCITEMENT With nearly 16,000 square-feet of flexible event space equipped with state-of-the-art audio visual equipment, a variety of dining and catering options and luxury hotel with spa on-site, Casino Rama Resort can accommodate all your event needs from your next business meeting, conference, trade show, corporate event or retreat. For more information visit CasinoRama.com/events or call 705-238-5900 to speak directly to our Group Events team.

Must be nineteen (19) years of age or older with valid government issued photo identification to gain access to the gaming floor or Entertainment Centre. Those who have been trespassed and/or self-excluded from Casino Rama Resort or any OLG property may not visit Casino Rama Resort, participate in promotions and/or redeem offers.


WME NEOP

NT

L

VE

DE

RECREATIONAL COTTAGE OWNERSHIP

IN MUSKOKA ON A PRIVATE & PRISTINE SPRING-FED LAKE!

3RD ANNUAL ORILLIA RIB FEST AUGUST 25 - 27

COTTAGES FROM $81,900* $581/MONTH | $268/BI-WEEKLY1 Payments include HST!

This is not a timeshare; enjoy outright cottage ownership! Open Financing Available OAC. Move in and enjoy as early as TWO WEEKS from purchase!

Northern Heat Rib Series top North American teams serve up mouthwatering BBQ, accompanied by an array of other tasty treats including funnel cakes, ice cream, slushies, blooming onions, poutine, hot dogs & more! Arts, crafts, clothing & Kids’ Zone. Beer garden & live entertainment! Tudhope Park, Atherley Road, on the shores of Lake Couchiching, info@northernribseries.ca (Fri: 4:00 - 11:00 pm / Sat: 11:00 am - 11:00 pm / Sun: 11:00 am - 7:00 pm)

13TH ANNUAL STARRY NIGHT GALLERY & STUDIO TOUR AUGUST 26 | DOWNTOWN ORILLIA

Bonnie Lake in Bracebridge, Ontario

fully furnished

AN ALL-INCLUSIVE COTTAGE LIFESTYLE! • • • • • • • • • •

Family entertainment Daily supervised activities for kids Resort team & on-site maintenance Use of canoes, kayaks and paddle boards Beautiful combed sandy beach Hydro Grounds keeping Water/Septic Unlimited guest passes Mascot characters for kids

Get all of the above from $5,000/annum2!

open concept

BONNIE LAKE RESORT

BRACEBRIDGE 10 minutes from resort!

47TH ANNUAL FALL AUTOMOTIVE FLEA MARKET SEPTEMBER 7 - 10 | BURL’S CREEK EVENT GROUNDS A car lover’s dream! Collectibles, classics, hard to find parts, car sales corral, show & shine, auto auction, hundreds of vendors, great food & more! Burl’s Creek Event Grounds, 180-8th Line South, Oro-Medonte, just off Hwy. 11, half-way between Orillia & Barrie, 705-487-3663 or info@thebafm.com (Thurs. - Sat: 7:00 am - 7:00 pm / Sun: 7:00 am - 5:00 pm)

167TH ORILLIA FALL FAIR SEPTEMBER 8 - 10 | ODAS PARK

Call 1 (855) 866-0896 to book a resort tour today! Exclusive offer: visit.bonnielakeresort.com/today

A magical evening of art & music! Experience Orillia’s vibrant arts community & meet local artists in their galleries & studios. Live music in a variety of venues, restaurants & on the streets! 7:00 - 11:00 pm, Downtown Orillia, 705-325-7205

Expires June 18

*Excludes HST. A 20% deposit on the full purchase price including HST is required ($19,000) at the time of purchase. 1 Monthly payment includes HST. Open finance rate of 4.99% OAC over 180 months, with no penalties, or hidden fees, if you choose to pay down loan early. 2 Excludes HST. The annual all-inclusive resort management fee varies, according to your location on the resort.

Fun for all ages! Midway, demolition derby, horse shows & livestock competitions, crops & crafts competitions, children’s farm olympics, truck & tractor pull, singing contest, live entertainment, licensed refreshment area & more! Presented by Orillia District Agricultural Society. ODAS Park, 4500 Fairgrounds Road off Hwy. 12 West, 705325-0353 (Free bus from various Orillia locations). t


ONTARIO’S FAVOURITE ZIP LINE ADVENTURE PARKS

NOW WITH 5 LOCATIONS INCLUDING HIGHWAY 60 IN HUNTSVILLE, HORSESHOE VALLEY NEAR BARRIE, AND TWO IN THE GTA!

TREETOPTREKKING.COM


GROUP BOOKING BONUS OFFER Relax, refresh and reinvigorate your team at our full-service resort on beautiful Lake Joseph! Fully equipped main meeting room All guest rooms are full suites with separate living rooms Wireless high-speed internet BOOK YOUR NEXT MEETING WITH ACCOMMODATIONS AT ROCKY CREST GOLF RESORT AND RECEIVE THE FOLLOWING AS OUR WAY OF SAYING “THANK YOU” FOR YOUR BUSINESS! BOOK 20 TO 50 ROOM NIGHTS Two certificates valid for two night’s accommodation for two at Rocky Crest Golf Resort or Sherwood Inn.

BOOK 51 TO 75 ROOM NIGHTS Two certificates valid for two night’s accommodation for two at Rocky Crest Golf Resort or Sherwood Inn, includes one complimentary breakfast and dinner for two with a bottle of wine.

BOOK 76 TO 99 ROOM NIGHTS Two certificates valid for two night’s accommodation for two at Rocky Crest Golf Resort or Sherwood Inn, includes one complimentary breakfast and dinner for two with a bottle of wine. Two certificates for a golf foursome at a ClubLink Muskoka course of your choice (not including cart).

Photos: Kevan Ashworth, Marc Rochette

BOOK 100 OR MORE ROOM NIGHTS Complimentary seven-night stay for two at Rocky Crest Golf Resort or five night Sunday to Thursday stay in best room available (excluding cottages) at Sherwood Inn. Two certificates valid for two night’s accommodation for two at Rocky Crest Golf Resort or Sherwood Inn, includes one complimentary breakfast and a dinner for two with a bottle of wine. Two certificates for a golf foursome at a ClubLink Muskoka course of your choice (not including cart).

To check availability and secure your exclusive Muskoka getaway, please call 1-800-263-5763 or email rocsales@clublink.ca Quote RevPublishing17. Pricing based on paid room nights at end of event. Bonuses are valid after event. Cumulative room nights. Certificates valid to May 31, 2018. New business only. Blackout dates apply. Golf restrictions apply.

20 BARNWOOD DRIVE, MACTIER, ON P0C 1H0 | 705-375-2240 | rockycrest.ca

/RockyCrestResort

@_RockyCrest


Warm Weather

IS FAST APPROACHING DR. TUMI | BARRIE PLASTIC SURGERY • Breast Augmentation • Tummy Tuck • Liposuction

• Thigh Lift • Face Lift • Injectables

VISIT WWW.BARRIEPLASTICSURGERY.COM FOR A FULL LIST OF SERVICES

LEARN MORE ABOUT TODAY’S LEADING TECHNOLOGY IN FAT REDUCTION TREATMENT! BOOK YOUR CONSULTATION TODAY 102-34 QUARRY RIDGE RD. | BARRIE, ON INFO@BARRIEPLASTICSURGERY.COM | 705.737.9235

MEETING THE ENVIRONMENT AND YOUR NEEDS WITH THE UTMOST INTEGRITY AND CONCERN FOR OVER 25 YEARS

MUSKOKA STEEL DOCK COMPANY L.T.D. WE SPECIALIZE IN STEEL DOCK CONSTRUCTION, BUT THAT’S NOT ALL WE OFFER......... Summit Hydraulic Boat Lifts • Upper Structure Steel • Boat House Raising Steel Piling Is 6” Round Width, 1/2” Wall Thickness • Many Choices Of Decking 705.765.0080 | MUSKOKASTEELDOCKS@GMAIL.COM | CWB CERTIFIED | WWW.MUSKOKASTEELDOCK.COM


It doesn’t take a telescope to see the stars at the Great Indoors. Catch the biggest names in music and comedy, as well as production shows and sporting events live in our 5,000 seat state-of-the-art Entertainment Centre.


FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT

GEORGE THOROGOOD AND THE DESTROYERS ROCK PARTY TOUR THURSDAY, JUNE 1 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM TICKETS ARE $43/$55/$68

TOTO SATURDAY, JUNE 10 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM TICKETS ARE $32/$42/$55

LONESTAR

TERRY FATOR

FRIDAY, JUNE 2 SHOWTIME: 9 PM, DOORS OPEN: 8 PM TICKETS ARE $40/$50/$63

FRIDAY, JUNE 23 SHOWTIME: 9 PM, DOORS OPEN: 8 PM TICKETS ARE $48/$59/$76

THREE DOG NIGHT

THE FAB FOUR: THE ULTIMATE TRIBUTE

FRIDAY, JUNE 9 SHOWTIME: 9 PM, DOORS OPEN: 8 PM TICKETS ARE $30/$40/$50

SATURDAY, JUNE 24 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM TICKETS ARE $26/$37/$52

ZZ TOP THE TONNAGE TOUR SATURDAY, JUNE 3 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM TICKETS ARE $66/$76/$91

BURTON CUMMINGS AND BAND FRIDAY, JUNE 30 SHOWTIME: 9 PM, DOORS OPEN: 8 PM SATURDAY, JULY 1 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM TICKETS ARE $60/$72/$87

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 53


FOREIGNER

TREVOR NOAH

DONNY & MARIE

FRIDAY, JULY 7 SHOWTIME: 9 PM, DOORS OPEN: 8 PM SATURDAY, JULY 8 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM TICKETS ARE $50/$60/$70

SATURDAY, JULY 29 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM TICKETS ARE $39/$49/$65 MATURE CONTENT

SATURDAY, AUGUST 19 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM SUNDAY, AUGUST 20 SHOWTIME: 7 PM, DOORS OPEN: 6 PM TICKETS ARE $80/$90/$105

WAYNE BRADY

JEFF DUNHAM

FRANKIE VALLI & THE FOUR SEASONS

FRIDAY, JULY 14 SHOWTIME: 9 PM, DOORS OPEN: 8 PM TICKETS ARE $32/$42/$60 MATURE CONTENT

PERFECTLY UNBALANCED FRIDAY, AUGUST 4 SHOWTIME: 9 PM, DOORS OPEN: 8 PM TICKETS ARE $75/$85/$100 MATURE CONTENT

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25 SHOWTIME: 9 PM, DOORS OPEN: 8 PM SATURDAY, AUGUST 26 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM TICKETS ARE $56/$70/$85

KISS FREEDOM TO ROCK TOUR

LOUIS CHEUNG I’M OK TOUR

FRIDAY, AUGUST 18

SUNDAY, AUGUST 27

SHOWTIME: 9 PM, DOORS OPEN: 8 PM TICKETS ARE $125/$135/$170

SHOWTIME: 5 PM, DOORS OPEN: 4 PM TICKETS ARE $35/$45/$60 t

SHERYL CROW BE MYSELF TOUR SATURDAY, JULY 15 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM TICKETS ARE $75/$85/$100

HOWIE MANDEL FRIDAY, JULY 28 SHOWTIME: 9 PM, DOORS OPEN: 8 PM TICKETS ARE $46/$56/$71 MATURE CONTENT

DIANA ROSS IN THE NAME OF LOVE TOUR FRIDAY, JULY 21 SHOWTIME: 9 PM, DOORS OPEN: 8 PM SATURDAY, JULY 22 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM TICKETS ARE $70/$80/$95

SANTANA TRANSMOGRIFY TOUR 2017 SUNDAY, AUGUST 6 SHOWTIME: 8 PM, DOORS OPEN: 7 PM TICKETS ARE $85/$100/$115


With spinning wheels and flashing reels, the Great Indoors is the perfect place to play, with 2,500 slots and more than 110 table games


Special

EVENTS 2017 37TH ANNUAL ORILLIA PERCH FESTIVAL APRIL 22 - MAY 13 Canada’s Largest Registered Fishing Derby!

SPRING BOAT, COTTAGE & OUTDOOR SHOW JUNE 9 - 11 Free Admission!

CHRISTMAS IN JUNE

JUNE 24 Fabulous Decorated Boat Contest. Free to Viewing Public!

ORILLIA WATERFRONT FESTIVAL AUGUST 11 - 13 Free Admission!

orillia.com

SPECIAL EVENTS Some special events that are being held at Sainte-Marie throughout the summer. National Aboriginal Day – June 21 National Aboriginal Day is a time for all Canadians to celebrate the cultures of Indigenous peoples, Inuit and Metis, and their contributions to Canadian history. In recognition of National Aboriginal Day, Sainte-Marie offers Native singing, drumming and dancing, lacrosse and canoe demonstrations, kid’s heritage crafts, and Indigenous crafters.

What will you create? The Orillia Museum of Art & History is a hub of culture and heritage located down in the heart of Downtown Orillia featuring exhibitions and events for all ages. orilliamuseum.org | 30 Peter Street South, Orillia ON, L3V 5A9 | 705-326-2159 @OrilliaMuseum

Bagattaway Lacrosse Festival – June 24-25 The Bagattaway Lacrosse Festival, hosted jointly by Sainte-Marie among the Hurons and the Toronto Rock, offers the opportunity to experience the traditions of Canada’s national summer sport. Visit the site of one of the first recorded accounts of this Indigenous game and try your hand at skills competitions. In addition, you’ll have the opportunity to meet Toronto Rock players.


“© May 2017 Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation”

// MUSKOKA SPOTLIGHT

TIME CAPSULE SAINTE-MARIE AMONG THE HURONS

From the earliest date of the French Settlement at Quebec in the 17th century, the call of the wilderness was overwhelming. Samuel de Champlain, Quebec’s founder and first governor was an avid explorer and cartographer. So too were French Jesuit missionaries. Their legacy lives on in the form of the impressively reconstructed Sainte-Marie among the Huron mission near Midland. For fifty years, since its may 1967 opening, the living history museum has been transporting people four centuries into Ontario’s past, to a time when Sainte-Marie was the only European settlement in Ontario. The site is not only among the province’s most historically important locations, but also one of its most engaging. Their Jesuit’s zeal to spread the word of God to the First Nations brought them deep into the continent’s interior and bringing them into contact with the large and powerful Huron nation on the northeastern shores of Lake Huron, some 800 miles west of Quebec. In 1639, missionaries established a substantial fortified mission in the center of the Huron’s domain, which they called Sainte-Marie among the Hurons and which served as a headquarters for several other smaller missions established nearby. Sainte-Marie was a well-fortified compound, with large masonry tower-like bastions and some stone curtain walls on the north and east sides, and stockade walls edging wet moats on the south and west sides. The mission was a highly efficient village with a blacksmith, carpenter shop, granary, a barn that housed a number of hardy livestock, chapel, hospital, and bunkhouses. It was home not only to priests but also donnes (workers who served God but did not take holy vows) and a handful of soldiers. By the mid-1640s, SainteMarie was home to over 60 people, making it the largest European community in Canada west of Quebec and home to a fifth of French Canada’s entire population. However, the missions were doomed. Successive epidemics of smallpox had killed well over half of the once-powerful Huron nation. The Huron, quite naturally, grew suspicious of the Black Robes. It seemed wherever they went, this strange and deadly illness appeared. Worse, the Huron’s ancient enemy, the Iroquois, took advantage of their weakness to attack. Starting in 1647, they set Huronia ablaze as they destroyed one village after another. >>

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 57


“© May 2017 Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation”

Finally they set upon the Jesuit missions. Over one thousand Iroquois launched an attack on St. Ignace, about five miles from St. Marie along the shore. Only three of the mission’s four hundred Huron escaped death or capture. Next, they attacked St. Louis, where they captured two Jesuits, Jean de Brebeuf and Gabriel Lalement, and tortured them to death in grisly fashion. Fearing an assault, Sainte-Marie’s residents abandoned the mission, which they burned as they left. On Georgian Bay’s Christian Island, the Huron and Jesuits built Saint-Marie II and settled in for the winter. Hundreds died from starvation; those who ventured across the ice to the main land to hunt risked death by Iroquois war bands. In June 1650, the French, accompanied by about 300 Christian Hurons, left for Quebec. The remainder of the Huron dispersed among other friendly tribes. The once strong Huron nation, and the Jesuits’ dream of a new Christian society, had disappeared from Ontario forever. But the ruins of Sainte-Marie weren’t forgotten. In the early 20th century interest in the site grew, leading to extensive archaeological work

beginning in the 1940s. In 1967, a meticulously researched, full-scale reconstruction of the mission on her original site was open to the public (though work wouldn’t be completely finished until the following year). After 300 years, Sainte-Marie had risen again from the ashes.

VISITING When you visit Sainte-Marie among the Hurons, you walk through a recreated village to witness a bit of early 17th century life in what was then the wilderness of Ontario. As you explore the historic site, you’ll sense the challenges faced by those who founded and lived at this famous mission (a location so remote, a letter took two years to travel to France), as well as the religious conviction that drove the Jesuits to face such hardships. Throughout the summer season, daily existence at the mission is brought to life in informative demonstrations by costumed staff and “hands-on” activities every day that share

aspects of life in the 17th century. These include fire-starting and cooking, native games, period music, and the medicinal techniques employed by Jesuits and Native peoples. Your visit begins with a colourful audio-visual presentation in the theatre that sets the stage for your journey. When the lights turn on at the end of the short film, a wall in the theatre slides open and your doorway to the 17th century presents itself. A few steps later and you find yourself transported 370 years into the past. The first building you’ll come to is a soldier’s barracks, flanked by stone bastions that lend the mission a distinctly military impression. In truth, military presence was limited. 22 soldiers were garrisoned here in 1644, but the number had sunk to only 6 in 1649 even as the threat to the region by the Iroquois was looming. A number of stone bastions, and several lengths of stone wall, were constructed in 1647 to make up for the lack of soldiers. Two stone bastions have been rebuilt around the standing remains of original structures. Elsewhere on-site, original stonework excavated in 1941 has been preserved as they represent the first European masonry in Ontario. >>


discover muskoka

COTTAGE FINDS

ERA 67

Welcome to Era 67, where each signature dish is made fresh to order. Our steaks are cut fresh daily while the aromas of our homemade soups and sauces filter through the kitchen. This belief in preparing all of our food fresh stems from our pure passion for Canadian culture, land and seas.

Cottage Finds showcases a variety of hidden gems, one-of-a-kind shops, traditional stores, boutiques, leading edge restaurants, pubs and live entertainment that engage visitors and locals alike. Just park your car and explore cottage country.

64 Mississaga Street West, Orillia, ON 705.259.1867 | era67.com

SUNSET CRUISES

Muskoka’s shimmering blue waters, its majestic green pines, its spectacular scenery all await your discovery aboard the Sunset Cruises Peerless II & Idyllwood. Captain Potts, will show you Muskoka scenery accessible only by our smaller ships. A whole new discovery. Email us at info@sunsetcruises.ca for more information. 100 Joseph Street, Port Carling, ON 705.645.2462 | sunsetcruises.ca |


In the early 20th century interest in the site grew, leading to “© May 2017 Ontario Tourism Marketing Partnership Corporation”

extensive archaeological work beginning in the 1940s…After 300 years, Sainte-Marie had risen again from the ashes.

Another highlight is the blacksmith shop, which was originally staffed by a Jesuit lay brother. The Huron were so impressed by the blacksmith’s skills they called the French Agnonha, or ‘iron people.’ Iron was scarce due to the difficulty in transporting it by canoe and so was used sparingly. Because coal was not available, Sainte-Marie’s blacksmith would have often relied on wood embers for his forge making the heating of metal a challenging task. Items that were manufactured at Sainte-Marie included nails, hinges, spikes and small structural items. The Jesuits proved as skilled in agricultural pursuits as in spreading the word of God. The granary is impressive in size, and needed to be as the mission boasted a three-year surplus of corn grown in fields outside its walls. As worshipping Catholics, the priests grew wheat for sacramental bread and cultivated local grapes for wine. A barn housed chickens, pigs and cows; milk and eggs were important for French diets and pork supplemented the vegetarian diet of the Huron. Livestock had to be carefully selected to survive the harsh conditions of frontier Canada; watch for Houdan chickens, with their plumed heads, and Canadienne cattle, a particularly rugged breed. The heart of the mission, quite naturally, is the Church of Saint Joseph. Built to accommodate the spiritual needs of the Huron, and to inspire interest in Christianity, the Church of Saint Joseph represents Jesuit efforts to bridge cultural divides between the native and French cultures. Here, visitors solemnly look upon the graves of the martyred priests, Jean de Brebeuf and Gabriel Lalemant. Elsewhere on-site, one finds a smaller chapel exclusively used for European-style worship by the Jesuits.

Other sites of particular interest include Sainte-Marie’s hospital, the first in Ontario; a waterway whose exact purpose remains unknown and controversial to this day (was it a locked canal permitting canoe entrance from the river as reconstructed, or was it perhaps the race for a gristmill, a source for fresh water, or even a means of draining the wet soil?); and the Huron longhouse, where you listen to the retelling of native legends. Complete your tour at the Sainte-Marie Museum which puts the mission in historic context. The museum explains the motives and transportation of early explorers, the society and culture they left behind in Europe, what they came to do in New France, and how they learned to adapt to a new way of life in Huronia. Visitors also learn about the fur trade, the role of the canoe in opening up Canada, and the 20th century processes of archaeological excavation and reconstruction of Sainte-Marie. Among the exhibits are hundreds of fascinating artifacts excavated from the ruins of Sainte-Marie. One artifact on display in 2017 stands out: Samuel de Champlain’s Astrolabe. This navigational aid, found in 1867 in Cobden, Ontario, and attributed to the famed explorer brings us closer to the man and his role as an explorer who initiated contact with the First Nations cultures he encountered. It’s one of only a handful of astrolabes on display in the world today. Take the short drive to Midland’s Sainte-Marie among the Hurons, a trip measured not in miles but in years—more than 370 years, in fact. There you’ll discover one of Ontario’s most historically relevant and immersive sites, and experience an early example of the cultural diversity that makes modern Canada so special. t


The Perfect Spot PHOTO: MICHAEL STEINGARD

TO TIE THE KNOT… MUSKOKA STYLE!

$11,000

++

Wedding Package SELECT DATES

NOVEMBER 2017 THROUGH APRIL 2018 To secure your date please contact Christina VanKempen, Catering Manager cvankempen@clublink.ca 1-800-461-4233 ext. 431

INCLUDES: • Exclusive use of Sherwood Inn Resort from 4 p.m. on day of arrival to 11 a.m. on day of departure • Services of on-site catering manager for planning, preparation, and execution of your wedding • Wedding menu tasting for the wedding couple • Welcome bonfire with s’more kits • Standard one-hour cocktail reception • Reception hors d’oeuvres (three per person, resort’s choice) • Three-course dinner (choice of menu, max. 70 guests) • Wine service with dinner (two glasses per guest, resort’s choice) • One hour of standard host bar following dinner • Coffee and tea station • Late night buffet for 70 guests • DJ for post dinner dancing (Resort’s choice) • Tealight holders and candles on dining tables • Run of the House room rate • Personalized welcome agenda for each guest • Set up and tear down of ceremony and reception • Two nights’ accommodation at Sherwood Inn Resort with breakfast each morning for the bride and groom • Anniversary one-night stay with breakfast • SOCAN and Re-Sound Fees ADDITIONS: • Additional guests (71+) are welcome for $125 per person to a maximum of 120 guests • Add a Friday night welcome dinner for your guests • Increase host bar service RUN OF THE HOUSE ROOM RATE - $139 • Includes gourmet buffet breakfast, based on single or double occupancy per night • Rate is subject to a $15 resort amenity fee, 15% gratuity on the breakfast portion and 13% HST Taxes and gratuities not included. Minimum commitment of 40 rooms over two nights.

S H E R W O O D I N N . C A


HIKING MUSKOKA


“In every walk with nature, one receives far more than he seeks’ – John Muir BY MEGAN PASCHE

Muskoka is the perfect place to get out and experience nature. The air is clean, crisp and fresh, and nature engulfs you wherever you go. The land is dotted with hundreds of lakes, a never ending blanket of trees (of all different species including spruce, pine, poplar, balsam and birch), and there are spots that are soothing to both the body and mind. Hikers have over two hundred and fifty species of birds, fifty types of mammals and twenty-five species of amphibians to discover.

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 63


Muskoka is the perfect place to get out and experience nature. The air is clean, crisp and fresh, and nature engulfs you wherever you go. The land is dotted with hundreds of lakes, a never ending blankets of trees, and there are spots that are soothing to both the body and mind. Hikers have over two hundred and fifty species of birds, fifty types of mammals and twenty-five species of amphibians to discover. There are endless trails to get out and explore, and they all range in difficulty and length, from family friendly strolls to tough hikes with hilly terrain. There are trails for hikers, bikers and even horseback riders. Whichever trail you choose, there is something special about heading out and exploring Muskoka’s natural landscape. Practically speaking, when you head out on a hike, make sure to wear comfortable shoes, bring snacks, water and a camera, and be sure to let someone know your hiking plans, as cell phones will likely not work when you get out onto some of the trails. Many trails will lead you out to stunning viewpoints so you can take in some of Muskoka’s sweeping vistas.

ROSSEAU Skeleton Lake Fish Hatchery Trail The trail is 1km of level gravel path and is accessible off of Hatchery Road. This former fish hatchery was used to produce trout to release into local lakes and streams, but closed in the early 1990s. The path will take you past the area where work is being done to naturalize the site, and you will pass several different habitats on your way.

PORT CARLING Hazelwood Trail This trail is 5km return and once served as a link between Port Carling and Port Sandfield. The trail passes through a forest, between bluffs and beside a pond. It is of moderate difficulty. A parking lot can be found off of Hazlewood Road. Huckleberry Rock Trail This is a 2.5km trail that leads hikers to a scenic lookout over Lake Muskoka. The trail can be accessed from Milford Bay Road. Along this trail, you’ll find some of the oldest rocks in the world, some of them dating back millions of years.

HUNTSVILLE Avery Park Trail This is a short trail that leads hikers through a beautiful old forest. It is about 1km long and can be accessed from Yonge Street. Memorial Park Trails These trails are in Southeast Huntsville and wind through forest and eventually along the Muskoka River. Trails are accessed from the Centennial Centre. Fairy Vista Trail This 3.4km all season trail will bring you through fields, forests and wetlands. It can be accessed by going to the corner of Hwy #60 and Fairyview Drive. This trail is paved, so it can be used for hiking, cycling, rollerblading and is wheelchair accessible. Hunter’s Bay Trail Parking is available at Avery Beach at the lake side of Yonge Street. This 3.8km trail is part of the Trans Canada Trail, and is good for walking or cycling. The trail stretches along the river, and there is a 450-foot section of it that actually floats on Hunter’s Bay, making it a great place to stop for a swim. >>


FREE $10 GIFT CARD Present this ad at Tanger Shopper Services in Cookstown for your Free $10 Tanger Gift Card. Limit one per household. Expires 10/31/17 Code 4273317

TAKE A TIME OUT AT TANGER OUTLETS to find the latest fashions for less. Discover your style, your way.

UNDER ARMOUR PANDORA TOMMY HILFIGER EDDIE BAUER GAP FACTORY STORE H&M BANANA REPUBLIC FACTORY STORE SWAROVSKI BATH & BODY WORKS

When life calls for a

PADERNO KITCHEN STORE CALVIN KLEIN FAMOUS FOOTWEAR AND MANY MORE

COOKSTOWN, ON 3311 County Rd 89 (705) 458-1371 Hwy 400 at Hwy 89 TangerOutletsCanada.com

Shop Outlets. Shop Tanger.

Tanger Outlets Cookstown is open Victoria Day, Canada Day, Civic Holiday, Labour Day and Thanksgiving Day. Visit TangerOutletsCanada.com for additional holiday hours.

Shop Downtown Orillia

Over 150 shops and 25+ restaurants

CHECK OUT OUR UPCOMING EVENTS

Streets Aliv e! Maple Masterpie ces Outdoor A rt Exhibit

June 17– Oct 14

Mariposa Folk Festival Downtown Stage

Downtown Summer Block Party & Mural Reveal

July 7-8

July 29

Client: Downtown Orillia Management Board

Agency: Twig

Downtown Classic Car Show

ht and Starry Nig ur & To ry Galle Farm Downtown ner in to Table D

August 19

Job: Casino Rama Magazine 1/2 Page Ad

August 26

DOWNTOWNORILLIA.CA

Artwork Dimension: 8.0556” x 4.8819”


BRACEBRIDGE Bracebridge Bay Trail This is a short trail (1.5km) that begins at the Bracebridge Visitors Centre and follows the bay around to the falls. This trail also features informational plaques along the trail, which will enlighten hikers regarding the history of Bracebridge. Bracebridge Resource Management Trails This set of trails varies in length from 3km to 8km. They are said to be some of the most scenic trails in the area. The centre, where parking is available, is off of Highway 11. These trails are rated easy to moderate. Wilson Fall’s Trail This trail stretches 2km to 5km. The highlight of this trail is Wilson’s Creek Falls, which is 41 feet high. A bridge will take you right over the falls for a stunning view. There are various access points, but the trailhead is located at Macaulay Public School on Cedar Lane. This is one of the more difficult trails, as it features a lot of steep hills. Strawberry Point Trail Parking for this trail is on Strawberry Bay Road. The trail stretches though the woods and eventually leads to an area that will give you a panoramic view of Lake Muskoka. The trail continues on and eventually leads you to a spot that is great for swimming or picnicking.

GRAVENHURST Brydon’s Bay Trail Parking for this trail is on Old Portage Road. The trail follows a family friendly, 2.3km loop, and wanders through an old pine forest. Hahne Farm Trail This is a series of short trails that loops around a marsh, giving hikers a beautiful view. Parking is available under the water tower in Pine Ridge. Old Stone Road Trail This old trail was once used as an old wagon path between Bala and Gravenhurst. This trail is 6km one way and goes mostly through forest and over the occasional marsh. The trailhead is one Muldrew Lake Road.

BALA Cranberry Trails This 14km of trails wind through some interesting geography, ranging from wetland to rock to forested area. Parking is available at 1074 Cranberry Road. More information can be found at: Muskoka Trails Council www.muskokatrailscouncil.com t


After a full day exploring the Great Indoors, unwind and stay the night in our luxury all-suite hotel. Learn about hotel packages and book online at casinorama.com


TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 1

Casino rama resort spring summer 2017  

Explore Casino Rama Resort and all there is to see and do in Ontario's Lake Country for Spring/Summer 2017 in this bi-yearly publication.