VOICE Magazine: January 21, 2022

Page 1

Voice Magazine Magazine

www.voicesb.com Friday, January 21, 2022

Art

Artist Marie Schoeff ’s solo exhibition at Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art

25

Courtesy image

SB Districts

Insights on Santa Barbara Districts shared by Helene Schneider, Dale Francisco, and H. Bendy White

6

Opera Santa Barbara’s sublime performance of Semele reviewed by Robert F. Adams

16

In This Issue

Cover Photo Courtesy of the Author

Photo by Priscilla

Review

At Heaven’s Door: What Shared Journeys to the Afterlife Teach About Dying Well and Living Better by William J. Peters, was released this week by Simon & Schuster.

New Business

Community News. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 21 Josef Woodard: Sounds About Town. . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

SBIFF

Cinema

Sigrid Toye: Harbor Voice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Photo courtesy of Claire Waterhouse

John Palminteri’s Community Voice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Harlan Green: Economic Voice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Calendar..9-11* Cinema PAGE 8

VOICE Magazine is a 17 year SBIFF sponsor

Photo courtesy of Jason Lewis

Galleries & Art Venues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 4 - 2 7 * Español y Inglés

Photo courtesy of SBIFF

Community Market. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-23

Athleta opens its doors on State Street

12

Benedict Cumberbatch to recieve SBIFF Cinema Vanguard Award

21

An interview with Claire Waterhouse, SBIFF Education Manager

Chronicling stories of shared transformative and healing experiences.

15

VOICE Magazine Cover Story see page

2


2

At Heaven’s Door: “What Shared Journeys to the Afterlife Teach About Dying Well and Living Better” released this week by Simon & Schuster By Christopher Davis / WAVE Comm SB

I

N 2000, the now internationally recognized end-of-life expert and grief and bereavement therapist William Peters was volunteering at the Zen Hospice Project in San Francisco when something strange happened. He was reading aloud to a patient when suddenly, he felt himself floating in midair, completely out of his body. The patient, who was also aloft, looked at him and smiled. The next moment, Peters felt himself return to his body, but the patient never regained consciousness and died. Perplexed and stunned, Peters began searching for other people who had similar experiences and for answers explaining what had happened.

From internationally recognized endof-life expert and grief therapist William J. Peters comes a groundbreaking, deeply-researched exploration – rich with powerful personal stories – of the endof-life phenomena known as a shared death experience: At Heaven’s Door’s an essential guide to a better life and a better death. The book is available online or at local bookstores including Chaucer’s, Paradise Found, Family Therapy Institute, and Yoga Soup.

At Heaven’s Door: What Shared Journeys to the Afterlife Teach About Dying Well and Living Better is the culmination of that work. Peters, who holds degrees from Harvard’s Graduate School of Education and UC Berkeley, has spent nearly 20 years gathering and meticulously categorizing stories of people who have experienced what is known as a “shared death experience” (or SDE). At Heaven’s Door is filled with extraordinary moments – which cut across continents and cultures – of individuals who have shared in the passing of their loved ones, including bereaved parents who experience

January 21, 2022

Courtesy photo

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

Author William J. Peters

their children’s entry into the afterlife, spouses departing this earth after decades together, and more. Peters’ research led him to discover that these experiences are open secrets in the hospice and medical communities. In speaking with individuals who have had SDEs, Peters found that SDEs offered more than just a final glimpse of a loved one. People reported feeling more at peace with death, more comfortable managing their grief, and they frequently found greater purpose and meaning in their own lives. Peters is a leader in this field; he is the founder of the Shared Crossing Project and director of the Shared Crossing Research Initiative, which recently published the first research article on SDEs in the American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. With At Heaven’s Door, he shares his pioneering research and powerful cases with readers for the first time. Readers will learn about the different types of SDEs, the experiences of those who have been lucky to share in the crossings of their loved ones, and practices you can implement in your own life to help make the passing of your loved ones more conscious and connected. He answers questions like, what can explain these shared death experiences? What do these experiences tell us about what lies beyond? And, most importantly, how can they help take away the sting of death and better prepare us for our own final moments? How can we have both a better life and a better death? We are living through a period of immeasurable loss. More than one in 400 Americans has died due to COVID, creating ripples of bereavement and loss. Death is also finding us sooner; in 2021, U.S. life expectancy fell to its lowest levels in nearly 20 years and experienced the biggest single year drop since the worst days of World War II. Not only are we unable to outrun death, we cannot

even keep it at bay. Peters’ message – both for the dying and those they leave behind – is a balm, comforting and inspiring. He writes, “I hope these stories from ordinary people just like you and me will provide solace for those of you who may fear death, and inspiration for those of you who want to cross this great divide with confidence and courage.” At Heaven’s Door: What Shared Journeys to the Afterlife Teach Us About Dying Well and Living Better was released by Simon & Schuster, this week. For more information, visit www.sharedcrossing.com and www.sharedcrossing.com/story-library.

n

William Peters is the founder of the Shared Crossing Project and director of its Research Initiative. He is a psychotherapist at the Family Therapy Institute of Santa Barbara. Recognized as a global leader in the field of shared death studies, he has spent decades studying end-of-life experiences. Previously, Peters worked as a hospice volunteer with the Zen Hospice Project in San Francisco and as a teacher and social worker in Central and South America. A practicing grief and bereavement therapist, he holds degrees from Harvard’s Graduate School of Education and UC Berkeley. His work on end-of-life is informed by his therapeutic work with individuals and families, personal experiences with death and dying across cultures, and his family’s own end-of-life journeys. He lives in Santa Barbara, California.


January 21, 2022

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

a n o t h e r f i n e p ro p e rt y r e p r e s e n t e d b y

D aniel e ncell

• #4 Berkshire Hathaway Agent in the Nation • Wall Street Journal “Top 100” Agents Nationwide (out of over 1.3 million) • Graduate of UCLA School of Law and former attorney (with training in Real Estate law, contracts, estate planning, and tax law) • Dedicated and highly trained full-time support staff • An expert in the luxury home market

remember, it Costs no more to Work With the best (but it Can Cost you plenty if you don’t)

Dan Encell “The Real Estate Guy” Phone: (805) 565-4896 Visit: www.DanEncell.com for market information & to search the entire MLS Email: danencell@aol.com DRE #00976141

E ach Y Ear D an SpEnDS O vEr $250,000 I n M arkEtIng a nD a DvErtISIng!

NEW LISTING!

56 OLIVE MILL ROAD • MONTECITO

Ultra-charming, this newly reimagined 3 bed/3 bath Montecito Del Mar townhouse is ideally located in the highly sought-after Lower Village/ Butterfly Beach neighborhood. This lock-and-leave style townhome is convenient to the world-renowned Biltmore Hotel, Rosewood Miramar, Butterfly Beach, and the fine dining and shopping on Coast Village Road. Upon entry, the spacious living room welcomes you with a cozy, tiled fireplace and an abundance of natural light. An easy floorplan allows for effortless flow from one room into the next. High-quality finishes and top of the line appliances make the kitchen a delightful place to cook. With your own private balcony overlooking the gardens, an inviting fireplace, and luxurious ensuite bath the primary suite is the perfect place to relax at the end of the day. Two more bedrooms, one ensuite with a large balcony, add to the functional use of this townhome. The exquisite back patio commands attention. Fenced for ultimate privacy, the tiered brick patio enjoys lush landscaping, various entertaining vistas, and two fountains that create a relaxing ambiance. This inspiring patio is the ideal place to entertain family and friends or simply enjoy a beautiful Montecito day. Montecito Union School District.

OFFERED AT $2,250,000

© 2021 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHHS and the BHHS symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. CalDRE#: 00976141

3




6

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

OPINION

Please Save Santa Barbara’s Parades

W

E ARE A CITY defined by celebration and revelry. Decades of shared and historic memories celebrated as a community have created a rich and diverse heritage for the City of Santa Barbara. Parades have become an art form and city residents the artists, garnering a world-wide reputation that is positive, inspiring, and fun. As change descended with the pandemic and parades were temporarily prohibited, new possibilities presented themselves in the form of a promenade on State Street. The promenade has offered many opportunities for the city to come together, play together (outside), and define/re-define itself. Businesses were allowed to move onto the streets to protect patrons, changing the flow of traffic, both motorized and pedestrian. But, parades have been put on hold, for two years now. Parades in Santa Barbara are fundamentally a community activity, economic engines which generate millions of dollars in revenue for the city, and also hold great historic significance. Because of these factors, parades are an essential part of long range planning — planning that has been discussed over the past two years and was partly resolved with the formation of a new committee, the State Street Advisory Committee. The new committee was organized months ago at the wishes of city residents and agreed upon by the City Council to advise the council on all matters concerning master planning for State Street. Its members were carefully selected over a couple of months and now have met once a month about five times. They were directed to hire a non city employee (Tess Harris) to assist and oversee their work and help hire a consulting firm to oversee the work that will be presented to city staff and council for review. Her title is State Street Master Planner. The learning curved for new hires is significant and the consultants will not actually be on board to begin the learning process until June or July. These decisions have left the city with new parklets, closed streets, and old rules that need to be revised in the interim; revisions that are a necessity in order to accommodate the wonderful possibilities created by the promenade. Of course, the two year hold and committee delays haven’t bothered those who don’t like parades and community festivals in the first place. Many of them regularly left town or

closed their businesses on celebration days. For tens of thousands of others, though, this absence of parades has been significant and negative. The State Street Advisory Committee is a response to this history and the differing perspectives. In the meantime, the city is facing the end of its emergency ordinance that closed State Street, including demands from the Fire Department to get in line with State-wide fire lane rules that were suspended in the initial days of the pandemic — rules that require a 20 ft. passage way for emergency vehicles. Accommodating parades on State Street will require an examination of this 20 ft. rule which will affect about 30 businesses currently located on the city right of way. Also, city rules were suspended governing chair to bathroom ratios for businesses, parking to business space ratios, fees for using the public right of way, and liquor service rules. These are just a few of the regulations that are in play at this time and will be in the coming months. And yet, while the City Council considers the implementation of an Economic Support plan leading up to the emergency ordinance’s ending, City Hall has announced that many of its inperson services have been suspended in the wake of Omicron. This only highlights the fact that we are still living in unprecedented, unpredictable times, and emphasizes the need for the City to consider approaches that meet our current situation while honoring our beloved traditions. Unfortunately, Santa Barbara City Council is lined up to decide the fate of parades in Santa Barbara on January 25th – without the State Street Advisory Committee offering a suggestion on a single new idea for State Street moving forward. It is extremely important to include input and ideas from a wide spectrum of community members – including the Advisory Committee tasked with State Street master planning. Everyone can send comments to the City Council today via email at: https://www.santabarbaraca.gov/contact/council/default.asp Sarah Gorman: sgorman@santabarbaraca.gov; Rebecca Bjork: rbjork@santabarbaraca.gov; Ariel Calonne: acalonne@santabarbaraca.gov; Randy Rowse: rrowse@santabarbaraca.gov; Alejandra Gutierrez: agutierrez@santabarbaraca.gov, Mike Jordan: mjordan@santabarbaraca.gov; Oscar Gutierrez: ogutierrez@santabarbaraca.gov; Kristen Sneddon: KSneddon@santabarbaraca.gov; Eric Friedman: EFriedman@santabarbaraca.gov; Meagan Harman: mharmon@santabarbaraca.gov; Holly Perea: hperea@santabarbaraca.gov.

– VOICE Editorial Board

January 21, 2022

January 18, 2022

An open letter to the City of Santa Barbara Redistricting Commission: Hon. Melinda A. Johnson (Ret.) Hon. Abraham Khan (Ret.) Hon. Elizabeth Allen White (Ret.)

A

S THE CITY OF SANTA BARBARA INITIATES THE PUBLIC HEARING PROCESS regarding updating its six council district boundaries, we are writing this letter to explain the circumstances the City Council faced and our intent during the 2015 settlement process. We hope that providing some historical context and institutional memory will help inform the Redistricting Commission and the public as they develop and adopt a new district map that will be in effect for the next decade. As is well known, in 2015, the City of Santa Barbara was sued by local plaintiffs under the California Voting Rights Act. The City Council determined there was little hope of success challenging the lawsuit in court, and thus entered into a settlement agreement with the plaintiffs. The settlement changed the way voters elected our six City Councilmembers from an at-large system to one by district. To the core issue of the settlement agreement, two of the newly formed districts became Latino “majority minority” districts: District 1 on the Eastside and District 3 on the Westside. We understand that to the greatest extent possible the current redistricting process will ensure that District 1 and District 3 remain Latino majority districts when the new map is adopted. What may be less well remembered are some of the other elements that were very important to the plaintiffs, the public, and the City Council. First, was the intent to create a process that was as transparent as possible. Even though creating new districts was part of a legal settlement, the City Council also wanted to engage the public in a strong community-wide effort as these changes would significantly alter how voters elect their local representatives. The City Council kicked off the public input process with a hearing at the Faulkner Gallery at the main library with over 100 attendees, providing information on how to understand the demographic data and use the online mapping tool. According to the March 24, 2015, council agenda report, more that 135 members of the public created user accounts for the online tool and the city received 16 alternative maps in addition to the three drafts created by a demographic consultant. Those maps were presented at a second public hearing for review and comments, and from that meeting, the City Council finalized the map, with the approval of the plaintiffs in the legal settlement. Also noteworthy was how the plaintiffs, the public, and the City Council all came to a consensus that State Street should have representation from as many council members as possible. It is not by accident that State Street is bordered by all six districts: four districts in the downtown area (Districts 1, 2, 3 and 6) and by two districts on Upper State Street (Districts 4 and 5). As State Street is the major economic and cultural engine of the City of Santa Barbara, we all agreed that each Councilmember should be accountable to a portion of the constituents in that area. The same approach was also considered with the waterfront. With only four of the six districts bordering the coastline, it became too difficult for the more land-based District 3 or District 6 to have an area at the waterfront without breaking up other communities of interest. Finally, both the public testimony and City Council’s review indicated that communities of interest should include contiguous or adjacent residential and commercial areas, in addition to State Street. Thus, District 1 includes the Milpas Corridor; District 2 includes the Meigs/Cliff Drive intersection; District 3 includes the San Andres/ Micheltorena area; District 4 includes Coast Village Road; District 5 includes Upper De La Vina and the Airport; and District 6 includes Mission/De la Vina area and Cottage Hospital. We continue to hear comments on how this significant change in electing our City Councilmembers has impacted local government. Regardless of one’s opinion on that matter, we believe we should acknowledge and honor the significant public process that took place in creating the first district map in 2015, in accordance with the legal settlement. Please keep the historical context, community input, and our intentions in mind this year when reviewing and adopting the next district map.

Helene Schneider: Mayor 2010 – 2018 Dale Francisco: City Councilmember 2008 – 2016 Harwood Bendy White: City Councilmember 2010 - 2018


January 21, 2022

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

7

City Council to consider allowing expanded outdoor business areas on January 25th

Will Parklets and Outdoor Business Areas Be Sticking Around?

T

By Kerry Methner / VOICE

HE STATE STREET ADVISORY COMMITTEE was briefed on January 10th with an update on the City of Santa Barbara’s plans for State Street and the replacement of the Emergency Ordinance, which allowed for the closing of State Street and the creation of business spaces or parklets in parking areas and portions of various streets, with an Economic Development Ordinance. City staff have made the report to several other bodies such as Downtown Santa Barbara, as well as the SSAC, and are recommending that Council consider adopting an Economic Recovery Extension and Transition Ordinance. In the SSAC meeting more than one committee member expressed questions about whether the SSAC itself could make recommendations about the interim plans. Chair Dave Davis indicated that it would be up to the City Council to evaluate and act, and implied the City Council meeting would be the place committee members might speak up. “We actually got convened very early and we do have the ability to make comments on the interim standards, but as I think you’ll hear, that’s really going to be handled up at council,” said Davis. Jason Harris, the City’s Economic Development Manger, updated the committee on the implementation of the planned order, noting that “another substantive update [to the ordinance] is looking for all ‘what we call outdoor business facilities’ because again, these aren’t parklets, parklets are really an extension of the sidewalk on an on street parking space on an active roadway; in the case of State Street that’s been closed, we refer to them as outdoor business facilities... We’re looking for those to become portable, so any new facilities created as of January 25th would be required to be portable, and then we have a provision in the ordinance... that existing [structures] transition over this two-year period of time. We’re also looking to reopen closed streets... as well as prohibiting outdoor cooking.” This reassessment, which has been in the works for some time, is in response to the expiration of the current Emergency ordinance on March 8th that allowed for the temporary use of outdoor business areas on the State Street Promenade, on private property, and the use of parklets in on-street parking spaces throughout the city to meet the ongoing needs of businesses recovering from pandemic closures and impacts. Over the term of the temporary emergency ordinance allowing expanded outside business areas, the city reports that approximately 150 businesses have participated in the outdoor facilities

program. Presenters also reported that the California state requirement of a 20-foot-wide fire lane is impacting staff recommendations to the council. A City statement summarized the current conditions and recent past, noting, “When Downtown State Street closed in May 2020, the Fire Department was supportive of a 14-foot-wide fire access lane with the understanding that the closure was a short-term response to the public health emergency.” Because the City is now considering extending outdoor business exemptions via an Economic Recovery Extension and Transition Ordinance for almost two additional years until December 31, 2023 rather than extending the Emergency Ordinance again, the Fire Department believes that California State requirements for a 20-foot-wide fire access lane must be observed. Approximately 25 businesses on State Street will need to modify their outdoor business facilities to clear the center of the street to accommodate the wider fire access lane. “The ordinance would provide an additional 22 months until December 31, 2023 for businesses to operate expanded outdoor business facilities and parklets Citywide, and it authorizes the continued closure of downtown State Street to vehicles while regulatory changes and the State Street Master Plan are in development,” the City statement continues. So, for now it seems, the State Street Advisory Committee is in a hurry up and wait mode as the RFP for a consultant to lead them is developed, offered, and respondents evaluated by staff, Chair, and Vice Chair. The RFP should be available in early February and sometime in March respondents will begin to be selected. The goal is to begin work on the actual master plan in June or July of 2022. In the meantime, the committee is acquainting itself with important information like traffic and circulation issues and state requirements for fire lane safety, as occurred in this meeting. “The State Street Master Plan will utilize urban design and placemaking tactics to further the revitalization of downtown that supports commerce and provides a community gathering place for residents to enjoy their downtown,” noted Tess Harris, State Street Master Planner. “The City is embarking on an opportunity to be forward-thinking and build off the existing momentum to make downtown more interesting and appealing to everyone.” The Council Ordinance Committee will review, and City Council will consider adopting the Economic Recovery Extension and Transition Ordinance on January 25th.

COMMUNITY NEWS

11 Members of Oath Keepers Militia Group Charged with Seditious Conspiracy Rudy Giuliani Subpoenaed by Jan. 6 Committee

J

UST OVER A YEAR AFTER THE JANUARY 6TH, 2021 ATTACKS on the U.S. Capitol, eleven members of the Oath Keepers, a far-right extremist militia group, have been charged with seditious conspiracy. This decision is a landmark step in the legal response to the attacks, as it marks the first seditious conspiracy charges imposed tied to January 6th. The group’s founder and leader, Stewart Rhodes, was among those charged. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, Rhodes was arrested the morning of Thursday, January 13th. To date, over 725 individuals have been arrested nationwide for crimes connected to the January 6th attacks, and the case is ongoing. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, 72 hate groups are located throughout California, although the Oath Keepers are not listed as one of them. The DOJ’s seditious conspiracy charges allege that after the 2020 Presidential election, the Oath Keepers members recruited and organized individuals to participate in the January 6th attacks, trained individuals in paramilitary combat tactics, brought paramilitary weapons and gear to the Capitol, and ultimately attempted to take control of the Capitol to disrupt the certification of the Electoral College vote. Also this week, Rudy Giuliani, along with three other lawyers — Jenna Ellis, Sidney Powell, and Boris Epshteyn — were subpoenaed by the U.S. House committee investigating January 6th. These individuals all pursued lawsuits claiming the 2020 elections were fraudulent for President Trump. “The four individuals we’ve subpoenaed today advanced unsupported theories about election fraud, pushed efforts to overturn the election results or were in direct contact with the former president about attempts to stop the counting of electoral votes,” said Committee Chairman Representative Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, in a statement shared by the New York Times on Tuesday, January 18th.

Community Meeting to be Held on Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary

A

S EFFORTS CONTINUE TO OFFICIALLY DESIGNATE THE CHUMASH HERITAGE NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY, 350 Santa Barbara will host a free, virtual community conversation at 6pm Thursday, January 27th. If designated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary would protect marine life and historically significant lands along 140 miles of the Central Coast. Thursday’s talk will feature a guest speaker from the NOAA National Sanctuaries West Coast Region, with participants having the opportunity to ask questions and learn more about the process. To register, visit https://tinyurl.com/4v9f94uc

Operation Recognition Application Deadline Extended to Award Veterans Honorary High School Diplomas

D

O YOU KNOW A VETERAN OR INDIVIDUAL WHOSE EDUCATION WAS INTERRUPTED BY INTERNMENT OR MILITARY SERVICE? The Santa Barbara County Education Office has extended the deadline of its Operation Recognition program, which awards honorary high school diplomas to eligible individuals and veterans who were interned or served in the military during World War II, the Korean War, or the Vietnam War. Family members may apply on behalf of eligible loved ones who are deceased. Applications are due Monday, January 31st, with recipients being honored at a ceremony in April. For more information and eligibility criteria, visit www.sbceo.org/OR


8

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

s EMAPick

CIN

SCRIPT TO SCREEN: DUNE • Virtual film discussion with

screenwriter Eric Roth • UCSB Carsey-Wolf Center, • Free • www.carseywolf.ucsb.edu • 2pm Sa, 1/22.

GUIÓN A PANTALLA: DUNE • Discusión virtual

cinematográfica con el guionista Eric Roth • UCSB Carsey-Wolf Center • Gratis • www.carseywolf.ucsb.edu • 2pm sábado, 1/22.

MET LIVE: CINDERELLA • Screening of this talented

production • Music Academy of the West, Hahn Hall • $10-28, ages 7-17 free • https://tinyurl.com/yck93vyy • 2pm Su, 1/23.

producción • Music Academy of the West, Hahn Hall • $1028, edades 7-17 gratis • https://tinyurl.com/yck93vyy • 2pm domingo, 1/23.

Dune screenwriter Eric Roth will give a virtual talk with the UCSB Carsey-Wolf Center at 2pm, Saturday, January 22nd.

TELEVISIÓN GLOBAL: VENENO • Charla virtual con la actriz Daniela Santiago • UCSB Carsey-Wolf Center • Gratis • www.carseywolf.ucsb.edu • 12pm viernes, 1/28.

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Jan 21 - 27, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

The King’s Daughter (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 1:50, 5:00, 7:20. Sing 2 (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:25, 7:00. Sat-Sun: 1:40, 4:25, 7:00. West Side Story (PG13): Fri-Thur: 4:10. Licorice Pizza (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 7:30.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

Scream (R): Fri: 2:45, 4:20, 5:30, 7:00, 8:15, 9:40. Sat: 1:40, 2:45, 4:20, 5:30, 7:00, 8:15, 9:40. Sun: 1:40, 2:45, 4:20, 5:30, 7:00, 8:15.Mon-Thur: 2:45, 4:20, 5:30, 7:00, 8:15. The 355 (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 5:00, 7:45. The King’s Man (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:35, 7:30.Sat/Sun: 1:35, 4:35, 7:30. Spider-Man: No Way Home (PG13): Fri: 3:00, 4:45, 6:15, 8:00, 9:30.Sat: 1:30, 3:00, 4:45, 6:15, 8:00, 9:30. Sun: 1:30, 3:00, 4:45, 6:15, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 3:00, 4:45, 6:15, 8:00.

HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

Parallel Mothers (R): Fri-Sun, Wed/Thur: 4:30, 7:15. The Tragedy of MacBeth (R): Fri-Sun, Wed/Thur: 5:00, 7:30.

METRO 4

SBIFF Currently Interviewing for New Internship Positions

Are you eager to gain hands-on experience and give back to the Santa Barbara International Film Festival? Applications for SBIFF’s internship opportunities are currently available online, with selected individuals earning the chance to work within one of SBIFF’s eleven departments, including programming, education, development, marketing, live event production, and more. Open to college students and beyond, interns are required to work a minimum of ten hours a week leading up to the festival, and 40 hours a week during the festival. Visit www.sbiff.org/film-festival/internships

SBIFF actualmente está entrevistando para nuevos puestos de interno

MET LIVE: CENICIENTA • Proyección de esta talentosa

GLOBAL TV: VENENO • Virtual talk with actress Daniela Santiago • UCSB Carsey-Wolf Center • Free • www.carseywolf.ucsb.edu • 12pm Fr, 1/28.

January 21, 2022

¿Estás ansioso por adquirir experiencia práctica y retribuir al Festival Internacional de Cine de Santa Bárbara? Las solicitudes para las oportunidades de puestos de interno de SBIFF están disponibles en línea, y las personas seleccionadas obtendrán la oportunidad de trabajar en uno de los once departamentos de SBIFF, que incluyen programación, educación, desarrollo, marketing, producción de eventos en vivo y más. Abierto a estudiantes universitarios y más allá, los pasantes deben trabajar un mínimo de diez horas a la semana antes del festival y 40 horas a la semana durante el festival. Visita www.sbiff.org/film-festival/internships

Festival Dates March 2nd to 12th VOICE Magazine is a 17 year sponsor

Ojai Art Center Theater: VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE

UCSB Studio Theater: 24-HOUR PLAY FESTIVAL

VANYA Y SONIA Y MASHA Y SPIKE

FESTIVAL DE JUEGO 24 HORAS

A playful Chekov parody • Ojai Art Center Theater, Ojai • $18-20 • www.ojaiact.org • 7:30pm Fr, 1/21 through 2/13.

Una divertida parodia de Chekov • Teatro del Centro de Arte de Ojai, Ojai • $18-20 • www.ojaiact.org • 7:30pm viernes, 1/21 al 2/13.

New, short plays by UCSB students and faculty • UCSB Department Theater/Dance NED • Studio POS• TFreePof•O7pm Theater, UCSB Sa, 1/22. Nuevas obras cortas de estudiantes y profesores O de UCSB •P Departamento OSPUEdeSTTeatro/Danza de UCSB • Studio Theatre, UCSB • Gratis • 7pm sábado, 1/22.

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Scream (R): Fri: 2:45, 4:00, 5:30, 6:45, 8:15, 9:30.Sat: 1:20, 2:45, 4:00, 5:30, 6:45, 8:15, 9:30. Sun: 1:20, 2:45, 4:00, 5:30, 6:45, 8:15. Mon-Thur: 2:45, 4:00, 5:30, 6:45, 8:15. Spider-Man: No Way Home (PG13): Fri: 2:30, 4:45(LP), 5:45, 8:00(LP), 9:15. Sat: 1:30(LP), 2:30, 4:45(LP), 5:45, 8:00(LP), 9:15. Sun: 1:30(LP), 2:30, 4:45(LP), 5:45, 8:00(LP). Mon-Thur: 2:30, 4:45(LP), 5:45, 8:00(LP).

F I E S TA 5

OnSTAGE Center Stage Theater: THE TENDER LAND

American opera presented by Westmont College Music Dept. • Center Stage Theater • $10-15 • www.centerstagetheater.org • 7pm Fr, 1/28 & Su, 1/30.

JANUARY 21 - 27 “IT'S ACTIVISM, THERAPY, AND GREAT CINEMA ALL AT ONCE.” INDIEWIRE

LA TIERRA TIERNA

Una ópera estadounidense presentada por el Departamento de Música de Westmont College. • Center Stage Theatre • $10-15 • www.centerstagetheater.org • 7pm viernes, 1/28 & domingo, 1/30.

SHORTLISTED FOR THE ACADEMY AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY FILM BEST ANIMATED FILM AND BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM

916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Reedeming Love (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:40, 7:40. Sat/Sun: 1:40, 4:40, 7:40. The King’s Daughter (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. The 355 (PG13): Fri-Thur: 5:15. Sing 2 (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:15, 5:25, 7:00. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 2:50, 4:15, 5:25, 7:00. Nightmare Alley (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 8:00. Sat/Sun: 2:10, 8:00. The King’s Man (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:55, 7:50.Sat/Sun: 2:00, 4:55, 7:50.

Michael Shasberger will direct the music for Westmont College’s production of The Tender Land, 7pm Friday, January 29th and Sunday, January 30th

Let’s Go To The M O V I E S

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Parallel Mothers (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:15, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00. Licorice Pizza (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:45, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:15, 4:45, 7:45. ARLINGTON West Side Story (PG13): Fri-Thur: 4:00, 1317 STATE STREET 7:20. SANTA BARBARA House of Gucci (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:10. 805-963-9580 Sat/Sun: 1:25, 4:10, 7:30. Spider-Man: No Way Home (PG13): American Underdog (PG): Fri, Fri-Thur: 3:45, 7:00. Mon-Thur: 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:20.

FRI: 5:15pm, 7:30pm SAT: 2:00pm, 7:30pm / SUN: 2:00pm MON, TUES, THURS: 5:15pm, 7:30pm WED: 4:30pm ADDED SHOWINGS OF DRIVE MY CAR SAT/SUN 4:00PM PROOF OF COVID-19 VACCINATION OR NEGATIVE TEST REQUIRED

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM

NORTH S.B. COUNTY THEATRES Movie Listings for 1/21/22-1/30/22 MOVIES LOMPOC • (805) 736-1558 / 736-0146 AMERICAN UNDERDOG -PGDaily 4:30-7 | Sat-Sun 2-4:30-7 SPIDERMAN: NO WAY HOME -PG13Daily 3:45-7 SING 2 -PGDaily 4:30-7 | Sat-Sun 2-4:30-7 SCREAM -RDaily 4:30-7 | Sat-Sun 2-4:30-7 All Screens Now Presented In Dolby Digital Projection and Dolby Digital Sound!

www.playingtoday.com


January 21, 2022

COUNTY ZONING ADMINISTRATOR HEARING • 9am Mo, 1/24 •

https://tinyurl.com/bdffyb3p

AUDIENCIA DEL ADMINISTRADOR DE ZONIFICACIÓN DEL CONDADO • 9am lunes, 1/24 • https://tinyurl.com/bdffyb3p

CITY SINGLE FAMILY DESIGN BOARD CONSENT AGENDA REVIEW • 11am Mo, 1/24 • https://tinyurl.com/yc53b2hz

REVISIÓN DE LA AGENDA DE CONSENTIMIENTO DE LA JUNTA DE DISEÑO DE VIVIENDAS UNIFAMILIARES DE LA CIUDAD • 11am lunes, 1/24 • https://tinyurl.com/yc53b2hz

CITY ARCHITECTURAL BOARD OF REVIEW CONSENT AGENDA REVIEW • 1pm Mo, 1/24 • www.SantaBarbaraCA.gov/ABR

REVISIÓN DE LA AGENDA DE CONSENTIMIENTO DE LA JUNTA DE REVISIÓN ARQUITECTÓNICA DE LA CIUDAD • 1pm lunes, 1/24 •

www.SantaBarbaraCA.gov/ABR

Safari Local

In Person & Online Activities for Everyone Actividades en persona y en línea para todos

BILINGUAL / BILINGÜE

Friday • viernes 1.21.22 CHILDREN | NIÑOS

STAY AND PLAY POP-UP

Share stories with your kids • SB Public Library • Oak Park • Free • 10am-12pm Fr, 1/21.

QUÉDATE Y JUEGA POP-UP

Comparte historias con tus hijos • Biblioteca Pública de SB • Oak Park • Gratis • 10am-12pm viernes, 1/21.

STORYWALK IN THE PARK

Outdoor activities and story • SB Public Library • Oak Park • Free • 10am-12pm Fr, 1/21.

PASEO DE CUENTOS EN EL PARQUE

Historia y actividades al aire libre • Biblioteca pública de SB • Oak Park • Gratis • 10am-12pm viernes, 1/21.

MUSIC | MÚSICA

CITY ARCHITECTURAL BOARD OF REVIEW • 3pm Mo, 1/24 •

AN EVENING WITH KT TUNSTALL

JUNTA DE REVISIÓN ARQUITECTÓNICA DE LA CIUDAD •

UNA VELADA CON KT TUNSTALL

www.SantaBarbaraCA.gov/ABR

3pm lunes, 1/24 • www.SantaBarbaraCA.gov/ABR

COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS • 9am Tu, 1/25 • www.countyofsb.org/bos

JUNTA DE SUPERVISORES DEL CONDADO • 9am martes, 1/25 • www.countyofsb.org/bos

CITY SIGN COMMITTEE • 9am Tu,

1/25 • www.SantaBarbaraCA.gov/SIGN

Rock/folk concert • Lobero Theatre • $46-106 • www.lobero.org • 8pm Fr, 1/21. Concierto de rock/folclore • Teatro Lobero • $46-106 • www.lobero.org • 8pm viernes, 1/21.

SPECIAL EVENTS | EVENTOS ESPECIALES

LIBRARY ON THE GO

Visit the library’s van • SB Public Library • Oak Park • Free • 10am-12pm Fr, 1/21.

BIBLIOTECA SOBRE LA MARCHA

Visita la camioneta de la biblioteca • Biblioteca pública de SB • Oak Park • Gratis• 10am-12pm viernes, 1/21.

COMITÉ DE LETREROS DE LA CIUDAD • 9am martes, 1/25 •

Saturday • sábado 1.22.22

SB CITY COUNCIL • 2pm Tu, 1/25 •

LECTURES | MEETINGS | WORKSHOPS CONFERENCIAS | REUNIONES

www.SantaBarbaraCA.gov/SIGN https://tinyurl.com/n9jdrtdy

AYUNTAMIENTO DE SB • 2pm martes, 1/25 • https://tinyurl.com/n9jdrtdy

CITY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & HUMAN SERVICES COMMITTEE •

AN EVENING WITH PETE SOUZA

Talk from a former Chief Official White House Photographer • Lobero Theatre • $49.50-69.50 • www.lobero.org • 8pm Sa, 1/22.

UNA VELADA CON PETE SOUZA

Charla de un ex fotógrafo jefe oficial de la Casa Blanca • Teatro Lobero • $49.50-69.50 • www.lobero.org • 8pm sábado, 1/22.

SPECIAL EVENTS | EVENTOS ESPECIALES

COFFEE & CLASSICS

Admire and learn about vintage cars • The Community Hot Rod Project Inc. • South Coast Church, 5814 Cathedral Oaks Rd • Free • www.thecommunityhotrodproject.com • 8-10am 2nd & 4th Saturdays.

CAFÉ Y CLÁSICOS

Admira y aprende sobre los autos antiguos • The Community Hot Rod Project Inc. • South Coast Church, 5814 Cathedral Oaks Rd • Gratis • www.thecommunityhotrodproject.com • 8-10am segundo y cuarto sábado.

Sunday • domingo 1.23.22 MUSIC | MÚSICA

Beatles music concert • SOhO Restaurant & Music • $15-20 • www.sohosb.com • 7:30pm Su, 1/23.

THE BEATUNES

Concierto de música de los Beatles • SOhO Restaurant & Music • $15-20 • www.sohosb.com • 7:30pm domingo, 1/23.

OUTDOORS | AL AIRE LIBRE

YOGA ON THE WHARF

Guided yoga class on the pier • Power of Your Om • Stearns Wharf • Donation based, suggested $10-25 • https://tinyurl.com/5d55crcx • 9am Su, 1/23.

YOGA EN EL MUELLE

Clase de yoga guiada en el muelle • Power of Your Om • Stearns Wharf • Basado en donaciones, $10-25 sugeridos • https://tinyurl.com/5d55crcx • 9am domingo, 1/23.

PLANT TALK

Learn about drought-tolerant plants • SB Botanic Garden • Free with admission • 12pm Su. Aprende sobre plantas tolerantes a la sequía • SB Botanic Garden • Gratis con entrada • 12pm domingo.

COMITÉ DE SERVICIOS HUMANOS Y DESARROLLO COMUNITARIO DE LA CIUDAD • 6pm martes, 1/25 •

RANCHO LA PATERA & STOW HOUSE

https://tinyurl.com/tfpmy6c6

Take a tour, support the Museum Store, or enjoy the beautiful grounds • www.goletahistory.org • 11am to 2pm weekends.

CITY STAFF HEARING OFFICER • 9am We, 1/26 • www.SantaBarbaraCA.gov/SHO

FUNCIONARIO DE AUDIENCIAS DEL PERSONAL DE LA CIUDAD • 9am

https://tinyurl.com/5n7hscrb

COMISIÓN DE PARQUES Y RECREACIÓN DE LA CIUDAD • 4pm miércoles, 1/26 • https://tinyurl.com/5n7hscrb

Una velada con Pete Souza

Obtén una perspectiva personal de la vida en la Oficina Oval mientras el Teatro Lobero presenta Una velada con Pete Souza a las 8pm, el sábado 22 de enero. El principal fotógrafo oficial de la Casa Blanca para el presidente Barack Obama y el presidente Reagan, Souza, presentará una selección de sus fotografías detrás de escena y las historias que las acompañan. Para boletos ($49.50-69.50) visita www.lobero.org

RANCHO LA PATERA & STOW HOUSE

Haz un recorrido, apoya la Tienda del Museo o disfruta de los hermosos jardines • www.goletahistory.org • De 11am a 2pm los fines de semana.

SANTA BARBARA GHOST TOURS

Professor Julie Ann Brown tours you through Downtown Santa Barbara sharing the stories of local resident ghosts • $35-$150 • www.sbghosttour.com

SANTA BARBARA GHOST TOURS

La profesora Julie Ann Brown recorre el centro de Santa Bárbara compartiendo las historias de los fantasmas residentes locales • $ 35-$150 • www.sbghosttour.com

Monday • lunes

1.24.22

OUTDOORS | AL AIRE LIBRE

HIKE THE ARROYO HONDO PRESERVE

Mondays & Wednesdays, 12:30 to 3pm and the first & third weekends, Saturdays & Sundays from 10am to 12:30pm and 12:30pm to 3pm. Free • https://tinyurl.com/ya3pgxge

See Your Event Here!

Santa Barbara Ghost Tours Walk with Professor Julie as she shares tales of mystery and history... & meet friendly spirits... Call or text to schedule your walking tour! • 805-905-9019

Do you have events you want to publicize? Submit listings (title, location, admission fee, time, and contact info) to calendar@voicesb.com

Tuesday • martes 1.25.22 CHILDREN | NIÑOS

STAY AND PLAY

Share stories with your kids • Eastside Library • Free • 8:30-10:30am Tu, 1/25.

QUÉDATE Y JUEGA

Comparte historias con tus hijos • Biblioteca Eastside • Gratis • 8:30-10:30am martes, 1/25.

STORYWALK IN THE PARK

Outdoor stories and activities • SB Public Library • Sunflower Park • Free • 2-3:30pm Tu, 1/25.

PASEO DE CUENTOS EN EL PARQUE

Cuentos y actividades al aire libre • Biblioteca Pública de SB • Sunflower Park • Gratis • 2-3:30pm martes, 1/25.

LECTURES | MEETINGS | WORKSHOPS CONFERENCIAS | REUNIONES

WHAT IS RESPONSIBLE AI?

Talk with William Wang, UCSB Center for Responsible Machine Learning Director • Free • https://tinyurl.com/2k9s73uc • 4pm Tu, 1/25.

CAMINA EN LA RESERVA ARROYO HONDO

¿QUÉ ES LA IA RESPONSABLE?

los lunes y miércoles de 12:30 a 3pm y el primer y tercer fin de semana del mes, sábados y domingos de 10am a 12:30pm y de 12:30pm a 3pm. La visita es gratuita • https://tinyurl.com/ya3pgxge

Habla con William Wang, director del Centro para el aprendizaje automático responsable de UCSB • Gratis • https://tinyurl.com/2k9s73uc • 4pm martes, 1/25.

SPECIAL EVENTS | EVENTOS ESPECIALES

TEEN ADVISORY BOARD

FESTIVAL OF HEARTS VIRTUAL FUNDRAISER

miércoles, 1/26 • www.SantaBarbaraCA.gov/SHO

CITY PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION • 4pm We, 1/26 •

An Evening with Pete Souza

Gain personal insight into life in the Oval Office as the Lobero Theatre hosts An Evening with Pete Souza at 8pm, Saturday, January 22nd. The Chief Official White House Photographer for President Barack Obama and President Reagan, Souza will present a selection of his behind-the-scenes photographs and stories that accompany them. For tickets ($49.50-69.50) visit www.lobero.org

THE BEATUNES

CHARLA DE PLANTAS

6pm Tu, 1/25 • https://tinyurl.com/tfpmy6c6

Photo courtesy of Lobero Theatre

Government Meetings • Reuniones gubernamentales

9

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

Auction supporting Friendship Center • www.friendshipcentersb.org/foh2022 • Mo, 1/24-2/5.

EVENTO VIRTUAL PARA RECAUDAR FONDOS - FESTIVAL OF HEARTS

Subasta de apoyo al Friendship Center • www.friendshipcentersb.org/foh2022 • lunes, 1/24-2/5.

Help shape Library events, programs, and collections • Eastside Library • Free • 4-5pm Tu.

JUNTA ASESORA DE ADOLESCENTES

Ayuda a dar forma a los eventos, programas y colecciones de la biblioteca • Biblioteca del lado este • Gratis • martes de 4-5pm.

VIRTUAL SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP - INTERMEDIATE

Practice Spanish language in a natural way • SB Public Library • Free • www.santabarbaraca.gov/gov/depts/lib/default.asp • 4:30-5:30pm Tu.


10

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

Safari Local

PASEO DE CUENTOS EN EL PARQUE

EL CÍRCULO FRANCÉS

LECTURES | MEETINGS | WORKSHOPS CONFERENCIAS | REUNIONES

PLANES, TRAINS, AND AUTOMOBILES

Actividades al aire libre y cuentos • Biblioteca Pública de SB • Carpinteria Children’s Project • Gratis • 2-4pm miércoles, 1/26.

In Person & Online Activities for Everyone CONTINUES / CONTINÚA Actividades en persona y en línea para todos

ARE THE FEDS GOING BIG ON CLIMATE ACTION?

BILINGUAL / BILINGÜE

Webinar with US Representative Salud Carbajal • Community Environmental Council • Free • https://tinyurl.com/y82kanmt • 12pm We, 1/26.

¿LOS FEDERALES ESTÁN APOSTANDO FUERTE POR LA ACCIÓN CLIMÁTICA?

Seminario web con el Representante de EE. UU. Salud Carbajal • Consejo Ambiental Comunitario • Gratis • https://tinyurl.com/y82kanmt • 12pm miércoles, 1/26.

Safari Local

Photo courtesy of Westmont College

HOW TO START A CALIFORNIA NONPROFIT

In Person & Online Activities for Everyone Actividades en persona y en línea para todos

BILINGUAL / BILINGÜE

Tenor and Westmont junior Sibongakonkhe Msibi

Westmont Presents The Tender Land

Inspired by Great Depression photographs and accounts of tenant farmers, Aaron Copland’s The Tender Land continues to move modern audiences with its compelling score and coming-of-age story. Westmont College will present this American opera at 7pm Friday, January 28th, and 7pm, Sunday, January 30th, at Center Stage Theater. The performance will feature the entire Westmont College Choir, under the direction of Michael Shasberger, Adams Professor of Music and Worship. For tickets ($10-15) visit www.centerstagetheater.org

Inspirada en fotografías de la Gran Depresión y relatos de agricultores arrendatarios, La tierra tierna de Aaron Copland continúa conmoviendo al público moderno con su cautivadora partitura y su historia sobre la mayoría de edad. Westmont College presentará esta ópera estadounidense el viernes, 28 de enero a las 7pm y el domingo, 30 de enero a las 7pm en el Center Stage Theatre. La presentación contará con todo el coro de Westmont College, bajo la dirección de Michael Shasberger, profesor de música y adoración de Adams. Para boletos ($10-15) visita www.centerstagetheater.org

Practica el idioma español de forma natural • Biblioteca pública SB • Gratis • www.santabarbaraca.gov/gov/depts/lib/default.asp • 4:30-5:30pm martes.

SPECIAL EVENTS | EVENTOS ESPECIALES

HEAD GAMES TRIVIA NIGHT

Weekly trivia for prizes • Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co, 137 Anacapa St F, SB • Free • 7pm Tu.

NOCHE DE TRIVIA DE JUEGOS MENTALES Trivia semanal para premios • Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co, 137 Anacapa St F, SB • Gratis • 7pm martes.

Seminario web con el CEO Jan Masaoka • CalNonprofits • Miembros gratis, $15 general • https://tinyurl.com/59bh6e6p • 1pm miércoles, 1/26.

PASSING FOR PERFECT BOOK LAUNCH

Virtual talk with author erin Khuê Ninh • UCSB Interdisciplinary Humanities Center • Free • https://tinyurl.com/4jkn78r6 • 2-3pm We, 1/26.

PASANDO POR EL LANZAMIENTO DEL LIBRO PERFECTO

Charla virtual con la autora erin Khuê Ninh • Centro Interdisciplinario de Humanidades UCSB • Gratis • https://tinyurl.com/4jkn78r6 • 2-3pm miércoles, 1/26. Group for LGBTQ+ youth of color • Pacific Pride Foundation • Free • Alternating in-person and online meetings • RSVP: https://tinyurl.com/hnkfvb9t • 4-5:30pm We.

ORGULLOSO JUVENTUD DE COLOR

Grupo para jóvenes de color LGBTQ + • Pacific Pride Foundation • Gratis • Reuniones alternas en persona y en línea • Reserva tu lugar: https://tinyurl.com/hnkfvb9t • 4-5:30pm miércoles.

THE SB PUBLIC LIBRARY VIRTUAL ENGLISH CONVERSATION GROUP

BABY AND ME

For all English language learners • Free • www.santabarbaraca.gov/gov/depts/lib/default.asp • 4:30-5:30pm We.

Pre-literacy class for babies 0-14 months • SB Public Library • Alameda Park • Free • 1111:30am We, 1/26.

BEBÉ Y YO

Clase de prealfabetización para bebés de 0 a 14 meses • Biblioteca Pública de SB • Parque Alameda • Gratis • 11-11:30am miércoles, 1/26.

STORYWALK IN THE PARK

CÓMO INICIAR UNA ORGANIZACIÓN SIN FINES DE LUCRO EN CALIFORNIA

PROUD YOUTH OF COLOR

Westmont presenta La tierra tierna

GRUPO VIRTUAL DE CONVERSACIÓN EN ESPAÑOL – INTERMEDIO

Webinar with CEO Jan Masaoka • CalNonprofits • Members free, $15 general • https://tinyurl.com/59bh6e6p • 1pm We, 1/26.

Outdoor activities and story • SB Public Library • Carpinteria Children’s Project • Free • 2-4pm We, 1/26.

GRUPO DE CONVERSACIÓN VIRTUAL EN INGLÉS DE LA BIBLIOTECA PÚBLICA DE SB

Para todos los estudiantes del idioma inglés • Gratis • www.santabarbaraca.gov/gov/depts/lib/default.asp • 4:30-5:30pm los miércoles.

LE CERCLE FRANÇAIS

A French conversation group, all levels welcome • Arnoldi’s Cafe, 600 Olive St., SB • Free • http://sbfrenchgroup.yolasite.com • 5-7pm We.

WIGGLY STORYTIME

For toddlers aged 14 months to 3 years • SB Public Library • Alameda Park • Free • 10:1510:45am We, 1/26.

HORA DE CUENTOS WIGGLY

Para niños pequeños de 14 meses a 3 años • Biblioteca pública de SB • Parque Alameda • Gratis • 10:15-10:45am miércoles, 1/26.

Un grupo de conversación en francés, todos los niveles son bienvenidos • Arnoldi’s Cafe, 600 Olive St., SB • http://sbfrenchgroup.yolasite.com • Gratis • 5-7pm miércoles. Virtual talk by historian Betsy J. Green • SB Historical Museum • Free • www.sbhistorical.org • 5pm We, 1/26.

AVIONES, TRENES Y AUTOMÓVILES

Charla virtual de la historiadora Betsy J. Green • Museo Histórico SB • Gratis • www.sbhistorical.org • 5pm miércoles, 1/26.

INDY BOOK CLUB

Virtually discuss Disability Visibility, edited by Alice Wong • SB Independent and SB Public Library • Free • https://tinyurl.com/49u5vbnh • 6-7pm We, 1/26.

CLUB DE LIBROS INDY

Discute virtualmente Disability Visibility, editado por Alice Wong • SB Independent y SB Public Library • Gratis • https://tinyurl.com/49u5vbnh • 6-7pm miércoles, 1/26.

MUSIC | MÚSICA

SB TREBLE CLEF WOMEN’S CHORUS

Sing with others, no audition needed • Vista del Monte Patio Room, 3775 Modoc Rd. • Free • https://tinyurl.com/4ns8nzvu • 6:30pm We.

CORO FEMENINO DE SB TREBLE CLEF

Canta con otros, no se necesita una audición • Salón del Patio de Vista del Monte, 3775 Modoc Rd. • Gratis • https://tinyurl.com/4ns8nzvu • 6:30pm miércoles.

SPECIAL EVENTS | EVENTOS ESPECIALES

LIBRARY ON THE GO

Visit the Library’s van • SB Public Library • Shoreline Park, by Tots Playground • Free • 1011:30am We, 1/26.

BIBLIOTECA SOBRE LA MARCHA

Visita la camioneta de la biblioteca • Biblioteca pública de SB • Shoreline Park, por Tots Playground • Gratis • 10-11:30am miércoles, 1/26.

LIBRARY ON THE GO

Visit the Library’s Van • SB Public Library • Harding School, off Gillespie St • Free • 12:452pm We, 1/26.

BIBLIOTECA SOBRE LA MARCHA

Visita la camioneta de la biblioteca • Biblioteca pública de SB • Harding School, en Gillespie St • Gratis • 12:45-2pm miércoles, 1/26.

OPEN MIC STAND-UP COMEDY

Feeling anxious, fatigued, depressed, or just experiencing isolation challenges?

Hypnosis can help.

Reaching into the depths of our unconscious mind, we are able to find the resources needed to remain calm, feel inner peace, and even find joy in the midst of the chaos in our lives and the world. In-person or on-line sessions.

Dr. Ginger Swanson

Certified Medical Support Hypnotherapist

805-886-4716 www.DrGingerSwanson.com

QUÉDATE Y JUEGA

Comparte historias con tus hijos • Biblioteca Pública de SB • Carpinteria Children’s Project • Gratis • 11am-12pm, jueves, 1/27.

LECTURES | MEETINGS | WORKSHOPS CONFERENCIAS | REUNIONES

B2B NETWORKING EVENT

Meet local businesspeople • SB South Coast Chamber of Commerce • SB Zoo • https://tinyurl.com/3hbk88sz • $10 members, $20 general • 9-10:30am Th, 1/27.

EVENTO DE NETWORKING B2B

Conoce a empresarios locales • Cámara de Comercio de la Costa Sur de SB • Zoológico de SB, Discovery • $10 miembros, $20 general • https://tinyurl.com/3hbk88sz • 9-10:30am jueves, 1/27.

WORD AND LIFE VIRTUAL BOOK STUDY

Discuss Sacred Earth, Sacred Soul by John Philip Newell • Word and Life SB • $65, scholarships available • www.wordandlife.us • 10-11:30am Th through 3/17.

ESTUDIO DE LIBRO VIRTUAL DE PALABRA Y VIDA

Discute Sacred Earth, Sacred Soul por John Philip Newell • Word and Life SB • $ 65, becas disponibles • www.wordandlife.us • 10-11: 30am jueves, hasta 3/17.

Local comedians • Mel’s Cocktail Lounge, 209 W Carrillo St., SB • 7pm We.

MICRÓFONO ABIERTO - COMEDIA STAND-UP Los comediantes locales • Mel’s Cocktail Lounge, 209 W Carrillo St., SB • 7pm miércoles.

Thursday • jueves 1.27.22 CHILDREN | NIÑOS

STAY AND PLAY

Share stories with your kids • SB Public Library • Harding University Partnership School • Free • 8:45-9:45am, Th, 1/27.

Wednesday • miércoles 1.26.22 CHILDREN | NIÑOS

January 21, 2022

Antica Furnishings By Appointment Call or Text 805-845-1285

www.AnticaFurnishings.com

QUÉDATE Y JUEGA

Comparte historias con tus hijos • Biblioteca Pública de SB • Harding University Partnership School • Gratis • 8:45-9:45am, jueves, 1/27.

STAY AND PLAY

Share stories with your kids • SB Public Library • Carpinteria Children’s Project • Free • 11am12pm, Th, 1/27.

Eco-friendly Land Management Noxious Weed Abatement Sustainable Agriculture Fire Mitigation Scott Rothdeutsch | Owner scott@sbgoats.com

805-460-8898


ACTIVIST BROWN BAG LUNCH

Virtual meeting for local advocates, organizers, and neighbors • The Fund for SB • Free • https://tinyurl.com/2vukvj2u • 12-1:30pm Th, 1/27.

ALMUERZO EN BOLSA DEL ACTIVISTA

Reunión virtual para defensores locales, organizadores y vecinos • The Fund for SB • Gratis • https://tinyurl. com/2vukvj2u • 12-1:30pm jueves, 1/27.

NEW TO MEDICARE

Virtual presentation • Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program • Free • www.CentralCoastSeniors.org • 12pm Th, 1/27.

NUEVO AL MEDICARE

Presentación virtual • Programa de Consejería y Defensa de Seguros Médicos • Gratis • www.CentralCoastSeniors.org • 12pm jueves, 1/27.

POETRY CLUB

Discuss the works of Langston Hughes • Montecito Library • Free • 2-3:30pm Th, 1/27.

CLUB DE POESÍA

Discute las obras de Langston Hughes • Biblioteca Montecito • Gratis • 2-3:30pm jueves, 1/27.

PROUD YOUTH GROUP

Group for LGBTQ+ students • Pacific Pride Foundation • Free • Alternating in-person and online meetings • RSVP: https://tinyurl.com/hnkfvb9t • 4-5:30pm Th.

GRUPO DE JÓVENES ORGULLOSOS

Grupo para estudiantes LGBTQ + • Pacific Pride Foundation • Gratis • Reuniones alternas en persona y en línea • Reserva tu lugar: https://tinyurl.com/hnkfvb9t • 4-5:30pm jueves.

SPANISH CLASS - THE POSITIVE IMPACT OF MUSIC IN EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

Webinar on childhood benefits of music • SB Public Library • Free • https://tinyurl.com/y3dh8vfx • 6pm Th, 1/27.

11

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com CLASE DE ESPAÑOL - EL IMPACTO POSITIVO DE LA MÚSICA EN EL DESARROLLO DE LA PRIMERA INFANCIA Seminario web sobre los beneficios de la música para la infancia • Biblioteca pública de SB • Gratis • https://tinyurl.com/y3dh8vfx • 6pm jueves, 1/27.

OUTDOORS | AL AIRE LIBRE

STATE STREET PROMENADE MARKET

Located on the 900 & 1000 blocks of State St between Carrillo and Figueroa Sts • 3 to 7:30pm Thursdays • https://tinyurl.com/yx9v4pmd

MERCADO DEL STATE STREET PROMENADE

Ubicado en las cuadras 900 y 1000 de la Calle State entre las Calles Carrillo y Figueroa • 3 a 7:30pm los jueves • https://tinyurl.com/yx9v4pmd

CARPINTERIA BIRDWATCHERS VIRTUAL MEETINGS

Evening birdwatching classes • Free, all ages & ability levels. 4-5:15pm Thursdays via Zoom: https://tinyurl.com/y9rheypj

REUNIONES VIRTUALES DE OBSERVADORES DE AVES DE CARPINTERIA

Clases nocturnas de observación de aves • Gratis, todas las edades y niveles de habilidad. 4-5:15pm los jueves a través de Zoom: https://tinyurl.com/y9rheypj

SPECIAL EVENTS | EVENTOS ESPECIALES

LIBRARY ON THE GO

Visit the Library’s Van • SB Public Library •Alameda Park, by Kid’s World playground • Free • 10am-12pm Th, 1/27.

BIBLIOTECA SOBRE LA MARCHA

Visita la camioneta de la biblioteca • Biblioteca pública de SB • Alameda Park, junto al parque infantil Kid’s World • Gratis • 10am-12pm jueves, 1/27.

MARC MARON

Evening with comedian Marc Maron • Lobero Theatre • $51121 • www.lobero.org • 7:30pm Th, 1/27.

CAMA: The Los Angeles Philharmonic

Celebrate the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s first local performance since its 100th anniversary at the Granada Theatre at 7:30pm Friday, January 28th. Presented by CAMA, conductor Elim Chan and pianist Igor Levit will lead the orchestra in a program of Beethoven, Mendelssohn, and the U.S. premiere of Elizabeth Ogonek’s Cloudline. For tickets ($36-116) visit www.granadasb.org

CAMA: La Filarmónica de Los Ángeles

Celebra la primera presentación local de la Filarmónica de Los Ángeles desde su 100 aniversario en el Teatro Granada a las 7:30pm el viernes, 28 de enero. Presentado por CAMA, el director Elim Chan y el Conductor Elim Chan pianista Igor Levit dirigirán la orquesta en un programa de Beethoven, Mendelssohn y el estreno en Estados Unidos de Cloudline de Elizabeth Ogonek. Para boletos ($36-116) visita www.granadasb.org Photo by Rahi Rezvani

January 21, 2022

MARC MARON

Velada con el comediante Marc Maron • Teatro Lobero • $51-121 • www.lobero.org • 7:30pm jueves, 1/27.

Friday • viernes

1.28.22

CHILDREN | NIÑOS

STAY AND PLAY POP-UP

Get involved in the arts. Join the Granada team!

Share stories with your kids • SB Public Library • Shoreline Park • Free • 10am-12pm Fr, 1/28.

QUÉDATE Y JUEGA POP-UP

Box Office Associate. FT or PT avail. Core hours noon to 6pm Tues-Sat with additional hours for shows or admin. Tech savvy to learn ticketing software – Tessitura.

Comparte historias con tus hijos • Biblioteca pública de SB • Parque Shoreline • Gratis • 10am-12pm viernes, 1/28.

Event logistic crew/facilities PT. Care for a community treasure and liaison with show production. Hours centered on show requirements and some regular maintenance duties.

Virtual concert with singer/songwriter Thuy • UCSB MultiCultural Center • Free • https://mcc.sa.ucsb.edu • 6pm Fr, 1/28.

Theater Front of House Assistant PT. Work with volunteers to make patron show experience top tier. Hours variable depending on show schedule.

MUSIC | MÚSICA

AN EVENING OF POP AND R&B

LIBRARY ON THE GO

Visit the Library’s van • SB Public Library • Ortega Park, by the basketball court • Free • 2-4:30pm Fr, 1/28.

BIBLIOTECA SOBRE LA MARCHA

Visita la camioneta de la Biblioteca • Biblioteca Pública SB • Parque Ortega, junto a la cancha de baloncesto • Gratis • 2-4:30pm viernes, 1/28.

Saturday • sábado MUSIC | MÚSICA

MARISELA

Concert by Spanish singer Marisela • Granada Theatre • $52132 • www.granadasb.org • 8pm Sa, 1/29.

MARISELA

Concierto de la cantante española Marisela • Teatro Granada • $52-132 • www.granadasb.org • 8pm sábado, 1/29.

SPECIAL EVENTS | EVENTOS ESPECIALES

UNA TARDE DE POP Y R&B

WOMEN’S SELF-DEFENSE WORKSHOP

CAMA: LA PHILHARMONIC

TALLER DE DEFENSA PERSONAL FEMENINA

Concierto virtual con el cantautor Thuy • Centro Multicultural UCSB • Gratis • https://mcc.sa.ucsb.edu • 6pm viernes, 1/28. Beethoven, Mendelssohn, and more • Granada Theatre • $36116 • www.granadasb.org • 7:30pm Fr, 1/28.

Learn self-defense basics • SB Krav Maga Family Self Defense Center, 325 Magnolia Ave, Goleta • $20 • https://tinyurl.com/2p96a443 • 11-12:30am Sa, 1/29. Aprende los conceptos básicos de defensa personal • SB Krav Maga Family Self Defense Center, 325 Magnolia Ave, Goleta • $20 • https://tinyurl.com/2p96a443 • 11-12:30am sábado, 1/29.

Consortium Support Specialist FT. Database management and tech support for ticketing and patron tracking. Tech savvy to learn a complex system – Tessitura.

CAMA: FILARMÓNICA DE LOS ÁNGELES

Concessions Server PT. Great customer service focus and opportunity for tips. Hours variable depending on show schedules.

LIBRARY ON THE GO

MARTIN SEXTON

BIBLIOTECA SOBRE LA MARCHA

MARTIN SEXTON

To apply: www.granadasb.org/About/Careers

1.29.22

Beethoven, Mendelssohn y más • Teatro Granada • $36-116 • www.granadasb.org • 7:30pm viernes, 1/28.

Sunday • domingo

SPECIAL EVENTS | EVENTOS ESPECIALES

MUSIC | MÚSICA

Visit the Library’s van • SB Public Library • Shoreline Park • Free • 10am-12pm Fr, 1/28. Visita la camioneta de la biblioteca • Biblioteca pública de SB • Shoreline Park • Gratis • 10am-12pm viernes, 1/28.

1.30.22

Soulful folk, rock and blues concert • SOhO Restaurant & Music Club • $30-66.50 • www.sohosb.com • 8pm Su, 1/30. Concierto de soul, folk, rock y blues • SOhO Restaurant & Music Club • $30-66.50 • www.sohosb.com • 8pm domingo, 1/30.


12

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

January 21, 2022

Photos courtesy of Jason Lewis

Jog, Walk, or Run Over to Athleta on State

J

By Daisy Scott / VOICE

UST IN TIME TO SUPPORT LOCALS IN THEIR QUEST TO MEET EXERCISE-DRIVEN NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS, Athleta has opened its doors on State Street. A brand owned by GAP Inc., Athleta aims to empower women and girls with its comfortable, versatile, and stylish range of active wear and athletic attire. Local shoppers will certainly find this to be the case as they explore the new store’s wide range of styles and inclusive sizing options. “Santa Barbara is an amazing community full of opportunities to live our brand and put our product to the test, which made it a natural fit for our newest store,” said General Manager Jason Lewis. “From the beaches to the trails, we can’t wait to get out and explore!” Born and raised in Santa Maria, Lewis joins Athleta after over 30 years of working in the retail industry. Over half of his career has been focused on serving Santa Barbara stores, with his past experiences including working with Robinson’s Coach, Marshall’s, and Banana Republic. Ever passionate about the outdoors and a father to a teenage daughter, Lewis was drawn to work with Athleta due to its commitment General Manager Jason Lewis to the environment and focus on making a difference in women’s lives. As a certified B Corp in the United States as well as Canada, Athleta holds itself to higher environmental standards than other companies. Its Santa Barbara store comes as Athleta continues investing in new locations as part of the company’s strategic growth plan to achieve $2 billion in net sales by 2023. Spanning 3,500 square feet of retail space, Athleta’s spacious State Street location includes a broad selection of the company’s products, all of which are created with an active lifestyle in mind. Whether a customer is searching for a matching sports bra and legging set for yoga, running shorts and workout shirts, or just casual, cozy athletic attire, Athleta offers styles that are as comfortable as they are fashionable. Fashions also range from bright colors and patterns to more neutral tones, ensuring there are items to please individuals’ varying tastes. To help direct shoppers, many of the store’s clothing items are arranged into sections that identify what they would be most useful for, such as everyday wear versus colder weather training. There are also accessories such as hats and headbands available, as well as sleepwear items. Younger shoppers can also find items from the Athleta Girl collection on display. Athleta also stands out for its inclusive sizing, with over 500 styles ranging from sizes XXS to 3X available online and in stores. Additionally, all store employees undergo training on the principles of bodypositive language as well as tools for assessing shoppers’ comfort in order to become bodySTRONG® certified by Athleta. “Providing an inclusive and empowering shopping environment for every person who walks through our doors is core to our DNA at Athleta,” explained Lewis. “We’re also focused on giving our customer choices to shop and interact with our brand in whatever way is most comfortable and convenient for her, whether that’s shopping with us in store, online, or by using our Buy Online, Pickup In Store service.” Athleta is open daily: 11am to 6pm • 733 State St. • www.athleta.gap.com

Photography by Ralph A. Clevenger & Friends Chiara Salomoni John Kelsey Beatriz Moino Eryn Brydon Liz Grady On exhibit now through March 31, 2022 Sponsored by: George H. and Olive J. Griffiths Charitable Foundation, Mimi Michaelis, Jack Mithun and Mercedes Millington, June G. Outhwaite Charitable Trust, Alice Tweed Tuohy Foundation, and the Wood-Claeyssens Foundation

sbmm.org 113 Harbor Way, Ste 190, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 • sbmm.org • 805-962-8404


January 21, 2022

13

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

Sounds About Town

Enter the Worldly Orchestras By Josef Woodard / VOICE

OMETHING AKIN TO AN EPIPHANY settled into the Granada Theatre early this month, when Santa Barbara’s long hiatus from international orchestras came to a highly musical end, courtesy of the sublime London-based Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. Although hardly a stranger here, this being its 13th visit made possible by the CAMA’s “International Series” of touring orchestra concerts, the moratorium-busting appearance by a world-renowned orchestra amounted to a particular pleasure.

Next Friday’s eagerlyawaited LA Phil return to Santa Barbara arrives with respected young conductor Elim Chan at the podium, with a juicy program including the stalwart stuff of Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3 (with Igor Levit, another respected Russian pianist, as soloist), Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4 “Italian.” Most notably, though, the program also boasts the U.S. premiere of Elizabeth Ogonek’s Cloudline.

Three-dimensional, highly articulate live orchestral music in our face and ears again: what a concept, and what a thrill. RPO’s latest visit, conducted by ace Russian maestro Vasily Petrenko, reached its apexes on British musical soil, with the tough love post-impressionism of Benjamin Britten’s Four Sea Interludes from Peter Grimes and, after intermission, the delectable 14-part mosaic that is Elgar’s Enigma Variations. In between came the crowd-pleasing romantic pillow fight of Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concert, beautifully dispensed up by elegant Russian virtuoso pianist Olga Kern and orchestral company. During the interval, a few affable, be-tuxed RPO musicians could be found ducking into the Granada-adjacent Sportsman Lounge, hoisting a beer and discussing the apt pictorial aspects of Britten’s Sea Interludes, which apparently neatly evokes a particular stark beach in Sussex in musical terms. During this first stop of a 14-city U.S. tour, they were also admiring the genuine “Americanness” of the Sportsman, replete with hunting trophies on the wall, and John Prine on the jukebox.

Photo by Rahi Rezvani

S

(now in place at the San Francisco Symphony), and on into the exalted era of maestro Gustavo Dudamel.

As it happens, a strong Santa Barbaran connection Elim Chan will conduct the LA Phil on January 28th, in a performance presented by CAMA links the return of both Chan and Ogonek, both part of the 2018 Music Academy of the West season. Ogonek was an artist-in-residence that summer. Chan had the distinction of conducting the London Symphony Orchestra in the first year of a collaborative pact with MAW, leading a concert highlighted by Ogonek’s poetic work Sleep and Unremembrance, in its West Coast Premiere.

INTERNATIONAL GLOW, FROM DOWN THE ROAD: On the subject of world-class orchestras doing it live in the 805, next Friday’s CAMA event brings to the Granada the mighty Los Angeles Philharmonic, in an annual CAMAhosted tradition going back to 1920. Correction: the CAMA/LA Phil annual pact had a gap year, during the previous COVID-ized season. When last the orchestra landed at the Granada, it was on March 6, 2020, only a few days prior to a general shutdown/lockdown of musical events. That appearance came as part of the much-heralded 100th anniversary of the LA Phil, whose global status was greatly boosted during the tenure of conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen

In an interview before the 2018 MAW visit, the Hong Kong-born Chan, now 35, traced her seminal connection to her life’s pursuit: “I had fallen in love with music and wanted to be a conductor since my first time in an orchestra concert when I was around eight or nine years old. I was fascinated by the ‘magic powers’ of the conductor. At the time the conductor was also a woman and so to me I never thought it would be any problem for me to do the same.

SAT JAN

“I was singing in a children’s choir at the time, and I started learning piano, and later on also cello so I could play in orchestra. Yet I also loved biology and psychology-another dream of mine was to work in the forensics--so I chose to give this a go in college. The next thing I knew was that music constantly knocked on my door and I could not doubt myself more but to commit myself to music. The rest is history, and I am very lucky to be on this wonderful journey.”

29

The journey continues, and, luckily for us, swoops back and through the Granada Theater.

ANAÏS MITCHELL + BONNY LIGHT HORSEMAN

The esteemed singer-songwriter whose, Broadway smash Hadestown won 8 Tony Awards®, including Best Musical, is joined by her fellow folk supergroup trio band members, Eric D. Johnson and Josh Kaufman, of Bonny Light Horseman – performing selections from their two-time GRAMMY® nominated album. John C. Mithun Foundation The Bentson Foundation

LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

LOBERO.ORG @loberotheatre 805.963.0761

Photo courtesy of SOhO

IN OTHER MUSIC NEWS:

Tuesday brings Hawaii’s contemporary/traditional band Kulaiwi-Native Lands to SOhO.

In terms of other musical genres hitting local stages, next week’s menu includes an actual, live-on-stage visit from KT Tunstall, tonight (January 21) at the Lobero Theater (she last “played the venue” in audiencefree, streamed form in 2020). At SOhO, Santa Barbara’s premiere showcase club and eatery, Tuesday brings Hawaii’s contemporary/ traditional band KulaiwiNative Lands, and on Thursday, Donovan Frankenreiter, surf-rock troubadour and former act on Jack Johnson’s Brushfire Records roster.

Woodard is a veteran cultural critic, who wrote for the Los Angeles Times for 25 years, has contributed to Rolling Stone, Entertainment Weekly, DownBeat, and many music magazines, and a long association with the Santa Barbara Independent and News-Press. To date, he has published two books for Silman-James Press, on jazz legends Charles Lloyd and Charlie Haden, respectively. He recently published a debut novel, Ladies Who Lunch. Woodard is also a musician, a guitarist, songwriter, and head of the Household Ink Records label.


14

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

January 21, 2022

Tree-of-the-Month, January 2022:

Winter Blooming Acacia Trees Acacia baileyana; A. dealbata; A. decurrens N JANUARY AND FEBRUARY IN SANTA BARBARA, the first trees to present amazing canopies of color are the Acacias. The most remarkable of these are three species that seem to explode with brightyellow flowers: Bailey Acacia; Silver Wattle Acacia; and Green Wattle Acacia. Out of the dozens of other Acacia species in our area, these three stand out as the earliest of winter bloomers – and the ones that bear the most profuse floral displays. Besides flowering beautifully, they are evergreen and well suited to our Mediterranean climate. All three have similar, small (¼ inch), rounded, yellow flowers, which occur in racemes or panicles that develop at the Silver Wattle Acacia Flowers ends of the branches and contain 25 to 30 flowers. The flowers have a delightfully sweet scent, something like fresh cotton candy. Fair warning: Some people develop allergic hay fever to the voluminous pollen that drifts off in the wind. The most ornamental is Bailey Acacia, which has been a popular tree here since it was first introduced in 1903 by the pioneering horticulturist, Dr. Francesco Franceschi. In our area, it grows rapidly to form a small-scale tree (20- to 30-feet tall and 20- to 35-feet wide) with a broad, rounded crown. Its gracefully weeping branches are covered with silvery blue-gray foliage. The bipinnately compound leaves are comprised of two to six pairs of pinnae each bearing 12 to 30 pairs of pinnules (3/16-inches long), which create a delicate fern-like appearance. After pollination, the flowers produce bean-like seed pods Bailey Acacia Leaves (two- to four-inches long and ¼- to ½-inches wide). Its bark is light gray; smooth when young but developing furrows with age. It grows naturally as either a multiple-trunked tree or a large shrub. It can be trained as a single-trunked tree, good to plant as an individual specimen or in mass plantings for a screen. It does best in full sun and will thrive in any type of soil, provided it is well-drained. It is fairly drought-tolerant and is cold-hardy to 20 degrees Fahrenheit. It can survive with our normal rainfall but, understandably, does better with some additional irrigation during the dry season. The Bailey Acacia is also known by other common

names: “Fernleaf Acacia;” “Golden Mimosa;” and, “Cootamundra Wattle.” Its botanical name is Acacia baileyana. The genus name, Acacia, is Latin but was derived from the Greek word, akakia, meaning “Egyptian thorn acacia.” The specific epithet, “baileyana,” honors the Australian botanist, Frederick Mason Bailey (1827-1915). It is native to a limited area of the Cootamundra region of New South Wales, Australia, where it is known as Cootamundra Wattle. The word “wattle” comes from an old English word for the branches and twigs that were used in weaving lattice for sheep fences and other structures. In Australia, early European settlers made huts and shelters of wattle, using the long flexible branches Silver Wattle Acacia of Acacias mixed with mud. On that continent, the term became precaution, planting should be limited to managed urban synonymous with Acacia trees and the landscapes. These trees are essentially maintenance-free; name stuck, well, like mud. however, periodic pruning to lighten the load of branches There is a purple-leafed cultivar, is well advised, since their wood is brittle and can break in Acacia baileyana ‘Purpurea.’ Its leaves winds and rain. emerge with a distinctive lavender to In the right location, any of these lovely Acacias will almost purple color that turns silvermake a stunning addition to a residential, commercial, gray with age. It is a shorter tree, with a or park landscape. Soon enough, their spectacular yellow maximum height of 20-feet. blooms will be easy to spot around town! The other two species, the Silver Bailey Acacias are seen on the 2200 block of Alameda Wattle Acacia and Green Wattle Padre Serra, on the 1800 block of Eucalyptus Hill Road, Acacia, are quite similar to each other, at 1 S. Los Carneros Road, and on the 101 Freeway at the differing primarily in their leaf colors. They both differ State Street/ Highway 154 overpass, as well as scattered from Bailey Acacia in their taller upright growth habit around in the Mission Canyon neighborhood. Silver (up to 50-feet tall with a spread of 40-feet) and in their Wattle Acacias and Green Wattle Acacias are seen on Old relatively larger leaves. Their bipinnately compound leaves Coast Highway (between Park Place and Hot Springs have 20 to 50 pairs of pinnules on rachis up to fourRoad), on the 100 to 200 Blocks of Hot Springs Road inches long, with ten to 26 pairs of pinnae. These species (along with Black Wattles), and on the 600 Block of Cold occur naturally in southeastern Australia, with the Silver Spring Road. Wattle’s range extending further into Tasmania. They naturally hybridize together and also naturally hybridize Tree-of-the-Month articles are sponsored by Santa Barbara Beautiful, whose mission includes increasing public awareness with the Black Wattle (Acacia mearnsii), making their and appreciation of Santa Barbara’s many outstanding trees exact identification rather difficult. and, in a long-time partnership with the City Parks & Recreation The Silver Wattle, also known by the common names Department, the funding and planting of trees along the City’s streets. “Blue Wattle” and “Mimosa,” has the botanical name, Acacia dealbata. The specific epithet, dealbata, is from the Those who wish to honor a special someone can do so with an attractive commemorative marker that will be installed at Latin word, dealbatus, meaning “whitewashed.” the base of an existing street tree in the City of Santa Barbara. The Green Wattle has the botanical name, Acacia Because Santa Barbara Beautiful has participated in the planting to date of over 13,000 street trees, there are plenty of trees from decurrens. The specific epithet, decurrens, is derived from which to choose! Application forms are available at a combination of the Latin words, de and curro, meaning www.sbbeautiful.org “running down the stems.” The Green Wattle also differs from the other two species in that it has dark gray bark that frequently develops warts along the trunk. In Australia, Acacias are used in numerous ways: for their wood - to make furniture, tools, and fine carpentry; for their flowers to make dyes, food additives, and floral arrangements; and, for their sap - to formulate Designate a tree as a tribute to a family member or friend. chemicals for medicines. Unfortunately, these Acacias, like many other Santa Barbara Beautiful Acacias, are short-lived, having an expected life has funded more than 13,000 span of 30 to 40 years. street trees in Santa Barbara! Fortunately, they are easy to Find out more at www.SBBeautiful.org grow and appear to be free of pests and diseases. They are known to be invasive in For more information visit: some Mediterranean regions; www.sbbeautiful.org/commemorativetrees.html locally, they do not appear to Santa Barbara Beautiful is a 501 (c) 3. Donations may be tax deductible. TAX ID: 23-7055360 be a pest tree problem. As a Photos by David Gress

I

By David Gress / Special to VOICE

Commemorative Tree Plaques... Great Gifts & Great Memories


January 21, 2022

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

15

SBIFF Education Programs Inspire Film Lovers of All Ages

F

By Daisy Scott / VOICE

Photos courtesy of SBIFF

ROM A CHILD’S FIRST DISNEY CARTOON TO THE MOMENT AN INDIVIDUAL RECOGNIZES A PART OF THEMSELVES REPRESENTED ON SCREEN, films possess an inherently inspirational quality. No local organization better understands this than the Santa Barbara International Film Festival, which annually unites people nationwide in appreciating cinema. Claire Waterhouse, SBIFF Education Manager, ensures that the organization’s educational programming continues to inform and connect future generations of filmmakers and movie-goers year-round. “Education is at the heart of everything SBIFF does,” shared Waterhouse. “I think through the pandemic, film has become more important than ever, and people are understanding how important it is to connect with people.... There’s no better form than film. You’re getting to see people on screen, you have elements of music and visual arts, and you get to experience other people’s lives. It’s just such a beautiful way to get to connect to other SBIFF Executive Director Roger Durling and Mike’s Field Trip to the Movies audience members worlds and other people.” more. The organization’s Film Studies Program additionally hosts undergraduate students Waterhouse speaks from personal experience when from across the nation during the festival, granting them an insider experience and private it comes to SBIFF’s positive impact. Growing up in Santa sessions with guests. SBIFF Education Manager Barbara, she quickly developed a strong admiration for the Claire Waterhouse The festival also features the culmination of the 10-10-10 Screenwriting and Filmmaking festival and SBIFF as an organization. When she attended Mentorship and Competition, Santa Barbara City College, she took courses with SBIFF showcasing ten films created by Executive Director Roger Durling, which strengthened her love of film. a total of 20 local high school As a UCSB student, Waterhouse went on to intern with SBIFF, later being hired as the and college students with the Production Coordinator for the 2018 festival. Now, as Education Manager, she most enjoys guidance of industry experts. being able to support opportunities for community members to better understand, access, “When we have mentors or and connect over great films. guest speakers, I think it gives All of SBIFF’s educational programs are provided to participants free of charge, with the our students such confidence majority of them being shifted to virtual platforms amidst the pandemic. in themselves to realize One of SBIFF’s newer opportunities is its Stories Matter initiative, held in partnership that they can also become a with documentarian and actress Leslie Zemeckis. The program provides women between cinematographer or director or the ages of 18 and 30 with guidance to write their own stories, whether that be through a an editor. I think it opens up screenplay or another written format. the world to them,” explained For college students, SBIFF offers the Rosebud Program, which annually provides twelve Waterhouse. individuals access to screenings with film industry professionals, group conversations, and SBIFF also offers internship opportunities to college students Community members enjoying an AppleBox Family Film at and beyond. Each intern is the Arlington Theatre paired with a specific SBIFF department to gain valuable experience and support the organization’s many components. SBIFF additionally partners with the United Boys & Girls Club of Santa Barbara County to send under-served teenagers to a sleepaway Film Camp to expand their cinematic skills. To inspire younger movie-goers, SBIFF annually hosts Mike’s Field Trip to the Movies, bringing fourth through sixth graders countywide to the Arlington Theatre for a film screening and director Q&A. SBIFF also hosts AppleBox Family Films, inviting low-income families to enjoy free screenings at the Arlington. When the pandemic prevented in-person screenings, SBIFF compiled virtual Family Fun Film Activity Guides for children to complete at home. Virtual content was also shared with area classrooms, allowing SBIFF to continue educating students on the film industry’s almost limitless possibilities. “Film isn’t really taught in elementary school,” commented Waterhouse. “Film is such an important art form, and so many people from an early age are watching movies... but a lot of kids don’t understand how films are made or all the processes that go into making a film... there are so many jobs within film.” Additional SBIFF education opportunities include its Santa Barbara Filmmaker Series which highlights local filmmakers during downtown Santa Barbara’s 1st Thursdays. Film Talks with industry professionals are also uploaded online for community enjoyment.

JUXTAPOSED T H E A R T O F C U R AT I O N

For more information about SBIFF, visit www.sbiff.org

O P E N S 1 S T T H U R S D AY JA N UA RY 6 TH, 2 0 2 2 T H R O U G H F E B R U A R Y 2 1 ST

11 EAST ANAPAMU STREET | SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101 (805) 730-1460 | www.sullivangoss.com

SBIFF’s 30 Film Studies Program participants before a tribute during the 2020 festival


16

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

Opera Santa Barbara

W

By Robert F. Adams, Special to VOICE

ITH SUPPLE, SUBLIME MOVEMENT (in both body and voice) Jana McIntyre's character led Opera Santa Barbara in a premiere of a lively Baroque opera, Handel’s Semele, set in a fantastical Hollywood of the past. An adventurous way to start off the 2022 New Year, and a company first, this opera was filled with vocal gymnastics by a wonderful cast, accompanied by a deft company. The music and story of Semele belongs to another time and place. It premiered in 1744 in England, based on a libretto from the Restoration playwright William Congreve. An amusing opera, which is a little like a soap opera, it mashes together oratorio style and classical drama, while portraying a relationship between a mortal (Semele) and a god (Jupiter) – all to the tune of polyphonic choruses and arias.

and Telemann. The score is full of complex recitatives, grounding the work in a complicated historical style. The overall effect is comic and lighthearted rather than portentously tragic. In just one of the many plot threads, a comically self-important and scheming Juno, accompanied by her assistant Iris, tries to right the wrongs bestowed on her with assistance from the God of Sleep, Somnus. Led by an accomplished all-female artistic team, conductor Emily Senturia and stage director Sara E. Widzer, both revealed a masterful approach to updating this work. In this production, the setting was transferred to a kind of fantasy derived from the early Golden Age of Hollywood, probably the late 1920s silent-film era and the early 1930s when the Los Angeles based film studios were starting to have a large cultural impact on the world. The effectiveness of the performances could be sourced to the slyly sexy staging by Widzer and her handling of the adept

Photo by Zach Mendez

Handel's music borrows from styles of the time, including Congreve’s stage plays, earlier attempts at a Semele opera, and appropriations from Cesare, Scarlatti,

Jana McIntyre as Semele

Jana McIntyre as Semele and Robert Stahley as Jupiter

historic Lobero to optimal effect, the lighting from Helena Kuukka and the imaginative projected imagery from production designer Yuki Izumihara added immeasurably to the pleasures that were mined from this Handel work. The kinetic projections, both realistic and allegorical, ranged from orange trees that framed the void of the backdrop, to showing rare Southern California storms and lightning bolts, to amber-fused archival film clips of Hollywood as a center of silent film moviemaking. The sets and garden elements seemed to suggest film mogul palaces, a place where the ghosts of William Randolph Hearst, Douglas Fairbanks, and Mary Pickford would not feel out of place. All these god-like movie power brokers were surrounded by stylish mortals including the vain leading character Semele and hangers-on represented by Cadmus, the forlorn Athamas, and the yearning Ino. Much of the effectiveness of the setting update was the interesting contrast as it bumped up against Handel's old style of the music.

Many kudos should be given to the costume designer Stacie Logue along with the hair and makeup magic of Heather Kostis Protopapas, Artistic & General Director; Susan Jackson; Palmer Jackson, Jr., Executive Chairman of the Granada Theatre; Joan Rutkowski, OSB Board Sterling who Chair; and Nicholas Burlett, OSB Vice Chair at the opening night celebration really pulled the theme together, cast of singer-actors, all of whom credibly effectively capturing the opulence and portrayed and sung the challenging music artificiality of the Hollywood mythos. while delivering internal monologues that An amusing evening emerged full of were strongly felt in-between the notes. musical complexity, strong singing, and The most thrilling moments included visual panache. At opening night, the the coloratura arias from soprano Jana performance was dedicated to title singer McIntyre, singing with ravishing grace Jana McIntyre’s father, John McIntyre, and style portraying Semele, and mezzoand the production sponsors included the soprano Sara Coit as Juno, a no-nonsense Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation, George H. platinum blond goddess that seemed to & Olive J. Griffiths Charitable Foundation, pull all the strings. Nancy and Fred Golden and a host of Robert Stahley was also very effective others including Margaret Arvey, Mary in his ribald characterization of the Dorra, David Mason, Bella Domani, the overtly-lusty Jupiter. Here is a figure Walter and Holly Thomson Foundation, perhaps manipulated by his vanity and Bank of America, Paseo Nuevo and the by seductive females, both mortal and Santa Barbara Office of Arts & Culture. immortal, surrounding his palatial overThe artistic and General Director sized bed. The cast also included strong Kostis Protopapas thanked everyone in characterizations from Logan Tanner the company individually at the Patron’s as Thamas, Colin Ramsey singing both Cadmus and Somnus, Christina Pezzarossi reception following the show, an offering of genuine gratitude for the cast and as Ino and Sunwoo Park as Iris, along production team that put together the with the dancing chorus. The performers entertaining Semele. gathered steam through the acts of Semele and by the concluding celebratory dance, For more on 2022 season and Opera Santa Barbara programs, visit www.OperaSB.org or call were successful in winning over those in 805-898-3890. n attendance. Photo by Priscilla

Handel’s Semele

Photo by Priscilla, www.SantaBarbaraSeen.com

A Baroque Moment, Hollywood Style:

January 21, 2022

This production was originally developed by the Pittsburgh Opera in the spring of 2021 and Opera Santa Barbara continued its develpment and brought it to the Lobero with both amusing and astounding moments throughout the three acts. Using the shallow stage of the

Robert F. Adams, a Santa Barbara landscape architect, is a graduate of UCLA’s School of Theatre and Film, as well as Cal Poly. He has served on the film selection committees for the Aspen Film Fest and the SB International Film Festival. Email him at robert@earthknower.com.


January 21, 2022

17

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

WILL SMITH KING RICHARD

AUNJANUE ELLIS KING RICHARD

KRISTEN STEWART SPENCER

CAITRIONA BALFE BELFAST

ARIANA DEBOSE WEST SIDE STORY

JAMIE DORNAN BELFAST

ALANA HAIM LICORICE PIZZA

EMILIA JONES CODA

TROY KOTSUR CODA

SIMON REX RED ROCKET

SANIYYA SIDNEY KING RICHARD

BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH THE POWER OF THE DOG

JOIN US IN-PERSON FOR 200 FILMS, PANEL DISCUSSIONS, AND TRIBUTES TO THE YEAR’S BEST

MARCH 2-12, 2022

GET YOUR TICKETS NOW AT SBIFF.ORG


18

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

January 21, 2022

Harbor VOICE Getting to Know Commodore Eli Parker

Photo by Theresa Koons

REAT PLANS ARE UNDERWAY ALONG THE WATERFRONT, THE HARBOR, AND STEARNS WHARF IN ANTICIPATION OF 150TH YEAR CELEBRATIONS! Can’t wait to tell you about these milestones as they become ready for prime time. Committees, meeting in various locations, are planning a raft of exciting events to make 2022 a banner year. Keeping my ear to the ground is a numero uno priority – the only thing I lack at this point is a set of water wings, a fedora, and a press pass in its hatband. Planning at the Santa Barbara Yacht Club has been well underway with the upstairs remodel and the downstairs under construction to be in “Bristol Condition” for an expanded 2022 Opening Day. Now scheduled for the first weekend in April, a committee is hard at work making big plans jam-packed with fun. And, as you know... I’m curious! Eli Parker, this year’s Commodore, seemed the right person to approach. In the course of our conversation he not only shared some of the Club’s plans, but stories about his early years in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles and the journey - via boating - to the Santa Barbara Whitney and Eli Parker Yacht Club. Definitely a Santa Barbara boy, Fess Elisha Parker III was one of the two children of Marcella and Fess Elisha Parker, Jr. The elder Parker was widely known for his recognizable face as Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett in the popular 1950-70’s TV series and later as a Montecito Montecito Magazine Magazine successful real estate developer and wine maker. “At the time Dad’s work as an actor was based in Los Angeles, then theApproval industry’s center,” explained Parker. “Those years brought our family Proof Proof Approval Montecito south to Orange County to be closer to his work.” It was during the family’s eight year stay in Magazine OC that Parker discovered sailing. “My dad had a sailboatomoored in Newport Harbor called o Approved, Approved, Proof Approval no changes noteak... changes the Sea Witch with sort of a pirate flare and a black hull, lots of aosalty looking boat! The Approved, Sea Witch was our platform for many fun family weekends.” OR OR no changes OR In the 1970’s, o theChanges elder Parker changed course and moved his family back to Santa Barbara, marked o Changes marked o Changes marked trading his iconic coonskin hat for a new career as a real estate developer.“When we moved ______________ Date ______________ ______________ back, my dad’s new hobby was a 52 foot powerboat calledDate the Sea Isle, Date moored on an end Approved by tie... and where I Approved got my firstby taste of ‘boat maintenance,’” Approved Parker laughed. by “He put a piece of ____________________ sandpaper in my hand and said, ‘Here’s how you do it, Kid!’” ____________________ ____________________ The family’s frequent trips to the Islands with their close friends, the late Sign Staff Commodore • Please Fax to 966-6103 Fred Rice (1985) and his family, continued unabated. They visited the •Yacht Club often and • Please Sign • Please Sign• email to enjoyed weekend trips on the Parker and Rice boats. Parker admitted coming to the conclusion art@montecitomag.com • Fax to 966-6103 Fax to 966-6103 that some boats are limited to what he considered to be “a•slow crawl” but a Marauder with Thanks, Flannery email toand a deep V hull could mitigate• that emailproblem. to Chris“As twin six cylinder •engines a young man I Art Director art@montecitomag.com art@montecitomag.com had the time of my life waterskiing with friends and having some fun crazy crossings in heavy 805-966-2445 surf,” he chuckled. “Guess we were too young to realize what could have happened, but it was Thanks, Thanks, Our Color Proofs are Chris Flannery Chris Flannery sure fun at the time!” printed on a color ink jet Art and Director ArtinDirector printer.although he’d Getting married raising a family, Parker’s focus was real estate, • This proof is a Color 805-966-2445 805-966-2445 developed an interest in wines. As working with family had always been a great source of pride Corrected Epson Proof calibrated using a the craft and pleasure, Parker began as an assistant winemaker. After several years of learning custom ICC profile to under the guidance renowned winemakers, in 1996 Parker tookProofs the represent reigns of the Our of Color Proofs are Our Color are offset pressFess Parker

Photo courtesy of fessparker.com

G

By Sigrid Toye, Special to VOICE

Eli Parker, his sister Ashley Parker Snider, and their families

Winery assuming the title and responsibilities of President. His sister, Ashley Parker Snider, joined him, eventually becoming a partner, both stewards of their father’s vision through Fess Parker Enterprises. Parker and Yacht Club member Mike Drammer became sailing buddies and boat partners for both competition and fun on the water. With Drammer’s encouragement, Parker joined the Yacht Club, and, as they say, the rest is history! “Our club’s extensive remodel and our Saturday Opening Day on the first weekend in April will be the perfect spot for two days of festivities and fun races.” Parker noted that the club is planning a 150th historical video and a possible 150th partnership with Stearns Wharf. Anticipating the coming year, Parker exclaimed, “It’s truly an honor to be the Commodore of this amazing club and I’m looking forward to our Opening Day weekend and an active, fun 2022.” Fair winds and smooth seas to you, Commodore Eli Parker! Sigrid Toye volunteers for the Breakwater Flag Project. She is on the board of directors of the Maritime Museum and participates in Yacht Club activities. An educational/behavior therapist, Sigrid holds a Ph.D in clinical psychology. She loves all things creative, including her two grown children who are working artists. Send Harbor tips to: Itssigrid@gmail.com

PURCHASE PURCHASE ANDHOME THE ANDHOME PURCHASEPURCHASE THE PURCHASE ANDHOME PURCHASE THE REFINANCE REFINANCE LOANS LOANS OF YOUR DREAMS. YOUR DREAMS. REFINANCE LOANS OFOF YOUR DREAMS.

bankofthewest.com

bankofthewest.com

Bank of the West continues to offer a variety of loan options to Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. © 2020 Bank of the West. All loans subject to credit approval, standard mortgage qualifications, fit your needs. and underwriting requirements. Additional fees, conditions, and restrictions may apply.We have jumbo (up to $4,000,000), interest only, printed on a color ink jet adjustable rate and cash-out loans. Montecito Magazine Fall 2017 printer. • This proof is a Color Bank of the West • 1/2 page Askto1st our relationship pricing Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. © 2020 Member Bank FDIC. of the Equal West. Housing All loans Lender. subject ©about credit 2020 approval, Bank of the standard West. Allmortgage loans subject qualifications, to credit approval, stand ProoF Corrected Epson Proof and underwriting requirements. Additional fees, and underwriting conditions, and requirements. restrictions Additional may apply. fees, conditions, and restrictions may apply. calibrated using a to get even lower interest rates. conditions. • This proof is not an exact match. • Color matching is neither implied nor guaranteed.

custom ICC profile to represent offset press conditions. • This proof is not an exact match. • Color matching is neither implied nor guaranteed.

Dennis Boneck, Rear Commodore, Dave Sadecki, Vice Commodore, Eli Parker, Commodore, and Andra Escola Jr., Staff Commodore (Past Commodore)

Photo by Theresa Koons

printed on a color ink jet printer. • This proof is a Color Corrected Epson Proof calibrated using a custom ICC profile to represent offset press conditions. • This proof is not an exact match. • Color matching is neither implied nor guaranteed.

WEST. GO GOWEST.

Montecito Magazine Fall 2017 Montecito Magazine Fall 2017 Mortgage Banker, NMLS#237143 Elizabeth Winterhalter, the West| •Elizabeth.Winterhalter@bankofthewest.com 1/2 page Bank of the West • 1/2 page CellBank (805)of904-7328 1st ProoF

1st ProoF

Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. © 2021 Bank of the West. All loans subject to credit approval, standard mortgage qualifications, and underwriting requirements. Additional fees, conditions, and restrictions may apply.


January 21, 2022

19

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

Palminteri’s

Community VOICE

Free COVID Tests Available for All

John Palminteri

What’s Been Happening? Sea Landing Under New Ownership

Don’t wait until tomorrow as you may have heard. FREE GOVERNMENT COVID TESTS are available NOW. Limit 4. Order at www.Covidtests.gov or https://special.usps.com/testkits

Harbor Patrol to the Rescue! A PERSISTENT DOG, chasing a soccer ball, ended up in near shore waters the morning of Saturday, January 15th and needed help. Santa Barbara Harbor Patrol officers made two rescues. The dog and the ball. Oh, and they were monitoring the tsunami alert at the same time!

The ownership of a landmark site at the Santa Barbara harbor has changed. Sea Landing is now called SANTA BARBARA LANDING. The Santa Barbara Landing LLC is comprised of the owners of the Stardust and Coral Sea, Channel Islands Expeditions, Santa Barbara Jet Boats, and the Sea Landing Dive Center. Watch for changes to include more retail space and beautification towards West Beach and the walkway.

State St. Promenade Crash

Broad Street Oyster Co. Lands on State St. BROAD STREET OYSTER CO. sees an opportunity by opening in Santa Barbara during the pandemic. This started as a pop up in the Funk Zone in 2017. Now it has restaurant space with Shaker Mill and Modern Times in the multi-use Kim’s Service Dept. building in the 400 block, between Haley Street and Gutierrez Street.

Showers of Blessing Serves People Experiencing Homelessnesss

A PROMENADE CRASH Tuesday morning, January 18th, in Santa Barbara leads to the arrest of the driver of a small car that witnesses reportedly saw driving through parklets and patios on State Street and then do a reckless spinning turn. This was between Figueroa and Anapamu. The street is closed to cars. Police are investigating the driver for possibly being under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

A CONSOLIDATED SITE in a downtown Santa Barbara parking lot offers help on many levels for those living in or near homelessness. It’s a trusted group. Some success stories are coming from this site with proven help in health and housing.

Photos by John Palminteri • www.facebook.com/john.palminteri.5 • Twitter @JohnPalminteri • Instagram @JohnPalminteriNews


20

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

Legal support for journalists at protests By Jason M. Shepard, Ph.D.

A

Fall 2021: California Publisher

S PUBLIC PROTESTS OVER POLICE MISCONDUCT SPREAD throughout the United States after the May 2020 police officer Derek Chauvin murdered George Floyd, some of the biggest threats to journalists trying to report the news came from the police. “We have seen a surge in egregious acts of violence and obstruction made against members of the press across the country and right here at home in the Golden State,” said Sen. Mike McGuire (D-Healdsburg). Now, thanks to a significant new law authored by McGuire and signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsom in October, journalists in California will see new legal protections while covering protests and marches after the law takes effect January 1, 2022. Under current law, journalists covering natural disasters are allowed into emergency areas behind police lines and are exempt from police curfews. The new law expands this access to protests and marches, and the civil unrest that can follow protests, explicitly allowing journalists access to protest areas that are closed by the police during an emergency. The law prohibits police from interfering with newsgathering and citing journalists for failing to disperse. The law also gives journalists the right to immediately challenge any detention with a supervisor on scene. The law defines a covered journalist as anyone who is “a duly authorized representative of any news service, online news service, newspaper, or radio or television station or network.” “This law will provide critical protections for the press as they attend and report on First Amendment events

like protests, marches, rallies, and demonstrations,” McGuire said in a statement. “California is leading the way to ensure the freedom of the press and the First Amendment are protected and held to the highest standard.” Police groups opposed the bill, saying the need for public safety after protests turn violent is different than in natural disasters. They pushed for changes requiring journalists to seek permission to be in closed areas, but the bill’s supporters scuttled those amendments after journalist groups complained the changes could do more harm than good. Newsom vetoed a similar bill in 2020, reportedly over concerns about the definition of who is covered and that fringe groups could use the law to cause harm in closed areas. The bill gained momentum again following several high-profile incidents, including one near Echo Park Lake in March 2021 after the Los Angeles Police Department attacked and detained journalists covering a protest over the city’s clearing of a homeless encampment. At least two journalists were shot with rubber bullets and three others were detained, according to reports. The incidents were among more than 50 recent cases of police actions against journalists documented by a coalition of California journalism advocacy groups organized in support of the new law. They included 27 cases of assaults or injuries, 16 detainments without arrests, and seven arrests with citations. “During the past two years, working conditions for journalists have steadily deteriorated across the state. While covering protests, many of our newspaper, television, radio, digital, freelance, and student media colleagues were arrested, detained, or injured by

law enforcement,” the coalition wrote in a letter urging Newsom to sign the bill. The coalition created a slideshow of graphic photos documenting injuries suffered by journalists. The photos included the bloody neck of Adolfo Guzman-Lopez of NPR affiliate KPCC, who was shot with a foam bullet by Long Beach police in May 2020 while covering a Black Lives Matter protest. Other California cases included the arrest of Josie Huang, a reporter for KPCC and LAist. Los Angeles Sheriff ’s deputies attacked and arrested Huang while she covered a small protest that had assembled in September 2020 outside of a hospital as two officers who had been shot in an ambush were being treated inside. The sheriff ’s department initially said Huong refused orders and did not identify herself a reporter, but video recorded on her phone of the incident showed otherwise. “In more than 50 documented instances over a year, clearly identified journalists reported being targeted by law enforcement while covering protests in California. A disproportionate number of those journalists are Black and brown,” Ashanti Blaize-Hopkins, an associate professor of journalism at Santa Monica College and vice president of the Society of Professional Journalists Greater Los Angeles chapter, wrote in an editorial in The Sacramento Bee. “A free press is essential to a functioning democracy. Journalists are the eyes and ears of the public and must have the freedom to cover civil disturbances without interference. Erosion of press rights results in an uninformed or ill-informed public,” wrote Blaize-Hopkins, a leader of the coalition pushing for the new law. Nationwide, protests have become the most common place for journalists to be attacked or arrested, according to the U.S. Press Freedom Tracker, a project of more than two dozen press freedom groups. In 2020, the project identified 400 attacks against journalists and 129 arrests of journalists at protests in the U.S., many of them fueled by the murder of George Floyd and the broader Black Lives Matter movement. An analysis by the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press documented 89 attacks against journalists by protesters in 2020, and in at least half of them, journalists appeared to be singled out because of their newsgathering role. Even more concerning is that 80 percent of the documented attacks against journalists came from the police. Police attacked journalists using rubber bullets, tear gas, pepper balls, batons,

January 21, 2022

and fists. Police also blocked access to public places and detained and arrested journalists for doing their jobs. “Journalists were impeded or outright prevented from reporting news about one of the most important social movements in recent history,” the report concluded. Perhaps the highest profile arrest was that of Omar Jimenez, a CNN correspondent who was arrested in Minneapolis, along with his crew, live on CNN while covering the Floyd protests. The Minnesota governor personally apologized for the arrests. (Disclosure: I chair a committee of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication that gives an annual First Amendment award, and Jimenez was the 2020 recipient). In most cases where journalists were arrested on scene, charges were ultimately dropped. In one rare prosecution of a reporter, an Iowa jury in March found Des Moines Register reporter Andrea Sahouri not guilty on two criminal charges of failing to disperse and interference with police. “Newsgathering is a fundamental part of press freedom. Reporters need to be at protests as the public’s eyes and ears, to conduct interviews, take photos, and witness for themselves the actions of protesters and law enforcement,” Des Moines Register Executive Editor Carol Hunter told her newspaper. “If reporters are arrested and hauled away from protests, that denies people the right to know what’s going on in their community.” At least in California, journalists can breathe a little easier in knowing the law is on their side when they are doing their jobs reporting at protests and marches. This piece first appeared in the Fall 2021 issue of California Publisher, official publication of the California News Publishers Association, and is republished n with permission.

Jason M. Shepard, Ph.D., is professor and chair of the Department of Communications at California State University, Fullerton. His primary research expertise is in media law, and he teaches courses in journalism, and media law, history and ethics. Contact him at jshepard@fullerton.edu or Twitter at @jasonmshepard.


January 21, 2022

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

21

Benedict Cumberbatch to Receive SBIFF Cinema Vanguard Award

Photo courtesy of SBIFF

OASTING INCREDIBLE RANGE, GREAT EMOTIONAL DEPTH, AND A TALENT FOR FULLY EMBODYING COMPLEX CHARACTERS, Benedict Cumberbatch is unquestionably a once-in-a-generation actor. This spring, the Santa Barbara International Film Festival will honor Cumberbatch for his staggering career with their Cinema Vanguard Award. The presentation will take place in-person event on Wednesday, March 9th, where Cumberbatch will discuss his past roles and most recent performance in director Jane Campion’s The Power of the Dog. “He’s an intelligent, enigmatic, and deeply committed artist who comfortably straddles a career in blockbusters and independent cinema where he works with visionary talent like Jane Campion,” said SBIFF Executive Director Roger Durling. “We’re ecstatically planning our celebration of Benedict Cumberbatch.” SBIFF’s Cinema Vanguard Award is presented to actors who have significantly contributed to cinema while taking artistic risks and definitively forging their own, new paths. In 2021, the award went to Carey Mulligan, who had recently starred in Promising Young Woman. Past recipients include stars such as Laura Dern, Michael B. Jordan, and Willem Dafoe. Cumberbatch is a fitting addition to this rank of honorees. Born in London, he has distinguished himself as a theater actor, starring in the Barbican Theatre’s 2015 production of Hamlet. In 2010, he portrayed a modern interpretation of the iconic character Sherlock Holmes in the BBC’s television series Sherlock, gaining him international recognition and acclaim. Over the past decade, Cumberbatch has consistently proven himself as an actor that cannot be categorized into one specific genre. In terms of drama, he has portrayed historic figures such as Alan Turing in The Imitation Game, and Thomas Edison in The Current War. Regarding science-fiction and fantasy, he starred in Star Trek Into Darkness and The Hobbit films as the voice of Smaug, the dragon. In recent years, he has taken on the mantle of Doctor Strange for the Marvel franchise. In The Power of the Dog, released on Netflix in November 2021, Cumberbatch plays Phil, a shrewd, rough, and frequently downright mean ranch owner in 1920s Montana. Benedict Cumberbatch

Photo courtesy of IMDb

B

By Daisy Scott / VOICE

Benedict Cumberbatch as Phil in The Power of the Dog

The film follows Phil as his brother, George (Jesse Plemons), marries widow Rose Gordon (Kirsten Dunst). Phil responds with great cruelty toward both Rose and her son, seemingly making a concentrated effort to make them miserable. A compelling psychological drama unfolds, examining the nature of grief, resentment, and relationships. The film has already garnered significant Oscar buzz, as well as won the 2021 Golden Globe Awards for Best Motion Picture – Drama and Best Director for Campion, who worked closely with Cumberbatch to realize Phil’s character arc. “We [Cumberbatch and Campion] had an equal love and need to carefully create this character from the page to the screen,” Cumberbatch explained to The Guardian in December 2021. “We understood the complexity of a man whose monstrous behaviour masks a deep well of pain; a scar needed to be understood in order to be inhabited.” The Santa Barbara International Film Festival will take place March 2nd through March 12th. For passes and event tickets, visit www.sbiff.org

COMMUNITY NEWS

Point-In-Time Count Rescheduled, Several Hundred Volunteers Still Needed

T

O SUPPORT THE WELLBEING OF COMMUNITY MEMBERS, the countywide Point-In-Time Count has been rescheduled to take place between 5:30am to 8:30am, Wednesday, February 23rd. This semi-annual count records the number of individuals and families experiencing homelessness in our county on a given day, with gathered information used to promote public awareness, plan local assistance efforts, and justify funding. Several hundred volunteers are still needed for this winter’s count. “With everything that has happened over the past two years, the Point-in-Time Count is more important than ever,” said Jett Black-Maertz, Housing Program Specialist, Sr. with the County of Santa Barbara Community Services Department. “It is important that we have an accurate count; we can’t do that without the help of volunteers.” To volunteer, please sign up at https://countyofsb.pointintime.info

Community Invited to take County Climate Action Plan Community Survey

G

IVE BACK TO THE PLANET AND THE COMMUNITY THIS MONTH by completing the County of Santa Barbara’s Climate Action Plan community survey before its February 1st deadline. Currently, the county is developing the 2030 Climate Action Plan in an effort to reduce local emissions by 50 percent. Drafts of proposed measures and actions are now available, with topics explored including housing, transportation, and mobility; resilient clean energy; sustainable and circular economies; and land stewardship and carbon sequestration. To provide input on these drafted measures and actions, and ensure the plan meets the community’s needs, visit https://sb_cap.consider.it

SB County and Goleta Commit to Local Match for Pursuit of $16 Million State Homekey Grant

I

N AN EFFORT TO ADDRESS THE NEED FOR LOCAL SUPPORTIVE HOUSING, the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors has approved local capital matching funds for the Housing Authority of the County of Santa Barbara to apply for a state Homekey grant. This $16 million grant would provide permanent supportive housing for people who are at risk for or are currently experiencing homelessness, with funds going toward purchasing the Super 8 hotel on Hollister Avenue. If the Homekey grant funds are awarded, the County will contribute $3,047,501 in matching funds for capital costs. The Goleta City Council has also approved $600,000 in funds toward the project’s local capital match. “Identifying sites for permanent supportive housing can be a long and challenging process,” said Second The Super 8 hotel on Hollister Ave. in Goleta District County Supervisor Gregg Hart. “Thanks to the dedication of the County of Santa Barbara, City of Goleta, and Housing Authority of Santa Barbara County, our community is making progress toward our goal of increasing safe and supportive housing resources for people experiencing homelessness. This project will change the lives of the individuals who are provided with housing and services, while also improving the quality of life for our entire community.” The Housing Authority would own and manage the 60-unit housing project, with State HCD Homekey funds being awarded directly to the Housing Authority. The Housing Authority must offer reasonable assurance to the state of matching contributions in order to cover costs for five years, with the estimated cost of annual operations being $992,698. For more information, visit www.countyofsb.org


22

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

January 21, 2022

EconomicVOICE A Softer Landing for Inflation? By Harlan Green / Special to VOICE

W

ILL INFLATION KEEP RISING, squeezing consumers, or return to a more normal range this year? The Consumer Price Index (CPI) that measures retail goods and services rose to 7.1 percent in December and has forced the Fed to promise to raise interest rates several times to ‘tame’ a rising inflation rate that seems to most worry the pundits and bankers. That’s because once the Fed starts taking money out of circulation by selling the $4 trillion plus in securities it’s holding, the money supply should shrink and thus take away the punch bowl of easy money that has prevailed during the pandemic and pushed the financial markets to record highs. So, the debate du jour is can the Fed take away the punchbowl without sinking the economy into another recession? There’s a lot of money in circulation, thanks to all the pandemic aid, but what happens when it’s withdrawn? The hope is for what is called a ‘soft landing,’ a slowing of economic activity that doesn’t morph into an economic slump. It would be nice if inflation could tame itself without too much government intervention. Inflation could moderate this year because consumers annually cut back on spending after the holidays to pay down their credit cards and save for

the income tax season. But even so, the Fed must act to look like it’s on the ball by making noises that it’s ready to raise the price of borrowed money by acting preemptively. That is supposed to lower inflation expectations and thus dis-incentivize consumers and businesses from rushing to buy before the next price rise. Do such expectations of future inflation really affect consumers’ behavior? That’s still an open question among economists. And the answer is much more complicated today because this inflation is caused by a serious shortage—of goods, services, and employees to manufacture and distribute them. So all of this is in turn dependent on the course of the ongoing COVID pandemic that is keeping workers away from work, and causing the supply chain bottlenecks. As a side note, a recent study by two UC Davis Labor economists in www.Econofact.org – Labor Shortages and the Immigration Shortfall, posits that part of the labor shortage is due to a shortfall in immigrants over the past two years – some two million working age adults – due to restrictions placed on immigration from the pandemic. And approximately one million are collegeeducated, which could impact productivity and employment over the longer term. They cite other causes for the labor shortage, such as increased retirement and increased

Computer Oriented RE Technology

bargaining power of workers as playing an important role. The authors also contend, “While more generous unemployment and welfare benefits introduced during the crisis may have discouraged workers from taking low-paying jobs in 2020 and early 2021, they do not seem to be the cause of current shortages, since most of those benefits expired by mid-2021. Recent anecdotal and preliminary evidence finds a push by workers for more job-flexibility, safety, and generally, better conditions causing resignations and contributing to unfilled job openings.” So the labor shortage could last for years, unless Washington and Congress get their immigration act together. Immigration has historically been a major source of U.S. population and job growth. In fact, we shouldn’t forget that we are a nation of immigrants that has always been dependent

Feb Mar

Apr

May June July

Aug Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

'11

80

94

146

119

135

140

147

156

160

128

126

170

'12

114

113

183

170

225

215

217

213

173

218

190

275

'13

141

146

189

197

265

209

217

216

181

178

138

167

‘14

142

132

141

186

207

174

196

179

171

160

137

170

‘15

142

113

235

202

226

210

207

217

155

149

124

150

‘16

126

118

153

166

220

195

174

214

187

161

158

159

‘17

142

132

164

149

189

257

193

224

178

173

172

170

‘18

101

121

172

179

234

211

165

225

184

171

145

163

‘19

128

168

190

179

210

208

259

209

173

157

152

212

‘20 ‘21

144 125 154 151

168 223

219 244 228 247

295 202

283 216

141 264

101 84 250 225

225 175

255 187

CA$H ON THE SPOT

CLASSIC CARS RV’S • CARS SUV • TRUCKS MOTORHOMES

We come to you!

702-210-7725

Harlan Green has been the 16-year EditorPublisher of PopularEconomics.com, a weekly syndicated financial wire service. He writes a Popular Economics Weekly Blog. He is an economic forecaster and teacher of real estate finance with 30-years experience as a banker and mortgage broker. To reach Harlan call (805)452-7696 or email editor@populareconomics.com.

924 Anacapa St #B1F, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

(805) 965-6448 • Established 1993

805-962-2147 • JimWitmer@cox.net • www.Cortsb.com South County Sales

Jan

Harlan Green © 2022 Follow Harlan Green on Twitter: https://twitter.com/HarlanGreen

www.VoiceSB.com • CASA Santa Barbara, Inc.

Santa Barbara

For Information on all Real Estate Sales:

on immigrants, and the effect of the immigration shortfall is much more worrisome than inflation because studies show they bring a high level of skills that are good for economic growth. So even speeding up approval of a backlog of 460,000 entry visas cited by the State Department as still unprocessed could make this a softer landing.

Independent Community Journalism Our mission is to provide accessible news for everyone along with a broad and inclusive perspective on our local community in both our FREE digital and print editions. If everyone who reads VOICE Magazine supports it, our future will be made secure. Mark Whitehurst, PhD Publisher & Editor Publisher@VoiceSB.com

Kerry Methner, PhD Editor & Publisher Editor@VoiceSB.com

Send a contribution today to: VOICE Magazine, 924 Anacapa, #B1-F, Santa Barbara CA, 93101

Legal Advertising: Voice Magazine is an adjudicated newspaper of General Circulation (Case #SP 20CV02756 dated: Oct. 27, 2020). We can publish Probate, Trustee, Name Change, Summons, and other notices. Memberships: Please inquire about our rates: Publisher@voicesb.com Daisy Scott, Writer • News@VoiceSB.com Jeanette Casillas, Translator Maureen Flanigan, Bookkeeping Columnists: Robert Adams • Robert@EarthKnower.com Harlan Green • editor@populareconomics.com Amanda & Richard Payatt • foodwinetwosome@cox.net Sigrid Toye • Itssigrid@gmail.com Josef Woodard • c/o editor@voicesb.com Advertising: Advertising@VoiceSB.com Circulation: Central Coast Circulation • (805) 636-6845

California Newspaper Publishers Association

Hispanic-Serving Publication

All advertising in this publication is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This publication will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of this law.


January 21, 2022

23

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

Voice COMMUNITY MARKET • A Legal Paper CasCade Capital (805) 688-9697 Experience you can count on!

CHRIS AGNOLI (805) 682-4304

LEGAL NOTICES

chris@suncoastrealestate.com www.chrisagnoli.com

805.895.1799 805.705.5334 www.TheSantaBarbaraLifestyle.com

Top 1% of all Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Realtors nationwide

CalBRE: 00624274 | 01434616

00

At the Center of Santa Barbara’s Cultural Conversation | www.VoiceSB.com

EARTHQUAKE RETROFITTING

Fast Private Lending

1st & 2nd Trust Deeds Commercial ~ Land Mixed Use ~ Multifamily No Tax Returns Simple Documentation No Minimum Credit

March 22, 2019

www.neilsteadman.com CalBRE License #00461906

DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

Eagles Nest Ocean Views Santa Barbara’s Premiere Ocean View Apartments

• Every apartment has outstanding ocean views with the very best island and sunset views in town. • 31 one bedroom apartments, each with granite counter tops and a magnificent view. • Recently updated on a dead end street with a reserved parking spot for each unit. • Only six blocks to the ocean and on a bluff top with mild ocean breezes year round. All the top floor units have high beamed ceilings and no steps, so easy access for all ages. • With 10 furnished apartments, there is short term as well as long term flexibility in rental agreements. • See the best of Santa Barbara from this park-like setting.

For more information or to schedule an appointment call John at 805-451-4551.

50 + Years Experience - Local 35+ Years • Floor Leveling • Quality Remodeling • Foundation Replacements • Foundation Repairs • New Construction • Retaining Walls • French Drains - Waterproofing • Site Drainage Systems • Underpinnings - Caissons • Structural Correction Work • Concrete Driveways

805.698.4318

FREE INSPECTION William J. Dalziel Lic#B311003 – Bonded & Insured visit our site at:

www.williamjdalziel.com billdalziel@yahoo.com

The Multi-family Investment Specialist

JOHN R. WHITEHURST Property Manager/Owner

805-451-4551 • www.SBOceanViewRentals.com

Home Realty & Investment

DRE#01050144

Santa Barbara Mortgage Interest Rates

Contact your local loan agent or mortgage broker for current rates: DRAPER & KRAMER MORTGAGE CORP. Please call for current rates: Russell Story, 805-895-8831 PARAGON MORTGAGE GROUP Please call for current rates: 805-899-1390 HOMEBRIDGE FINANCIAL SERVICES Please call for current rates: Erik Taiji, 805-895-8233, NMLS #322481

MONTECITO BANK & TRUST Please call for current rates: 805-963-7511 • Coastal Housing Partnership Member

STEVE GOLIS

sgolis@radiusgroup.com www.radiusgroup.com

805-879-9606

CA Lic. 00772218

SB MORTGAGE GROUP Simar Gulati, 805-403-9679 UNION BANK Please call for current rates: Teri Gauthier, 805-565-4571 • Coastal Housing Partnership Member Rates are supplied by participating institutions prior to publishing deadline and are deemed reliable. They do not constitute a commitment to lend and are not guaranteed. For more information and additional loan types and rates, consumers should contact the lender of their choice. CASA Santa Barbara cannot guarantee the accuracy and availability of quoted rates. All quotes are based on total points including loan. Rates are effective as of 1/12/2022. ** Annual percentage rate subject to change after loan closing.

Which non-profits do you support?

To place your classified ad, email advertising@VoiceSB.com

Legal Notices Run your legal notice in VOICE Magazine Fictitious Business Name Alcohol License Summons Name Change Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Public Entities For information & rates:

Publisher@VoiceSB.com FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT: The following person/ persons is/are doing business as SANTA BARBARA WINE O’CLOCK TOURS; JOHANNES STEENKAMP & ASSOCIATES REALTY; SB-SUV; GRAPEVINE-SANTABARBARA; SANTA BARBARA WINE O’CLOCK EXCURSIONS; and JOHANNES STEENKAMP & ASSOCIATES at 1422 Twinridge Rd, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. JOHANNES C STEENKAMP at 1422 Twinridge Rd, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara on January 10, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the County Clerk. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN No. 2022-0000053. Published January 14, 21, 28, February 4, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT: The following person/ persons is/are doing business as BODYKIND at 1303 Kowalski Ave Ste A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. JENNIFER L MCCANDLESS at 1303 Kowalski Ave Ste A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara on December 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the County Clerk. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN No. 20210003398. Published December 31, 2021, January 7, 14, 21, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT: The following person/ persons is/are doing business as PEDRO’S SMOG CHECK at 2234 De La Vina St, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. PEDRO Z LOPEZ at 127 N Alisos St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara on December 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the County Clerk. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN No. 20210003458. Published January 21, 28, February 4, 11, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT: The following Corporation or Limited Liability Company is doing business as OVERAGE TITAN and ELEVATE INVESTMENTS at 2126 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA 93108. FUTURE RETURN HOLDINGS at 2126 East Valley Rd, Montecito, CA 93108. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara on December 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the County Clerk. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN No. 20210003435. Published December 31, 2021, January 7, 14, 21, 2022.

Read this week’s issue of VOICE Magazine at www.VoiceSB.com Includes all ads with live links


24

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

January 21, 2022

A Study in Contrasts Curates a Dynamic Viewing Experience

The Goleta Valley Art Association presents

“Welcome 2022!”

an Art Exhibition at The Faulkner Gallery January 5 - 30, 2022

Spring Sky, acrylic, by Holly Hungett Last of the Season by Jerilynne Nibbe woodcut

www.TheGoletaValleyArtAssociation.org

Photo by Daisy Scott / VOICE

A

By Daisy Scott / VOICE

T FIRST GLANCE, NO TWO ARTISTS SEEM MORE DIFFERENT THAN GERALD PATRICK AND STEPHEN HOLLAND. Patrick’s bright canvases invite viewers to peacefully reflect on specific colors, a stark contrast from Holland’s busy, semi-satirical scenes of human interaction. Yet where others have observed differences, Silo118 gallery has only viewed artistic potential, uniting the duo’s works for its A Study in Contrasts exhibition. The show will remain on display through mid-February. “I wanted something simple to balance the complicated,” explained Bonnie Rubenstein, Silo118 Owner/Director. “Actually, I don’t even think this is very simple, but I just think that the juxtaposition of the two styles is very complimentary... with Gerald’s work, you can really see Stephen’s work.” Visitors immediately feel the artistic tension between Patrick’s and Holland’s works. On the left wall, Patrick’s Meditation on Color surrounds viewers with vibrant works inspired by the colors and designs he has encountered in international travels. A series of displayed misshapen monochromatic vases point to Patrick’s beginnings as a potter in Los Angeles. Each of Patrick’s larger-than-life canvas forces viewers to contemplate specific hues and their interactions with other colors with only their own perspective to guide their reaction. Geometric shapes and the occasional three-dimensional quality bring additional complexity to some pieces. As the exhibition’s name suggests, this results in an almost meditative viewing experience. An almost dizzying contrast awaits visitors on the gallery’s right wall, where Holland’s The Human Circus exhibition is displayed. Holland has long been celebrated for his portraits of athletes and celebrities, with several of his pieces being accepted into the Smithsonian Catalogue of American Portraits, including his 2008 portrait of President Obama. Untitled (yellow with blue border) by Silo118’s display features Holland’s more recent Gerald Patrick

A Study in Contrasts Installation

works, which capture busy scenes of human activity, many of which feature individuals dancing and playing instruments. Each of his depicted figures holds a cartoon-like quality, adding a sense of levity that is heightened by his bold colors. However, upon closer examination, these images increasingly take on a more caricature-esque quality as layered political and social commentary shines through. Together, Patrick’s and Holland’s works expertly highlight each other’s distinct, visual nuances. Rather than view each wall individually, visitors are compelled to look from wall to wall to fully experience A Study in Contrasts. Visitors can meet artist Stephen Holland from 1pm to 3pm Saturday, January 22nd and 29th at Silo118. Gerald Patrick will visit from 1pm to 3pm, Saturday, February 5th.

California by Stephen Holland

Silo118 is located at 118 Gray St. and open Thursdays-Saturdays, 12pm to 5pm and by appointment • www.silo118.com


January 21, 2022

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

25

Marie Schoeff, Amplifying the Between, through March 26th, Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art

Between and Beyond the Lines

A

By Josef Woodard / VOICE

RTIST MARIE SCHOEFF has been an important and distinctive member in the ranks of Santa Barbara-based artists, especially as part of the contemporary, freshly-spun notions division. Since landing in town in 1983, with her artist husband Dane Goodman and family, Schoeff ’s work has peeked at us – and piqued our interest – in various corners, group shows, and toooccasional solo exhibitions.

One of her memorable solo M to Me to Mine by Marie Schoeff outings showed up on the local gallery radar with her 2013 show Schoeff identifies her work as being influenced by a diverse array of impulses, TRACES, at the fondly remembered including Jungian pictorial impulses and her experience as a woman and mother, contemporary art haven that was translated loosely into a vocabulary blending rounded shapes and linear bursts. Jane Deering Gallery. Echoes of that In the monoprint series titled by sequential days, from 2018, overlapping orbs show—including her Coil series and Whirl by Marie Schoeff and oblong shapes are punctuated by raw, jagged drawn gestures, a prevailing doppelganger spiraling studies Plumb graphic balancing act in her recent phase. and Plumbless – combine with other chapters in the artist’s ongoing evolution in the must-see retrospective show now at Westmont Museum of Art, Amplifying In the main gallery, various strands of her art, working with recurring the Between. forms and visual leitmotifs, are, in a sense, grounded by four fairly epic pieces – monumental, yet equipped with a lightness of being. Face Up (2014), is a four This major exhibition, delayed by a season by the pandemic police, offers paper panel piece which literally faces the doorway and draws us in, gently. a broad and valuable overview of what the artist has been up to for 40 odd A signature years, connecting many stylistic and thematic dots and admix of clean, surveying her journey through rounded forms various “between” states. intersects with As if partly by historical scratchy, Cy and conceptual design, Twombly-esque the Museum’s entryway markings, with space features art from improvisational the 1980s, and from her freedom. alluring abstraction-meetsYet vaster, realist paintings from 2005, in the epic pieces and approaches department, is seemingly distinct (key word her 1990 pastel/ “seemingly”) from the more charcoal piece M abstracted artistic statements to Me to Mine, in the main gallery. From the consuming one earlier work, her paintings of the Museum’s deal with fragmented views of Face Up by Marie Schoeff largest walls. In the “real world,” transformed a scale writ large but again retaining a sensuous air, the piece embodies Schoeff ’s by oblique perspectives. In 1981’s Eaves, a diagonallyMarie Schoeff in her studio interest in marshalling expressive and tangentially natural forces and elements. pitched eave bisects shades of deep blue – building Gusting energies in black and white, in the left side, morph as we read left to right and sky – with an observant, naturally abstracting eye. In Tower Top (1986), a into a muted color palette and suggestions of hair, grasses and cool vibrations. rooftop corner becomes an unwitting perch for a tufted cloud form, taking on The effect is almost an implied narrative arc, but in abstracted syntax. the character of an ambiguous, omniscient entity. From the ‘00s, her alluring Whirl sits alongside a series of paintings in which vaguely floral/anatomical forms (or think poeticized references to breasts and jellyfish) are found afloat or swimming fluid – the “between” factor in action.

Tucked semi-secretly on the back side of the suspended panel holding Face Up, we find the newest piece of the bunch, last year’s Between Ordinary. In this piece, made with drypoint, gouache, ink, and watercolor, familiar visual elements of floating spheres and wily calligraphic marks float, now in collage form, atop an eye-friendly soft green backdrop. This fresh artistic statement finds the seasoned artist pushing ever further towards her personalized aesthetic goals.

In Schoeff ’s art, more generally, links to recognizable facsimiles of the observable, “known” world are linked to a mysterious dimension of her own devising/imagining.

Hope is in the air, in this specific work and also in the artist’s saga, conveyed in a fine retrospective which is anything but a finalizing statement.

Eaves by Marie Schoeff

Josef Woodard is a veteran cultural critic, who wrote for the Los Angeles Times for 25 years, has contributed to Rolling Stone, Entertainment Weekly, DownBeat, and many music magazines, and a long association with the Santa Barbara Independent and News-Press. To date, he has published two books for Silman-James Press, on jazz legends Charles Lloyd and Charlie Haden, respectively. He recently published a debut novel, Ladies Who Lunch. Woodard is also a musician, a guitarist, songwriter, and head of the Household Ink Records label.


26

Van Gogh

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

• GALLERIES • STUDIOS • • MUSEUMS • • PUBLIC PLACES

CLAY STUDIO GALLERY: Selections from the Don Reitz Collection • 805-565-CLAY • www.claystudiosb.org • 1351 Holiday Hill Rd,

CORRIDAN GALLERY: 125 N Milpas • We-Sa 11-5 & by Appt • 805-966-7939 • www.corridan-gallery.com CYPRESS GALLERY: 119 E Cypress Av, Lompoc • Sat & Sun 1-4 • 805-737-1129 • www.lompocart.org

EL PRESIDIO DE SANTA BÁRBARA: Nihonmachi Revisited; Memorias y Facturas • 123 E. Canon Perdido St • Th-Sun 11-4 • www.sbthp.org/presidio ELVERHØJ MUSEUM: 1624 Elverhoy Way, Solvang • 805-686-1211 • Th-Mo 11-5 • www.elverhoj.org FAULKNER GALLERY: Goelta Valley Art Assoc: Welcome 2022! ~ Jan 30 • www.thegoletavalleyartassociation.org

GALLERY 113: SB Art Assn • 1114 State St, #8, La Arcada Ct • 805-965-6611 • 2-5 daily • www.gallery113sb.com

Evening Glow - Douglas Preserve Original Oil Painting by

Ralph Waterhouse Felice Willat

Illuminations Gallery La Cumbre Center for Creative Arts La Cumbre PLaza

10 WEST GALLERY: New Vibes 2022 ~ Mar 7 • 10 W Anapamu • Thu-Sun 11-5 • 805-770-7711 • www.10westgallery.com

ARCHITECTURAL FDN GALLERY: Attention to Loss by Pecos Pryor ~ Mar 5 • 229 E Victoria • 805-965-6307 • www.afsb.org ART, DESIGN & ARCHITECTURE MUSEUM: Harmonia Rosales: Entwined; Sound of a Thousand Years: Gagaku Instruments from Japan ~ May 1 • We-Sun 12-5 • 805-8932951 • www.museum.ucsb.edu ART FROM SCRAP GALLERY: www.exploreecology.org/art-from-scrap

ATKINSON GALLERY: What is America? Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Zoe Leonard, and Glenn

Waterhouse Gallery La Arcada at State & Figueroa Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805-962-8885 www.waterhousegallery.com

Ligon • January 28 - March 18 • Opening Reception: Friday, Jan 28th 3:30-5:30pm • SBCC Humanities Bldg #202, East Campus, 721 Cliff Dr • Tu-Fri 11-5pm • http://gallery.sbcc.edu

BELLA ROSA GALLERIES: 1103-A State St • 11-5 daily • 805-966-1707 CASA DE LA GUERRA: Currently Closed

CASA DOLORES: Navidad Mexicana and Nativity scenes ~ Feb 5; Ongoing: Bandera Ware and traditional outfits, Huichol, Tehuana dress, China Poblana skirt • 1023 Bath St • www.casadolores.org

CHANNING PEAKE GALLERY: Remedy: Art is the Cure ~ Mar 25 • 1st fl, 105 E. Anacapa

GALLERY LOS OLIVOS: Winter Saloncelebrating 30 years! ~ Jan • 2920 Grand Ave, LO • Thur-Mo 10-5 • 805-688-7517 • www.gallerylosolivos.com GANNA WALSKA LOTUSLAND: Reservations 805.969.9990 • www.lotusland.org

REH FINE ART @ GRAYSPACE: Abstract Art Collection ~ Jan 30 • 219 Gray Av • Fri & Sat, 12-6pm; Thur & Sun, 12-5pm; Wed by appt • 805-689-0858 • www.grayspaceart.com JAMES MAIN FINE ART: 19th & 20th Fine art & antiques • 27 E De La Guerra St • Tu-Sa 12-5 • Appt Suggested • 805-962-8347 JARDIN DE LAS GRANADAS: re[visit] 1925 by Cochran & Smith • 21 E Anapamu St. JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SB Portraits of Survival • Mo-Th 9am-5pm, Fr 9am-3:30pm • 805-957-1115

KARPELES MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY & MUSEUM: 21 W Anapamu St • We-Su 12-4 • 805-962-5322. KATHRYNE DESIGNS: Local Artists • 1225 Coast Village Rd, A • M-Sa 10-5; Su 11-5 • 805-565-4700 LA CUMBRE CENTER FOR CREATIVE ARTS: Three Multi-Artist Galleries at La Cumbre Plaza • Wed-Sun 1-6 • lacumbrecenterforcreativearts@gmail.com

GETTING TO KNOW

A

LTHOUGH IT MAY BE EXPECTED THAT ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST FAMOUS ARTISTS earned their title through years of study, Vincent van Gogh only completed about four months of formal artistic training over the course of his career. While taking drawing classes at the academy of art in Antwerp, Belgium, he grew increasingly frustrated with the school’s adherence to tradition, writing to his brother, Theo: “‘I actually find all the drawings I see there hopelessly bad — and fundamentally wrong. And I know that mine are totally different — time will just have to tell Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890), who’s right. Damn it, Portrait of Dr. Gachet (Auvers-sur-Oise), not one of them has May 15, 1890. Etching, 7 × 5 3/8 in. Lent by the Minneapolis Institute of Art, Gift of any feeling for what Bruce B. Dayton, 1962, P.13.251. a classical statue is.” Time certainly told who was right, as evidenced by The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s purchase of a set of van Gogh’s prints — now valued at a few million dollars — earlier this month. Image courtesy of SB Museum of Art

A rt | A rte

St • 805-568-3994

January 21, 2022

To learn more about van Gogh, visit www.vangoghmuseum.nl

The Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s exhibition, Through Vincent’s Eyes: Van Gogh and his Sources, opens February 27th, 2022. www.SBMA.net MUSEUM OF SENSORY & MOVEMENT EXPERIENCES: La Cumbre Plaza, 120 S. Hope Av #F119 • www.seehearmove.com

PALM LOFT GALLERY: 410 Palm Av, Loft A1, Carp • By Appt • 805-684-9700 • www.Palmloft.com

LOBSTERTOWN USA GALLERY: 3823 Santa Claus Ln, Carpinteria • Open Thu-Sa 125pm • www.lobstertownusa.com

PEREGRINE GALLERIES: Early California and American paintings; fine vintage jewelry • 1133 Coast Village Rd • 805-252-9659 • www.Peregrine.shop PORTICO GALLERY: Open Daily • 1235 Coast Village Rd • 805-729-8454 • www.porticofinearts.com

Orange Untitled with Orange

Gerald Patrick

LYNDA FAIRLY CARPINTERIA ARTS CENTER: Queen of the Coast • Thu-Su 12-4 • 865 Linden Av • 805-684-7789 • www.carpinteriaartscenter.org

MARCIA BURTT STUDIO: Holiday 2021 ~ Feb 6 • 517 Laguna St • Th-Su 1-5 • 805-962-5588 • www.artlacuna.com

MAUNE CONTEMPORARY: Finally Home ~ April • 1309 State St • Tu-Su 11-5 & By appt • 805-869-2524 • www.maune.com

MOXI, THE WOLF MUSEUM: Exploration + Innovation • Lunchboxing with Lasers • Daily 10-5 • 805-770-5000 • 125 State St, SB • www.moxi.org

Kerry Methner

www.TheTouchofStone.com

805-570-2011

A. Michael Marzolla

Contemporary Art / Excogitation Services

www.marzozart.com 805-452-7108

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SB: Closed for installation through Jan 29 • 653 Paseo Nuevo • www.mcasantabarbara.org

Hank Pitcher, 9’ x 16.5’

3823 Santa Claus Ln, Carpinteria lobstertownusa@gmail.com

www.lobstertownusa.com

Silo118 Until February 12


January 21, 2022

Art | Arte

SANTA BARBARA ART WORKS: Artists with Disabilities programs, virtual exhibits • 805-260-6705 • www.sbartworks.org

SANTA BARBARA ARTS: Unique fine art & crafts from local artists & crafts people • 1114 State St #24 La Arcada Ct • Th-Su 11-5 • 805-884-1938 • www.SBArts.net

SANTA BARBARA FINE ART: Richard Schloss: Painting the Light ~ Mar • 1321 State St • MoSa 12-5; Su 12-4; Closed We • 805-845-4270 • www.santabarbarafineart.com SANTA BARBARA TENNIS CLUB:

805-689-0858 • www.RuthEllenHoag.com

Ruth Ellen Hoag Fine Art at GraySpace

Abract Nine ~ Mar 3 • 10-2 daily • 2375 Foothill Rd • 805-682-4722

Art Events Eventos de Arte RECEPTION FOR QUEEN OF THE COAST @ LYNDA FAIRLY CARPINTERIA ARTS CENTER: Juried by local painter Ben O’Hara and photographer Glenn Dubock in conjunction with the Rincon Classic • Meet the artists, music from Wrinkled Teenagers • Free • 3-6pm, Sa, Jan 22. RECEPCIÓN PARA REINA DE LA COSTA EN LYNDA FAIRLY CARPINTERIA ARTS CENTER: Jurado por el pintor local Ben O’Hara y el fotógrafo Glenn Dubock en conjunto con Rincon Classic • Conoce a los artistas, música de Wrinkled Teenagers • Gratis • 3-6pm, sábado, 22 de Enero.

Local News for a Global Village | www.VoiceSB.com

Queen of the Coast Reception

Continued... SB BOTANIC GARDEN: Pressed: Botanical Art and The Herbarium • 1212 Mission Canyon Rd • 10-5 daily • 805-682-4726 • www.sbbg.org

SB MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY: closed through Jan 21st • The Sea Center is closed through Spring 2022 • www.sbnature.org

SB MARITIME MUSEUM: closed through Jan 21st • www.SBMM.org • 805-962-8404

SULLIVAN GOSS: AN AMERICAN GALLERY: 100 Grand & Winter Salon ~ Jan 24; Juxtaposed ~ Feb 21 • 11 E Anapamu St • 805-730-1460 • www.sullivangoss.com

SB HISTORICAL MUSEUM: Queen on the Hill, Borein & His Circle of Friends, The Story of SB • 136 E De la Guerra • Thur 12-5, Fri 127; Sat 12-5 • 805-966-1601 • www.sbhistorical.org

SB MUSEUM OF ART: Highlights of American Art; Portrait of Mexico Today; Important Works on Paper from the Permanent Collection: New Selections; Mediated Nature; Contemporary Gallery - Ongoing; In the Meanwhile ~ Jan 30; • Tu – Su, 11 –5; Thu, 11-8 • www.sbma.net • 805-963-4364

27

SILO 118: Blaze, Lapalma, Foley & Foley, Patrick • Now re-opened! • 118 Gray St • 12-5 Th-Sa or by appt • www.silo118.com

SYV HISTORICAL MUSEUM & CARRIAGE HOUSE: Art Of The Western Saddle; Tales From Mattei’s Tavern • 3596 Sagunto St, Santa Ynez • Sa, Su 12-4 • 805-688-7889 • www.santaynezmuseum.org THOMAS REYNOLDS GALLERY: The Art of California • Th-Sat 12-5 & By Appt • www.thomasreynolds.com

UCSB LIBRARY: A Call to Action: Documenting

Santa Barbara’s Art & Activism ~ Jun 24 (Special Collections); Art of Science 2020 ~ Dec 31 • in the Learning Commons • www.library.ucsb.edu

WATERHOUSE GALLERY: Notable CA & National Artists • La Arcada Ct, 1114 State St, #9 • 11-5 Mon-Sat, 12-4 Sun • 805-962-8885 • www.waterhousegallery.com

T

HE LYNDA FAIRLY CARPINTERIA ARTS CENTER’S Queen of the Coast free community reception will be held this Saturday, January 22nd, 3 to 6pm, outdoors in the Koch Courtyard. Meet exhibition artists, enjoy live music from the Wrinkled Teenagers, a No Host Beer & Wine Bar, and Charcuterie Cones from Carp Kitchen. “We are excited to celebrate this exceptional exhibit with our community” shared Linda Rosso, Executive Director of the Carpinteria Rincon Summer, Oil on Canvas courtesy of Taj Vaccarella Arts Center. “We have made great strides in the last 20 years and are thrilled to offer a stateof-the-art venue to showcase our extraordinary artists!”

Sponsors: Exhibition Sponsor-Rincon Designs & Community Sponsors-Esau’s Café and Pacifica Graduate Institute. Held in collaboration with the 40th annual Rincon Classic.

WESTMONT RIDLEY-TREE MUSEUM OF ART:

Marie Schoeff: Amplifying the Between ~ Mar 26 • 805-565-6162 • M-F 10-4 • www.westmont.edu/museum

MARCIA BURT T Marcia Burtt Gallery 517 Laguna St., Santa Barbara

WILDLING MUSEUM: Close to Home, Three Printmakers: Claudia Borfiga, Karen Schroeder, and Sara Woodburn ~ Feb 22 • 1511 B Mission Dr, Solvang • www.wildlingmuseum.org

805 962-5588 www.artlacuna.com

REGENERATION ARTIST TALK: HARMONIA ROSALES • Virtual talk with Afro-Cuban American artist Harmonia Rosales • UCSB Interdisciplinary Humanities Center • Free, RSVP required • https://tinyurl.com/yckn77k4 • 4-5pm Th, 1/27. CHARLA DE ARTISTA DE REGENERACIÓN: HARMONIA ROSALES: Charla virtual con la artista afrocubana estadounidense Harmonia Rosales • Centro Interdisciplinario de Humanidades de UCSB • Gratis, se requiere reserva • https://tinyurl.com/yckn77k4 • 4-5pm jueves, 1/27. SB ARTS & CRAFTS SHOW • Local artists & artisans • 236 E. Cabrillo Blvd., SB • 10am-5pm Sundays. EXPOSICIÓN DE ARTES Y ARTESANIAS SB • De artistas y artesanos locales • 236 E. Cabrillo Blvd., SB • 10am-5pm los domingos. CONTROLLING THE NARRATIVE: BOTH / AND • Conversation and reading with author Emily Rapp Black, Frida Kahlo and My Left Leg • SB Museum of Art, Mary Craig Auditorium • Members $5, general $10 • https://tinyurl.com/yckny8pk • 2:30pm Su, 1/23.

CONTROLANDO LA NARRATIVA: AMBOS / Y • Conversación y lectura con la autora Emily Rapp Black, Frida Kahlo y My Left Leg • SB Museum of Art, Mary Craig Auditorium • Miembros $5, general $10 • https://tinyurl.com/yckny8pk • 2:30pm domingo, 1/23. ARTIST TALK: A STUDY IN CONTRASTS: Artist Stephen Holland shares about his work • Silo118, 118 Gray Street • Free • 1-3pm Sa, 1/22, & 1/29. UN ESTUDIO EN CONTRASTES: La artista Stephen Holland comparte sobre su trabajo • Silo118, 118 Gray Street • Gratis • 1-3pm sábado, 1/22, y 1/29. PAINT JAM: Find your voice in 15 words of less- Create a “Painted Affirmation” Jan. 26, Feb. 2, Feb. 9, Feb. 16 • Virtual workshops start at 5pm ($29-$108) • Register: https://tinyurl.com/5xeccwj5 PAINT JAM: Encuentre tu voz en 15 palabras o menos: crea una “afirmación pintada” 26 de enero, 2 de febrero, 9 de febrero, 16 de febrero • Los talleres virtuales comienzan a las 5pm ($29$108) • Regístrate: https:/ /tinyurl.com/5xeccwj5 Send your art openings, receptions, and events to Art@VoiceSB.com to be included in this free listing.

Art Exhibit Unveiled at the Santa Barbara Airport

N

EXT TIME YOU’RE AT THE AIRPORT, visit the new temporary art exhibit featuring Photographer Alan Lucchetti and a new community arts focused organization, Santa Barbara Records. The exhibit is on the first floor, just past the main rotunda on the right hand side. The showcase highlights our beautiful community and serves as a reminder just how meaningful the Photo by Alan Lucchetti arts are to our culture and economy.


“ American Riviera was helpful all through the process of buying our first home. They were patient and had an answer for every question. They were so great, we came back to purchase our next home!” — KELLY & ELIZABETH HAHN, HOMEOWNERS

This is True Community Banking HOM E E QU I T Y L I N E S | C O N F OR M I N G & J U M B O MORTG AG E S | B R I D G E L OA N S

Combining our expertise with yours to find solutions for your unique needs.

NMLS# 808293

• 805.965.5942 Visit us at AmericanRiviera.Bank www.AmericanRiviera.Bank


Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.