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Casady School TWISTER Yearbook CRIER Newspaper 9500 N. Pennsylvania Oklahoma City, OK 73120 www.casady.org

Twister Editors Elizabeth Nordin, Co-Editor Phone: 420•9480 Email: elizabethnordin@gmail.com Caroline Blakley, Co-Editor Phone: 850•0031 Email: cjb1293@gmail.com

Crier Editors Eric Kaplan, Editor Phone; 625-6288 Email: cubsfan42@mac.com Aamina Shakir, Managing Editor Phone: 808-4845 Email: chickums@sbcglobal.net

Adviser Mr. Sam Effinger Office: 749-3161 Cell: 473-SAMS (7267) Email: effingers@casady.org

On-line Staff Manual Go to: idisk.mac.com/casadycrier or idisk.mac.com/casadytwister Username: casadycrier or casadytwister Password: cyclones You will find it in the Public folder. Download Staff Manual.

Publications Staff Manual Purpose The student publications at Casady School are designed to be a communications link between students, their school, and their community. Their duty is to inform students about school events, personalities, activities, current events, and trends that will affect them. Besides providing opportunity for the exchange of ideas among readers, student publications also exist as an academic tool by which student staff members explore communication skills and careers. The high school press is governed by the same basic legal rights and responsibilities as the professional press. High school journalists have the right guaranteed in the First Amendment to free expression, insofar as published items may not contain libel or obscenity, invade the privacy of individuals, incite or violate the laws of copyright, or violate community standards of appropriateness. With the right to freedom of expression comes an obligation to the highest ideals of the journalistic profession. These include responsibility, independence, sincerity, truthfulness, accuracy, impartiality, and decency. Good taste should be exercised in all content. The student publications of Casady School will act as a forum for students, staff, parents, and other interested readers.

Ownership and Finances The legal publisher of student publications is the Board of Trustees. The agents of the Board are the Headmaster, Dean of Students and the adviser of the publications. The publications staff accepts advertising that sells products and services. The sale of advertising demonstrates that the publication is a successful communication link that reaches a reading and buying market.

Staff Qualifications and Membership Staff selection for high school publications will be determined through an application process carried out during the spring trimester. Student applicants will be evaluated on the basis of skills, experience, grade point average, citizenship and attendance. Finalists will be interviewed and selected by the current adviser and editors. Removal from the publication’s staff may be recommended by the adviser, counselor, principal, or editorial board. In the case of plagiarism or any other deliberate violations, no written warning will be given.

Meetings Staff members are responsible for knowing the dates and times when the publications staff meets (usually during Activities Period). Staff members are required to attend after school meetings to complete deadlines. (See page 2 sidebar.)

Responsibilities Members of the staff are responsible for their own job as outlined in each publication’s section of this manual. Student journalists will also follow these general guidelines.

Student journalists will:

• Submit copy that conforms to community standards and good journalistic writing style. • Rewrite material to improve style, sentence structure, grammar, spelling and punctuation or to remove material not permitted in school publications as elsewhere specified. • Check and verify all facts and the accuracy of all quotations using proper attributions.

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Pubinfo Twister Deadlines Nov. 13: Dec. 11: Jan. 15: Feb. 19:

72 pages 72 pages 72 pages 72 pages

Pages must be completed in 16-page signatures.

Crier Deadlines Publication Stories Date Deadline

Layout Begins

Members of the staff are expected to follow all rules of the school while on staff business, even if business takes them off school grounds. Students who break school rules are subject to removal from staff.

The responsibilities of the Adviser include the following:

• Serve as a liaison between the administration and staff • Provide instruction and practice so that students can master journalistic skills and concepts • Provide leadership and guidance • Establish a workable chain of command for the staff • Establish a sound budget • Supervise students engaged in the publication program • Be available for advice • Keep abreast of legal and ethical concerns • Be aware of technological changes and the impact on scholastic journalism • The adviser is not present to run the staff, but to act as a resource

Yearbook Staff Job Descriptions Editor-in-Chief

Nov. 8, 16, 29

The editor-in-chief is responsible for achieving the goals below. This job description seeks only to outline general areas of responsibility in an effort to keep the editor aware of his/her performance. In the case of co-editors, they must work with the adviser to divide the responsibilities equally. • Participate in at least one summer workshop • Develop a theme and a deadline schedule • Work with the other editors to keep them conscious of the theme • Work with section editors to keep the style and layout of the book consistent • Act as a liaison between the adviser and the staff • Work to reduce personal conflict within the staff to a minimum • Establish a ladder for the yearbook • Oversee all staff meetings, making sure such meetings are productive and timely • Establish a calendar where key upcoming events, news tips, and photo possibilities could be entered ahead of time • Maintain individual staff files in which all assignment sheets and completed assignments are kept • Do a final check on all copy and layouts before sending to printer • Collect all pages at the end of each deadline for submission to adviser • Be available to attend after school sessions • Be knowledgeable of the computer operating system and the programs necessary for producing the publication • Be impartial when giving assignments • Write and design the opening and closing section of the yearbook and the division pages • Meet with adviser on a regular basis

Dec. 7, 15

Section Editors

Activities Meetings Twister: D days Sep. 7, 15, 23 Oct. 5, 13, 21, 29 Nov. 9, 17, 30 Dec, 8, 16 Jan. 7, 18, 26 Feb. 3, 15, 23 Mar 3, 22, 30 April 7, 15, 26

Crier: C days Sep. 3, 14, 22, 30 Oct. 12, 20, 28

Jan. 6, 14, 25 Feb. 2, 10, 22 Mar. 2, 21, 29 April 6, 14, 25 May 4, 12, 20 Staff meetings on these dates are required during Activities Period (12:00). Any conflicts should be reported to Mr. Effinger or the editor as soon as possible.

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• Responsible for knowing the stylistic, grammatical, ethical and legal standards of the yearbook • Generate ideas for spreads that could appear in the yearbook • Reserve time after school to complete deadlines • Be prepared to work on-line at home to complete deadlines • Ensure proper identification of all students in pictures • Attend all editorial board and staff meetings • Stress to reporters effective writing style • Complete all story assignments • Set a good example by keeping busy and encouraging others to do so • Be aware of the major editing problems for high school yearbooks


• Obtain ideas for stories and maintain deadlines for copy, headlines, photos, captions, etc. for athe section • Assing all stories and photos to staff reporters and photographers • Check all facts and names in stories that will appear in the section • If assignments do not come in on time, immediately notify the editor so he/she can help the reporter solve this problem • Be ultimately responsible for the completion of their section • The following responsibilities are section specific -Student life: keep track of major school events -Sports: gather all team scores and obtain the team pictures (identify players) -Academics: assist in story ideas and section style -People: assist in placement of portrait photos and assure accuracy of names -Organizations: gather information on all groups and organization; help organize group photos and assure accuracy of names -Ads: coordinate ad sales, divide ads into pages, design all ads

Yearbook Reporter/Staff

• Attend all staff meetings • Be available for after school sessions • Be prepared to work on-line at home to complete deadlines • Assist all staff members and editors whenever they need help • Make sure all assignment sheets are signed and returned to the editor • Understand that failing to meet a deadline will result in removal from staff • Check all facts and names that will appear in the copy • Self-edit and check the spelling of all stories prior to submission • Complete all rewrites and rough layouts on time • All stories are to be typed according to staff stylesheet • Maintain assigned copy of the staff manual • Promote the yearbook and help with distribution and yearbook sales campaign

Photographer

• Shoot photos as assigned and on time • Stay alert for photo opportunities (carry camera at all times) • Obtain caption information whenever possible • Keep organized files of images on the computer • Edit, crop and adjust all images for publication

Photo Editor

• Meet all deadlines • Bridge gap between photographers and reporters • Stay alert to photo opportunities • Help with selecting, cropping, and adjusting photos for publication • Keep organized files of images on the computer • Schedule group pictures • Provide training and feedback to photographers

Newspaper Staff Job Descriptions Editor-in-Chief

Pubinfo Uploading Photos (Twister) Staff Members: • Rename all files to be uploaded with this format: ddmmyy_photo subject_001 where ddmmyy is 2-digit day, 2-digit month, and 2-digit year and 001 is 3-digit sequenct number. Example: • Renaming of photos can be done quicklyand automatically in Bridge. • Make sure all photos have been color corrected and made suitable for publication. • Go to Upload Images in YTO and follow the directions. Non-staff (students and parents) • Open browser • Go to images.jostens.com. • Enter Login ID: 1179855 • Enter Password: cyclone • Follow online instructions

Logging in Computer Login: publications# Password: publications (# is 1-6, depending on which computer station you’ve selected.)

Yeartech Online Open Firefox Got to yearbookavenue.com Year: Pull down 2010 Login: your school login Password: if you don’t know it, see Mr. Effinger Job number: 33643

• Responsible for content of paper • Will determine what article should or should not be included in each issue, and will insure proper balance between each area • Will call editorial board meetings to discuss each issue of the paper to determine proper balance between sections • Responsible for staff relations • Supervise all areas of newspaper production • Liaison between administration, adviser, and staff • Responsible for some writing especially the editorial page

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Pubinfo Story guidelines (Crier)

• Write the story in Microsoft Word. • Type your name on the first line • Type a headline idea on the second line. • Stories must be a minimum of 300 words (unless it is a news short). Be sure to include quotes from the people involved in the story. • DO NOT DOUBLE SPACE ANYWHERE. You should never hit the space bar twice, even at the end of a sentence. • DO NOT TAB. Do not hit the tab, even at the beginning of a paragraph. Indents will be added when the story is placed in the paper. • Avoid any paragraph longer than 35-40 words. • Quotes should be separate paragraphs. See QUOTES in Style Sheet for consistent style. • Proof the story and be sure to run spell check. • Remove editorializing words and phrases, unless it is an opinion piece. • Write in third person (he, she, him, her, they, them, etc.). • Use first person (I, me, we, us, etc) only in opinions and commentaries. • Avoid use of second person at all times (you, your, yours, etc.). • Avoid using name of school or year in your copy. Your readers should already know this. • See instructions for sending the story over the Internet or by email. (See the section on Sample Newspaper stories for good examples to follow.)

• Ultimate responsibility for proofreading each section

Managing Editor

• Assigns class, organization, activity, and community news • Responsible for content and proof reading • Responsible for headlines • Assigns beats to reporters • Keeps a futures book • Responsible for some writing, especially on the editorial page • Proofreads every edition

Page Editor

• Responsible for any artwork, special effects or design, which should appear in the paper. • Responsible for assigning all stories and seeing they are completed • Should proofread copy • Responsible for seeing that each article has a headline and that each picture has a complete caption • Responsible for putting together articles, photos, and other elements to form the most attractive, interesting and efficient paper possible • Sees that assigned pages are completed by deadline • Will electronically submit all stories to editor in Microsoft Word • Knows how to use computer programs to compete pages • The following are specific to each page editor: News Editor -Responsible for balanced news coverage of all events relevant to students -Responsible for accuracy of facts and names in stories Sports Editor -Responsible for the balanced coverage of all sporting events, girls and boys, or any athletic activities -Responsible for accuracy of scores, names, and dates in the stories he assigns -Responsible for securing photographs of good quality to accompany stories -Will write any sports editorials Feature Editor /Entertainment Editor -Responsible for all features, entertainment stories and columns in paper -Makes sure all stories are assigned and completed Opinions Editor -Responsible for all opinion stories in paper -Works with editor to establish editorial policies -Responsible for letters to the editor

Reporters

• Responsible for a beat and relations between the staff and people on that beat • Responsible for developing at least two stories from beat • Must write stories assigned • Proofreads own stories • Electronically submit stories to editor in Microsoft Word • Complete stories by assigned deadline

Advertising Manager

• Supervises sale of all advertising • Keeps ledger of advertising paid and due • Reminds staff of advertising still needed • Designs advertisements • Writes and develops ideas for newspaper articles

Photographer

• Supervises equipment and its use • Maintains equipment and reports any problems • Downloads all photos in specified folder on Crier Server • Fulfills assignments from editors • Assigns picture taking event to others

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• Takes initiative in finding good pictures

Photo Editor

• Meet all deadlines • Downloads all photos in specified folder on Crier Server • Sees that digital images are kept orderly in specified folder • Distributes photo images to page editors • Bridge gap between photographers and reporters • Stay alert to photo opportunities • Help with selecting, cropping, and scaling photos • Schedule group pictures when needed • Provide training and feedback to photographers

Policy Guide Newspaper Editorial Policy (printed in every issue of the Crier):

The Crier is a publication of Casady School, produced, written and designed by the students of the Casady Upper Division. The Crier staff believes in maintaining editorial integrity, placing importance in sound journalistic principles of truth, fairness and objectivity. In so doing, The Crier will not purposely show disregard for facts nor proceed with malicious intent in any item contained in its pages. Editorials, representing the newspaper’s opinion on issues, are unsigned and will appear on the Opinions page. Columns, representing the writer’s personal viewpoints, are by-lined. The Crier recognizes that as publisher of the newspaper, the administration has the legal right of prior review, but we will endeavor to conduct our reporting and coverage to merit the ultimate trust of the Casady community. The Crier will not knowingly print anything libelous or obscene, nor will we engage in personal attacks against members of the community.

Letters

Readers are encouraged to use the open forum provided by The Crier to exchange ideas and thoughts which affect the School and community through the submission of letters to the editor. All letters should be sent to The Casady Crier, Casady School, 9500 N Pennsylvania, Oklahoma City, OK 73120 or emailed to casadycrier@mac. com. All signed submissions will receive consideration for publication. While letters may be edited due to space limitations, their original intent will be honored. Letters must be signed; however, the writer may request anonymity.

Pubinfo Sending stories by email: • In your email program, create a new message. • Send to: casadycrier@mac.com • Subject: type your name and story subject (Sam Effinger-Homecoming) • Attach: the Microsoft Word file containing your story.

Sending stories over the Internet: On a Mac:

• From the Finder, click on Go menu and choose iDisk and Other User’s iDisk… • Username: casadycrier • Password: cyclones • Drag your story to the appropriate folder.

On a PC.

• Open your browser. • Go to idisk.mac.com/casadycrier • Username: casadycrier • Password: cyclones • Double-click appropriate folder to open it. • Click on the upload button and browse to locate your file.

Advertising

The Crier welcomes community advertising. However, the editors reserve the right to refuse any advertisement deemed inappropriate for high school students. Inquiries should be directed to Sam Effinger, 405-749-3161.

Distribution

The Crier is distributed freely to the students, faculty, administration and staff of Casady’s Upper Division. Subscription is offered to all Upper Division parents (and others requesting it) at $10 per year.

Artwork/Illustrations/Photos

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Pubinfo

Artwork or photo illustrations will be marked as such. No artwork or illustration will be meant to ridicule or demean a specific person. Photo images may not be manipulated in an way that alters the reality of the content.

Writing a caption

Yearbook

Gather information

We reserve the right to refuse advertising that the staff determines is false or misleading to the student body. No ads will be printed that promote or demonstrate products or services that do not meet community standards for good taste or that are illegal to the majority of the student audience. Advertisements that appear in the publication are not necessarily endorsed by the publication.

Who: Gabby Bumgardner, Wally Widge What: blueberry pie-eating contest When: Sept. 8, homecoming pep assembly Where: Bobcat Gym Why: to raise money for Overeaters of America How: pies were dontated by cheeleader mothers Before the action: contestants were chosen in a school-wide poll After the action: Gabby ate two and one-half pies in five minutes to beat the field of eight Quote: “I was halfway though the second pie when I felt a sick rumbling in my stomach. I really didn’t think I could hold it down, but I thought about all those unfortunate overeaters I was helping, and I just made myself finish.”­— Gabby Bumgardner

Writing guidlines

• Write the first sentence in present tense. • Write subsequent sentences in past tense. • Start with the most interesting fact. • Don’t start with name or date; they’re not the most interesting. • Start with vivid, descriptive phrase. I• Include an optional quote to complete the story.

Example:

Furiously stuffing blueberry pie into her mouth, Gabby Bumgardner races to beat Wally Widge and six other entrants in the annual homecoming pie-eating contest Sept. 8. Contestants had five minutes to eat the pies, cooked and donated by cheeleader moms, to raise money for Overeaters of America. Gabby finished two and one-half pies to claim first place. “I was halfway though the second pie when I felt a sick rumbling in my stomach,” Gabby said. “I really didn’t think I could hold it down, but I thought about all those unfortunate overeaters I was helping, and I just made myself finish.”­

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Advertising/Senior Salutes

Artwork/Illustrations/Photos

Artwork or photo illustrations will be marked as such. No artwork or illustration will be meant to ridicule or demean a specific person. Photo images may not be manipulated in an way that alters the reality of the content.

Book Sales

All students will be charged $65 to their book accounts for a yearbook. Any student who wishes not to purchase a book must have a parent or guardian notify the financial office. A letter will be sent in the fall to give parents the opportunity to opt out. Exchanges can be made for books with minor flaws if no writing is in the book. If a book has been written in, then no exchange can be made unless the adviser feels the flaw in the book is of major proportion (pages missing, pages upside down, etc.).

Obituaries

When a student or a member of the school staff dies during the current coverage period, the staff of the school publication will treat the death in an appropriate, respectful manner. The portrait of that person will appear as it would under normal circumstances, in the same location and at the same size. The name of the person and the dates of birth and death will appear under the photograph. For those readers who were associated with the deceased, this treatment will provide a memory of the individual. For all others, it provides a record of events.

Portraits

All students and school personnel must have their portraits made with the official school portrait photographer in order to be included in the current volume of the publication. Since the school-selected studio provides student identification photos at no charge, and publication photos are taken simultaneously, there will be no charge for seniors, underclass students or faculty/staff who want only publication/ID photos. All students must take photos according to school dress code policy. Students must return preview photos within two weeks of receipt. The school-selected photographer will take all senior portraits for the yearbook. Seniors must sit for the picture by prescribed deadline and return the preview pictures to the photographer by prescribed deadline in order to be included in the current yearbook and to select the pose of their choice. All students and faculty/staff will be afforded two opportunities to have their portraits taken. (The original date and the retake date.) By having all portraits taken by the same photographer under the same conditions, the publications staff can be assured of the highest quality reproduction of all photographs, serving the best interests of all students.


The pies were, of course, blueberry, and they were provided by the mothers of the cheerleader squad, all in a effort to raise spirit before the football game against the Snodgrass Grazers.

Quote

“We are fortunate to have so many involved parents,” cheerleader sponsor Linda Helpinhand said. “The mothers spent countless hours baking 25 pies, just to be torn apart in a crazy, hard-fought competition.”

Transition

The five senior contestants, chosen by a random drawing of names, were robed in blue plastic shower curtains and caps to protect themselves from stains. It didn’t do much, however, to protect them from the dangers of overeating.

Quote

“I was halfway though the second pie when I felt a sick rumbling in my stomach,” winner Etta Holthang said. “I really didn’t think I could hold it down, but I thought about the awful mess I would make if I threw up, so I just made myself finish.”

Transition

The other contestants were Bob N. Forapples, Claude Hopper, Anna Septic, and Ida Claire. None of them, however, were prepared for the mess to come.

Quote

“I was still cleaning blueberries out of my hair three days later,” Anna said. “and my teeth have been stained blue ever since. They must have made those pies with permanent blue ink.”

Conclusion

• Compose the story on the spread layout in Yeartech Online • Stories must be edited to fit the allotted space. Be sure to include plenty of quotes to help tell the story. • DOUBLE SPACE ONLY TO INDENT PARAGRAPHS. Do not double space after periods or anywhere else. • DO NOT TAB. For a first line indent, hit the space bar three times at the beginning of each paragraph. • Avoid any paragraph longer than 35-40 words. • Quotes should be separate paragraphs. See QUOTES in Style Sheet for consistent style. • Proof the story and be sure to run spell check. • Remove editorializing words and phrases. • Write in third person (he, she, him, her, they, them, etc.). • Avoid use of first and second person at all times (I, me, mine, you, your, yours, etc.). • Avoid using name of school or year in your copy. Your readers should already know this. • Follow the feature format in the next sidebar.

There were plenty of blue faces to go around during the first spirited pep assembly of the year. It wasn’t, however, due to low enthusiasm or melancholy moods. Five senior competitors had the “blues” all over their faces in the second annual pieeating contest.

Transition

Story guidelines (Twister)

SAMPLE STORY Lead

Pubinfo

Feature Format (Twister)

In the end, it was all worth the effort. The Oilers defeated the Grazers 25-0, and there were no blue faces in Tarpit Stadium by the end of the game, at least on the home side.

LEAD TRASITIONAL PARAGRAPH QUOTE TRASITIONAL PARAGRAPH QUOTE TRASITIONAL PARAGRAPH QUOTE TRASITIONAL PARAGRAPH CONCLUSION Begin with a stong lead, that pulls the reader into the story. Do not start with the name of the club, sport, class. Also avoid beginning with a name, including the name of the school. Follow with a trasitional paragraph that provides facts and information about the story. Be specific. Avoid using indefinite adjectives and pronouns (many, some, a few, several). Instead, provide reas numbers whenever possible (52 students arrived instead of many students arrived). Follow the transitional paragraph with a relevant quote. This quote should be colorful and informative, helping to tell the story. Continue this same pattern with the rest of the story. End with a conclusion that ties the pieces together. It should also tie in with the lead, leaving the reader with a feeling of completion.

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Pubinfo Publication Lab Rules 1. No food or drinks are allowed near the computers. Food and drinks may be consumed at the round table or sofa only. 2. Publications #1 (between the printer and scanner) is designated as the photo station. If you have photos to download or photos to scan, you must use this computer. Use this computer for other activities only when no others are available. 3. The Logos computer (the white Mac) may be accessed when all others are in use. Please see the adviser to assist in logging in. 4. Do not change any system preferences on the computers without the permission of the adviser. This includes the Desktop picture. 5. Do no install any fonts or applications on the computers without the adviser’s permission. 6. Do not plug in any device, including thumb drives without permission from the adviser. 7. No CDs or DVDs are to be accessed on the computers without the adviser’s permission. 8. Use of the Internet is limited to publication specific activities. It is not to be used for personal business of any kind, including email or chatting. Only the Crier and Twister email accounts may be accessed. 9. When you have completed your session, save your work, quit any open applications and log off. Do not shut down. 10. Gather all papers, photos, etc., and take them with you.

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Style Sheet Abbreviations

1. Names. Abbreviate the name of your school or organization in second reference. Spell out the first references and abbreviate thereafter. Never abbreviate the name of another school. Example: Students of the Future Journalists of America elected new officers last week. The sponsor of FJA, however, resigned. 2. Use Casady School in first reference. Use Casady in subsequent references. There are no abbreviations. 3. Before a name. Abbreviate the following titles when used before a full name outside direct quotations: Dr., Gov., Lt. Gov., Mr., Mrs., Ms., Rep., the Rev. and Sen. Also see Titles.

Academic Departments

Use lowercase except when proper nouns are included in the title: the history department, the English department.

Addresses

1. Directions in addresses are abbreviated, all caps. Do not use periods. Example: 114 NW 8, 2357 NW 50 2. Streets with numbers as names and used in an address are simply the number. Do not use suffixes -st, -nd, -rd, -th. Use the number even if the street is 1 to 9. Example: 855 SE 2 3. When the number of the street is used alone, spell out streets one through nine. For streets over nine, use the numeral with -st, -nd, -rd, -th. Example: His office is located on Fifth Street. Example: The city planted trees along 39th Street. 4. In an address the name of the city is spelled out. Example: 1144 NW 98, Oklahoma City, OK 5. When the city or state is used as part of an address, the state is abbreviated; the city should always be followed by a comma. (See States) Example: The fire was at 1423 NW 38th, Paris, TX. 6. When the state stands alone, it is not abbreviated. (See States) Example: Students in Oklahoma must take a state mandated test. 7. Only use the abbreviations Ave., Blvd. and St. with a numbered address. Example: 9500 Pennsylvania Ave. Spell them out and capitalize when part of a formal street name without a number. Example: Pennsylvania Avenue was closed for repairs. Lowercase and spell out when used alone or with more than one street name. Example: All avenues in the city are four lanes. 8. All similar words (alley, drive, road, terrace, place, court, etc.) are always spelled out. Capitalize them when they are part of a formal name without a number; lowercase when used alone or with two or more names. 9. Always use figures for an address number (even when below 10) Example: 9 Morningside Court

10. Abbreviate compass points used to indicate directional ends of a street or quadrants of a city in a numbered address. Example: 5300 NW 50, 222 E 42 St.

Adviser

The accepted journalistic spelling is adviser, not advisor. Use advisor, however, if the official title uses that spelling.

Affect, Effect

1. Affect, as a verb, means influence: The game will affect the standing. 2. Affect, as a noun, is best avoided. It occasionally is used in psychology to describe emotion, but there is no need for it in everyday language. 3. Effect, as a verb, means to cause: He will effect many changes in the company. 4. Effect, as a noun, means results: The effect was overwhelming. He miscalculated the effect of his actions.

Ages

1. In most cases, use numerals. Hyphenate the phrase xxyear-old (where xx is the age) when it is used as an adjective or it stands alone as a noun. Example: He was 18 years old. She is a 19-year-old freshman. The culprit was a 14-year-old. 2. Do not spell out ages under 10. When the context does not require “years” or “years old”, it is presumed to be years. Example: The child was 3 when he started pre-school. The 3-year-old made strange noises.

Agreement

1. Use singulars with singulars, plurals with plurals. 2. Make pronouns and nouns match. Right: All the students want their pictures taken. Wrong: Everybody wants their picture taken. 3.Make subject and verbs match. Examples: Three members of the team are league allstars. Each member of the team is a winner.

Alumna, Alumnus/ Alumnae, Alumni

Use alumna to refer to an individual female graduate, alumnus to refer to an individual male graduate. Pluralize as alumnae for females and alumni for males. Refer to a mixed group as alumni, or use the English word: graduates.

Apostrophe

1. Use to form a possessive. To form the possessive of a singular word add an apostrophe and the letter s. Example: Tim’s shoes, Miss Burns’s room To form the possessive of a plural word not ending in s, add an apostrophe and an s. Example: children’s toys To form the possessive of a plural word ending in s, add an apostrophe only. Example: girls’ softball, Tigers’ season record 2. Use in contractions or to show omitted letters or figures. This apostrophe should be a closing mark (’) when typographical quotes are used. Example: it’s (meaning it is), don’t, ’03 3. Use in plurals of letters and figures. Example: There are four s’s in Mississippi.

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4. Do not use apostrophes in the possessive pronouns: theirs, its, hers, yours, ours, etc.

Books

1. References to books should be in italics. Example: Ms. Phillips assigned Moby-Dick to the class. 2. Reference to the name of the school newspaper or yearbook is capitalized and in italics. Do not underline or place in quotes. Example: The Twister and The Crier won several awards.

Casady School

1. When referring to Casady School, always capitalize. 2. When referring to Casady as “the School,” always capitalize School. 3. Use Casady School in first reference. Subsequent references may be Casady.

Capitalization

Do Capitalize: 1. All proper nouns, months, days of week, holidays. Example: New York, April, Tuesday, Fourth of July 2. Names of sections of the country, but not directions. Example: We live in the Southwest (meaning a particular region of the country that includes Oklahoma). Example: He walked southwest of here (meaning a direction). 3. One-word titles when they precede name of adults. Example: He interviewed Coach Jerry Jones. 4. Full names of schools, clubs, organizations, streets, geographical areas or companies. Example: Casady School, Southwest Preparatory Conference (SPC), Ninth Street, South Canadian River, Grantham-Griffing Field House, Standard Oil Company, Casady Board of Trustees. 5. Divisions when used in reference to Casady, but not when used in a general sense. Example: There were six new students in the Upper Division. Many schools have upper division courses that are too easy. 5. Names of races and nationalities (but not black and white). Example: Caucasian, American, Indian, Oriental Example: The mayor was elected from the black community. 6. Nicknames of athletic teams. Example: Cyclones, Tigers, Yellow Jackets 7. Principal words in titles of books, plays, movies or songs. Always the first word. Example: All juniors were required to read The House of the Seven Gables. 8. References to the President of the United States. Example: The President met with the press today. 9. Specific course titles, but not general subjects, unless they are languages: Example: He took three French classes. She was an algebra genius. He enrolled in Algebra III and Ancient History. Do Not Capitalize:

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1. School subjects, except languages or specific course titles. Example: social studies, algebra, journalism, French, English, Algebra II 2. Personal titles used without names. Example: After the headmaster presented his speech, the ceremonies began. 3. The words street, club, company, or similar words UNLESS they are a part of a specific name. Example: The club elected officers. Example: The Science Club sponsored the event (actual name of club). Example: Many schools do not have a science club (not the name of a specific club). 4. Abbreviations for the time of the day. Example: 8 a.m., 3:30 p.m. 5. Seasons of the year. Example: winter, spring, summer, fall 6. Academic departments, except for words derived from proper nouns. Example: English department, math department 7. Boards and committees, unless they are specific titles of specific groups. Example: the student body, the dance committee, the advisory board Example: The trustees meet once a month. Example: The Casady Board of Trustees approved all funding requests. 8. School rooms, except for buildings with special names. Example: room 237, north gym, Hightower. 9. The use of black or white in reference to nationality.

Cities

1. Cities and towns in Oklahoma should stand alone. Example: She lives in Edmond; her parents are from Tulsa. 2. Out-of-state cities and towns should be followed by their state’s abbreviation, unless it is widely known and not easily confused. (See States). Example: The orchestra made a trip to Chicago.

Class Titles

1. Class titles are capitalized when naming a specific group. Example: The Junior Class made prom decorations. 2. Class titles are lowercase in all other instances. Example: The freshmen and sophomores had an endof-the-year picnic. 4. Reference to lower grades are spelled out and not capitalized. Example: The children playing are in the fourth grade. 5. When used as an adjective, hyphenate. Example: Three eighth-grade students won writing awards. 6. Hyphenate when using grade designation as name of student. Example: There were no first-graders at the assembly.


Cliches, Indefinites

1. In general copy do avoid using various, many, numerous, some, a lot, a few, several, more than ever before, etc. Wrong: Several students appeared at the board meeting. Right: Approximately 40 students appeared at the board meeting. 2. In sports copy avoid, at all costs, over-worked expressions and cliches: gridders, roundballers, grapplers, etc.

Clubs

1. Capitalize club when part of the proper name of the organization. Use lowercase elsewhere. Example: He was also a member of the Chess Club. Example: There are three new clubs at Casady School. 2. For the first reference of a club in the copy, use the full name. For each subsequent reference use the abbreviation. Do not use periods between capital letters. Example: The National Honor Society was recently honored with a certificate from the national organization. It was the first such award for this chapter of the NHS.

Colon

1. Use a colon to introduce a series after “as follows” or a similar term, but NOT after linking verbs (are, is, were, include, etc.). Example: The following officers were elected: Joe Jones, Sally Smith . . . Example: The new officers include Joe Jones, Sally Smith… 2. Use to introduce an example. Example: He gave this example: If three boys were . . . 3. Use to separate hours from minutes (when not on the hour), and minutes from seconds in sports statistics. Do not use :00 when the time is on the hour. Example: The meeting began at 8:30 a.m. It was over by 9. Example: He ran the mile in 4:09:22.

Comma

1. Use to separate words in a series. Example: He took French, algebra, history and math. (Note that the journalistic style does not use a comma before the “and”.) 2. Use to set off parenthetical expressions or nonessential phrases and clauses. Example: Joe Jones, whom I met yesterday, will be there. (Here, the clause is nonessential.) Example: The man whom I admire the most is my dad. (Here the clause is essential; hence, no comma.) Example: There was no way, of course, to pass the test. 3. Use to set off appositives, nouns of address, or identifications. Example: Mary White, the sophomore candidate, was elected. Example: Linda, will you be there? 4. Use to separate a quotation from the rest of the sentence.

Example: “We raised enough money,” John Winkledorf said, “and we plan to use it all.” 5. Use in addresses. Example: Mr. Carl Rumpf, 1902 S. Harvard, Bethany, OK 6. Use in numbers over 999, except for street numbers, telephone numbers, etc. 7. Use to indicate a reading pause in long sentences, or whenever understanding of a sentence can be improved. 8. Use in sports scores. Example: Cyclones 44, Tigers 3 9. Use before “and”, “but” and “or” to separate independent clauses in a sentence. Example: The coach was asked to leave, but his players remained on the bus. 10. Use after an introductory clause if the idea is not essential to understanding the sentence. Example: When the boy reached the school, he went to his locker. Example: If you attend the meeting I will stay home. 11. Do not use in the place of a period or semicolon. Wrong: The teacher left the room, the students became noisy. Right: The teacher left the room; the students became noisy. Right: The teacher left the room. The students became noisy. Best: When the teacher left the room, the students became noisy. (Combine sentences whenever possible to show relationship or cause and effect.)

Counselors

1. Spell with one l: counselors. 2. Capitalize before a proper name (as a title). Example: They were introduced to Counselor Bill Bates.

Curriculum, Curricula

Curriculum is singular; curricula is plural.

Dates

1. Months used in complete dates are capitalized and abbreviated: Jan. April July Oct. Feb. May Aug. Nov. March June Sept. Dec. Example: The contest was Feb. 28, 1988. 2. Months used alone are capitalized and not abbreviated. Example: The club did not meet in February. 3. Do not use the preposition “on” before the date. Wrong: The sale was held on Oct. 8. Right: The sale was held Oct. 8. 4. Days of the week are spelled out and capitalized. Example: They met every Friday. 5. The year as a noun is 2007. As an adjective use ’07. Example: The team has not lost since 1998. Example: The ’06 yearbook was distributed last Friday. 6. Avoid, however, using the year in copy unless referring to a year other than the current one.

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Decades

Use Arabic figures to indicate decades of history. Use an apostrophe to indicate numerals that are left out; show plural by adding the letter s. Example: the 1890s, the ’60s, the mid-1930s

Directions

Capitalize directions when referring to a section of the country. Example: She came from the South. He arrived from the West Coast.

Director of Admission

The correct title is Director of Admission (not Admissions).

Divisions

Capitalize Divisions of Casady School: Primary Division, Lower Division, Middle Division, Upper Division. Do not capitalize when used in a general sense: It was the only school that did not bring lower division students.

District Titles

Class ranking is expressed in numerals and capital letters. Do not use a hyphen. Example: The Bixby Pride Marching Band swept the Class 4A championship in marching. Example: Watonga High School finished second in the Class B state high school basketball championships.

Editorial Adjectives

Do not use adjectives that imply a judgment by the writer. Wrong: He made an awesome dunk in the last minute of the game. Right: He made a dunk in the last minute of the game, assuring a victory for the Gladiators.

Email

1. The word is email. Do not hyphenate. 2. Always italicize, but do not underline: winkleq@casady. org

Farther, Further

Use farther to refer to distance: He ran two miles farther up the road than Jon. Use further to refer to degree: He saw further consequences of the staff cuts.

Heights

Use figures and spell out “feet” and “inches”. Do not hyphenate unless used as an adjective or used as a noun to replace. Example: He is 5 feet 9 inches tall. The 6-foot man fell. He is a 6-footer.

His, Her

1. Do not presume masculine in constructing a sentence, but use the pronoun he or his when an indefinite antecedent may be male or female. Example: Everyone in the class brought his book. Every girl on the team brought her family. 2. Do not use the plural their to mean his or her. Wrong: Everybody who wanted to drive paid for their own gas. Right: Everybody who wanted to drive paid for his own gas.

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High School (School)

1. Avoid using the name of your school. The reader knows what high school or school you are writing about. 2. Spell out the complete name of other high schools or schools. Example: The football team placed second in SPC. (The reader will know it is your school’s team.) Example: Country Day School’s tennis team took last in SPC. 3. Do not capitalize high school or school when used alone (except when referring to Casady as the School). Example: The board met to make plans for the new high school. Example: Casady School placed in the top ten.

Hyphen

1. No general rule can be stated for the use of the hyphen in compound words. You must learn the individual words. Most hyphenated words are titles, but not all titles require hyphens. If you can write a compound word as one (cheerleader) or as two (fire chief), do not use a hyphen. 2. Use in these compound titles: vice-principal, vicepresident, all-state team, sergeant-at-arms, secretarytreasurer. 3. Do not use in such words as weekend, bylaws, copyread, proofread, homecoming, lineup, classroom, makeup, homework, classwork, textbook, fundraiser. 4. Use with compound adjectives, but not with the same words used as nouns. Example: 50-yard line, six-day trip, 20-foot poster Example: He ran 50 yards. The trip lasted six days. 5. Use in sports scores. Example: The Lions won 7-3. 6. Use, between syllables only, to divide words at the end of lines.

Initials

1. Use periods and no space when an individual uses initials instead of a first name: E.B. White. 2. Do not give a name with a single initial (J. Jones) unless it is the individual’s preference or a first name cannot be learned.

Its, It’s

It’s is a contraction for it is or it has: it’s up to you. It’s been a long time. Avoid this contraction unless it is part of a quote. It is preferable to use “it is.” Its is the possessive pronoun of it: The team lost its second game.

Jersey Numbers

Always place jersey numbers in parentheses following the name in a caption to aid in identification. Example: Caught from behind, Johnny Runningback (39) is tackled by all-state safety Billy Blueblood (18) in the Bombers’ first game of the season.

Jr., Sr., III, IV, etc.

1. Abbreviate as Jr. and Sr. only with full names of persons. Do not precede by a comma: Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. 2. Do not place a comma before III, IV, etc., when used as part of name: Harry Wallings III. 2. Do not use Jr. or Sr. to mean a member of the junior or senior class.


3. If necessary to distinguish between father and son in second reference, use the “elder Smith” and the “younger Smith”.

Languages

Capitalize the proper names of languages and dialects: Arabic, Cajun, English, Yiddish, Cockney, Italian.

Lay, Lie

1. The action word is lay. It takes a direct object. Laid is the form for its past tense and its past participle. Its present participle is laying. 2. Lie indicates a state of reclining along a horizontal plane. It does not take a direct object. Its past tense is lay; its past participle is lain; its present participle is lying. 3. When lie is used to mean an untrue statement, the verb forms are lie, lied, lied, lying.

Magazines, Newspapers

Magazines and newspapers are capitalized and italicized. Example: He purchased a copy of Newsweek. Example: Every student should receive a copy of The Crier.

Mascots

1. Use mascots to refer to your school team as a variation. Example: The Cyclones roared over the Plainsmen last Friday in a lop-sided victory. 2. Do not overuse in copy, especially sports. 3. Do not use to mean the students in a school. Wrong: Cyclones enjoy eating pizza. Right: Casady students prefer pizza over hamburgers.

Measurements

Use figures and spell out “yard”, “meters”, “feet”, inches”, etc. Example: The field is 100 yards long; the room is 10 feet by 16 feet; it was a 10-by-16-foot room.

Money

1. Cents. Use numerals and spell out “cents”. Example: 2 cents, 75 cents 2. Even dollars. Use a dollar sign with numerals. Example: $1, $136, $1,335 3. Dollars and cents. Use the dollar sign and the decimal. Example: $7.99, $14.80, $25,644.69

Months

1. Use the following abbreviations when used in compete dates: Jan. April July Oct. Feb. May Aug. Nov. March June Sept. Dec. Example: The first meeting was Jan. 7. 2. Spell out months when not used with a specific date. Example: No accidents occurred in December. 3. Do not use “on” before a date. (See Dates)

Names

1. With adults the first reference should include the title, first name and the last name. Each subsequent reference should include the title and the last name. Example: Mr. Jack Jones has been named headmaster at Mudwater Day School. This is Mr. Jones’s first year as a headmaster.

2. With students the first reference should include the first and last name. Each subsequent reference should include only the first name. In the event that two students in a story share the same first name, then use the last names. Example: Sherry Phillips recently resigned as president of Student Council. It was a hard decision, Sherry disclosed.

Numbers

1. Always use numerals for ages, dimensions, money, percents, days of the month, degrees, hours of the day, scores, room numbers, page or chapter numbers and street numbers. Example: 8-year-old, 5 feet 2 inches, 10 cents, 5 percent 2. Excluding the above, spell out numbers one through nine. Use numerals for numbers above nine. Example: three football players, 16 softball players, one cheerleader 3. Spell out numbers that begin sentences, but avoid doing so. 4. In numbers over 999, use a comma. The exceptions to this are addresses, years, phone numbers, etc. Example: 1,112 fans, 1112 NW 48, 1989 5. Cents: 5 cents, 95 cents 6. Even dollars: $2, $139 7. Dollars and cents: $15.99 8. Use Roman numerals for wars and to show personal sequence for animals, people, movies, etc. Example: World War II, Psycho III, Rocky IV, Pope John XXIII. 9. Spell out casual expressions. Example: A thousand times no! Thanks a million. 10. Use words or numerals according to an organization’s practice. Example: 20th Century Fox, Big Twelve 11. Spell out “first” through “ninth” when they indicate sequence in time of location. Example: first base, First Amendment, fifth in line 12. Use 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, etc., when the sequence has been assigned in forming names. Example: 7th Fleet, 1st Sergeant

Percentages

Use figures, and spell out “percent”. For amounts less than 1 percent, use a zero and decimal. Example: 110 percent, 3 percent, 43.5 percent, 0.5 percent Personifications Capitalize popular personifications. Example: Grim Reaper, Mother Nature, Old Man Winter

Pompon, Pom Pon Squad

1. Pompon is the large ball of crepe paper waved at sporting events. 2. Use Pom Pon Squad to refer to the organization of girls who use the pompons.

Principal

The principal is your “pal”. Do not confuse the word with principle.

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Pronouns

1. Use who and whom to refer to persons and animals with names. Example: John Jones is the man who helped me. 2. Use that and which to refer to inanimate objects and animals without names. Example: We could not find the dog that bit me. 3. Be certain that the pronoun agrees both in number and gender with its antecedent. Example: Everyone who brought his book was rewarded. Example: Each member on the softball team indicated that she was willing to play. 5. See It’s, Its.

Quotes

1. Place the attribute AFTER a short quote, the name first. Wrong: Ms. Jane Jones said, “We are proud of our efforts.” Right: “We are proud of our efforts,” Ms. Jane Jones said. 2. In a longer quote, place the attribute after the first natural pause, name first. Example: “It was really hard work,” Ms. Jones said, “but we were happy with the float.” 3. If punctuation is part of the quote, it goes inside the quotation marks. If not, outside. Example: “What is your name?” she asked. Example: How many times have you heard “I hate English”? 4. Never place more than one end mark at the end of a quote. Wrong: Did he ask, “Who is that masked man?”? Right: Did he ask, “Who is that masked man?” 5. Use indirect quotes for variety. Example: Mr. Wallingford said that there would be no more pep assemblies.

Religious Titles

Examples of usage: the Rev. Harvey Richards for a priest or minister, then Father Richards or Rev. Richards Rabbi Jason Smauel, then Rabbi Samuel Brother Juan Gomez, then Brother Gomez Sister Mary Crowley, then Sister Crowley Never refer to a member of the clergy as just a reverend or the reverend.

Said

Use said or says. Avoid expressions that unnecessarily color the facts or imply mind reading such as believed, claimed, feels and thinks.

Saint

Use St. in the names of saints, cities and schools: St. Edward; St. Louis, Mo., St. Mark’s School.

Semicolon

1. Use to separate independent clauses not connected by a conjunction. Example: He was old; she was young. 2. Use between divisions of a listing.

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Example: The officers were James Clark, president; Wanda Day, vice-president; and Bill Smith, secretary. 3. Use to divide enumeration when commas would not be clear. Example: The three committees will handle personnel and training; sales, promotions and advertising; and marketing and finances.

Sports

1. In giving scores, always begin with your school’s score. Example: The Hogs lost 3-10. 2. Do not use abbreviations for height, weight or distances. Example: the 128-pound wrestler, the 6-foot 7-inch basketball player 3. District titles use no hyphens: 4A, 3B 4. Use Southwest Preparatory Conference in first reference, SPC thereafter.

States

1. Use the two letter postal designation when part of a complete address. No period after the abbreviation unless it is the end of the sentence. Example: 123 W 6, Ardmore, OK 2. Some of the abbreviations for surrounding states are: AZ Arizona AR Arkansas CO Colorado KS Kansas LA Louisiana MO Missouri NE Nebraska NM New Mexico OK Oklahoma TX Texas If uncertain about a state, look it up at USPS.com. Do a search for “state abbreviations”. 3. Use the entire name of the state when appearing alone. Example: Students arrived from Texas, Kansas and Colorado. 4. When naming city and state, place a comma after the state name when it is not the end of the sentence. Example: She lived in Tyler, Texas. He visited Battle Creek, Michigan, several times that summer.

There, Their, They’re

1. There indicates in a place or at a place. Often used to introduce clauses. Example: No one was there. Example: There was no one in the gym. 2. Their is the possessive form of the pronoun they. Example: The cheerleaders presented their award to the school. 3. They’re is the contraction of they are. Avoid using contractions unless part of a quote. It is preferable to use “they are”. Example: “They’re going to practice much harder,” Coach Jones said.

Time

1. Use numerals for time. Example: The game began at 7:15. 2. Do not be redundant. Wrong: The game began at 7:15 p.m. that evening. Right: The game began at 7:15 p.m. 3. Do not use :00 for times on the hour.


Example: The game began at 7 that evening. 4. Note that a.m. and p.m. are not capitalized and use periods.

Titles

1. A title preceding a name is capitalized. Example: Headmaster Charles W. Britton 2. If the title follows the name, use lowercase. Example: Mr. Charles W. Britton, headmaster 3. The above rules also apply to class and club officers. Example: Senior President Joe Jones Example: Joe Jones, senior president 4. Never abbreviate these or other club officer titles: president vice-president secretary treasurer reporter parliamentarian sergeant-at-arms representative 5. Every adult must have an appropriate title. Example: Superintendent Willy Ward 6. Women’s titles should be Miss, Mrs., or Ms. These adults must be consulted to obtain their preferences. Be consistent. 7. Also see Names.

United States

Write United States out when used as a noun. U.S. may be used as an adjective.

Example: He returned to the United States after a threemonth visit of Europe. He travelled with three other U.S. citizens.

Web sites and email

Italicize but do not underline: www.casady.org, joejones@ hotmail.com Weight Use figures and spell out “pounds”, “ounces”, “grams”, etc. Example: He weighed 265 pounds.

Who, Whom

1. Who is the word when used as the subject or predicate nominative of the clause. Example: The woman who rented the room left the window open. She is who? 2. Whom is used as the object of the verb or preposition. Example: The woman to whom the room was rented left the window open. Whom do you wish to see? 3. Also see Pronouns.

Whose, Who’s

1. Whose is the possessive form of who. Example: I don’t know whose coat was lost. 2. Who’s is a contraction meaning who is or who has. Avoid this contraction unless part of a quote. It is preferable to use “who is” or “who has”. Example: “He’s the man who’s taking us,” Joe said. She is the teacher who is leaving next month.

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Newspaper Sample Stories NEWS

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Fresno State professor suspended after two students said he threatened to bring a gun to class and start shooting has been reprimanded by the university, but will continue to teach. Joe Parks, a tenured education professor, said he never made the threat, and other students backed him up. “It is a letter of reprimand based on lies, innuendos and information taken out of context concerning alleged comments I made in class,” Parks said. The student who first reported Parks’ alleged threat said he is disappointed that Parks will be back in the classroom. “I don’t know how they can allow him to teach,” said Jose Francisco Escutia, 30, of Selma. “It’s crazy. I can’t believe it.” Parks, who is 64, disclosed this week that officials at California State University, Fresno gave him a letter of reprimand on July 30. Janette Redd Williams, associate vice president for academic personnel at Fresno State, said she couldn’t talk about Parks’ case because it’s a personnel issue. In general, a letter of reprimand is a warning for an employee to change behavior but does not trigger a pay cut, Redd Williams said. Employees can be suspended without

pay, demoted or fired if the behavior persists. She would not say whether the university found that Parks made the alleged threat. But in general, she said, labor laws prevent the university from automatically firing an employee for making a threat. “There are different levels of threats,” Redd Williams said. “You have to take all the circumstances into consideration to evaluate the seriousness of the threat.” Some students also accused Parks of making racist comments in class in 2007 and 2008. Parks said he purposely made some provocative comments about racism, sexism and other issues that new teachers need to know about to be effective. Redd Williams would not say whether the university found that Parks made inappropriate comments. He is, however, being required to take an online course on sexual harassment. In addition, Fresno State “strongly” recommended that Parks take other steps to “rehabilitate your objectionable conduct,” including getting help from a pastor, counselor, licensed clinical social worker, psychologist or psychiatrist. Parks said the counseling recommendation is insulting to him as a black man, and he won’t go.

He has taught at Fresno State for 10 years, and he has been praised in the past for his classroom work. Three university officials —including Jeri Echeverria, provost and vice president for academic affairs—wrote supportive letters about Parks when he was promoted to full professor in 2007. In February, however, Escutia reported to university officials that Parks told him and other students in a teacher-preparation class: “I wish I could bring my s* and shoot all of you. Ah, I’m kidding, hah, hah, hah.” Escutia said he believed the expletive referred to a gun, and another student later corroborated Escutia’s story to university officials. Parks was suspended with pay. But two other students told The Fresno Bee that Parks never made threats. Parks said he will teach two classes in the fall semester that starts Aug. 25, and Redd Williams confirmed that. Meanwhile, Parks has filed a complaint with the California Department of Fair Housing and Employment, charging that Fresno State discriminated against him based on race and age. Redd Williams said she is investigating the claim. Such a complaint is necessary before a civil lawsuit may be filed in state court.

What makes people loyal to a smaller place rather than a Starbucks is quality and atmosphere that cannot be replicated in a chain, said Robynn James, the general manager of Habit, whose past is with Starbucks. “People in Sacramento know good coffee,” James said. “To a customer, our coffee is a swift kick in the pants. Get a good cup of coffee and it makes a difference in your day.” Customers Hank Floyd and John Turk were recently playing chess in Habit and each drinking a Kerouac, a chilled espresso and cream drink served in a martini glass. “Friends from school hang out here,” said Turk, 16. “It’s just a really chill spot to be.” At The Coffee Garden in Sacramento, owner Michael Madsen has a Rolodex full of customer names. “(We have) a pretty loyal customer base,” Madsen said. “So I’m not worried about this business.” The economy has affected his customers— rather than a customer buying a coffee and a pastry, some get only coffee. “People are just trying to save here and there,” said Madsen. “But we do what we can

with customer service and late hours to make up the difference.” Starbucks, too, is banking on loyalty to the brand as it faces economic stresses in addition to having expanded past customer demand without timely innovation of new products, according to Owens. Owens reported a series of protests by customers who wanted to save their Starbucks that were scheduled for closing. Billy Mongold of Sacramento was outside his favorite Starbucks after the store’s morning rush had subsided. When employees confirmed that the location was closing, Mongold said he was surprised. “This place is close to my house,” he said. “It’s really convenient.” He will soon have to go to “the Starbucks down the street” to get his usual venti white iced mocha. According to Owens, 75 percent of all closing Starbucks locations are within three miles of another Starbucks. He said that when one store closes, nearby stores can expect a boost in sales as customers move to get what he calls their “Starbucks fix.”

NEWS FEATURE

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n an economy where the siren song of Starbucks’ two-tailed mermaid has weakened slightly, independent coffee retailers are managing to maintain business, owners say. The little guys are trading on loyalty and, because of that, store sales have not dropped significantly and their core remains strong with a steady flow of patrons. “People are loyal when it comes to coffee. It’s part of their routine that doesn’t change from morning to morning,” said John Owens, an equity analyst with Morningstar. As the Seattle-based Starbucks chain remakes itself with new products, analysts say consumers remain loyal to the brand, not a specific location. Independents, meanwhile, sell their independent-ness—the vibe of the local coffeehouse, its uniqueness and the product offered. Chris Pendarvis owns five coffeehouses in the Sacramento area, including The Naked Lounge in Sacramento and Habit in El Dorado Hills, Calif. Repeat visits and word of mouth are how they are able to maintain their business, Pendarvis and store employees said.

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OPINION

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hen did teen pregnancy become entertaining? You know, the stuff of a break-out summer comedy, an Oscar-winning independent film, and now the ABC Family series “The Secret Life of the American Teenager.” Nothing quite says “a new kind of family”—the network’s slogan—like a 15-year-old’s unplanned pregnancy. It’s only a matter of time before some artist makes “Large Times at Gloucester High.” Apparently, pregnancy provides a better plot device than abortion, especially since the procedure has become one of culture’s dirty words. In Knocked Up, one pothead slacker is so uncomfortable he calls it schmabortion, putting a lie to Hollywood’s leftist tendencies. Teen pregnancy is on the rise for the first time after a 14-year downturn. In real life, misguided teens think pregnancy is a wondrous adventure—that is, until they have to care for a baby on a daily basis. “A teenage pregnancy immediately turns the odds against mother and baby,” says Dayle Steinberg, president of Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania. Teens believe they’re superheroes when it comes to birth control and health care. Young expectant mothers, the poor ones not depicted in Juno or on ABC Family, are more likely to risk unhealthy behavior (smoking,

drinking) and less likely to receive prenatal care, putting mother and child at risk. A baby proves a powerful hindrance to schooling, while tethering young mothers to government services and financial dependency. Education, not family income or background, is the great indicator of economic success. Those 17 knocked-up girls of Gloucester didn’t simply make a pregnancy pact but an agreement that stagnates education, obstructs future career choices, and clogs income. “Hollywood entertains and Planned Parenthood prevents,” Steinberg says. “Responsible behaviors aren’t promoted enough.” Studies show teenagers aren’t receiving adequate information at home or in the classroom about sex and reproductive health. Abstinence-only sex education, granted substantial federal funding in recent years, teaches the fallibility of contraception and inaccurate information about abortion, according to a congressional investigation. The lessons have had no effect on curtailing teenage sexual activity, which nearly half of all 15- to 19-year-olds experience. Meanwhile, one in four teenagers contracts a sexually transmitted infection. They represent a fourth of the sexually active population, but half of those people with sexually transmitted infections, suggesting a laxity when it comes to prevention. Last

year, an 80 percent increase of gonorrhea cases occurred in Delaware County, Pa., for example, more than a quarter among teenagers. But that doesn’t exactly make for entertainment, does it? “Secret Life” offered a public-service announcement on teens talking to adults, though the show seems more likely to boost pregnancy-test sales. Scenes from future episodes suggest that the heroine will continue school and get help from her mother. If only. Teenagers come to Philadelphia’s Women’s Medical Fund when life doesn’t work out like that. “These are teens who can’t tell their parents, and they don’t have any money and don’t have access to help,” says executive director Susan Schewel. Recently, the Women’s Medical Fund helped a 16-year-old obtain an abortion. She felt she couldn’t tell her mother—her father isn’t in the picture, and the father of her child isn’t, either. “By making my decision,” the girl wrote to the fund with her $25 contribution, “I am now able to move forward in my life and continue my schooling, knowing I can still reach for the stars.” There’s a secret life of an American teenager you don’t tend to see in movies or on television.

Phelps was humbled to be on the same seven-gold pedestal as Spitz. “The biggest thing is when someone says you can’t do things, when people say it’s impossible to tie or break these records, I proved anything’s possible,’’ he said. “If you put in the hard work and put your mind to it, anything’s possible.” This time, there was no world record, as there had been for Phelps’ previous six golds. Instead, the Baltimore phenom proved he can win in the tightest of races. Phelps made up ground in the final 50, and took an extra half-stroke at the finish, which would seem to have hurt him as Cavic’s hands were already underwater gliding to the wall. But Phelps’ extra kick surged him forward with force at the touchpad. Elsewhere: In women’s gymnastics, Nastia Liukin and Shawn Johnson won the gold and silver medals, respectively, in the all-around final Friday. Only six tenths of a point separated Liukin and Johnson, who became the first American women to finish first and second in gymnastics’ marquee individual event. Liukin joined Mary Lou Retton, who won in 1984, and Carly Patterson, who won in

2004, as the third American woman to win the Olympic all-around title. Liukin capitalized on beautiful, nearly flawless routines on uneven bars, balance beam and floor exercise to upset her teammate, who was defending world champion, and hold off China’s Yang Yilin, who took the bronze medal. At 5-3, Liukin was one of the tallest gymnasts in the competition. She towered over the 4-8 Johnson and the Chinese, who have denied reports that their gymnasts are underage. Her lithe, willowy movements impressed the judges, who rewarded her with the top score on uneven bars. She harkens back to a previous era in gymnastics, when elegance prevailed over acrobatics. Johnson was clearly disappointed with her silver medal, two days after the U.S. team’s mistakes had enabled China to win gold in the team competition. But she held back her tears and congratulated her friend. Liukin said she was inspired by the Olympic accomplishments of her father and coach, Valeri, who won two golds and two silvers for the Soviet Union at the 1988 Olympics. Liukin was born in Moscow and lives in Parker, Texas.

SPORTS NEWS

E

ven Michael Phelps couldn’t believe his eyes. He said he had to take off his goggles to make sure it was his name, and not Milorad Cavic, next to the No. 1 after a thrilling finish in the Olympic 100-meter butterfly. Phelps, who was in seventh place at the turn, surged in the final few meters and somehow managed to out-touch the SerbianAmerican Cavic by a hundredth of a second. To the naked eye, it was nearly impossible to tell who won. And from some camera angles, it appeared Cavic had the gold. But the Omega electronic clock read: Phelps 50.58. Cavic 50.59. The Serbian team was disputing the result, but FINA officials met with team leaders after the race and reviewed the video footage. The Serbians accepted the result after seeing the tape. Cavic was gracious in defeat and said he was “honored’’ to be the guy who almost beat Phelps. It was Phelps’ seventh gold medal at these Olympics, which ties Mark Spitz’s 36-yearold record from Munich. He will attempt to break the record Sunday morning in the 4x100 medley relay.

—­17—


SPORTS FEATURE

N

ot many things can get Eli Manning to match the smile he wore as he lifted the Lombardi Trophy after Super Bowl XLII. One that comes close, however, is the satisfaction he gets from helping unfortunate children. After all, how many 27-year-olds have their names emblazoned on a children’s clinic? In December, the Eli Manning Children’s Clinics at the Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children will open in Jackson, Miss., thanks in part to money raised by the Giants’ quarterback. “I like working with kids, it’s entertaining for me,” Manning said the other day at the Giants’ University at Albany training site. “Obviously the ones that are unhealthy and sick, it’s hard. You feel for them and want to do everything you can for them to make them feel better, make them have a better day, just get them to laugh or smile, try to get them to talk to you.” Making the clinics happen has been a concerted effort by the entire Manning family, BankPlus in Jackson and Batson, the only hospital in Mississippi dedicated solely to the care and treatment of children. It involved a June gala, “An Evening with the Mannings,” in Jackson that raised nearly $1

million and featured an on-stage cook-off between Eli and famed New Orleans chef Emeril Legace. “I know in New York those numbers sound small,” he said, “but in Mississippi— that’s a different league.” Manning said he wanted to give something back to Mississippi, which played an important part in his life during his college days. The need for a new wing at the hospital for children turned out to be a perfect match. He has a five-year commitment to raise $2.5 million, and has reached half that amount in just two years. His love for helping children, however, began before he became the No. 1 selection in the 2004 NFL draft, and long before he led the Giants to the NFL championship. It started when Manning, big man on the Ole Miss campus, began spending his leisure time in a very un-BMOC way. “In college, there was this little center for mentally challenged and disabled kids I used to go to,” he recalled. “There were maybe 20 kids in this little school, and they didn’t have much going. “So I used to visit there kind of randomly, they just say, ‘Drop by any time.’ It was only five minutes from the campus, so if I had an extra 30 minutes, or an hour, I’d drop by.”

He also would visit the elementary school, which also was just five minutes from the campus. “I’d drive by it every day on the way to the football stadium,” he said. “The teacher told me the kids do their reading between 11 and 12, and then they get their nap. So if you can come by, you can read to the kids. “I’d have 30 minutes to kill, and what should I do? I’d drop by and read to the kids. A lot of them were young and they might know me or know the name after we were introduced. It was fun being around them and seeing them laugh and hear some of the questions they ask, just the innocence of a child.” Manning said that when he was growing up he watched his father, Archie, the former NFL quarterback, get involved with several charities. While that may have provided him a game plan, it still had to be executed. “You can see someone do it, but if you don’t really enjoy it, you’re never going to take it to heart, you’re never going to do much of it,” he said of the work. “Sometimes you just might like being around kids, you feel like you can act like a little kid yourself without being under the microscope. “As much as they enjoy it, I might enjoy it even more than they do.”

ENTERTAINMENT REVIEW

J

okes within jokes. Movies within movies. A reel suicide mission that turns into a real one. Ben Stiller’s Tropic Thunder is raunchy, raucous and riotously funny. But so acutely self-conscious that the effect is one of a standup comedian furnishing color commentary on his own act. Written by Stiller, Justin Theroux and Etan Cohen, the movie about the making of a Vietnam War movie called Tropic Thunder is a self-mocking comedy tweaking showbiz self-importance. And an action flick chronicling a studio’s bungle in the jungle. And an excessive inventory of Hollywood excesses. On the desert-island location of “Tropic Thunder,” a milquetoast director (Steve Coogan) endeavors to film the muscular memoir of a macho paraplegic (Nick Nolte). The filmmaker is saddled with wimpy actors who go together about as well as chalk and chowder. In general, they represent the bandof-brothers population of war movies. In particular, types that appeal to reliable moviegoing demographics, the action guy with the bulging biceps, the serious actor with the bulging cranium, and the hip-hop impresario with the bulging pockets. Action lug Tugg Speedman (Stiller) is a Stallone-esque grunter in a sweatband, out to redeem his career.

—­18—

Speedman’s one-note emoting appalls thespian Kirk Lazarus (Robert Downey Jr.), a Russell Crowe-like Aussie perfectionist who resorts to “pigment augmentation” (read: blackface) to play an African-American. Lazarus’ hubris appalls black entrepreneur Alpa Chino (Brandon T. Jackson), a P. Diddylike businessman who views acting in movies as an extension of the brand. Then there are the druggie (Jack Black as Eddie Murphy-ish comic Jeff Portnoy, eager for dramatic cred) and the male ingenue (Jay Baruchel as Kevin Sandusky, eager to survive), respectively out of it and new to it. Kevin is appalled that seasoned filmmakers and actors can’t tell the difference between prop grenades and the type that sever limbs. Like the explosives detonated by Tropic Thunder’s overzealous technician (Danny McBride), Stiller’s film carpet-bombs for laughs when it would be more joke-effective to go for the surgical strike. While aiming for the funnybone, the filmmakers bruise other body parts. Three performances survive the bombs and the blood and the viscera, two of them cameos. As Tugg’s agent, Rick Peck, a role originally written for Owen Wilson, the uncredited Matthew McConaughey is hilarious playing a guy in the Hollywood bubble that bursts when he learns that his client is in mortal danger.

Wearing fatsuit and bald cap, unrecognizable in the role of the film’s vulgarian producer, Les Grossman, Tom Cruise, as his character’s name suggests, cares more about grosses than human lives. Best of all is Downey, whose rumbling dialogue has the wah-wah sound of an R&B guitar and the authority of the late Isaac Hayes. As usual, Downey is sublime, lightly funny in a screenplay where the humor is often heavy-handed. Stiller is more effective behind the camera than on screen as Tugg, a role reportedly written for Keanu Reeves. Tugg spends the movie trying to live down the ignominy of having played a Forrest Gump-like character in a box-office failure. Are the film’s caricatures insulting or offensive to blacks and the mentally disabled? As its targets are not blacks or the mentally disadvantaged but actors who would do anything for awards, I think not. (That said, the film’s depiction of cartoony Asian druglords did seem like an anachronism from 1940s war films.) With its repetitious passages of stumblein-the-jungle slapstick and geysers of in-jokes, Tropic Thunder finally is more successful as a critique of Hollywood movies than as a Hollywood comedy. But it has just enough surprise laughs to guarantee a freak meteorological event. This “Thunder” will precede box-office lightning.


Work Flows Page

Content

Purpose

20

Wrapping Text Around an Object

Steps for getting text to flow around the contours of an object.

20

Creating a Text Box (and Controlling Columns)

Steps to make a box for typing or placing text into. Also how to control the number of columns.

20

Placing a Photo

Steps for creating a box to place a photo and making it fit.

21

Creating a Byline

Steps for making the bylines at the top of Crier stories.

21

Creating a Headline

Steps for making a text box for headlines.

21

Filling Text Box with Placeholder Text

A quick way to fill an empty text box with dummy copy.

21

Creating and Styling a Line

Steps for making a graphic rule line and applying a stroke and color to it.

22

Downloading Photo Images

Work flow for downloading images in Bridge from the digital camera to the Twister or Crier server.

23

Batch Rename

Work flow for quickly renaming a large group of photos in Bridge.

24

Scanning Photographs

Directions for scanning in photos to use in publications.

25

Fixing Problem Photographs (Too Dark, Too Light)

Steps for adjusting a photograph that is too dark or light.

26

Fixing Problem Photographs (Bad Lighting, Off-color)

Steps for adjust a photograph with off-color lighting.

27

Fixing Problem Potographs (Backlit Photo)

Steps for lightening a dark object or subject against a bright background.

28

Layout Guidelines for Twister

Steps for creating an effective and appealing yearbook spread.

29

Layout Guidelines for Crier

Steps for creating an effective and appealing newspaper page.

Forms (following page 30) appendix

Crier Page Planner

Form for Crier editors to plan pages for upcoming issues of the newspaper

appendix

Crier Assignment Sheet

Form for Crier editors to make assignments to staff. One copy must be provided to the adviser.

appendix

Crier Staff Application

Form for application to the Crier staff.

appendix

Twister Staff Application

Form for application to the Twister staff.

appendix

Crier Advertising Contract

Contract to reserve space for advertisers in the Crier.

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—­20—


Crier basics 1. Opening the Library.

a. Choose File…Open. b. Navigate to 2009-2010 Crier… Libraries and open the Library that corresponds with your compute number. c. drag the design you want to use to your layout. c. Ungroup it (Object…Ungroup).

2. Placing Copy. a. Click inside the dummy copy and choose Edit…Select All. b. Choose File…Place. Navigate to the story you want to place. Be sure that the Replace Selected Item box is checked. Open the story. c. Choose Edit…Select All. d. On the Paragraphs Pallette, Click on Body Copy. Using the bottom handle, resize the copy block until the copy fits correctly. There should be no red + in the lower right corner.

3. Text Frame Options a. You can change the number of columns in a story module with the Text Frame Options dialog box. b. Seclect the copy block you want to change with the selection tool. c. Go to Object…Text Frame Options. d. Click the Preview box at the bottom to view your changes. e. To change the number of columns, increase or decrease the number of columns in the Number box. f. to prevent the copy or caption from flowing around a text wrap object, check the Ignore Text Wrap box.

Text Frame Options

This dialog box lets you change the number of columns in a copy block. You can also set the copy to ignore text wrap.

The library pallette

The library pallette offers a wide range of copy modules to choose from. There are also a wide variety of sidebars, quote boxes and photo boxes.

4. Placing a photo. a. Open the photo you want to use in Photoshop. Make any necessary color corrections (such as Image… Adjustments…Auto Levels). b. Change the mode by choosing Image…Mode…CMYK. c. Save the photo as a JPEG into the folder with your page layout. Use this format to name it: section_description. jpg. Example: news_chapel demolition.jpg. (The jpg is added automatically.) d. On your layout in InDesign, choose File…Place. Navigate to the photo and open it. With the photo selected, choose Object…Fitting…Fill Frame Proportionately. You may make adjustments to the photo frame by dragging the handles. e. To change the frame size without changing the photo inside (that is, to crop the image), drag any handle to resize the frame. f.To reduce or enlarge the image AND the frame, hold down the COMMAND and SHIFT keys. Drag any corner of the photo. g. To reposition the photo INSIDE the frame, choose the white arrow (Direct Selection tool). Drag the photo to repsosition it in the fram. h. Open the Info pallette (Window… Info). With the photo selected, make sure the Effective PPI is ABOVE 200. If it isn’t the photo cannot be used.

5. Placing a caption. a. Drag over the caption overline (the small bold head above the caption). Type in a 2-4 word catchy phrase that will hook the reader and describes the photo. b.Drag over the caption and type in a new one. Be sure it answers the 5 w’s (who, what, when, where, why and how). It should provide the reader with all pertinent information. First sentence must be present tense. Every subsequent sentence should be past tense. c. If the styles are incorrect: click inside the overline. In the Paragraph Styles pallette, click on Caption Overline. Next, click inside the the caption and choose Caption in the Paragraph Styles pallette.

6. Placing the by-line

a. Place the cursor on the far left of the first line of the story. Hit RETURN twice. b. Place your cursor on the first blank line you created and type the by-line: by Wanda Goosemeyer. Click on Byline Name on the Paragraph Styles pallette. c. Place your cursor on the second blank line you created and type in the position: news editor. Click on Byline Position on the Paragraph Styles pallette. d. You will probably have to readjust the copy frame. Make sure there is no red + showing at the bottom right of the story frame.

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Wrapping text around an object

Creating a text box

Placing a photo

InDesign

InDesign

InDesign

1. Choose the Text tool in the tool box. 2. Drag the mouse to draw a box where you want the copy to be placed. Don’t worry if you don’t get it right the first time. You can drag the corner handles to readjust it. 3. Click inside the box and type in your text or use the File>Place… command. 4. Choose Object>Text Frame Options to control the number of columns. 5. Be sure to apply the correct style (in the Paragraph Styles palette) to all the paragraphs in the copy.

1. Click on the Rectangular Tool in the Tool Box. 2. Drag the mouse to draw a box the size you want for the photo. 3. You can resize the box by dragging the handles that appear when you select it. You can also drag it to a new location. 4. Be sure that the box is defined by the page grids, starting and stopping inside the horizontal and vertical grid lines. 5. Use the Place… command under File to put a photo in the box. 6. If the photo is too big when placed, choose Object>Fitting>Fit Content Proportionally. Readjust the frame by dragging the handles. 7. If the photo is too small when placed, DO NOT USE IT. Delete it and find a photo that is large enough.

1. Click on the object you want the text to wrap around. 2. Open the Text Wrap palette (If you don’t see it, Click on Window>Text Wrap.

Yeartech Online

3. Click on the third icon at the top (Wrap around object shape). 4. Enter the distance from the top, bottom, right and left you want around the object (from 0p5 to 1p0). You can just click in the box and use the up and down arrow keys to increase or decrease the distance. 5. Place the object over the text you want to wrap and make adjustments.

Yeartech Online

1. Make an Advanced Text copy block. Write the story. Click on Format and check the Text Wrapping box. 2. Click on the object to wrap around. Under Format, choose the type of text wrap you want.

1. Click on the Place New Text icon. Choose the type of text to place, such as Advance Text. 2. Resize the box by dragging the handles (the cursor will become a two-headed arrow when the cursor is positioned correctly for resizing). 3. Move the box to the location on the spread where you want the text placed (the cursor will become a four-headed arrow when the cursor is positioned correctly for moving). 4. Be sure to apply the correct type attributes to the copy. NOTE: If there is a copy block on another spread that is similar to the one you want to make, it will be easier to copy and paste it to the new spread, reposition it and type in the new text.

Yeartech Online

1. Click on the Place New Rectangle Photobox icon. Rotate

Resize 2. Resize the box by dragging the handles in the corners and on the sides. Rotate the box by dragging on the red circle. 3. Be sure the photo falls inside column lines (as above). 4. Click on the Images tab to the left of the layout.

5. Click on the Down Arrow next to the binocular icon. Browse to find the folder with the photo you want to use. Text Wrap Illustration. With text wrap turned on, any copy placed over the object will wrap around it.

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(continued next page)


6. Drag the photo to the box you made. 7. Double click on the photo and the crop adjustment controls will appear.

Creating a headline InDesign 1. Click on the Text tool in the tool box. 2. Drag the mouse to draw a box above the copy where you want the headline to be placed. Don’t worry if you don’t get it right the first time. You can drag the corner handles to readjust it. 3. Click inside the box and type in your headline. Use the same rules for capitalizing words as you would with any normal sentence, but do not place a period at the end. 4. Click on the paragraph icon in the control palette and turn hyphenation off. 5. Be sure to apply the correct style (in the Paragraph Styles palette) to the headline.

8. Drag the slider to make the image larger in the frame (or crop out parts). 9. Click and drag in the middle of the photo to reposition the photo in the frame. 10. Double click on the photo when you are done.

Creating a Byline (Crier) InDesign

1. Position the type cursor at the beginning of the first paragraph of the story. 2. Hit Return twice. 3. Click on the first empty line created and type By Firstname Lastname. Click on Byline Name style in the Paragraph Styles palette. 3. Click on the second empty line and type the position (such as news editor). DO NOT CAPITALIZE any word on this line. Click on the Byline Position style in the Paragraph Styles palette.

Yeartech Online

1. Click on the Place New Text icon. 2. Resize the box by dragging the handles. The cursor will become a two-headed arrow when you are positioned correctly for a resize. 3. Move the box to the location above the text where you want the headline placed. The cursor will become a fourheaded arrow when you are positioned correctly for a move. 4. Be sure to apply the correct type attributes to the headline. NOTE: If there is a headline on another spread that is similar to the one you want to make, it will be easier to copy and paste it to the new spread, reposition it and type in the new text.

Filling text frame with placeholder text 1. Click inside the text frame with the cursor tool or draw a new text box with the cursor tool. 2. Choose the font, size and style you want for the text, or choose a style from the Paragraph Styles palette. 3. Choose Type>Fill with Placeholder Text.

Creating and styling a line InDesign 1. Choose the line tool from the tool box. 2. Drag the mouse to draw the line. Hold down the Shift key to constrain the line to 45-degree angles. 3. Make sure the line is still selected before proceeding. 4. Open the Stroke palette. If you do not see it, choose Window>Stroke. 5. Enter the size of the line in the Weight box. Avoid using lines greater than 1 pt. except for special effects (usually colored lines). 6. Pull down the Type menu to choose Solid for most applications. 7. With the line still selected, open the Swatches palette. Again, if you do not see it, choose Window>Swatches.

8. Click on the Stroke icon. 8. Apply a color by clicking on one of the swatches. This will usually be Black. NOTE: To place a line around a photo, select the photo and follow steps 4 to 9.

Yeartech Online

1. Click and hold down on the triangle next to the New Rectangle Photobox. 2. Choose either horizontal or vertical line at the bottom. 3. In the control palette choose a line weight (usually 0.5 or 1 pt.)

4. Under the brush icon, choose a color. Be sure to consult with editor on color choice. NOTE: To place a line around a photo, select the photo and follow steps 3-4.

—­23—


Downloading Photo Images 1. Place your camera card into the card reader. Be sure to use the correct slot, and turn the card the correct way. It will open on the Desktop (probably an icon named NoName. Untitled, EOS_ Digital, etc.). 2. Open the folder with the images (it may be titled DCIM). 3. For Twister, open the Digital Photos folder. For Crier, open current Issue folder. 4. For Twister, open the section folder the photos should be dumped in. For Crier Open the Photos folder. Make a new folder inside this folder; if the images are first day of school, make a First Day of School folder. 5. Drag the images from the camera card folder into the Twister or Crier folder you opened. 6. Open Bridge and navigate to the folder you just placed the images in. 7. Select all the photos in the folder. 8. Under Tools, choose Batch Rename. 9. See the illustration to the right. Use it as a guide to renaming your photos. Be sure to make a specific name that identifies the event. Be sure to reset the Beginning Number to 1. 10. Click the Rename button. 11. Delete all duplicates and bad images. 12. Edit the images as needed. NOTE: More detailed instructions for Batch Rename on the next page.

Bridge Illustration. Rename your images using Batch Rename. Follow the format shown in this illustration.

—­24—


Batch Rename 1. On the dock, open Adobe Bridge (BR). 2. Click on the Favorites tab in the upper left corner. 3. Click on Digital Photos. 4. Double-click the section folder with the photos to be renamed, such as Student Life. 5. Double-click on the folder with the images, such as JW_FB Homecoming. All the thumbnails of the photos in that folder will be displayed. DO NOT select any photo by clicking on it. 6. On the Tools menu, choose Batch Rename... 7. Select Rename in same folder button. 8. Under New Filenames, there should be three pull-down menus. Type in the new name parts as follows: Text: AB_ (Photographer’s initials, followed by underscore) Text: event description_ (one or two words describing assignment, followed by underscore) Sequence Number: Type in start number 1 and pull down Three Digits 9. Look at the preview area at the bottom of the window to see if it looks correct. Example: JW_FB Homecoming FB_001.jpg 10. Click on Rename.

—­25—


Scanning Photographs 1. Place photos in the scanner. You may put more than one in at a time. 2. Press the scan button on the scanner. 3. Click on the Preview button. 4. In the window with the photos, and under the word marquee, click on the upper left button to deselect previous marquees; keep clicking until all marquees are gone. 5. With the mouse, drag a marquee (or marquees) around the photo(s). This is a good time to crop out parts of the photos you do not want. 6. Click on the ALL button. This will choose all marquees. 7. Make sure the resolution is set to 300. If the photos are going to be used larger in the book, be sure that the resolution is set to 400. If it’s going to be a dominant photo, set it to 600. 8. Click on the Scan button 9. When File Save Setting box opens, click on the choose button. Navigate to the folder where you want to save the photos (Usually Twister/Yearbook 2009/Digital Photos). 10. Type a common name in Prefix (for example: sports_ ballgame_). End with an underscore mark to separate it from the number 12. Reset the Start Number to 001. 11. Make sure Type is JPEG. 12. Click on OK. 13. When the scan is complete, click on the Close button. 14. Be sure to open the photos in Photoshop to make adjustments and clean scratches, etc.

—­26—


Fixing Problem Photographs Photo too dark

Before

1. Open the photo in Photoshop. 2. Open the Layers palette. 3. From the dropout menu, choose Duplicate Layer (or type Command-J). 4. At the top of the Layers palette, you will see a drop-down menu that reads Normal. Click on that menu and choose Screen. If the photo is still too dark, duplicate that layer again for as many times as it takes to get the photo the way you like it. Adjust opacity for minor adjustments (see NOTE). 5. Choose Flatten from the bottom of the Layers menu (or from the dropout menu). and Save As… the file into the appropriate folder.

After

Photo too light

Before

After

1. Open the photo in Photoshop. 2. Open the Layers palette. 3. From the dropout menu, choose Duplicate Layer (or type Command-J). 4. At the top of the Layers palette, you will see a drop-down menu that reads Normal. Click on that menu and choose Multiply. If the photo is still too light, duplicate that layer again for as many times as it takes to get the photo the way you like it. 5. Choose Flatten from the bottom of the Layers menu (or from the dropout menu). and Save As… the file into the appropriate folder.

NOTE: In both cases, either too dark or too light, you can make minor adjustments by playing with the opacity slider next to Screen or Multiply.

—­27—


Fixing Problem Photographs Bad Lighting

1. Open the photo in Photoshop. 2. Choose Image>Adjustments> Curves. 3. Click on the middle eyedropper icon the right side of the dialog box. 4. With the eyedropper tool, click any part of the photo that should be gray. Yes, GRAY. You should notice the change immediately. But keep clicking if the results are not good. 5. Click the Layer Adjustment icon at the bottom of the Layers palette and choose Hue/ Saturation. 6. Drag the saturation slider to the left to desaturate the colors. 7. If only one color is the problem (such as red), then choose Reds from the drop-down menu and desaturate it.

Before

After

—­28—


Fixing Problem Photographs Backlit Photo 1. Open the photo in Photoshop. 2. Choose Image>Adjustments> Shadow/Highlight… 3. When it opens, you will probably see an immediate change. 4. Move the Shadows Amount slider until the foreground object becomes visible. Be careful not to go too far. 5. The Highlights Amount should be set to 0 (zero). Before

After

—­29—


Layout Guidelines (Twister)

1. Apply a column plan (with YTO that’s usually 8 columns per page, as above). 2. Divide the spread into four quadrants as the examples above or below. 3. Reserve one quadrant, usually a smaller one, for the copy module (“First and 10” above). 4. Begin by designing from the inside and working outward, leaving white space on the outside of the spread. 5. Start with a dominant photo, probably located in the largest quadrant. Keep it near the center of the spread, as above. 6. Place a variety of photos (in shape and size) around it, keeping a one-pica distance between them. Photos should strictly align with columns.

eyeline

Quadrant design. In this design the eyeline is lower on the page, and the center gutter filled.

—­30—

7. In your first draft, do not run photos across quadrants. 8. Place captions on the outside corners created by the photo placement. Keep all captions, whenever possible, a consistent width. In the above spread, they are two columns wide.

8. Design the copy module, placing the head above the copy. Provide graphic interest to the module by incorporating photos, secondary heads, quotes, and other graphic elements. 9. Once completed, you may wish to use one of the photo boxes for a sidebar module (“TRUST ME…” box above).


Layout Guidelines (Crier) 6

Campus News

Friday, Sep. 30, 2008

theNewsrag

This is a quote to go in this box for additional info about the story.

Od tat vel dignisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, velismod molute feugue dio ea aciliquam, vel ut adit ullut duissim ilis accumsandre tatissit ad min heniatio er sed te consed magnim iure faccum ipit ullutpat illuptatin hendre mod modolor iure magna feum eliquam quis nim volent wismolortio eugiamc onullam, sustrud eseniam conulla feu faciduisis numsan ullan heniam iustisi eugue ting eui blan veliquat, suscillaore mincidunt laore vel utate tet vel do coreet, quipisl ut at. Ugue delis ate dit lut luptat. Ut diamet, sit nismodo odiamet utem dolesse feummy nulputa tumsan et, quisi ea feugait ercilla faciliq uiscipsum zzrit auguerosto odit ing ea feu faccumsandit prat. Um nonullan hent diam endiat amet, quipisi. faccumsan vulputat ad dolore magnim do ent prat. Pit augait ad dolortie vullaorer se tem zzrilit ing er illa faccum dolut aut at ullam quis duisissim aut wissit utate dit la faccum zzrit aliquiscilis nulla facipit nullan henibh esecte doloreet aliquate dolute minibh ent illuptatie dolore eliqui esecte tat illumsan vullam vulla commy num aliquisl diatiscidunt laorem zzrilit, consectem nisi. Lumsan ver iure veliqua tionsed dolorpe rostrud tem aliquat, veliquat. Um zzrit praessi. Equisci blandre tisim zzrit, con vel dolobore tat acipit il utpat utatuer susto euguer inibh eugiam, sustrud er si te minibh et prat ulput luptat.

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Headline for a related sidebar story Od tat vel dignisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, sandre tatissit ad min heniatio er sed te consed magnim iure faccum ipit ullutpat illuptatin hendre mod modolor iure magna feum eliquam quis nim volent

wismolortio eugiamc onullam, sustrud eseniam conulla feu faciuptat. Ut diamet, sit nismodo odiamet utem dolesse feummy nulputa tumsan et, quisi ea feugait ercilla faciliq uiscipsum zzrit auguerosto odit ing ea feu faccumsandit prat. Um nonullan hent diam endiat amet, quipisi. Idunt lumsandre eugiamet ilet aliquate dolute minibh ent

illuptatie dolore eliqui esecte tat illumsan vullam vulla commy num aliquisl diatiscidunt laorem zzrilit, consectem nisi. Lumsan ver iure veliqua tionsed dolorpe rostrud tem aliquat, veliquat. Um zzrit praessi. Equisci blandusto euguer inibh eugiam, sustrud er si te minibh et prat ulput luptat.

Hent ullutpat nostinis nonse mod etue magnim iriurer senisis ex eugait velesse feum vel eraessent ullam, quip exero consequ ipsustie dolortio dolore mod tie magna facipissisit vent ullutat lametum quipisi. senisis ex eugait velesse feum vel eraessent ullam, quip exero consequ ipsustie dol velesse feum vel eraessent

Final Layout. The yellow shape represents artwork or a cut-out photograph. A blue screened box was used behind the large quadrant to pull the pieces together. 6 Od tat vel dig

nisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, velismod molute feugue dio ea aciliquam, vel ut adit ullut duissim ilis accumsandre tatissit ad min heniatio er

Headline for another story in this module Onim do ent prat. Pit augait ad dolortie vullaorer se tem zzrilit ing er illa faccum dolut aut at ullam quis duisissim aut wissit utate dit la faccum zzrit aliquiscilis nulla facipit nullan henibh esecte doloreet aliquate dolute minibh ent illuptatie dolore eliqui esecte tat illumsan vullam vulla commy num aliquisl diatiscidunt laorem zzrilit, consectem nisi. Lumsan ver iure veliqua tionsed Um zzrit praessi. Equisci

blandre tisim zzrit, con vel dolobore tat acipit il utpat utatuer susto euguer inibh eugiam, sustrud er si te minibh et prat ulput luptat. Hent ullutpat nostinis nonse mod etue magnim iriurer senisis ex eugait velesse feum vel eraessent ull am, quip exero consequ ipsustie dolortio dolore mod tie magna facipissisit vent ullutat lametum quipisi. vent ullutat lametum quipisi. vent ullutat lametum quipisi.

Od tat vel dig

nisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, velismod molute feugue dio ea aciliquam, vel ut adit ullut duissim ilis accumsandre tatissit ad min heniatio er

1. Apply a column plan (usually 12 columns per page, as above). 2. Divide the spread into four quadrants as in the example above. 3. Devote each quadrant to one story with a headline leading into the story. The higher and larger the quadrant is on the page, the larger the headline must be. 4. For large in-depth stories, two adjacent quadrants may be combined to form one large module. 5. Other related sidebars should also be included in the quadrant with the main story. Note how a screened box was

theNewsrag

This is a quote to go in this box for additional info about the story.

Od tat vel dignisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, velismod molute feugue dio ea aciliquam, vel ut adit ullut duissim ilis accumsandre tatissit ad min heniatio er sed te consed magnim iure faccum ipit ullutpat illuptatin hendre mod modolor iure magna feum eliquam quis nim volent wismolortio eugiamc onullam, sustrud eseniam conulla feu faciduisis numsan ullan heniam iustisi eugue ting eui blan veliquat, suscillaore mincidunt laore vel utate tet vel do coreet, quipisl ut at. Ugue delis ate dit lut luptat. Ut diamet, sit nismodo odiamet utem dolesse feummy nulputa tumsan et, quisi ea feugait ercilla faciliq uiscipsum zzrit auguerosto odit ing ea feu faccumsandit prat. Um nonullan hent diam endiat amet, quipisi. faccumsan vulputat ad dolore magnim do ent prat. Pit augait ad dolortie vullaorer se tem zzrilit ing er illa faccum dolut aut at ullam quis duisissim aut wissit utate dit la faccum zzrit aliquiscilis nulla facipit nullan henibh esecte doloreet aliquate dolute minibh ent illuptatie dolore eliqui esecte tat illumsan vullam vulla commy num aliquisl diatiscidunt laorem zzrilit, consectem nisi. Lumsan ver iure veliqua tionsed dolorpe rostrud tem aliquat, veliquat. Um zzrit praessi. Equisci blandre tisim zzrit, con vel dolobore tat acipit il utpat utatuer susto

euguer inibh eugiam, sustrud er si te minibh et prat ulput luptat. Hent ullutpat nostinis nonse mod etue magnim iriurer senisis ex eugait velesse feum vel eraessent ullam, quip exero consequ ipsustie dolortio dolore mod tie magna facipissisit vent ullutat lametum quipisi.Idunt estinisim ametumm odolore eu feuip eliquip suscin utpat. Acip essi blandre ming etue mod eugiamet, quisiscipit ad minci euguero commy nulla core tet velissim quatismolor irit accum zzrit dolobore et, velisi. Agna feu feum velestissis enim ad delestrud eraessequis doluptat, suscin henim zzrit augiam, consequi tiscill andiam, commodolore magnaFaci tet laore consenisit pratue venim iliscidunt nullam, veliquat alisl ut ing ea facinim volore tionsecte cor ip erciniam in henit niamet nim doloreeliqui esecte tat illumsan vullam vulla commy num aliquisl diatiscidunt laorem zzrilit, consectem nisi. Lumsan ver iure veliqua tionsed dolorpe rostrud tem aliquat, veliquat. Um zzrit praessi. Equisci blandre tisim zzrit, con vel dolobore tat acipit il utpam zzrit praessi. Equisci blandre tisim mod eugiamet, quisiscipit ad minci euguero commy nulla core tet velissim quatismolor irit accum zzrit dolobore et, velisi. Agna feu feum velestissis enim ad delestrud eraessequis doluptat, suscin henim zzrit augiam, consequi tiscill andiam, commodolore magnaFaci tet laore consenisit pratue venim iliscidunt nullam, veliquat m, consequi tiscill andiam, commodolore magnaFaci tet laore consenisit pratue venim

Headline for a related sidebar story Od tat vel dignisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, sandre tatissit ad min heniatio er sed te consed magnim iure faccum ipit ullutpat illuptatin hendre mod modolor iure magna feum eliquam quis nim volent

wismolortio eugiamc onullam, sustrud eseniam conulla feu faciuptat. Ut diamet, sit nismodo odiamet utem dolesse feummy nulputa tumsan et, quisi ea feugait ercilla faciliq uiscipsum zzrit auguerosto odit ing ea feu faccumsandit prat. Um nonullan hent diam endiat amet, quipisi. Idunt lumsandre eugiamet ilet aliquate dolute minibh

ent illuptatie dolore eliqui esecte tat illumsan vullam vulla commy num aliquisl diatiscidunt laorem zzrilit, consectem nisi. Lumsan ver iure veliqua tionsed dolorpe rostrud tem aliquat, veliquat. Um zzrit praessi. Equisci blandusto euguer inibh eugiam, sustrud er si te minibh et prat ulput luptat.

nisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, velismod molute feugue dio ea aciliquam, vel ut adit ullut duissim ilis accumsandre tatissit ad min heniatio er

Headline for this module goes in this small space Od tat vel dignisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ulluore ut at. Ugue delis ate dit lut luptat. Ut diamet, sit nismodo odiamet utem dolesse feummy nulputa tumsan et, quisi ea feugait ercilla faciliq uiscipsum zzrit auguerosto odit ing ea feu faccumsandit prat. Um nonullan hent diam endiat amet, quipisi. Idunt lumsandre eugiamet il duverit euguerilla feuis ad eliquisi ercipsuscin vent nullaore feu faccumsan vulputat ad dolore magnim do ent prat. Pit augait ad dolortie vullaorer se tem zzrilit ing er illa faccum

dolut aut at ullam quism zzrit aliquiscilis nulla facipit nullan henibh sl diatiscidunt laorem zzrilit, consectem nisi. Lumsan ver iure veliqua tionsed dolorpe rostrud tem aliquat, veliquat. Um zzrit praessi. Equisci blandre tisim zzrit, con vel dolobtrud er si te minibh et prat ulput luptat. Hent ullutpat nostinis nonse mod etue magnim iriurer senisis ex eugait velesse feum vel eraessent ullam, quip exero consequ ipsustie dolortio dolore mod tie magna facipissisit vent ullutat lametum quipisi.zrit auguerosto odit ing ea.

Hent ullutpat nostinis nonse mod etue magnim iriurer senisis ex eugait velesse feum vel eraessent ullam, quip exero consequ ipsustie dolortio dolore mod tie magna facipissisit vent ullutat lametum quipisi. senisis ex eugait velesse feum vel eraessent ullam, quip exero consequ ipsustie dol velesse feum vel eraessent

Od tat vel dig

nisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, velismod molute feugue dio ea aciliquam, vel ut adit ullut duissim ilis accumsandre tatissit ad min heniatio er

Headline for another story in this module Onim do ent prat. Pit augait ad dolortie vullaorer se tem zzrilit ing er illa faccum dolut aut at ullam quis duisissim aut wissit utate dit la faccum zzrit aliquiscilis nulla facipit nullan henibh esecte doloreet aliquate dolute minibh ent illuptatie dolore eliqui esecte tat illumsan vullam vulla commy num aliquisl diatiscidunt laorem zzrilit, consectem nisi. Lumsan ver iure veliqua tionsed Um zzrit praessi. Equisci

blandre tisim zzrit, con vel dolobore tat acipit il utpat utatuer susto euguer inibh eugiam, sustrud er si te minibh et prat ulput luptat. Hent ullutpat nostinis nonse mod etue magnim iriurer senisis ex eugait velesse feum vel eraessent ull am, quip exero consequ ipsustie dolortio dolore mod tie magna facipissisit vent ullutat lametum quipisi. vent ullutat lametum quipisi. vent ullutat lametum quipisi.

Headline for the module goes here

Od tat vel dig

Quadrant 4

Quadrant 3

Headline for the module goes here Od tat vel dignisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, velismod molute feugue dio ea aciliquam, vel ut adit ullut cillaore mincidunt laore vel utate tet vel do coreet, quipisl ut at. Ugue delis ate dit lut luptat. Ut diamet, sit nismodo odiamet utem dolesse feummy nulputa tumsan et, quisi ea feugait ercilla faciliq uiscipsum zzrit auguerosto odit ing ea feu faccumsandit prat. Um nonullan hent diam endiat amet, quipisi. Idunt lumsandre eugiamet il dunt nullaor sum augiamet, velese dolorem irit lutat. Ut nonsectet, quipismod magniam consecte faccum volor sent lore tat la facidunt eliquissi bla corer sim verit euguerilla feuis ad eliquisi ercipsuscin vent nullaore feu faccumsan vulputat ad dolore magnim do ent prat. Pit augait ad dolortie vullaorer se tem zzrilit ing er illa faccum dolut aut at ullam quis duisissim aut wissit utate dit la faccum zzrit aliquiscilis nulla facipit nullan henibh esecte doloreet aliquate dolute minibh ent illuptatie dolore eliqui esecte tat illumsan vullam vulla commy num aliquisl diatiscidunt laorem zzrilit, consectem nisi. Lumsan ver iure veliqua tionsed dolorpe rostrud tem aliquat, veliquat. Um zzrit praessi. Equisci blandre tisim zzrit, con vel dolobore tat acipit il utpat utatuer susto euguer inibh eugiam, sustrud er si te minibh et prat ulput luptat. Hent ullutpat nostinis nonse mod etue magnim iriurer senisis ex eugait velesse feum vel eraessent ullam, quip exero consequ ipsustie dolortio dolore mod tie magna facipissisit vent ullutat lametum quipisi.ssim aut wissit utate dit la faccum zzrit aliquiscilis nulla facipit nullan henibh esecte doloreet aliquate

Campus News

Friday, Sep. 30, 2008

Second head will go in this place and fill up space

Quadrant 2

Quadrant 1

Second head will go in this place and fill up space

Od tat vel dig

nisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, velismod molute feugue dio ea aciliquam, vel ut adit ullut duissim ilis accumsandre tatissit ad min heniatio er

placed behind the Quadrant 1 on the final page layout to pull all the pieces together. 6. Work to include a photo or other related graphics inside the quadrant as well. 7. Use secondary heads and quotes to provide quick reader information and to add visual appeal. 8. All elements on the spread should carefully follow the column plan, starting and stopping inside column lines. 9. Place captions either under the photo or in the outside column(s) in the module.

Od tat vel dignisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, velismod molute feugue dio ea aciliquam, vel ut adit ullut cillaore mincidunt laore vel utate tet vel do coreet, quipisl ut at. Ugue delis ate dit lut luptat. Ut diamet, sit nismodo odiamet utem dolesse feummy nulputa tumsan et, quisi ea feugait ercilla faciliq uiscipsum zzrit auguerosto odit ing ea feu faccumsandit prat. Um nonullan hent diam endiat amet, quipisi. Idunt lumsandre eugiamet il dunt nullaor sum augiamet, velese dolorem irit lutat. Ut nonsectet, quipismod magniam consecte faccum volor sent lore tat la facidunt eliquissi bla corer sim verit euguerilla feuis ad eliquisi ercipsuscin vent nullaore feu faccumsan vulputat ad dolore magnim do ent prat. Pit augait ad dolortie vullaorer se tem zzrilit ing er illa faccum dolut aut at ullam quis duisissim aut wissit utate dit la faccum zzrit aliquiscilis nulla facipit nullan henibh esecte doloreet aliquate dolute minibh ent illuptatie dolore eliqui esecte tat illumsan vullam vulla commy num aliquisl diatiscidunt laorem zzrilit, consectem nisi. Lumsan ver iure veliqua tionsed dolorpe rostrud tem aliquat, veliquat. Um zzrit praessi. Equisci blandre tisim zzrit, con vel dolobore tat acipit il utpat utatuer susto euguer inibh eugiam, sustrud er si te minibh et prat ulput luptat. Hent ullutpat nostinis nonse mod etue magnim iriurer senisis ex eugait velesse feum vel eraessent ullam, quip exero consequ ipsustie dolortio dolore mod tie magna facipissisit vent ullutat lametum quipisi.ssim aut wissit utate dit la faccum zzrit aliquiscilis nulla facipit nullan henibh esecte doloreet aliquate

Od tat vel dig

nisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, velismod molute feugue dio ea aciliquam, vel ut adit ullut duissim ilis accumsandre tatissit ad min heniatio er

Headline for this module goes in this small space Od tat vel dignisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ulluore ut at. Ugue delis ate dit lut luptat. Ut diamet, sit nismodo odiamet utem dolesse feummy nulputa tumsan et, quisi ea feugait ercilla faciliq uiscipsum zzrit auguerosto odit ing ea feu faccumsandit prat. Um nonullan hent diam endiat amet, quipisi. Idunt lumsandre eugiamet il duverit euguerilla feuis ad eliquisi ercipsuscin vent nullaore feu faccumsan vulputat ad dolore magnim do ent prat. Pit augait ad dolortie vullaorer se tem zzrilit ing er illa faccum

dolut aut at ullam quism zzrit aliquiscilis nulla facipit nullan henibh sl diatiscidunt laorem zzrilit, consectem nisi. Lumsan ver iure veliqua tionsed dolorpe rostrud tem aliquat, veliquat. Um zzrit praessi. Equisci blandre tisim zzrit, con vel dolobtrud er si te minibh et prat ulput luptat. Hent ullutpat nostinis nonse mod etue magnim iriurer senisis ex eugait velesse feum vel eraessent ullam, quip exero consequ ipsustie dolortio dolore mod tie magna facipissisit vent ullutat lametum quipisi.zrit auguerosto odit ing ea.

Od tat vel dig nisc iliquip suscilla atisl duissecte mod magniam ero exero ex ercin ullum volore faci essisl iustisci bla feu facidunt ver iusto euguer autem qui eraese consequis dit la am, velismod molute feugue dio ea aciliquam, vel ut adit ullut duissim ilis accumsandre tatissit ad min heniatio er

Caption placement. Besides under the photo, captions may be placed in the outside margins of the module.

—­31—


—­32—


Crier

Page 1 Stories

Art/Photos

Notes

Art/Photos

Notes

Art/Photos

Notes

Art/Photos

Notes

Page Planner Issue: Date: Pages:

Pages 2-3 Stories

Pages 4-5 Stories

Pages 6-7 Stories


Page 8-9 Stories

Art/Photos

Notes

Art/Photos

Notes

Art/Photos

Notes

Art/Photos

Notes

Pages 10-11 Stories

Pages 12-13 Stories

Pages 14-15 Stories


Page 16-17 Stories

Art/Photos

Notes

Art/Photos

Notes

Art/Photos

Notes

Pages 18-19 Stories

Pages 20 Stories


Crier

News

Assignment Sheet

Issue: Date: Notes:

Features

Opinions

Sports

Entertaiment

Other

Page

Assigned to

Date Due

Date In


CRIER Newspaper Casady School, 9500 N. Pennsylvania, Oklahoma City, OK 73120 • Phone: (405) 749-3161 • www.casady.org

2010-11

2009-10 APPLICATION: The Crier staff is open to all Upper Division students. Name: _________________________________________________________________ Grade for 2010-11: __________________ Phone:_______________________________ Email: _______________________________________________________________

Please choose your TOP THREE CHOICES with a 1, 2 and 3.

 Editor-in Chief*  Managing Editor*  News Editor  Features Editor  Sports Editor

 Entertainment Editor  Opinions Editor  Photography Editor  News writer  Sports writer

 Features writer  Photographer  Graphic Artist  Cartoonist  Other:________________

Please explain any experiences or skills you have that qualify you for the choices above. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ If you were on the staff last year, please list three (3) assignments that were printed in the Crier. (Stories, photos, art). 1: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 3: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Do you have experience with Adobe InDesign? __________ If yes, please explain. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Do you have experience with Photoshop? __________ If yes, please explain. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ What major activities (plays, sports, clubs, etc.) will you be involved in during the year? ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ If you would be willing to enroll in Independent Study for one or more trimesters, please indicate which one(s): Fall Winter Spring

Please return this application to Mr Effinger in the Pub Lab of the Harper Wing. * If you are applying for Editor-in-Chief or Managing Editor, please also provide recommendation forms to your adviser and one classroom teacher.


TWISTER Yearbook Casady School, 9500 N. Pennsylvania, Oklahoma City, OK 73120 • Phone: (405) 749-3161 • www.casady.org

2011

2009-10 APPLICATION: The Twister staff is open to all Upper Division students. Name: _________________________________________________________________ Grade for 2010-11: __________________ Phone:_______________________________ Email: _______________________________________________________________

Please choose your TOP THREE CHOICES with a 1, 2 and 3.

 Editor-in Chief*  Managing Editor*  Student Life Editor  Academics Editor  Sports Editor

 Clubs Editor  People Editor  Seniors Editor  Student Life Staff  Academics Staff

 Sports Staff  Clubs Staff  People Staff  Photographer  Other:________________

Please explain any experiences or skills you have that qualify you for the choices above. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ If you were on the staff last year, please list three (3) spreads that you designed, wrote copy for, or took photos for. 1: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 3: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Do you have experience with Adobe InDesign or Yeartech Online? __________ If yes, please explain. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Do you have experience with Photoshop? __________ If yes, please explain. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ What major activities (plays, sports, clubs, etc.) will you be involved in during the year? ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ If you would be willing to enroll in Independent Study for one or more trimesters, please indicate which one(s): Fall Winter Spring

Please return this application to Mr Effinger in the Pub Lab of the Harper Wing. * If you are applying for Editor-in-Chief or Managing Editor, please also provide recommendation forms to your adviser and one classroom teacher.


Casady School, 9500 N. Pennsylvania, Oklahoma City, OK 73120 • Phone: (405) 749-3161 • Fax: (405) 749-3239 • www.casady.org

Advertising Contract Advertiser Information Advertiser _________________________________________________________________________________ Owner/Manager ____________________________________________________________________________ Address___________________________________________________________________________________ City _______________________________________ Zip _______________ Phone ______________________ E-mail ____________________________________________________________________________________ Ad sold by _____________________________________________ Date ______________________________ Sizes & Rates

£ Full Page: $175 BW, $250 COLOR (10 x 15.25 inches) £ Half Page Horizontal: $90 (10 x 7.5 inches) £ Half Page Vertical: $90 (5 x 15.25 inches)

£ Quarter Page: $55 Horizontal (10 x 3.75 inches) £ Quarter page Vertical: $55 (5 x 7.5 inches) £ Eighth Page: $30 (5 x 3.75 inches)

Publication Dates

£ £ £

£ Issue 2: _________________________ £ Issue 4: _________________________ £ Issue 6: _________________________

Issue 1: _________________________ Issue 3: _________________________ Issue 5: _________________________

P The deadline for all copy is 7 days prior to publication date. P 5% discount on ads paid in advance (not billed) P 10% discount on ads placed in three or more consecutive issues. £ Camera ready ad will be provided by advertiser. £ Ad will be prepared by the Crier staff. (Use back of this sheet to sketch ad.) Total Amount Due: ________________

£ Paid in full

£ Bill Later

I hereby authorize the insertion of the above ad(s) in the Pirate Log newspaper. Signed________________________________________ Position ______________________Date __________


Casady Publications Staff Manual