Issuu on Google+

ANNUAL REPORT 2010 A New Way of Doing Business

Bidding Farewell to an Ironworker Icon...

Joseph J. Hunt

Bill Brown and Joe Hunt


A New Way of Doing Business

PDM Bridge Fabrication Shop.

CONTENTS

1 2 3 4 6 14 20 21 26 28 30 34 43 47 48 53

Message from the Co-Chairs Message from the CEO Board of Trustees Financial Overview

The Ironworker Management Progressive Action Cooperative Trust was formed in 2003 under Section 302(c)(9) of the Labor-Management Relations (Taft-Hartley) Act. IMPACT is a non-profit, tax-exempt labormanagement trust under Section 501 (c) of the Internal Revenue Code.

Regional Advisory Boards Labor Management Conference National Substance Abuse Program Safety and Health Communications and Marketing Information Technology Green Technology Education and Training Industry Conferences Davis-Bacon Membership 2011 Looking Ahead Follow IMPACT on www.impact-net.org &

The primary mission of IMPACT is to expand job opportunities for union ironworkers and their signatory contractors through progressive and innovative labor-management programs, training and safety. IMPACT is governed by a 22-member Board of Trustees. Each of IMPACT’s 10 regions is represented by one labor trustee and one management trustee.


MESSAGE FROM THE CO-CHAIRS

Ready to Rebound! When IMPACT was established in 2003 no one

Hopefully it comes as no surprise to anyone reading

could have anticipated the challenges we would

this that we launched a three part initiative high-

face as a result of the 2008 financial collapse. We

lighting our welding, rigging and signaling training

have been saddled with times that would test the

requirements in major publications throughout the

mettle of both Labor and Management. Indeed, we

industry. We continue to emphasize the need for

have seen our contractors struggle mightily. Many

journeymen to upgrade their skills in these slow

of our contractors find themselves working to win

times, and while doing this we must be boastful of

jobs with the slimmest of margins, or none at all.

the fact that all of our Ironworkers are prepared to

Too many Ironworkers sit on the bench watching

deliver value on the job. This is a measure that will

their health care and other benefits disappear. But

be to our advantage when markets rebound.

the economy will rebound and when it does we will

We want to take our industry to the next level. The

need every one of our contractors to take advantage

construction industry has widely accepted safety

and seize those opportunities. Indeed, we will need

as a standard. We have embraced drug testing to

new contractors and more ironworkers

ROAD RECOVERY

mitigate unnecessary accidents to

in order to double our market share. In 2010, our office has done everything in our power to

TO

our Ironworkers. Now, IMPACT has embarked on a mission to take the attitudes of our

tighten our belts and have been questioned on

apprentices and mold them to be the “rock stars”

numerous occasions as to how we are using our

of the construction industry. We see a day when

funds. These questions allow us to reexamine

contractors of all stripes, seek out union Ironworkers

how we choose to utilize our talent and resources

because they are the best; have the best attitudes

and help us to perform the healthy exercise of self

and are the safest and most productive.

evaluation. In addition to looking in the mirror it

This is another key element in doubling

has also, in these tough times, made us more aware

our market share. In November of 2010 we conducted

of how important our future growth has become.

another in a series of “Industry Events” where over

We live in a free society where our users always

700 apprentices were armed with a vision of the

have a choice. We must insure that our business

future where their Union and their contractors work

model is profitable, provides a good career for

hand-in-hand to create work opportunities.

union Ironworkers and is sought out by those who purchase our services. We must achieve an appeal to our customers on a gut level as well as the obvious financial level. A wise business leader once said, “People go where their emotional needs are met.” We must meet those needs in the construction marketplace to double our market share by producing the highest skilled, safe and drug free Ironworkers with the right attitudes and behaviors.

We have one singular goal: double our market share in the next ten years.

WALTER W. WISE

Labor Co-Chair, IMPACT & General President, Iron Workers International

Our goal is clear: double our market share in the next ten years. The hard work to achieve such a lofty goal has already begun. IMPACT, seven years ago, was merely a vision. Today, it is the vehicle that we drive to reach our goals by working together, Ironworker and contractor, as partners. Completing our mission will result in better and safer ironworking careers, and a source of pride in 2020 that in 2010 we stemmed the tide of

We are the best in the industry but if we fail to tell

decline for union Ironworkers and their contractors.

anyone then shame on us! To that end we continued

We rebounded from a financial crisis and seized an

our aggressive advertising and marketing campaign.

opportunity to grow!

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

WILLIAM W. BROWN

Management Co-Chair, IMPACT & President/CEO, Ben Hur Construction Co.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

1


MESSAGE FROM THE CEO

Farewell, Joe Hunt

Joe Hunt, Bill Brown and Eric Waterman at AGC in St. Louis, September 2010.

I would like to acknowledge and thank Joe Hunt for not only the formation of IMPACT, but for the opportunity to serve as the first CEO of IMPACT. It was Joe, who after having gone through contentious strikes back in his home local decided that there had to be a better way for Labor and Management to communicate their needs and wants, beyond the bargaining table. He understood that for our business model to succeed there needed to be constant communication between the two key parties and a plan for addressing matters that were of mutual concern. Joe began discussions with Bill Brown, President and CEO of Ben Hur Construction to create this new model. So, today we have IMPACT, the premier labormanagement organization in North America. When Joe took the reins of the Ironworkers he had his work cut out for him. The organization was reeling from a troubling scandal and the work of rebuilding its reputation was paramount. The choices were clear. He could retreat into the old and familiar or he could create a new model that chose to listen to all the players, big and small, to seek a new path forward that offered hope and a chance at great success. The Ironworkers and their contractors are in better stead today for his taking the more challenging route. This was no small feat. Ironworkers all have opinions and are more than willing to share them with you. Joe took his message on the road to local unions and contractor associations. He spoke with national organizations and employers of all sizes. He utilized the media to put forth a message that the Ironworkers were will business partners. And this took time and unceasing effort.

ERIC WATERMAN

Chief Executive Officer Ironworker Management Progressive Action Cooperative Trust (IMPACT)

2

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

IMPACT today has a Labor-Management infrastructure that includes ten Regional Advisory Boards (RABs). That sounds impressive, but the truly impressive aspect of the RAB’s is that they take the leadership of the Ironworkers and the leadership of the contractors in the region and bring them together on a regular basis to set regional priorities, harness the creativity of both labor and management to grow local markets and use financial resources at the grassroots level. The RAB meetings are

structured to not just talk about the problems facing our industry, but to develop solutions. Joe led the way to launch a program to insure that Ironworkers were not under the influence of drugs or alcohol when engaging in our very dangerous occupation. Joe and leadership of IMPACT provided the “tip of the spear” when organizations such as the Financial Accounting Standards Board sought to impose ill conceived financial reporting requirements that could have a devastating effect on our pension plans. Joe understood that even though issues were complex and foreboding that we had to evaluate them and face them together, shoulder to shoulder to defeat them. Joe Hunt embraced the idea that for the Ironworkers and our contractors to remain viable that a major shift in our attitudes would be necessary. It was Joe who took the podium to address thousands of apprentices around the country to tell them to pay attention to the message at our Industry Nights events. He reiterated that IMPACT was not a money grab or a program to cut wages and benefits. That IMPACT was not a way to dilute collective bargaining. But that IMPACT was the new model of labor-management relations to reclaim and grow our market share. Over the years, I have seen some General Presidents becomes comfortable and complacent after taking office. They sometimes get use to standing ovations and the legions of men and women seeking to shake hands and the special recognition. But I have had the privilege of having worked closely with Joe Hunt for the past seven years. What I have seen is a man humble enough to take advice and strong enough to implement a plan. Joe could have continued in the General President role for years to come, he’s in good health, with a sharp mind and good spirits. But he puts the needs of the Ironworkers ahead of mere vanity. He passes the torch to Walt Wise knowing that it the Ironworkers are in energetic and capable hands and that the foundation he built with IMPACT will be built upon, expanded and grown into even more new and innovative programs. I, along with thousands of contractors and thousands of Ironworkers salute you, Joe Hunt. We salute you for your selfless leadership, your vision and your ability to put ego aside and put your organization first. You are a rare man indeed. I wish you a long retirement that is filled with the satisfaction of a job well done!

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


BOARD OF TRUSTEES

IMPACT Board of Trustees The IMPACT Board consists of 22 trustees, which allows each of IMPACT’s 10 U.S. regions to be represented by one labor trustee and one management trustee.

Co-Chair Labor

Co-Chair Management

Walter W. Wise

William W. Brown

Region I Co-Chair Labor

Region I Co-Chair Management

Region II Co-Chair Labor

Region II Co-Chair Management

Jay Hurley

Carl A. Johnson

Edward C. McHugh

Joseph N. Merlino

Region III Co-Chair Labor

Region III Co-Chair Management

Region IV Co-Chair Labor

Region IV Co-Chair Management

George Kratzer

Donn R. Taylor

Eric Dean

Alissa Schneider

Region V Co-Chair Labor

Region V Co-Chair Management

Region VI Co-Chair Labor

Region VI Co-Chair Management

Richard J. Ward

Victor E. Cornellier

Marvin L. Ragsdale

John Bosworth

Region VII Co-Chair Labor

Region VII Co-Chair Management

Region VIII Co-Chair Labor

Region VIII Co-Chair Management

Gordon Struss

William Livingston

Matt Groskie

Jeff Green

Region IX Co-Chair Labor

Region IX Co-Chair Management

Region X Co-Chair Labor

Region X Co-Chair Management

Joe Standley

David W. McEuen

Ron Piksa

Jeff Ilenstine

President, Iron Workers District Council of the New England States

President,Iron Workers District Council of Southern Ohio & Vicinity

President, Iron Workers District Council of the Tennessee Valley & Vicinity

President, Iron Workers District Council of North Central States

President, Iron Workers District Council of the State of California & Vicinity

General President, Iron Workers International

President, The Berlin Steel Construction Company

President, Century Steel Erectors Company

President, TSI/Exterior Wall Systems

President, Quality Re-Steel, Inc.

President, California Erectors, Bay Area Inc.

President, Ben Hur Construction Co.

General Treasurer, Iron Workers International

General Secretary, Iron Workers International

President, Iron Workers District Council of Texas & Mid South

President, Iron Workers District Council of the Rocky Mountain Area

President, Iron Workers District Council of the Pacific Northwest

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

Vice President, Bayshore Rebar, Inc.

President, Danny’s Construction Company, Inc.

President, Bosworth Steel Erectors, Inc.

Chief Executive Officer, Davis Erection Company, Inc.

Vice President, Tri States Rebar, Inc.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

3


FINANCIAL OVERVIEW

Where Does My IMPACT Money Go?!? 25 THINGS YOU MIGHT NOT KNOW ABOUT IMPACT As an Ironworker or a Contractor, you may be asking, “What does IMPACT do?” The Ironworker Management Progressive Action Cooperative Trust (IMPACT) was founded in 2003 with one core mission:

More Jobs! More Ironworkers! More Contractors! More Customers!

IMPACT funds every Labor–

Did you know that your IMPACT contributions include all of this? 1

Management

u Development of all Training Materials, u The Annual Ironworkers Instructors

Training Program, and

initiative imaginable allowing our contractors and local unions to attack the market with joint force.

Fund the entire budget of the National Training Fund, including:

u The National Apprenticeship Competition.

20% of all contributions go back to your local IMPACT Regional Advisory Board to help fund existing labor-management programs and develop new programs to grow market share and get more work.

2

Make the National Ironworker Welding Certification free with no testing or recertification costs.

3

Fund the development of the Ironworker Foreman Training Program and the Ironworker Foreman Pocket Guide.

4

Fund the development of the new Iron worker General Foreman-Superintendent Training Package and Online Course.

5

6

Help fund the programs of the Department of Reinforcing Steel.

Give millions of dollars in local and regional marketing efforts around the country and advertising in national trade publications.

7

Fund dozens of new welding fume extrac tion systems and welding booths in local Apprenticeship schools around the country.

8

IMPACT Budget Training n RAB Grants n Marketing/Public Relations n IT/Online Programs n Safety Programs n Shop/Certification/Reinforcing Programs n Substance Abuse Program n National Office n Operating Expenses n Eastern Office n Midwest Office n Western Office n Davis-Bacon n RAB Meetings n

4

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


FINANCIAL OVERVIEW

BUILDING THRU UNITY World Trade Center Site Tour

IMPACT contributions work directly for the General President Joe Hunt signs column at World Trade Center.

Fund major infrastructure lobbying efforts around the country to get more work for Ironworkers and our employers.

9

Fund the national Ironworker Wind Turbine Training Program available to all local unions and our contractors.

Fund project tracking systems to assist local unions and our employers to identify new construction and maintenance projects and to capture more work.

17

10

18

Fund marketing and training programs for the Shop Department that help our signatory shops stay competitive and grow the number of signatory shops.

19

Have established the first Off the Job Accident Insurance Policy in the construction industry in pilot programs around the country.

21

11

12

13

Fund the development of the Green Con struction for Ironworkers training materials.

20

Fund the Ironworker Davis-Bacon Office.

Fund the purchase of Mobile Training Trailers around the country.

Fund the IMPACT Safety and Health Roundtable, which brings all the major organizations in the Ironworking trade together to address the major safety and health issues in our industry.

Fund the Ironworker Safety & Health Department.

24

Fund grant writing consultants who have secured almost $3 million in federal grants for the National Training Fund and local unions.

Help fund the National Coordinating Com mittee for Multi-Employer Plans (NCCMP) to fight for legislation to protect your pension plan.

23

15

Make the TWIC cards free to hundreds of Ironworkers around the country.

22

Fund a National Safety Insurance/Work Comp Program that develops Alliances with major insurance companies and helps our employers lower their second highest cost — Work Comp Insurance.

14

Help local unions establish or upgrade their WEB sites at no charge.

Fund lobbying and legislative efforts around the country to promote Collectively Bargained Work Comp.

10 IMPACT Regional Advisory Boards. Grant money is returned to the regions to fund a variety of labor-management programs. In 2010, IMPACT awarded over $4,406,960 in Block and Supplemental Grants. Since its inception, IMPACT has awarded over $14,147,066 in grants.

16

25

Fund legal efforts to protect the work jurisdiction of our Ironworker employers.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

5


REGIONAL ADVISORY BOARDS

Regional Advisory Boards 2010 Activities Each Regional Advisory Board (RAB) is administered by a joint Labor Management Executive Committee. These RABs are serviced by three full-time IMPACT Regional Directors: Kevin Byrnes on the East Coast, Chuck Decker in the Midwest and Steve Rank in the West. The Regional Directors work closely with the RAB Executive Committees, local contractors and local unions to insure the IMPACT programs are implemented in keeping with the standards laid out by the IMPACT Trustees. In addition, the Regional Directors provide outreach to local contractor associations, contractors, their customers and Iron Workers District Councils and local unions.

The RAB Executive Committees are instrumental in moving IMPACT programs forward, especially training, safety, insurance and drug testing.

6

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

IMPACT Regions

The Regional Directors also work diligently to insure that local contractors and Iron Workers representatives are aware of educational opportunities sponsored by IMPACT such as the North American Iron Workers/IMPACT Labor Management Conference and RAB meetings that are open to all interested parties. The RAB joint meetings provide a forum for the exchange of information between RAB’s and also a chance to reach a larger audience of local union representatives, contractors and our customers. In addition, these meeting carry a heavy education component where high profile programs of IMPACT are showcased and discussed. These meetings also tap into synergies that allow for the exploration of the creation of new programs and projects aimed at benefiting Ironworkers and their contractors.

XI

X

II

VII VIII

IV

IX VI

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

III V

I


REGIONAL ADVISORY BOARDS

RAB I New England District Council CO-CHAIRS Jay Hurley & Carl Johnson RAB I, in conjunction with the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD), has ramped up Harassment and Discrimination training classes this past year. It is the goal to have anyone wishing to act as “job steward” take part in these classes and earn the certificate of completion.

Details and educational classes for members and contractors will begin shortly to get this program up and running. Drug testing is not only a great way to relay to our customers that we are drug free, it also benefits our pension and health plans with less lost man hours due to absenteeism and drug and alcohol related health issues. Our contractors are seeing reduction in workman’s compensation costs due to insurance discounts for participating in the drug testing program. This year, RAB I has seen a dramatic reduction

RAB I Executive Council Meeting.

in work hours due to the economic recession. RAB I Executive Council Meeting.

With high unemployment, many locals are using this time wisely, holding various classes in OSHA

IMPACT, following the lead of RAB I, has met

10 & 30 hour, foreman train-

with the Federal Equal Employment Opportunity

ing, wind turbine training,

Commission in Washington to take this training

scaffold training, and welding

on a National level. Far too many of our contrac-

updates and certifications.

tors and locals are involved in time consuming

This training will prove

and costly litigation. It is our goal to promote a workplace for all Ironworkers that is free of harassment and discrimination.

valuable when work returns. The Column, RAB I’s newslet-

RAB I MAJOR GRANT ACTIVITY u Edward M. Kennedy Institute u Quarterly Newsletter for the

New England States u Anti Discrimination Training u Website Maintenance

ter, continues to set the mark. With its informative

IMPACT Drug testing, already underway in

articles, jobsite photos, political discourse, and

Connecticut, is slated to be implemented within the

overall content, contractors and members find value

geographic jurisdiction of Local Union 7 in 2011.

in this quarterly publication.

Christopher Burger Presents at RAB I Executive Council Meeting.

RAB I Executive Council Meeting.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

7


REGIONAL ADVISORY BOARDS

RAB II District Councils of New York, Northern New Jersey, and Philadelphia and Vicinity CO-CHAIRS Edward McHugh & Joe Merlino RAB II continues to fund many marketing programs throughout its region. Local Union 361’s mobile billboard truck has logged many miles promoting the Union Ironworker in the New York City. Radio adds,

RAB II MAJOR GRANT ACTIVITY u National September 11

Museum u Quarterly Newsletter for Northern New Jersey u TWIC Card Reimbursements u Welding Equipment Upgrades u New York Labor News 2010 Campaign u Lobbying Campaign for On-Time Payment and Work Opportunities

billboards, newsletters, and brochures promoting the

IMPACT Eastern Regional Director, the course covered rules and regulations pertaining to OSHA’s Sub-Part “R,” steel erection. This type of relationship that IMPACT has developed with area OSHA offices across the nation has proven to be invaluable to our contractors and members.

skills, productivity, training, and benefits of being a

Our General officers and IMPACT directors contin-

Union Ironworker and our quality contractors have

ually meet for open dialogue and rulemaking with

all proven beneficial in helping secure work.

federal OSHA, reinforcing a common goal of clearly

Many local unions in RAB II, aided by IMPACT grants, have been updating their training facilities, computer systems, and weld shops to insure their journeymen and apprentices are training on the latest equipment. Locals 40 & 361’s training facility recently hosted a 2 day training seminar with OSHA compliance officers from New York and New Jersey. Arranged and conducted by IMPACT’s Western Regional Director Steve Rank and Kevin Byrnes,

defined best practices safety rules for our Industry. We are currently in talks with OSHA to implement written rules for the installation of reinforcing steel. IMPACT grants have also been used to fund lobbyists’ efforts to secure projects that put Ironworkers and their contractors to work. Legislation that promotes labor friendly laws, responsible contracting, prevailing rate, and project labor agreements are under constant attack.

Iron Workers and IMPACT Orchestrate “Rebuilding Through Unity” at the World Trade Center On September 2, 2010, the Iron Workers Inter-

Iron Workers International, Walt Wise, general

national and IMPACT in conjunction with Chartis,

Secretary, Iron Workers International, Ed McHugh,

Silverstein Properties, the Port Authority of

General Treasurer, Iron Workers International,

New York and New Jersey and the Occupational

and Eric Waterman, CEO, IMPACT.

Safety and Health Administration hosted a special event at the New York City World Trade Center to commit to achieving outstanding safety performance.

Pictured (left to right) are Steve Plate, President Joe Hunt, Dr. David Michael and Dan Conway.

President Hunt addressed the gathering, saying “I am very proud of the many Ironworkers who first built the World Trade Center in the 1960’s, the heroic Ironworkers who worked tirelessly on September 11, 2001, to rescue innocent Americans and remove mountains of twisted steel during the clean-up efforts, and the dedicated Ironworkers who are working now to rebuild this historic project.

Before the event, a site

In view of the series of catastrophic construction

tour was conducted

accidents that claimed the lives of workers on

for special guests including Dan Conway, President

projects here in New York and throughout

of Construction Risk Management and Surety for

the country, I challenge all of us in the spirit of

Chartis, Dr. David Michaels, Assistant Secretary

Rebuilding Through Unity, that we can do better.”

of Labor, OSHA, Joseph Hunt, General President,

8

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


REGIONAL ADVISORY BOARDS

RAB III District Council of Northern Ohio, Western Pennsylvania, Northern West Virginia and Southern Ohio CO-CHAIRS George Kratzer & Donn Taylor RAB III has put marketing programs in most local unions on hold, and has recently been concentrating on training initiatives. OSHA 10 & 30 hour classes, foreman training, scaffold training, and welding updates and certifications have taken precedence. A Mobile Training Trailer was purchased and equipped to address the need to bring training to our members in hard to reach areas. RAB III has formed Labor/Management groups, as we have found that when we approach customers as Labor and Management together, presenting our journeymen and apprentice training, safety programs, drug testing, and Standards of Excellence in a business-like, organized, and professional format, relationships are formed that secure more work for our members and contractors. RAB III has utilized grants to improve and update training classrooms, and to purchase and update smoke extraction systems, welding machines, tower

training, long distance learning equipment, and new computer technology. Local Union 3 in Pittsburgh, through an IMPACT grant, has continued its marketing programs, educating owners and the public on the training, skills, safety programs, and career opportunities that Union Ironworkers and our contractors provide. An IMPACT grant also assisted in a Safety & Health grant in the Cleveland local, which was used to promote Health screening for the members and their families. With the ever increasing cost of health care, this is a valuable tool to detect early diseases and health issues before they became a major health issue. IMPACT and the regional contractor association met with area contractors and owners to discuss the programs and services we can provide and how we can bring cost savings and value to their projects. RAB III utilized the Wind Turbine training program. High rescue training and bolt torque certificates were given to those participants through the grant we received.

RAB III MAJOR GRANT ACTIVITY u Marketing Program for the

Pittsburgh Area u Mobile Training Trailer u Labor-Management Initiative u Welding Equipment Upgrades u Safety and Health Grant for Cardiovascular Screening

RAB IV MAJOR GRANT ACTIVITY u TWIC Card Reimbursements

RAB IV St. Louis & Chicago District Councils

u OSHA 30 Instruction u OSHA Training Welding,

Post Tensioning u Welding Booths with Related

CO-CHAIRS Eric Dean & Alissa Schneider RAB IV activities focused heavily on training in the midst of slow economic times. With the assistance of IMPACT local unions were busy with welding certifications, OSHA 30, and post tensioning certifications. In that same vein the Chicago District Council will sponsor a Foreman Training session in the spring of 2011. RAB IV funded much needed welding materials for Local Union 112 in Peoria. In addition, Joliet, Illinois was the site of a RAB IV General Meeting

Equipment August 20 that allowed Local Union 444 to showcase u Lobbying Campaign for its apprentice competition as well as its new wind turSt. Louis Area Metro Expansion bine equipment. As part of the Federal Wind Turbine Grant, obtained through the efforts of IMPACT, and awarded by the Department of Labor, Local Union Co-Chairs Alissa Schneider of Danny’s 444 is one of five locals set up to provide specialConstruction (top left) and Eric Dean, President of Chicago District Council ized training for Tower Climbing/High Angle Rescue, address the RAB Delegates in Joliet, IL. Electronic Torque, Hydraulic Torque, and Mechanical Torque. These Certifications RAB IV Delegates assembled in Joliet, IL, are necessary for the intrifor an Executive Committee Meeting. cate parts of Wind Turbine Erection, and this training is now up and running.

Journeyman upgrade activities were the focus of three IMPACT grants in the Saint Louis area.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

9


REGIONAL ADVISORY BOARDS

RAB V District Council of the Mid-Atlantis States; the Southeast District Council and the Tennessee Valley District Council CO-CHAIRS Walter Wise & Victor Cornellier

RAB V MAJOR GRANT ACTIVITY u TWIC Card Reimbursements u Welding Equipment for Training

Facility u Quarterly Newsletter for Washington DC area u Facility Improvements at Local Union 201, Washington DC u Funding for Satellite Training Facility in Augusta, GA

RAB V experienced a slowdown in work due to the poor economy. During this time, many locals concentrated their time and efforts on OSHA 10 & 30 hour classes, foreman training, scaffold training, and specialty welding processes including dual shielded and therma weld processes. Computer equipment was purchased and members will be trained on it, as many jobsites now have computer tests and safety training that can only be done on site with computers. Training classrooms, welding machines, bandsaws and layout equipment were purchased to ensure that our members have the latest technology to fine tune their skills. IMPACT assisted our contractors in obtaining AISC certifications, providing professionals to assist them in the process. Green training and LEED assistance was also provided, as jobsites and contractors are now required to have these on green designated projects.

Mobile Training Trailers were purchased and outfitted in order to bring training to the vast area RAB V has to cover. Local Union 708 in Mobile, Alabama, recently took their training trailer to a large state fair where over 7,000 people were given a hands on demonstration on the training, skills, and career opportunities the Ironworkers can provide. IMPACT, working with the Florida shop fabricator PDM Bridge, provided Drug testing to all its employees. PDM and the Southern Company in RAB V are currently utilizing IMPACT programs and training. IMPACT will assist in subsidizing a well organized plan, spearheaded by the Ironworkers, to promote the use of Union contractors, state certified apprentice programs, and local resident clauses to secure work for our members and contractors on a large transportation project in Florida. Forming coalitions with community organizations, veterans groups, and minority organizations, the Ironworkers and IMPACT are leading the fight to make this job a reality.

RAB VI MAJOR GRANT ACTIVITY u TWIC Card Reimbursements u Regional Marketing and

Advertising Campaign u OSHA Instruction u Workers Assistance Program u Equipment for Training Facility at Local Union 48, Oklahoma City, OK

Joint meeting keynote speakers included Mark Breslin (above); Robert Powers of the Nuclear Energy Institute; Mitch Landrieu, Mayor of New Orleans; and RAB Co-Chairs, Walter Wise, General Secretary of the Iron Workers International, Vic Cornellier, President of TSI/Exterior Wall Systems, John Bosworth, President of Bosworth Steel Erectors, and Marvin Ragsdale, 9th General Vice-President of the Iron Workers International. Dorinda Folse (right), OSHA Area Director explains the OSHA Training Partnership.

10

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

RAB VI Texas & the Mid-South District Council CO-CHAIRS Marvin Ragsdale & John Bosworth RAB VI used IMPACT resources to upgrade welding ventilation systems at Local Union 84 in Houston and Local Union 135 in Galveston. Funding to upgrade welding certifications was granted to Local Union 48 in Oklahoma City and Local Union 548 in Tulsa. MDS Advertising, working on behalf of RAB VI, has developed a comprehensive marketing, branding and advertising program. RAB VI followed IMPACT protocol and named a Drug Testing Sub-Committee recently, and it is looking at ways to improve on what is being used in the Greater Texas/Louisiana area. In November, RAB V & VI held a joint meeting that was very well attended. The meeting featured remarks from Local Union 58 Business Manager Scott Murphy.

IMPACT staff also put on presentations over a variety of topics. Assistant to the IMPACT CEO, Kevin Hilton, laid out the FASB Pension issue as they relate to the unfunded liability and the potential quandary that faces parties in the Iron Working Industry. Harvey Swift, Assistant Director of Education and Training, provided a presentation on Wind Turbine Training. Chris Burger, Wage Compliance administrator, expounded on Davis/Bacon, and Steve Rank explained the IMPACT Safety Insurance model. Kevin Byrnes, IMPACT Eastern Regional Director, and Chuck Decker, Midwest Regional Director, gave short reports detailing the activities of their respective RAB’s.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


REGIONAL ADVISORY BOARDS

RAB VII North Central States District Council CO-CHAIRS Gordon Struss & William Livingston Block Grant activity for RAB VII included a move forward on a mobile training trailer. Marketing

RAB VII MAJOR GRANT ACTIVITY

brochures were developed and are being used

u TWIC Card Reimbursement

throughout the region. A $10,000 block grant was

u Training Facilities Improvements at

approved to attend trade shows and promote union ironworkers throughout the North Central States. The RAB VII general meeting in March featured an extended presentation and discussion on the training and certification needs of the contractors bidding wind turbine work in the RAB VII region.

Local Unions in St. Paul and Duluth u Marketing Campaign u Promotion of Local Union 25, Detroit

Training Facility u Marketing Brochure to Promote Local Union 849, Luck to Non-Union Contractors

RAB VIII Rocky Mountain District Council CO-CHAIRS Matt Groskie & Jeff Green Local Union 24A in Wichita, Kansas, using an IMPACT grant, is erecting a new training facility for structural, safety training, fall protection, and associated equipment handling. At the same time,

A Pilot Drug Testing program is being developed in RAB VIII, and the program and procedures are working nicely. This new system is delivering on expectations in areas where it is in use: Omaha, Albuquerque, and Pocatello.

Local Union 21 in Omaha received welder training upgrades, new equipment, and fume extraction system modernization.

Ironworkers build Spaceport in New Mexico.

RAB VIII also purchased a tandem trailer set. This will put two trailers on the road with capabilities to instruct welding, or other facets of the trade in a classroom

Iron Workers Wind Turbine Training at Local Union 27, Salt Lake City, NV.

setting, along with hands-on practical applications. Rick Meyer, Apprentice Coordinator of Local Union 495, accepted the responsibility for the design and assembly of these trailers. With versatility

RAB VIII MAJOR GRANT ACTIVITY

in mind, Rick’s design called for all internal parts to be interchangeable, allowing for various training scenarios.

u Training Trailer Fabrication

Local Union 27 is another of our locals to

u Pilot Drug Testing Program

utilize the USDOL Energy Training Grant provided

In addition to this new model, IMPACT is pursu-

with the assistance of IMPACT. With the delivery

ing a national Employee Assistant Program (EAP)

of the tools and the training unit, Wind Turbine

company to facilitate return to work status in areas

Training is moving full steam ahead.

where these services are not readily available.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

u Wind Turbine Training

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

11


REGIONAL ADVISORY BOARDS

RAB IX California District Council CO-CHAIRS Joe Standley & David McEuen

On health issues IMPACT provided Block Grant

RAB IX was active in hosting a series of labor-

Funding to retain an industrial hygienist and host

management service events to obtain consensus on

“IMPACT Welding Fume Seminars” to address

regulatory issues and industry practices.

Cal/OSHA regulations that are more stringent than

In view of the Iron Workers International and

RAB IX MAJOR GRANT ACTIVITY u TWIC Card Reimbursements u Marketing Program for

Public Works in Los Angeles u Signage on Scoreboard at

John Swet Unified School u Lobbying Effort in the

California area u Marketing Program for Work in Northern Nevada

IMPACT’s pursuit of a new OSHA standard for

federal OSHA standards, and discuss abatement methods to help prevent exposures to air borne

reinforcing steel and post-tensioning activities, a

metals during common welding operations.

“Reinforcing Steel Safety Consensus Committee”

IMPACT Regulatory Summits were hosted in

was established to discuss hazards associated with columns, walls, decks, impalement, rigging, site conditions, and post-tensioning. The committee will also submit recommendations to the Iron Workers International and IMPACT for potential rulemaking on new safety regulations governing the reinforcing steel industry. A “Qualified Rigger and Signalman Invitational”

Northern and Southern California to review safety issues and clarifications pertaining to steel erection and reinforcing steel activities. Representatives from Cal/OSHA were present to interact with labor and management representatives and discuss jobsites safety issues. IMPACT RAB IX Executive Committee approved

event was established to reach out to project owners,

IMPACT Block Grant Funds to reimburse ironwork-

controlling contractors, and signatory contractors

ers for costs of TWIC cards, sponsor an IMPACT

to showcase the Iron Workers Qualified Rigger and

Industry Nights event, develop an RAB IX news-

Signalman programs,and how they are designed to

letter, and develop and RAB IX Marketing website.

exceed the minimum requirements of OSHA standards.

Nevada OSHA Chief thanks Joe Standley for Steel Erection Training Partnership Stephen Coffield, Administrator of Nevada OSHA thanked Joe Standley, President of the District Council of Iron Workers, Dave McEuen, Management Co-Chair for IMPACT Region IX; and Michael Newington, Executive Director of the Western Steel Council, for providing steel erection partnership training sessions throughout the state of Nevada at the Ironworkers Apprenticeship Training facilities. Coffield stated “our inspection officers and staff appreciated the hands-on training they received on the Ironworkers and IMPACT Subpart R training programs and materials. This arrangement will enable enforcement officers, contractors, and Ironworkers to exchange Stephen Coffield (left), Administrator of Nevada OSHA, thanks Joe Standley, President of the District Council of Iron Workers.

12

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

information and discuss issues that will be beneficial to all parties. A strong supporter of the training initiative is Dave McEuen, Management Co-Chair for IMPACT. He states, “It is a win-win situation when the Ironworkers, steel erection contractors, and OSHA can work together to receive training on the same materials and regulations that govern the steel erection industry.”

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


REGIONAL ADVISORY BOARDS

RAB IX California District Council RAB IX Ironworkers, California OSHA and IMPACT Establish Steel Erection Partnership

Iron Workers District Council of California, Cal/OSHA, IMPACT, and the Western Steel Council establish training partnerships for Cal/OSHA compliance officers, local union business agents, signatory contractors and contractor associations. These training partnership sessions are provided at the local union training

Pictured (left to right) are Steve Rank, Director, Western Region, IMPACT; Joe Standley, President, District Council of Iron Workers; Len Welsh, Chief, Cal/OSHA; Dave McEuen, President, California Erectors, Inc., and Management Co-Chair RAB IX, IMPACT; Eric Waterman, CEO, IMPACT; and Kevin Hilton, Executive Assistant to the CEO, IMPACT.

facilities throughout the state of California. Dave McEuen, president of California Erectors, Inc., says the steel erection training accomplishes several things. “It gets our guys aware of Cal/OSHA, gives them a chance to understand what they do for a living” and it gives [DOSH] a chance to understand what we do for a living.” Joe Standley, president of the California District Council of Iron Workers says “I appreciate the willingness of Len Welsh, Chief of Cal/OSHA to work with our local unions and contractors to raise the standard of safety performance in the steel erection industry.

RAB X Pacific Northwest District Council CO-CHAIRS Ron Piksa & Jeff Ilenstine RAB X initiated several marketing campaigns to increase market share and work opportunities in the Pacific Northwest. IMPACT RAB X Block Grant Funds were used to retain a government consulting firm to pursue a series Washington State bridge projects that would create projects for IMPACT signatory contractors. The Columbia Crossing, High Speed Intercity Passenger Rail Program, BPA I-% Corridor Reinforcement Project, Alaska Way Viaduct Tunnel Replacement Project, SR 520 Bridge Replacement Project, and Sellwood Bridge Replacement Project were some of the projects targeted by IMPACT Block Grant Funds.

IMPACT RAB X Regulatory Summits were held in Seattle, Washington and Portland, Oregon that included representatives of State OSHA Plan officials from Washington and Oregon. The Employer’s Association Advertising Plan developed by Executive Committee members has produced many contacts and work opportunities for signatory employers. IMPACT Block Grant Funds were also used to pursue metal building training, tower rescue training, local advertising, and rigging certifications. Rex Smith of Fought & Company, Inc. (Tigard, OR) and Ron Piksa, IMPACT Labor Co-Chairman, recently completed shear stud, bend and pull tests on simulated field welds to determine if the resultant welds would meet AWS D1.5 requirements. IMPACT also is developing a comprehensive DVD defining test conditions.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

RAB X MAJOR GRANT ACTIVITY u Lobbying Effort for

the Columbia River Crossing Bridge u Employer Advertising Campaign for Pacific Northwest, including Alaska u Advertising Campaign at Outdoor Events and on Billboards u NCCCO Training u Distance Education Program in Alaska

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

13


LABOR MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE

Opportunities Revealed NORTH AMERICAN IRON WORKERS/IMPACT ANNUAL CONFERENCE A RESOUNDING SUCCESS

General Secretary Walt Wise (center) leads a panel discussion on Iron Workers training. Panelists include (left to right) George Kratzer, Dick Ward, Kevin Wallace and Ed Abbott.

Over 500 of the most distinguished leaders in

The conference had customer representation from

the construction industry laid out point-by-point

virtually every major industry in North America

plans on how to weather the economic storm

including aerospace, auto, education, power

and prepare for the future at the North American

generation, and steel. The Owner Panel — Changes

Iron Workers/IMPACT Annual Conference.

and Challenges from our Customers, moderated by Steve Lindauer of The Association of Union Constructors, tapped the brainpower of our customers for ways the Ironworkers and their contractors can become more desirable and thus, gain more work opportunities. In addition, expert panels and speakers delved into topics of critical importance to every local union and contractor including safety, the pension crisis, fiduciary responsibilities, regulatory issues, substance abuse and green energy initiatives to name a few. “It’s been my experience that the best way to attract the real players in the industry is to study what elements really need to be included. Our planning, which started the day after last year’s conference ended was driven by including elements

Those seeking a way to cope with extraordinary

that need to be discussed and acted upon, so that

economic challenges were provided “take home”

a tangible benefit is provided to our attendees,”

value and guidance. A look at the meeting agenda

added IMPACT CEO Eric Waterman.

revealed substance for all attendees regardless of their role in our industry. “It’s hard to attain a continually improving program at a conference that is as complex and diverse as this one, this year I think we really hit it out of the park,” said General OSHA Deputy Assistant Secretary, Jordan Barab addresses General Session.

President Joe Hunt who also serves as Labor Co-Chair of IMPACT. “The substance presented by the contractors, the Iron Workers and

The Iron Workers General Officers present Kendall Martin and John Rayner of Local Union 5 with the Eagle Award.

our customers was really impressive.”

14

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


LABOR MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE Business Managers and Contractors sit side-by-side and to discuss the path forward for the Ironworking industry.

“It’s hard to attain a continually improving program at a conference that is as complex and diverse as this one, this year I think we really hit it out of the park. The substance presented by the contractors, the Iron Workers and our customers was really impressive.” ~ Joseph Hunt, General President Iron Workers International General President and IMPACT Labor Co-Chair Joseph Hunt addresses the audience.

A packed house pays close attention.

Mr. Eric Greitens, a former Navy Seal and founder

This man has seen the worst aspects of humanity

of the Center of Citizen Leadership provided

and has rebounded without hesitation to establish

the audience with lessons in leadership and the

an organization that showcases the best aspects

importance of human relationships to the success

of humanity. I think he really made an impact on

of any leader. The message of Greitens was so

the audience,” said Bill Brown, CEO of Ben Hur

powerful that numerous speakers throughout the

Construction and Management Co-Chair of IMPACT.

conference referred back to his remarks. “When

The message of Eric Greitens dovetailed perfectly

you hear and see the accomplishments of a person

with words from Darrell Roberts, the Executive

like Eric Greitens, a Navy Seal, Rhodes Scholar

Director of Helmets to Hardhats, on the progress of

and true humanitarian you are really humbled.

recruiting veterans into a career in union construction.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

Over 500 of the most distinguished leaders in the construction industry laid out point-by-point plans on how to weather the economic storm and prepare for the future at the North American Iron Workers/IMPACT Annual Conference.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

15


LABOR MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE

North American Iron Workers/IMPACT Annual Conference The first day of the conference also provided the back drop for Jordan Barab of OSHA to announce a joint training initiative between the Iron Workers and OSHA to insure OSHA inspectors are up to date on current industry practices. In addition, breakout sessions on day one included a Town Hall meeting where contractors could speak directly to IMPACT CEO Eric Waterman updates the conference on recent IMPACT initiatives.

the Iron Workers General Officers in an open and frank basis; updates on organizing and the Employee Free Choice Act; developments in the Ornamental Industry; a session on new training initiatives that includes wind turbine, green and superintendent training;

“It’s been my experience that the best way to attract the real players in the industry is to study what elements really need to be included. Our planning, which started the day after last year’s conference ended was driven by including elements that need to be discussed and acted upon, so that a tangible benefit is provided to our attendees.” ~ Eric Waterman, IMPACT CEO

16

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

the IMPACT substance abuse program and a presentation on the Design-Build process.

Joanna Pineda, CEO of the Matrix Group, talks about the power of facebook, twitter and other social media.

Management, followed by two expert panel discussions, the first on the future of Nuclear Power construction and the next focusing on the current state of Iron Workers pension plans. Ms. Joanna Pineda, CEO of the Matrix Group International, revealed the power of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and MySpace. Updates on grants obtained by the

Day two of the conference was packed starting off

National Training Fund, as well as updates to

with the President of the AFL-CIO’s Building Trades

NTF materials and a preview of this year’s appren-

Department, Mr. Mark Ayers. A comprehensive

tice competition in Seattle were also provided,

economic analysis of the construction industry was

along with comments from Roger Ferch, President

provided by Chris Lissner of Acropolis Investment

of the American Institute of Steel Construction.

Steve Lindauer (center) of TAUC moderates Owner Panel. Also shown, from left to right are Jose Millan of the California Community Colleges, Tony Bridge and Tom Hanson of U.S. Steel and Ron Koshewitz of the Ford Motor Company, Kevin Reimer of PSEG Power and Richard Quinn of NASA.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


LABOR MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE

Exhibit Hall displays innovative products to attendees.

The afternoon of day two provided valuable breakout session on the future of the reinforcing steel industry, the IMPACT workers compensation and temporary disability efforts, the safe handling and erection of steel joists, steel girders and steel decking, along with an additional breakout on the pension crisis.

IMPACT Labor Co-Chair and General President Joe Hunt and IMPACT Management Co-Chair Bill Brown engage the audience in a frank discussion.

The Pension Crisis is addressed by an expert panel.

Join Us for the

2012 North American Iron Workers/IMPACT Labor Management Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada

Jan. 29 – Feb. 2, 2012 Paris u Las Vegas

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

Len Petrie of Exelon talks about the changing face of Nuclear Energy.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

17


LABOR MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE

North American Iron Workers/IMPACT Annual Conference The third day of the conference featured panels on marketing of Iron Workers training initiatives, along with a panel comprised of Business Managers and Contractors. Added to that, the audience heard from Steve Sandherr, CEO of the Associated General Contractors of America, who provided his view of the near term prospect of the construction industry. Bill Press, noted radio and television personality, provided his economic AGC CEO Steve Sandherr gives the audience his view of the outlook of the construction industry.

and political views and IMPACT’s own Steve Rank delivered an update on recent regulatory actions from OSHA, both from a state and federal perspective.

Standing room only crowd hears about the Iron Workers/IMPACT Green training initiative.

18

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

IMPACT Management Co-Chair Bill Brown compares notes with General Secretary Walt Wise and General Treasurer Ed McHugh.


LABOR MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE

Mark Ayers, President of the Building Trades Department of the AFL-CIO addresses the general session.

The conference wrapped up with a panel, moderated by General Secretary Walter Wise, on how local unions can work to preserve and expand their mar-

Iron Workers District Council President Eric Dean leads the discussion in the Ornamental breakout session.

kets during these trying times. General Secretary Ed McHugh also moderated a panel discussion on the importance of maintaining local union’s fiduciary responsibilities. And, the conference ended with another town hall style meeting with the General Officers addressing the questions and concerns of those in attendance representing Local Unions and District Councils. “Every meeting we put together has one goal: providing value-added or take-home value for the attendees, and I think we really hit the mark on this one,” Hunt added. Darrell Roberts of Helmets to Hardhats addresses the conference as General Treasurer Ed McHugh looks on.

“We need to get even greater attendance to arm our good contractors with the knowledge they need to grow and to educate our current and, hopefully, new customers on what we’re doing to keep us the most productive and competitive group they use,” added Brown.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

“We need to get even greater attendance to arm our good contractors with the knowledge they need to grow and to educate our current and, hopefully, new customers on what we’re doing to keep us the most productive and competitive group they use.” ~ Bill Brown, IMPACT Management Co-Chair

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

19


NATIONAL SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAM

Leaner, but Not Meaner, Drug Testing The Board of Trustees are constantly reviewing the offerings provided by IMPACT to insure that the Ironworkers and our contractors a getting the best value for the dollar spent. In 2010, the IMPACT substance abuse testing program came under close scrutiny and, as a result, saw major modifications made in certain areas of the country via a pilot program which revises the current program. The new slimmed down version of the Program eliminates costly

or a random, invariably, a number of them failed to

annual testing and features a

find their way to the intended recipient. In addition,

random program that directly

since the contractor did not have an active role,

involves our employers in the

other than referencing the database, their role was

random drug testing equation.

hit or miss. The revised Program involves everyone

The revised program notifies

equally and tests only Ironworkers that are currently

the contractor to send all

working. Mail-out notifications and annual testing

Ironworker employees to a

are eliminated. True random testing is used.

collection facility based on a random number being drawn electronically. The number represents the last digit of an Ironworkers social security number. The Ironworker with the corresponding number at the end of their social

The revised Substance Abuse Program involves everyone equally and tests only Ironworkers that are currently working. 20

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

security number is sent to a collection facility and

It is not the intent of the program to fix areas of the country that are not experiencing problems. In other words, there is no sense in fixing something that is not broken. However, the feedback on the pilot program has been positive, makes better sense to Ironworkers and contractors, and will likely have a better chance of being embraced by the end users.

takes an instant test, where allowed by law, and returns to work. All positive tests are referred on for full GC/MS analysis to insure no mistakes are made. In addition, this revision insures that only Ironworkers that are currently employed are part of the pool subject to testing. Of course, post-accident, for-cause and pre-employment testing remain a part of the screening solution. From the beginning the substance abuse program has experienced challenges in insuring that notifications reach the targeted Ironworkers. Regardless of whether the notification was for an annual drug test

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


SAFETY AND HEALTH

IMPACT Continues to Pilot Off the Job Accident Disability Plan IMPACT initiated an Off the Job Accident Disability

This IMPACT program will supplement the Short

Plan for Ironworker members in 2009. The IMPACT

Term Accident benefits of a member’s current

Plan is specifically designed to address off the job

Health and Welfare plan, and the two accident

accidents. Member’s current Health and Welfare

benefits will combine to provide the maximum

plans provide a limited short term disability benefit

benefit possible at no extra cost to the member.

in the event of sickness or accident off the job.

IMPACT Accident Disability Plan Benefits (In the event of an off the job accident)

Currently, the Ironworker District Councils of Chicago & Vicinity, Rocky Mountain Area and St. Louis & Vicinity have chosen to participate in the IMPACT Off the Job Accident Disability Plan. In 2010 the Pacific Northwest and Texas and Mid-South District Councils, along with Local

WAITING PERIOD – 7 Days

Union 5 in Washington, DC. came on board.

INCOME REPLACEMENT – 66.67% of Weekly Income

Ironworker members are eligible for this plan if

MAXIMUM WEEKLY BENEFIT – Up to $800 per Week (Total benefit combined with your existing plan and IMPACT Accident Disability Plan)

Health and Welfare plan.

BENEFIT DURATION – 6 Weeks per Disability

Program Manager

they are currently eligible under their local union

In addition to the benefits of the IMPACT Off the Job Accident Disability Plan, in the event of accidental death, the new program will provide the participants’ beneficiary $5,000 of Accidental Death & Dismemberment benefits.

The description provided above is a brief summary of the new benefits. Complete plan details are on file with IMPACT. Any potential benefits will be payable as defined in the policy.

MARK PERZINSKI

Benefits of the IMPACT Plan are provided by Chartis, an A+ rated insurer and leader in disability benefits.

Alliance Agreement Offers Benefits to Signatory Contractors IMPACT has entered into an Alliance Agreement with insurance carriers to explore new opportunities to better service of signatory contractors. Following are insurance carriers that participate in the IMPACT Safety Insurance Program and regularly attend IMPACT Regional Advisory Board meetings, insurance seminars, and other IMPACT functions.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

KENNY WAUGH

Director of Industry Liaisons, IMPACT

If you have questions regarding the IMPACT Insurance initiatives, contact Kenny Waugh at kwaugh@impact-net.org or 800-545-4921 or Mark Perzinski at 410-329-6472 or markperzin@hotmail.com.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

21


SAFETY AND HEALTH

IMPACT Safety & Health Roundtable Assessing New Administration’s Policies and Procedures The IMPACT Safety and Health Roundtable was

of the Iron Workers International led a discussion

established to address specific issues pertaining to the

on OSHA’s action to reissue compliance directives

ironworking industry and includes representatives

for the Subpart R – Steel Erection standard.

of labor and management. The IMPACT Roundtable

Dave McEuen, IMPACT management co-chair

meets bi-annually and hosts a July meeting in Ann Arbor, Michigan and a December meeting in Washington, DC.

for RAB IX provided a presentation on new innovations using “cone-zones” to protect Ironworkers from falls through roof and floor openings.

Pictured left to right are Steve Rank, Director, Western Region, IMPACT; Walter Wise, General Secretary, Iron Workers International; Ed McHugh, General Treasurer, Iron Workers International; and Bill Brown, Management Co-Chair, IMPACT and President/CEO, Ben Hur Construction Co.

Walt Wise, Ed McHugh, and Roger Struble representing the CRSI provided information on the industry coalition to pursue negotiated rulemaking for new reinforcing steel and post-tensioning OSHA regulations. Beth O’Quinn of the Specialized Carriers & Rigging Association and Ed Walsh, President of the New York District Council of Iron Workers address crane and rigging issues, and the need for OSHA to publish the Cranes and Derricks in Construction standard as a Final Rule. Downtown Ann Arbor, Michigan.

22

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Bill Mott representing the Associated General On July 21, 2010 the IMPACT Safety and Health

Contractors shared a series OSHA interpretive letters

Roundtable that is co-chaired by Ed McHugh, labor

that affect controlling contracts and subcontractors

co-chair and Bill Brown, management co-chair

on the jobsite. Wayne Creasap of The Association

convened their bi-annual meeting in Ann Arbor,

of Union Constructors discussed the OSHA’s Severe

Michigan during the 26th Annual Ironworkers

Violator Enforcement Directive and the ramifications

Instructor Training Course.

occurring on the jobsite.

As one of the featured guest speakers, Bill Parsons,

Mike Baker, Business Manager of Iron Workers

Acting Deputy Director for OSHA’s Directorate

Local Union 21, Omaha, Nebraska and Stephen Best

of Construction, provided an update on the

of JLG Industries, Inc. led a discussion on the use

Agency’s regulatory agenda and priorities for the

of aerial lift equipment and the need for OSHA to

construction industry. Walt Wise and Ed McHugh

revisit the current standard and prohibitive practices.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


SAFETY AND HEALTH

Study Reveals Similarity in Shop vs. Field Applied Shear Studs A study initiated and funded by IMPACT was

IMPACT RAB X Labor Co-chair Ron Piksa

designed to determine if field applied shear studs

and Executive Committee member Rex Smith

meet the American Welding Society (AWS)

coordinated the test in the presence Washington

welding standards. A letter from the AWS stated

and Oregon State D.O.T. representatives.

that prior to installing shear studs surfaces to

A study initiated and funded by

the top flanges of structural members, the surface

IMPACT was designed

must undergo special preparation in order to

to determine if

meet the AWS requirement.

field applied shear studs

Rex Smith of Fought & Company, Inc. (Tigard,

meet the American

OR) and Ron Piksa, IMPACT Labor Co-Chairman, recently completed shear stud, bend and pull tests

Welding Society

on simulated field welds to determine if the resul-

welding standards.

tant welds would meet AWS D1.5 requirements. The tests were completed on surfaces that were wet, muddy and oxidized to simulate outdoor conditions (including mist-coated inorganic zinc). The results showed that the simulated field welds met the requirements. All of the visual inspection and destructive tests,

IMPACT also is developing a comprehensive

performed by an independent lab, showed the simu-

DVD defining test conditions, introducing

lated field welded shop studs did not fail at the welds,

the parties involved, and profiling the extensive

but rather failed in the base metal at levels above the

testing performed.

AWS required tensile level. IMPACT is developing an official test study report to submit to the AWS, Department of Transportation for all states, AISC, and other organizations to dispel any misconceptions that field welded shear studs on bridge girders and other structures may be inadequate.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

23


SAFETY AND HEALTH

Pursuing New Reinforcing Steel & Post-Tensioning OSHA Standard General officers of the Ironworkers International

An overview of fatalities, accident trends and

and representatives of IMPACT recently met with

causation factors was presented to OSHA by

Dr. David Michaels, Assistant Secretary of Labor for

representatives of the Ironworkers International

the Occupational Safety & Health Administration

and IMPACT. Common activities during the

(OSHA) to request the Agency to purse Negotiated

reinforcing and post-tensioning process and

Rulemaking for developing new OSHA regulations

corresponding workplace accidents focused on

for the reinforcing steel and post-tensioning industry.

material handing injuries, structural collapse of vertical formwork and decks, structural collapse of vertical and horizontal columns, impalement by protruding reinforcing steel dowels, and use of post-tensioning equipment.

The Industry Coalition Rationale for pursuing Negotiated Rulemaking consists of the following primary considerations: 1. The current OSHA Subpart Q – Concrete and Masonry standard is antiquated and contains limited safety provisions for hazards associated with reinforcing steel and post-tensioning activities. Pictured left to right are Eric Waterman, IMPACT CEO; Ed McHugh, General Treasurer, Iron Workers International; Joseph Hunt, General President, Iron Workers International and Labor Co-Chair, IMPACT; and Walter Wise, General Secretary, Iron Workers International. (Not pictured is Bill Brown, Management Co-Chair, IMPACT.)

General President Hunt and Bill Brown, IMPACT Management Co-Chair provided Dr. Michaels with a petition letter from an industry coalition of stakeholders regarding fatalities and accident trends that continue to exist in the reinforcing steel and post-tensioning industry. The Industry Coalition of Stakeholders included representatives from The International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers, Ironworker Management Progressive Action Cooperative Trust, National Association of Reinforcing Steel Contractors, Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute, Post Tensioning Institute, Western Steel Council, Department of Reinforcing Ironworkers Advisory Committee, and The Center for Construction Research and Training.

24

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

2. Fatality and accident trends in the reinforcing steel and post-tensioning industry indicate a direct correlation between accident causation factors and lack of specific regulations. 3. The use of steel reinforcement and post-tensioning in poured in-place concrete is expected to double by 2015 from its 1990 level and may comprise a majority of commercial and industrial construction. 4. The Negotiated Rulemaking process will produce the best safety standard and regulations through the cooperative efforts of OSHA, stakeholders, and experts in the reinforcing steel and post-tensioning industry.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


SAFETY AND HEALTH

Unveiling New National Training Partnership IRON WORKERS INTERNATIONAL, IMPACT AND OSHA WORKING TOGETHER Under a new National Training Partnership

unique opportunity for us to work closely

established between the Iron Workers International,

with OSHA compliance personnel to illustrate

IMPACT, and the Occupational Safety and Health

our comprehensive training materials and

Administration (OSHA), partnership training

the quality of our training facilities throughout

events have been conducted by IMPACT in Nevada

the country. It is important for us to work

and New York.

together to achieve consistent interpretation

The focus of the new National Training Partnership is to provide specialized training to OSHA Compliance

and enforcement of the OSHA Subpart R – Steel Erection standards.

Officers throughout the country utilizing a series of eight steel erection training modules developed by IMPACT and the Ironworkers National Training Fund. Iron Workers Local Union 229 hosts Iron Workers/IMPACT OSHA Training Session.

Jordan Barab, Deputy Assistant Secretary of

“I appreciate the opportunity for our International

OSHA commented on a comprehensive evaluation

Association and IMPACT to work with the new

of the Iron Workers training materials stating

OSHA Administration to improve safety performance

“our Directorate of Construction Staff have

and compliance with the OSHA standard. I have

reviewed the Ironworkers steel erection training

committed the use of our training facilities to make

course and find the format of using DVD’s,

this National Training Partnership a success. Our

PowerPoint presentations, hands-on activities,

training facilities are evaluated to maintain the highest

and workbooks with examinations to be excellent

standards required by the Ironworker Apprenticeship

for training.” Bill Brown, IMPACT Management

Certification Program,” said Joseph Hunt, General

Co-Chair, said Barab’s announcement signals a

President of the Iron Workers International Union.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

The focus of the new National Training Partnership is to provide specialized training to OSHA Compliance Officers throughout the country utilizing a series of eight steel erection training modules developed by IMPACT and the Iron Workers National Training Fund.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

25


COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING

Social Media Isn’t Just for Kids Anymore IMPACT HAS LAUNCHED INTO THE SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD WITH A PRESENCE ON FACEBOOK, YOUTUBE & TWITTER These social media outlets are being utilized as

Do you want to know what IMPACT and the

tools to further promote IMPACT, the Ironworkers

Ironworkers are doing for you?

and our union contractor partners as a means to publicize our programs and create opportunities for the union ironworking industry. According to a report from The Nielsen Company, time spent on social media websites has tripled

The greatest benefit of using these types of media is the opportunity to convey a message directly to the rank and file and allow instant feedback from individuals located anywhere. During the 2010 North American Iron Workers/ IMPACT Labor Management Conference, live updates were posted on Twitter and Facebook

During the 2010 North American Iron Workers/ IMPACT Labor Management Conference, live updates were posted on Twitter and Facebook allowing non-attendees to follow along and post comments in real time.

26

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

allowing non-attendees to

from a year ago. In June 2010, 22.7% of all time spent on the internet in the United States is being spent on social networking sites. Facebook was created in 2004 and is currently the 2nd most visited website on the internet with 500 million users.

follow along and post comments in real time.

YouTube was created in 2005 and is currently the

Recap videos were posted to Facebook and YouTube

3rd most visited website on the internet exceeding

showing the previous day’s events and all pictures

2 billion visits a day. Twitter was created in 2006

taken during the conference are available for viewing

and currently has more than 106 million users.

on the IMPACT Facebook page. Take a moment and find out more about IMPACT and the Ironworkers through their social media initiatives.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING

Webinar Technology Produces Real Value in a Rough Economy The Internet is increasingly becoming the most

funding in September. Over 20 Locals from across

favored and economical way to conduct interactive

the country were in attendance. The live webinar

meetings for organizations throughout the world.

was also recorded and is currently available on the

Webinars are one way to conduct live meetings,

IMPACT website.

training, or presentations online.

This use of technology

The webinar format allows each participant to sit at

demonstrates another

his or her own computer and be connected to other

way IMPACT looks

participants via the Internet. The process allows each

to produce real value

of the attendees to access the meeting by clicking

in a tough economic

on a meeting invitation link distributed by e-mail.

climate and shows

A webinar can be collaborative and include polling

our commitment to

and question & answer sessions to allow full partici-

help members remain

pation between the audience and presenter.

competitive.

IMPACT has begun using webinars to allow staff located across the country to participate in regional meetings without the need to travel.

IMPACT has begun using webinars to allow staff located across the country to participate in regional meetings without the need to travel. The IMPACT Region V and VI meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana incorporated the webinar format to allow IMPACT western regional director, Steve Rank, to give a presentation on safety insurance from his office in California. IMPACT and GSP Consulting (GSP), a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania based government affairs firm, conducted a live webinar focusing on the process for Local Unions to apply for federal and state grant

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

27


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Getting the Jump on Competition and Getting More Work One of the key benefits available to IMPACT

The MHC network actively tracks more than 200,000

members is access to two online project tracking

non-residential projects updating 7,000 to 12,000

systems, the McGraw-Hill Construction Network

projects a day and provides instant access to over

and Industrial Information Resources Planning,

50,000 individual project plans and specifications.

Engineering and Construction (PEC) reports.

Industrial Information Resources PEC reports

These systems provide the most current information to help identify and bid thousands of upcoming commercial, residential, industrial and maintenance projects throughout the United States and Canada.

These systems provide the most current information to help identify and bid thousands of upcoming commercial, residential, industrial and maintenance projects throughout the United States and Canada.

28

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

identify specific project related data including company, plant, scope and status information. Industrial Information Resources maintains a database of plant information that today exceeds 40,000 plants and 300,000 plant management contacts across twelve industrial markets. “By utilizing these valuable tools made available by IMPACT we can build our market share and increase our membership and standing as one of

“The information we’ve learned from using the

the best organizations in the building trades,”

tracking systems has given us a better response time

says George Kratzer, President of the District

to share project information with our signatory

Council of Southern Ohio and Vicinity.

contractors in our jurisdiction”, says Bob Walsh, Business Manager of Local Union 40, New York, NY.

The IMPACT project tracking systems are made available by member contributions. Access to

The McGraw-Hill Construction (MHC) Network

the tracking systems is provided to Local Unions,

reports on all construction project types begin-

District Councils and Signatory Contractor

ning in the pre-planning stage and continuing

Associations and available to member contractors

through contract award and construction start.

at a discount.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

IMPACT Develops New Integrated Contacts Database and Website IMPACT has developed a new website and

IMPACT partnered with local website and data-

contacts database system to further enhance its

base developer Matrix Group International for

website and database capabilities and add more

the development of the new website and database

interactive elements to its web presence. The project

systems. The current IMPACT website was launched

marries the two, incorporating new functionality

in January 2006, while IMPACT has used its

allowing the IMPACT membership database and

FileMaker database system since the organization’s

conference management system to interact with the

inception in 2003.

new website providing instant online meeting and training registrations and a more robust signatory contractor search. The new website incorporates streaming video content describing current programs, new updates and important events. A new search function has been added allowing visitors to find contact information for Local Union Training Facilities throughout the United States and Canada. An online store is now available allowing members to purchase products and request materials and services. Members are also now able to login into the website and update contact information to ensure accuracy. The new IMPACT database system provides needed enhancements including: online access (allowing staff to access the system online from anywhere), integration with the IMPACT website providing instant updates to member contact information and a shared meeting calendar among other capabilities.

IMPACT IS IN CONSTANT COMMUNICATION WITH:

DOING MORE WITH LESS:

u 8,223 Organization Contacts

u Online Grant Request/Approval Tracking

u 7,762 Organizations

u Online Database Access

u 5,073 Union Contractors

u Shared Meeting Calendar

u 828 Fabrication Shops

u Enhanced External Communication System

u 336 Industry Associations

u Online Store

u 216 Media Contacts

u Enhanced Member Tracking Ability

u Online Meeting Registration

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

29


GREEN TECHNOLOGY

Wind Turbine Training Provided by IMPACT In an effort to provide training that meets the

The courses already tentatively scheduled for

demands of a growing wind turbine marketplace,

2011 are to be held March 7 – 10, June 6 – 9,

IMPACT partnered with a centrally located, world

August 29 – September 1, and October 24 – 27.

class technology center and is a not-for-profit public school training facility. The school is the Francis Tuttle Technology Center (FTTC) in Oklahoma City. FTTC, aided by Ironworker instructors and Apprenticeship Coordinators, designed a course specifically for Ironworkers, focusing on the certifications identified by Ironworker wind turbine contractors.

IMPACT and its grant writing consultant, GSP, submitted a grant application on behalf of the National Training Fund in September of 2009 to fund the replication of the FTTC Ironworker wind turbine training model. In January of 2010, The National Training Fund was notified that they were one of the few successful organizations and would receive the $1.9 million training grant. The grant was written so that the Ironworkers could replicate the wind turbine training conducted at FTTC, but because of grant restraints, only five local unions could be named as training partners. Since there are approximately 150 Ironworker training centers, the selection of which locals would

Local Union 433 conducts written test.

be named in the grant was made by the The participants in these courses receive nationally recognized certifications from Capital Safety, HYTORC, and Snap-on Industrial after four days of training (nine hours each day). This course schedule allows IMPACT to provide “just in time” or “on demand” training for Ironworkers

District Council President of the five areas of the country with the most projected wind turbine work. The training centers participating in the grant include Local Union 6 (Buffalo, NY), Local Union 27 (Salt Lake City, UT), Local Union 263 (Dallas/Fort Worth, TX), Local Union 433 (Los Angeles, CA) and Local Union 444 (Joliet, IL).

from anywhere in the U.S. or Canada at a very reasonable cost. The first IMPACT wind turbine training

Hydraulic torque wrench safety demonstration.

course was conducted at FTTC in March of 2010. Since that first course, seven other courses were conducted. Some of these courses were held at the request of Local Unions, others at the request of contractors, while others were scheduled courses with open enrollment for any Local Union or contractor. IMPACT will continue to schedule courses (about one every quarter) for Local Unions and signatory contractors for as long as there is a demand.

30

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


GREEN TECHNOLOGY

Train-the-Trainer Group at Francis Tuttle Technology Center in Oklahoma City, OK.

Two instructors from each of the five training

approximately 500 Ironworkers. The tools and

centers received train-the-trainer training at

equipment necessary to effectively deliver the

FTTC in March. Over the two year life of the grant,

training were purchased and delivered to each

these instructors will conduct training at their

of the five local training centers (nearly $250,000

respective local union training centers and issue

worth per location).

industry recognized third party certifications for

Each of the five local training centers set up the tools, equipment, and mock-ups, have started to conduct courses, and are on their way to training at least 100 ironworkers and issuing third party certifications. These certifications are the same ones given at FTTC and come from Capital Safety — DBI/SALA (wind turbine rescue training), HYTORC (hydraulic torque wrench safety and use), and Snap-on Industrial (basic fastener safety and torque theory plus mechanical and electronic tool use). Simulated ladder rescue training.

Simulated self evacuation training.

HYTORC training at Local Union 27.

Miscellaneous videos of the Wind Turbine Training being conducted (at FTTC and the grant Local Unions) can be viewed at IMPACT’s YouTube page: www.youtube.com/user/IronworkersIMPACT#p/u

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

For more information on Wind Turbine Training contact Harvey C. Swift at hswift@impact-net.org or 800-545-4921.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

31


GREEN TECHNOLOGY

Beating the Heat with SolarWall® ALTERNATIVE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY USES SOLAR THERMAL HEATING TO REDUCE ENERGY COSTS Bellefonte (Feb. 10, 2010) – G.M. McCrossin,

The energy that is produced allows the building

the Bellefonte based general construction and

owner the ability to categorize itself as an energy

engineering firm, announces that its Solar, Air and

generator becoming eligible for additional tax

Heating division has successfully installed central

and emissions credits. Additional information

Pennsylvania’s first SolarWall®, an alternative energy

regarding the available credits can be obtained

technology. SolarWall® is an alternative energy

at www.EnergyStar.gov.

system that produces solar heated air that heats a building through a new or existing ventilation system.

“SolarWall introduces preheated

“SolarWall® introduces preheated air into the ventilation system of a building, which supplements the heating load and offsets the various gas or electric costs associated with heating a building,” said Joe Leahey, vice president of G.M. McCrossin. 32

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

air into the ventilation system of a building, which supplements the heating load and offsets the various gas or electric costs associated with heating a building,”

“The Iron Workers are first to latch on to this new innovative technology. And through IMPACT, we are able to display the SolarWall® on our local union hall, while also saving money on our heating and cooling costs.” KERRY ZETTLEMOYER FST/BM, Iron Workers Local Union 404, Harrisburg, PA

said Joe Leahey, vice president of G.M. McCrossin. The alternative energy system utilizes the sun’s rays to generate heat. Through permeated steel siding, SolarWall® heats the air in the space created between the existing building’s exterior wall and the framework

SolarWall® can also be combined with photovoltaic

of the system. This heated air is then introduced

cells to produce both heated air and electrical energy.

into the building’s ventilation system heating the

The SolarWall® PV/T (Photovoltaic/Technology)

inside air. The simple, but effective use of solar

combines high-efficient technologies to create a

thermal heating annually produces 260,000 BTU’s

total energy system with improved paybacks over

of energy per square foot of SolarWall®.

conventional systems.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


GREEN TECHNOLOGY

About G.M. McCrossin G. M. McCrossin is a heavy construction firm that focuses on commercial, institutional and government projects throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. Based in Bellefonte, PA, McCrossin recently became a distributor and fabricator of SolarWall®, a solar air heating system. The technology The installation was complet-

year period, dependent

ed at the Ironworkers Local

upon the size and scope of

Union 404 hall in Harrisburg

the project. We believe this

and includes a SolarWall®, SolarWall® PV/T and a

is the biggest attribute of this product. Ultimately,

glazed SolarWall®, which includes a glazed surface

the product pays for itself and companies have the

covering the wall unit that generates even higher

ability to reduce or eliminate their energy costs.”

amounts of heated air.

As a heat generator, SolarWall® provides an

“We have seen significant increases in energy

economical and clean energy source

generation at the Local Union 404 site,” said Leahey.

for years to come.

provided through the SolarWall® system affords building owners’ significant energy savings and a reduction in heating fuel consumption, which results in a compelling return on investment. More information is available at www.GMMcCrossin.com.

Each installation includes various probes that allow McCrossin and the building owner to monitor the energy generation. The air captured in a SolarWall® system is heated between ten and forty-five degrees before entering the ventilation system, which is confirmed through the monitoring system. This results in a cost savings value before turning the heat pumps on. This is where the value of the system stands out. Not only does SolarWall® offer building owners’ tax and emissions credits, but the technology also qualifies for up to 9 LEED points in the Energy & Atmosphere, Materials & Resources and Indoor Environmental Quality categories. Leahey adds, “This simple, but effective technology has the ability to pay for itself over a three to eight

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

33


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

IMPACT Explores Use of E-Books The Ironworkers currently use printed training

During the past six years IMPACT and the National

packages to support their apprenticeship training

Training Fund have developed and updated all

and journeyman upgrading programs. Developed by

of the core training packages (e.g., Orientation,

the National Training Fund, these training packages

Structural, Welding, Reinforcing, Architectural and

typically consist of a reference manual, instructor

Ornamental, etc.). The cost to develop and print all

guide, student workbook, instructor DVD and in

of these training packages has been considerable.

many packages a set of printed drawings.

It is clear that Local Unions, IMPACT and the National Training Fund invest quite a bit in the development and use of quality printed training materials. At the direction of the IMPACT and National Training Fund Trustees, we are exploring the use of e-books for apprenticeship training and journeyman upgrading programs. An e-book (short for electronic book and also known as a digital book, ebook, and eBook) is “a portable electronic device used to download and read books or manuals that

Apple iPad

are in digital form.� E-books are usually read on dedicated hardware devices known as e-Readers or e-book devices, such as iPads, Kindles, etc.

Amazon kindle DX

Personal computers and some cell phones can also be used to read e-books. Barnes & Noble nook

34

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

It is clear that the use of e-books will continue to grow and that this is a technology that will benefit the Ironworkers. We are in the process of doing an extensive study of the advantages and limitations of e-books as well as a detailed cost benefit analysis. The study will be completed in early 2011 at which time the Trustees will make decisions on moving forward.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

2010 Yields New Training Materials IMPACT has a strong commitment to providing signatory contractors with highly skilled and trained Ironworkers. In its efforts to make world class training available to contractors, local unions and ironworkers, IMPACT funds the development of world class training materials. Three new training packages were released by IMPACT and the National Training Fund in 2010.

MATHEMATICS FOR IRONWORKERS This training package is designed to be used to teach basic mathematics to Ironworkers in a way that uses Ironworker examples which helps to make these materials interesting for apprentices and journeymen. There are over 1,150 different problems in the assignment sheets and tests. In addition to basic mathematics, this manual includes introductions to geometry, trigonometry and metrics.

LAYOUT INSTRUMENTS FOR IRONWORKERS This new training package focuses only on layout instruments. There are seven units in the new manual: u Introduction to Layout

u Lasers

u Mathematics for Layout Work

u Theodolites & Transits

u Basic Layout Tools

u Total Stations

u Levels

GREEN CONSTRUCTION FOR IRONWORKERS This package consists of a reference manual and an instructor CD. They are designed to be used to teach the apprentice or journeyman Ironworker and give

In its efforts to make world class training available to contractors, local unions and ironworkers, IMPACT funds the development of world class training materials.

him/her a better understanding of what is meant by the term “green construction.� The stickers are intended to be given only to participants who successfully complete the course.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

35


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

New Training Materials for 2011 With support from IMPACT, the National Training Fund continues to publish new training packages for apprenticeship training and journeyman upgrading programs. There are several new packages currently under development and scheduled for publication in 2011.

SHOP TRAINING MATERIALS The Shop Department is in the process

The primary work being done to support the Shop

of developing a model Shop Training

Training Program is the development of training

Program that will include a new

materials. For some Shop Training Program courses

training manual entitled Training and

the instructors will be able to use existing training

Fabrication for Shop Ironworkers.

materials (e.g., Welding, Blueprint Reading). For

With the support of IMPACT and working with the National Training Fund, this Shop Training Program

other courses, the Shop Department is working with IMPACT and the National Training Fund to develop new training materials.

will be based on shop apprenticeship

Marketing materials have been sent to all Iron-

programs that have been successfully

worker shops. These materials provided an overview

implemented for a number of years.

of a variety of products and services to support

The goal of the Shop Training Program

the shops including insurance, pension, training,

is to provide employers with a model program that

and welding programs along with the IMPACT

they can adapt and implement in order to ensure

Tracking Systems. We are confident that the Shop

that their Ironworkers have the knowledge and skills

Training Program will be well received by the

to work successfully in a shop.

Shops and our Local Unions.

GENERAL FOREMAN AND SUPERINTENDENT

General Foreman and Superintendent Training Manual and Course Topics

IMPACT and the National Training Fund (NTF)

part of the training will be done using a new

u The Ironworker GF

are developing a new training manual and

training manual supported by an online session

supporting course entitled General Foreman

and a second part of the course will be done using

and Superintendent Training for Ironworkers.

group-based training.

This course is being developed as a result of the

While this content is still being written and

suggestions of the employer foremen who have

edited, the manual is expected to be released

been attending the current Foreman Training

sometime early in 2011. It will be filled with lots

u Project Administration

course. IMPACT and the NTF have been conduct-

of Ironworker specific examples and exercises

u Estimating

ing the Foreman Training course within our District

to engage the participant and should provide

Councils for several years — and in each course

an Ironworker with knowledge that will better

the question is raised “When will you have a course

enable him/her to become a General Foreman or

for General Foremen and Superintendents?”

Superintendent or help an existing one perform

or Superintendent u Management Skills u Communication Skills u Safety Management

u Planning & Scheduling u Budgeting u Challenges u Project Completion

A labor/management task force recommended

their jobs more effectively.

a “blended learning” course for General Foremen and Superintendents. This means that

36

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

SCAFFOLD TRAINING FOR IRONWORKERS Ironworkers not only work on scaffolding, but are often required to erect and dismantle various types of scaffolding systems. This new training package will include: u Introduction to Scaffolding u Safely Using Scaffolds u Supported Scaffold Components, Capacities & Loading u Erecting & Dismantling Frame Scaffold Systems u Erecting & Dismantling Suspended Scaffold Systems u Erecting & Dismantling Systems-based Scaffolding u Erecting & Dismantling Tube and Coupler Scaffold Systems We are working closely with Harsco Infrastructure (formally known as Patent Scaffolding) to ensure that this new training package will meet the needs of our members.

This training package is scheduled for publication early in 2011. In addition, representatives from Harsco Infrastructure have been invited to conduct a scaffold train-the-trainer course during the annual instructor training program in July of 2011.

Mobile Training Trailers Expanding, Branding & Training Ironworkers The use of mobile training trailers to reach and provide quality training to ironworker apprentices and members who live at great distances from training centers is one way of meeting geographical challenges. Many District Councils and Local Unions have invested IMPACT grant funds in mobile training trailers and are finding them to be successful in reaching and training their members and positively branding the Iron Workers and our contractors. Locals that have training trailers use them primarily for burning, weld certification and for advertising/marketing at industry events and job fairs. The trailers can be used for classroom instruction as well. The Pacific Northwest District Council has been using its two training trailers for welding and burning for some time while the Rocky Mountain District Council is currently in the process of converting cargo trailers into trailers that can be used for training purposes. While completing the grant application for the wind turbine training program, IMPACT and the National Training Fund described the experience and innovative training approach of using training trailers to make the Iron Workers’ grant stand apart. The Department of Labor (DOL) saw the use of training trailers as a means of delivering the grant funded training to more areas as a worthwhile investment, awarding the Ironworkers $1.9 million to fund their wind turbine training. Part of the DOL funds were used to purchase mobile training trailers (which IMPACT then purchased large decals for) as a way to increase training opportunities for more ironworkers in more areas — possibly even to perform training at wind farms.

Local Union meeting the training needs of their membership and assisting their contractors include: Local Unions 27, Salt Lake City, UT; 387, Atlanta, GA; 751, Anchorage, AK; 798, Mobile, AL; and 848, Charleston, SC.

As with the typical mobile training trailers, the wind turbine training trailers can also be used for marketing at industry events. These trailers can be used as a marketing tool themselves and can also be used to bring other wind turbine tools to wind energy events. The Iron Workers are using an innovative approach and thinking outside the box to resolve some of the difficult geographical challenges faced by some of our local training centers. Mobile training trailers are one tool in the effort to provide our contractors with the safest, most well trained workforce available.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

37


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Annual Ironworker Instructor Training Program Moves to Michigan The National Training Fund (NTF) held the 26th

Executive Director of Apprenticeship and Training

Annual Ironworker Instructor Training Program

Mike White; NTF Management Co-Chair Vic

at Washtenaw Community College in July of 2010.

Cornellier, President of TSI Exterior Wall Systems;

IMPACT funds the National Training Fund includ-

Eric Waterman, IMPACT CEO; and Bill Brown,

ing the Annual Ironworkers

President of Ben Hur Construction Company and

Instructor Training Program.

IMPACT Management Co-Chair also addressed the

The annual program had been

participants during the opening session.

held in California for the past

The annual training program ensures that the Iron-

25 years. Having outgrown the

workers have qualified instructors and apprenticeship

program site at the University

coordinators able to develop the skilled Ironworkers

of San Diego, the NTF and

to meet the needs of our employers and contractors.

IMPACT Trustees initiated

For the first time this year an advanced training

a search for a new location.

course for Business Managers was conducted.

Trustees and staff from the Apprenticeship and Training Department and IMPACT visited the campus of Washtenaw Community College in Ann Arbor, Michigan to tour

Ironworker Instructor Checks Out a New Cutting Torch.

the facility and meet with faculty and staff. Based on the number of classrooms and computer labs, General President Joe Hunt, General Secretary Walt Wise and General Treasurer Ed McHugh present an IACP certificate to Rick Meyer of Local Union 495.

technical hands-on training facilities, and a strong union focus, the Trustees voted unanimously to move the program to Michigan in 2010. General President Joseph Hunt addressed the nearly 600 participants during the opening sessions stating

Each year the NTF and IMPACT upgrade existing courses and develop new courses for our coordinators and instructors. In 2010, several new and revised courses were held including: u u

New Apprenticeship Coordinator Course Advanced Business Manager Training Course

The following courses were based on new training packages developed this past year by the NTF and IMPACT: u

Green Construction for Ironworkers

u

Operating Layout Instruments

u

Mathematics for Ironworkers

u

Conveyor Installation and Industrial Maintenance

38

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

“We have the best instructor training program in the building trades.” Regarding moving the annual training program to Michigan, General Secretary

General Treasurer Ed McHugh addressed the par-

Walter Wise said “Change is never easy but when

ticipants during the closing session held on July 23.

there is no change there is no growth.” General

In addition, there were presentations of prizes by

Treasurer Edward McHugh added “Remember

vendors to participants based on hands-on events

what you are here for — the goal is to develop skilled

held during the Wednesday evening vendor demon-

and productive Ironworkers.”

strations. The final event during the closing session was a “week in review” slide show with music that highlighted key events from the training program. Due to the leadership of the NTF and IMPACT Trustees, the move to Michigan and the 26th Annual Ironworker Instructor Training Program was a success. The Apprenticeship and Training Department and IMPACT are now busy working on the 27th Annual Program scheduled for July 17 – 22, 2011. General Secretary Walter Wise speaks during the Survival of the Fittest course.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

IMPACT Embarks on EEOC Training REPORT ON REGION I TRAINING WITH MASSACHUSETTS COMMISSION ON HARASSMENT/DISCRIMINATION Region I under the direction of Co-Chairs Jay Hurley and Carl Johnson have been conducting training held by the Massachusetts Commission on Discrimination. to date, five classes have been conducted, with more scheduled, and have been attended by Contractors, Human Resource people, Steward’s, Superintendents, General Foreman, Foreman, journeymen and apprentices. It is the long term goal of Local Union 7 and New England District Council to make this training mandatory eventually for all members, and the short term goal that anyone holding the position of steward must complete this training by January of 2011. New England District Council has a written Harassment Discrimination Policy in place written by New England District Attorney Mickey Long for all of Local Union 7. These 4 hour training classes have been well received by everyone who has attended. The classes detail the various forms of Discrimination and Harassment educating the participants how to recognize and address any situations that may occur both on site and off site. Local Union 7 has established a chain of command so every issue is properly documented and investigated when

New England District Council has a written Harassment Discrimination Policy in place written by New England District Council Mickey Long for all of Local Union 7.

reported. The M.C.D. stated the Ironworkers are the first trade to request this type of training in Massachusetts.

Orientation Course Unveiled Building Your Future Today is an interactive presentation developed by IMPACT and sent to all Local Union apprenticeship programs in 2010. The objective of this presentation is to make apprentices and journeymen aware of why IMPACT was established and how IMPACT is helping to build the future of the Ironworkers. There are 60 slides in this presentation. There are also nine small-group exercises built into the presentation. In addition, there are a number of videos (ranging from a few seconds to several minutes) that can be used during the presentation. This highly interactive presentation requires two to three hours depending on the number of participants and the amount of discussion taking place in relation to the various exercises. The presentation package consists of a printed

The objective of this presentation is to make apprentices and journeymen aware of why IMPACT was established and how IMPACT is helping to build the future of the Ironworkers.

guide and the presentation slides and resources on the DVD.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

39


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Foreman Training Courses Conducted in Canada

Course participants with hard hats provided by Local Union 97, Vancouver.

At the request of Darrell LaBoucan, District Council

When asked about the Foreman Training course,

President for Western Canada and Executive Director

one participant responded “The greatest value to

of Canadian Affairs, IMPACT conducted a foreman

me was that this course is designed for the iron-

training course in Vancouver, British Columbia.

working trade.” Another participant commented

This course was held during 3 – 5 February 2010

that “This course is relevant for the Ironworkers

with 26 participants. Then at the request of

and their contractors.” While still another said,

Local Union 771’s Business Manager, Bert Royer,

“I am a general foreman on a job and I found

IMPACT also supported a foreman training course

every part of this course beneficial and think it

in Regina, Saskatchewan. This course was held

will help up and coming foremen in our trade.”

during 5 – 7 October 2010 with 22 participants.

Foreman Training for Ironworkers is a threeday course designed by IMPACT to help develop skilled Ironworker foremen. During this highly interactive course the participants learn the roles and responsibilities of the foreman. In addition, they learn how to create an effective work team, communicate effectively,

Between the two courses, the participants represent-

apply problem-solving skills, document and main-

ed Local Unions 97, 700, 728, 736, 771 and 786 and

tain records, maintain labor-management relations,

included foremen, business agents, apprenticeship

plan and schedule work, implement a safety program,

coordinators and instructors. Contractors were also

and ensure the quality of work.

well represented and included Alstom Canada, Empire Iron, Supreme Steel, KWH Contractors, CCM Group, Aker Solutions, Tesc Contractors, Brymark, Bartech, Harris Reinforcing, Bergen Reinforcing, Bergen Reinforcing, ERA Enterprises, Acorn Steel,

IMPACT is now in the process of developing a new training package and course entitled General Foreman and Superintendent Training for Ironworkers scheduled for publication in 2011.

G&M Steel Service, Southeast Construction, Jacobs, Supermetal, Supreme Steel (both Field and Shop Darrell LaBoucan presents course certificate to Dwayne Reynolds of Local Union 97, Vancouver.

divisions), Walters, BFI, PCL, and Sustaining Capital. In addition to Darrell LaBoucan, observers attending the February course included Eric Waterman, IMPACT CEO; Steve Rank, IMPACT Western Director; Arnie Johansen, Local Union 97 Apprenticeship Coordinator; Kevin Bryenton, President of the Ontario District Council; and James Leland, Local Union 97 Business Manager.

40

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Bert Royer presents a course certificate to Rick Muir of Local Union 771 (Foreman for Supreme Steel).

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Department of Labor Distance Learning Grant In September of 2009, General President Hunt announced that the National Training Fund had received a $536,000 grant from the Department of Labor (DOL) to support development and testing of distance learning. The title of the project is Expanding Ironworker Apprenticeship: Establishment of a Hybrid-Progression Model. The activities supported by this grant were implemented during 2010.

Jeremiah DeArmond of Local Union 732 studying at home.

This grant was secured through IMPACT and GSP

Apprentices using this distance learning approach

Consulting, a IMPACT grant writing consultant

complete the same courses as apprentices taking

organization. GSP’s services are provided by IMPACT

courses at the training center, attend the training

free of charge to all IMPACT signatory local unions.

center for the same number of shop hours, and complete the same knowledge and skill tests. It is

NTF and IMPACT staff are working with four

only the traditional classroom component that is

Local Union apprenticeship programs to test distance learning under this grant: Local Union 387 in Atlanta, Georgia; Local Union 732 in Pocatello, Idaho; Local Union 495 in Albuquerque, New

being completed at a distance. The core safety courses are not taught using distance learning and the apprentice must complete these at the training center.

Mexico; and Local Union 848 in Charlotte, North Carolina and Charleston, South Carolina.

Paul Forbes of Local Union 495 studying at the training center.

For purposes of the grant, IMPACT and the NTF are defining distance learning as a method of learning for apprentices who do not attend the classroom component of training center courses. The information or knowledge part of each course is delivered by self-study and includes periods of

IMPACT and the NTF will be implementing grant

training center attendance for skill development,

activities through August of 2011.

Anthony Mora of Local Union 495 tying rebar at the training center.

practice and testing.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

41


EDUCATION AND TRAINING

AISC Certification Program IMPACT’s AISC Certifications Contacts

During 2010, IMPACT continued to work with our signatory contractors and shops who wished to obtain AISC (American Institute of Steel Construction) erector or fabricator certification for their company. Upon request IMPACT will provide a free day of correspondence services (working over the phone, fax, email, ect.) and when needed a free day of in person consultation. This service is to help our signatory contractors through the application process or it could be to provide audit training or just to help get a contractor’s procedure policies in place.

Chuck McGowan AISC Shop Certification Consultant IMPACT

Erector certification consultants Ted Sheppard and Jim Hobson along with IMPACT shop consultant Chuck McGowan have worked with 60 contractors on every phase of the program. To request this service, please contact the IMPACT offices for a AISC certification consultant request form. At that time Kenny Waugh from IMPACT will contact you before assigning a consultant to your firm.

Jim Hobson AISC Erector Certification Consultant IMPACT

IMPACT’s Certification 2011 Advertisement Campaign One Rigging Accident Could

IMPACT aggressively showcases the certifications and credentials offered by the ironworkers and their contractors everyday. These world class advertisements appear in local and national construction trade magazines and in online forums virtually every day of the year.

Cost You Million$

Ted Sheppard

OneWrong

AISC Erector Certification Consultant IMPACT ive these Our Customers Rece itional Cost: Benefits at NO Add

tors Over 3,000 Contrac workers & Over 100,000 Iron

Kenny Waugh Director of Industry Liaisons IMPACT For more information on the IMPACT AISC Certification Program, contact Kenny Waugh, Director of Industry Liaison, at 800-545-4921 or kwaugh@impact-net.org.

42

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Can You Afford NOT to Hire Us? rkers.org w w w. i ro n w o 1 800.545.492 -net.org w w w. i m p a c t

One Bad Weld Could Cost You Million$

Industry’s Recognized as Construction ements Highest Training Requir Signalman Training Ironworker Qualified (B30) meets ASME Rigging Training Ironworker Qualified meets ANSI (A10.42) of Rigging & 80 Classroom Hours Crane Training um of 1,200 Hours Minim On-the-Job Training Professional Trained & Verified by Ironworker Instructors g Materials State-of-the-Art Trainin Online Tracking System Training Centers 150 over of rk Netwo in the USA & Canada Department of Labor Certified by the U.S. e ok, Twitter & YouTub Follow us on Facebo

Over 3,000 Contractors & Over 100,000 Ironworkers

Our Customers Receive these Benefits at NO Additional Cost: Recognized as Construction Industry’s Highest Training Requirements

Complete Welder Portability 110 Classroom/Hands-on Hours Minimum

w w w. i ro n w o r k e r s . o rg 800.545.4921 w w w. i m p a c t - n e t . o rg

Cost You Million $

Over 3,000 Con tractors & Over 100,000 Ironworkers

Ironworker Qualified Welding Certifications meet AWS D1.1 Structural Code & AWS D1.5 Bridge Code Standards

Can You Afford NOT to Hire Us?

Signal Could

Performance Verified by AWS Certified Welding Inspectors State-of-the-Art Training Materials Easy Online Verification Network of over 150 Training Centers in the USA & Canada Certified by the U.S. Department of Labor Follow us on Facebook, Twitter & YouTube

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

Can You Afford NOT to Hire Us ? w w w. i ro n

workers.o rg 800.545.4 921 w w w. i m p a ct-net.org

Our Customers Rec Benefits at NO Addeive these itional Cost: Reco

gnized as Construct ion Industry’s Highest Training Requirements Ironworker Quali fied meets ASME (B30) Signalman Training Ironworker Quali fied meets ANSI (A10. Rigging Training 42) 80 Classroom Hour s of Rigging & Crane Training 1,200 Hours Minim um of On-the-Job Train ing Trained & Verifi ed by Ironworker Instru Professional ctors

State-of-the-Art Training Materials Online Tracking System Network of over 150 in the USA & Cana Training Centers da Certified by the U.S. Department of Labor Follow us on Faceb ook, Twitt er & YouTu be


INDUSTRY CONFERENCES

IMPACT Conducts Leadership Skills for Ironworkers THE 2010 OUTSTANDING APPRENTICESHIP COMPETITION Every two years apprentices from the United States

The seminar was designed and conducted by Rick

and Canada come together at the Outstanding

Sullivan and Harvey Swift, Director and Assistant

Apprentice Competition to compete and determine

Director of Education and Training for IMPACT.

which Ironworker is the best of the

Washington during September 17-20. This year the competition was billed as the “Battle in Seattle” which was hosted by the District Council of

Recognizing that these apprentices

u Influencing & Persuading Others

to prepare us as the next generation

u Competitive Spirit

of Ironworker leaders.” Andrew

u Passion

Byerly out of Local Union 5 said

u Problem Solving

“This seminar has inspired me to

u Vision & Adaptability

become a better leader to further my

u Integrity

career.” Meikel Norris from Local

u Trust & Values

positive. Jamie Olinghouse of

ship Competition was held in Seattle,

Local Union 86 training center.

“This leadership seminar will help

Feedback on the seminar was

best. The 2010 Ironworker Apprentice-

the Pacific Northwest and held at the

Local Union 340 commented

The objective of this four-hour session was to make the participants aware of nine specific leadership skills which are required to help ensure that they have a successful career as an Ironworker:

IMPACT’s Kevin Hilton addresses the participants.

really are the best of the best, IMPACT conducted

Union 118 commented “This was a great opportunity

u Team Building

the first ever “Leadership Skills for Ironworkers”

to learn how to put your heart into your career.”

u Listening

seminar for the 55 competitors. Participants worked in small groups to complete a series of activities including how to become a successful Ironworker, describing an Ironworker with strong integrity, dealing with trust issues, the benefits of a competitive spirit, problem solving, and others. The final activity required the participants to describe what they wanted to be doing in five years. IMPACT’s Harvey Swift monitors a group activity.

At the conclusion of the seminar General Secretary Walter Wise,

General Secretary Walter Wise, General Treasurer Ed McHugh, and District Council President Ron Piksa address the participants.

General Treasurer Ed McHugh, and District Council President Ron Piksa addressed the participants and presented each with a completion Responses included being an Ironworker contractor,

certificate. Based on the success of this seminar,

becoming a certified welding inspector, working

IMPACT is exploring additional leadership develop-

as an apprenticeship instructor and being elected a

ment initiatives to help prepare the future leaders

local union officer.

of the Ironworkers.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

43


INDUSTRY CONFERENCES

IMPACT Construction Tradeshow Report We started off 2010 with the World of Concrete, we work on this show jointly with the Department of Reinforcing and Local Union 416, Las Vegas, NV. This show is normally 80,000 people strong so the atmosphere is good to highlight all of our reinforcing training and the Ironworkers signatory contractors. The two shows in March were the SEAA (Steel Erectors Association of America) and the AGC Constructor Expo. The SEAA show and the AGC show is a mix of union and non union members.

Eric Dean, Iron Workers General Vice President and Kenny Waugh are pictured with Doug Williams, Local Union 433 BM at the Glassbuild America trade show.

Glassbuild America is a show we cover every year along with the Iron Workers’ DOAMM Department. The three shows in October were CMAA (Construction Manager Association of America), FFA (Future Farmers of America) and Heavy Movable Structures. CMAA is a gathering of Construction Managers. Naturally it gives us a chance to showcase all Ironworker/IMPACT programs in hopes of more contractors. The FFA convention in Indianapolis is our biggest recruitment effort every year. There are FFA chapters from all over North America. IMPACT, along with Iron Workers Local Union 22, Pictured at the Future Farmers of America (FFA) trade show are (left to right) IMPACT Director Industry Liaison Kenny Waugh, along with Iron Workers Local Union 22 members Gilbert Janek, Thomas Miller, Pascal Kateme, Ralph Copley and Patrick Slatton.

It give us a chance to talk with some of the open shop

have a large 20’ x 20’ island booth that we staff

contractors about the Ironworkers various programs.

with Local Union 22 officers and teachers along

April brought us to the FHWA (Federal Highway

with myself to convey the message of joining the

Administration) and BCTD legislative conference.

Iron Workers to all the students that stop by.

Two of IMPACT’s larger National shows are the NASCC (North American Steel Construction Conference) and the American Wind and Energy Association (AWEA) Windpower show. Both were in May, and at both of these shows, Training and IMPACT programs were the hot topic. We also sit on several committees for both associations. June and July took us to the Skills USA National

In 2010, we had no less than 700 FFA Members climb the column.

competition and the TVA Labor Management conference. At Skills USA we talk with several students but the value of this is you have the teachers looking for opportunities for their students.

44

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


INDUSTRY CONFERENCES

HMM is a gathering every two years of movable bridge and structures personal.

Patrick Slatton, Iron Workers Local Union 22, instructs an FFA member the proper technique to use the safety harness to compete in the Column Climb.

AWS (American Welding Society) Fabtech is one

The friends and contacts that we continue to

of our yearly National shows and finally we tried

make at all the various functions prove invaluable

a new show this year at Power-Gen in December.

on a daily basis whether it is a Business Manager

Both shows were perfect to show case our training

calling with a question or needing a contact

and Labor Management programs to owners and

of some type or if a member or contractor has

suppliers to the power generating industry.

questions or need help. At the end of every year when we look back at the shows we attended we can always find positives that we took away from the event.

White Construction and National Steel City, LLC (IMPACT Contractor Members) at the Power-Gen International Trade Show in Orlando, FL, December 2010.

The friends and contacts that we continue to make at all the various functions prove invaluable on a daily basis whether it is a Business Manager calling with a question or needing a contact of some type or if a member or contractor has questions or need help. Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

Tom Miller, Iron Workers Local Union 22, times an FFA attendee in the Column Climb Competition.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

45


INDUSTRY CONFERENCES

IMPACT’s SteelDay IMPACT and AISC Provide Value-Added Training while Showcasing Ironworker Knowledge Base On September 24, the Iron Workers International and IMPACT along with AISC (American Institute

Kenny Waugh, Directory of Industry Liaisons, IMPACT, explains the Iron Workers Training Materials to Charles Thornton of Thornton Tomasetti.

All were treated to a tour of International headquart-

of Steel Construction) hosted our

ers to include a showcase of the Ironworker Training

second annual SteelDay event. This

manuals and given bags with Ironworker informa-

year we were very fortunate to have

tion to take back and share with their colleagues.

John Cross P.E. and Vice President of AISC present an AIA accredited short course on “The IMPACT of Structural Steel on Sustainable Design and the 10 Facts that every Architect and Engineer Must Know.” After sending out many invites and trying to target engineers and architects we drew

John Cross, Vice President of AISC, presents the AIA accredited short course.

a very diverse crowd to include several engineers from some of the larger engineering firms, Government DOT’s, engineering students and visitors from surrounding Government entities. Some of the attendees were directly off of jobsites and some just came in off the streets to see what was going on.

The Iron Workers and IMPACT along with the National Training Fund will continue to take every opportunity like this event to continue to spread the word about the great job that our union brothers and sisters along with our signatory contractors do on a daily basis.

SteelDay attendees during the AIA accredited short course.

46

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


DAVIS-BACON

Prevailing Wage Compliance “The system is broken and cheaters are kicking our behinds. Have you heard this?” says Wage Compliance Administrator Christopher Burger. “Defeatism will get us nowhere and I do believe we can get closer to a level playing field. Look, twenty years ago, public work was not always a lock for us and cheating has gone on for years,” he asserts. “But the question in a down economy is whether you have a strategy to fight back, and we are doing that.” In the last year and half, he says, the U.S. Department of Labor has gotten a shot in the arm with the hiring of new investigators and return to their mission. “That’s where we come in,” says Burger. He draws on his experience a trade unionist, a former labor organizer and years spent working a prevailing wage investigator for a fair contracting group. He says the goal is to educate and communicate with each Ironworker local union business manager, their agents and organizers “and yes,” he adds, “the contractors, so that we won’t sit still — we might actually win a few battles.” He goes on to say that even non-union contractors have come calling with key information about compliance issues. “This is easiest the busiest year for moving wage violation cases since I started here in 2006,” he says. And it’s not always just contractors playing fast and loose. “We saw one powerful federal agency that didn’t see fit to follow prevailing wage laws,” says Burger. “We called them on it, got the right wheels turning and the next thing you know, the job is being re-bid,” he says, “and most importantly, goes union, to boot.” The US DOL says that next year will be a year of stepped-up debarments for wage violators “and, sure, we want to help that process as it protects the fair contractor and the public at large.” “I am especially proud that General President Hunt (also IMPACT co-chair) became the first Ironworker ever to address the National Alliance for Fair Contracting’s annual conference in October.” While praising the DOL’s new efforts, Mr. Hunt made key points to the DOL representatives in attendance about what has to improve. Our participation through IMPACT, Burger says, is evidence that the ironworking industry recognizes that you shouldn’t

go it alone and that by pooling resources, you learn from each other on how to fight back. Since IMPACT recently joined the NAFC board, he says, “we are now part of a circle of prevailing wage experts who are being called upon by the national building trades to help improve procurement procedures, Davis-Bacon and related statutes to see make fair contracting a reality. Through NAFC, he says, IMPACT is a part of a network, he says, of DOL and other federal officials, Armed Forces labor advisors, state labor commissioners, etc. who meet regular to try to solve problems. “We have been active in responding to US DOL wage surveys,” he says, “particularly when we need to challenge a wage determination — be it with other trades or standing alone.” Mr. Burger continued work to establish best practices for local union-level tracking of work for wage surveys, bringing together two locals, various IT professionals, the International and others with existing systems. The end result, we hope, will be a modern system for locals to track their work properly, better prevail on surveys and increase work opportunities for their signatory contractors. In the last year, aside from regular duties, he’s given presentations for two District Councils, at the invitation of Ironworker Presidents Eric Dean (Illinois & Vicinity) and Ron Piksa (Pacific Northwest). He presented to the IMPACT RAB I Executive Council in Worcester, Massachusetts and also for the RAB V and VI meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana and in Kentucky on a DOL matter. He also addressed the annual IW Organizers Summit on Capitol Hill as well as the Organizing Department’s ACES program at the National Labor College.

What can be done about Davis-Bacon anyway?

Christopher Burger

Christopher Burger writes a monthly column for The Ironworker, writes guest articles in local union newsletters and has a Davis-Bacon

Work continues with Ironworker local business managers and signatory contractors to keep prevailing wages up-to-date with the DOL. Attention to problems concerning wage determinations and collective bargaining agreements is routine.

“Twitter” internet “social media”

There is regular participation in the Davis-Bacon Committee of the BCTD and frequent consulting with the committee chairman. There is regular compilation of wages nationwide for all locals for the bi-annual wage scale table,

not everything will click our way

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

account (IMPACTDavBacon) to post on hot topics in the field. “This is a tough road, I know and but we now seem to be facing it head on with a game plan.”

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

47


MEMBERSHIP

IMPACT Partners with Fabrication Shops As of December 31, 2010, IMPACT had over 60 Fabrication Shops making contributions. IMPACT and the National Training Fund have completed a new training manual created especially for the shops — Training and Fabrication for Shop Ironworkers (see page 36). u Aggressive Erectors

u Danly Engineering Co.

u Riverton Steel Construction

u Alcorn Fence (LA)

u Delta Steel

u Rodbusters/Wheeler, Inc.

u All West Fabricators

u Dietrich Iron Works

u Romak Iron Works

u Allied Steel Co., Inc.

u Eandi Metal Works

u S & S Welding

u Alrick

u Forderer Cornice Works

u San Mateo Art Iron Works

u AMT Metal Fabricators

u General Conveyor Inc.

u Sea Berg Metal Fab

u Architectural &

u Harris Salinas Rebar Inc.

u Shop Ironworkers 790 App

u Hoeck Iron Works

u Shopmen’s Local Union 509

u Lees Imperial Welding

u Smith Steel Services

u Atlas Ornamental Iron Works

u MacSteel Service Centers

u Steve Zappetini

u Bar Steel Service

u Metal Fab

u Stockton Steel

u Bridge Structural &

u Mission City Rebar Inc.

u Sun Iron Works Inc.

u Monterey Bay Rebar

u Supreme Steel Ltd.

u Muhlhauser Steel Inc.

u Taylor’s Steel & Welding Inc.

u National Metal Fab

u The Conco Companies

u Nor-Cal Steel, Inc.

u Vista Steel Company

u Olson Steel

u Washington Ornamental Iron

u Pacific Coast Steel (C)

u Westco Ironworks

u Park Steel Company Inc.

u Western Steel & Wire

u PDM Bridge, LLC

u Young’s Iron Works, Inc.

Structural Steel u Associated Rebar

Ornamental IW u Brodhead Steel Prod-Madera u Brodhead Steel Prod-San Fran u C A Buchen Corp u C E Toland & Son u Camblin Steel u CMC Fontana Steel u Concord Iron Works u Crown Fence Co.

48

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

u Plas-Tal Mfg

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


MEMBERSHIP

IMPACT Local Unions and Signatory Contractor Associations 1 3 5 6 7

Chicago Pittsburgh Washington Buffalo Boston

8

Milwaukee

9 11

Niagara Falls Newark

12 14 15

Albany Spokane Hartford

16 17

Baltimore Cleveland

21 22 24 25

Omaha Indianapolis Denver Detroit

27 28

Salt Lake City Richmond

29 33 36 37

Portland Rochester Easton Providence

40 44 45

New York Cincinnati Jersey City

46L

New York

46

Springfield

48 55 58 60 63 66 67 68

Oklahoma City Toledo New Orleans Syracuse Chicago San Antonio Des Moines Trenton

70 75 79 84

Louisville Phoenix Norfolk Houston

Associated Steel Erectors of Chicago Ironworker Employers Association of Western Pennsylvania Ironworker Employers Association of Washington, D.C. Upstate Iron Workers Employers Association Building Trade Employers’ Association of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts; Western Massachusetts Erectors Association Eastern Wisconsin Erectors Association, Inc.; Fox Valley Erectors Association; Associated General Contractors, Michigan Chapter Upstate Iron Workers Employers Association Building Contractors Association of New Jersey; New Jersey Steel Association, Inc.; Associated General Contractors of New Jersey; Construction Contractors Labor Employers Association of New Jersey Upstate Iron Workers Employers Association Northwest Ironworkers Employers Association Connecticut Ironworker Employers Association; AGC/CCIA Building Contractors Labor Division of Connecticut, Inc. Ironworkers & Glaziers Employers Association Construction Employers Association of Cleveland; Steel & Iron Contractors’ Association of Greater Cleveland Omaha Building Contractors Employers Association Indiana Construction Association Building Division, Inc. Colorado Steel Erectors Association Associated General Contractors, Michigan Chapter; Great Lakes Fabricators & Erectors Association; Michigan Conveyor Manufacturers Association; Re-Steel Contractors Association; Great Lakes Metal Building Erectors Association Utah Steel Erectors & Reinforcing Bar Association Virginia Association of Contractors; Constructors’ Labor Council of West Virginia, Inc.; Southwest Virginia Contractors Association; Northwest Ironworkers Employers Association Upstate Iron Workers Employers Association Signatory Contractors Associated General Contractors, Rhode Island Chapter; Rhode Island Steel Erectors Association Allied Building Metal Industries, Inc. Steel Erectors, Riggers & Fabricators Association Building Contractors Association of New Jersey; New Jersey Steel Association, Inc.; Associated General Contractors of New Jersey; Construction Contractors Labor Employers Association of New Jersey Allied Building Metal Industries, Inc.; New York Building Contractors Association; The Cement League; General Contractors Association of New York; Association of Concrete Contractors of New York; Employing Metallic Furring and Lath Association of New York; Association of Wall-Ceiling and Carpentry Industries of New York; Long Island Contractors’ Association Associated General Contractors of Illinois; Central Illinois Builders of Associated General Contractors Oklahoma Commercial and Industrial Builders and Steel Erectors Association Construction Contractors Council Mid-South Erectors Association, Inc. Upstate Iron Workers Employers Association Iron League of Chicago Texas Iron Workers Employers Association Des Moines Construction Council Building Contractors Association of New Jersey; Trenton Building Contractors Association; Associated General Contractors of New Jersey Iron Workers Employers Association, Inc. Arizona Steel Field Erectors Association Virginia Association of Contractors Texas Iron Workers Employers Association

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

When IMPACT was launched in 2003, we counted 58 local union members by the end of the year. As word spread about the breadth and depth of the proposed labor-management programs, local unions and their signatory contractor associations began adding IMPACT to their collective bargaining agreements. Today, we have 113 local unions contributing to IMPACT and 60 signatory shops have signed up.

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

49


MEMBERSHIP

IMPACT Local Unions and Signatory Contractor Associations

In 2010, 12 Canadian Local Unions began contributing to IMPACT.

The addition of Canada creates a unique opportunity, allowing IMPACT to truly have an international approach to its labormanagement model.

50

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

86 89 92 103 111 112 118

Seattle

Northwest Ironworkers Employers Association

Cedar Rapids

Signatory Contractors

Birmingham

Steel Erection & Crane Rental Association of Central Alabama, Inc.

Evansville

Tri-State Iron Workers Employers Association

Rock Island

Quad-City Builders Association

Peoria

Greater Peoria Contractors & Suppliers Association

Sacramento

Construction Employers’ Association; Building Industry Association of Southern California; Engineering & Utility Contractors Association; Industrial Contractors, UMIC, Inc.; Associated General Contractors, Las Vegas Chapter; Associated General Contractors, Nevada Chapter; Associated General Contractors, San Diego Chapter; Southern California Contractors Association; Steel Fabricators Association of Southern California; Western Steel Council; Associated General Contractors of California; United General Contractors, Inc.

135 136 147 155

Galveston

Texas Iron Workers Employers Association

Chicago

Machinery Movers Association of Greater Chicago

Fort Wayne

Associated Steel Erectors & Riggers Association

Fresno

Construction Employers’ Association; Associated General Contractors, Nevada Chapter; Building Industry Association of Southern California; Engineering & Utility Contractors Association; Industrial Contractors, UMIC, Inc.; Associated General Contractors, Las Vegas Chapter; Associated General Contractors, San Diego Chapter; Southern California Contractors Association; Steel Fabricators Association of Southern California; Western Steel Council; Associated General Contractors of California; United General Contractors, Inc.

167 172 197

Memphis

Iron Workers Employers Association of the Tennessee Valley and Vicinity, Inc.

Columbus

Associated General Contractors of Ohio

New York

Building Stone & Precast Contractors Association; Contracting Stone Setters Association

201 207 229

Washington

Signatory Contractors

Youngstown

Builders Association of Eastern Ohio and Western Pennsylvania

San Diego

Construction Employers’ Association; Associated General Contractors, Nevada Chapter; Building Industry Association of Southern California; Engineering & Utility Contractors Association; Industrial Contractors, UMIC, Inc.; Associated General Contractors, Las Vegas Chapter; Associated General Contractors, San Diego Chapter; Southern California Contractors Association; Steel Fabricators Association of Southern California; Western Steel Council; Associated General Contractors of California; United General Contractors, Inc.

263 272 290 292 301 321 340

Dallas/Fort Worth

Texas Iron Workers Employers Association

Miami

Southeastern Council of Ironworker Employers, Inc.

Dayton

Associated General Contractors, West Central Ohio Division

South Bend

Michiana Builders Association, Inc.

Charleston

Constructors’ Labor Council of West Virginia, Inc.

Little Rock

Arkansas Best Contractors Association

Battle Creek

Great Lakes Fabricators & Erectors Association; Western Michigan Steel Erectors Association; West Michigan Heavy Haulers Association; Great Lakes Metal Building Erectors Association

350

Atlantic City

Building Contractors Association of New Jersey; Trenton Building Contractors Association; Associated General Contractors of New Jersey; Construction Contractors Labor Employers Association of New Jersey

361 372 373

Brooklyn

Allied Building Metal Industries, Inc.

Cincinnati

Reinforced Concrete Contractors Association

Perth Amboy

Building Contractors Association of New Jersey; New Jersey Steel Association, Inc.; Associated General Contractors of New Jersey; Construction Contractors Labor Employers Association of New Jersey

377

San Francisco

Construction Employers’ Association; Associated General Contractors, Nevada Chapter; Building Industry Association of Southern California; Engineering & Utility Contractors Association; Industrial Contractors, UMIC, Inc.; Associated General Contractors, Las Vegas Chapter; Associated General Contractors, San Diego Chapter; Southern California Contractors Association; Steel Fabricators Association of Southern California; Western Steel Council; Associated General Contractors of California; United General Contractors, Inc.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


MEMBERSHIP

IMPACT Local Unions and Signatory Contractor Associations 378

Oakland

380 383 384 387 392 393 395

Champaign Madison Knoxville Atlanta East St. Louis Aurora Hammond

396

St. Louis

397 399

Tampa Camden

402 404 405

West Palm Beach Harrisburg Philadelphia

416

Los Angeles

417 420 424

Newburgh Reading New Haven

433

Los Angeles

440 444

Utica Joliet

451 469 477 480

Wilmington Jackson Sheffield Elizabeth

482 483

Austin Hackensack

489 492 495 498 506 509

Scranton Nashville Albuquerque Rockford Seattle Los Angeles

Construction Employers’ Association; Associated General Contractors, Nevada Chapter; Building Industry Association of Southern California; Engineering & Utility Contractors Association; Industrial Contractors, UMIC, Inc.; Associated General Contractors, Las Vegas Chapter; Associated General Contractors, San Diego Chapter; Southern California Contractors Association; Steel Fabricators Association of Southern California; Western Steel Council; Associated General Contractors of California; United General Contractors, Inc. Central Illinois Builders of Associated General Contractors Associated General Contractors of Wisconsin Iron Workers Employers Association of the Tennessee Valley and Vicinity, Inc. Association of Steel Erectors and Heavy Equipment Operators, Inc. Southern Illinois Builders Association Steel Erectors and Machinery Movers Association Industrial Contractors & Builders Association of Indiana; Calumet Builders Association Associated General Contractors of St. Louis; Erectors & Riggers Association of Greater St. Louis Union Contractors and Subcontractors Association, Inc. Building Contractors Association of New Jersey; Building Contractors Association of South Jersey Southeastern Council of Ironworker Employers, Inc. Ironworker Employers Association of Central Pennsylvania General Building Contractors Association; Contracting Riggers Association of Philadelphia and Vicinity; Concrete Contractors Association, Inc. Construction Employers’ Association; Associated General Contractors, Nevada Chapter; Building Industry Association of Southern California; Engineering & Utility Contractors Association; Industrial Contractors, UMIC, Inc.; Associated General Contractors, Las Vegas Chapter; Associated General Contractors, San Diego Chapter; Southern California Contractors Association; Steel Fabricators Association of Southern California; Western Steel Council; Associated General Contractors of California; United General Contractors, Inc. Fabricators and Erectors Association Independent Contractors Association Connecticut Ironworker Employers Association; AGC/CCIA Building Contractors Labor Division of Connecticut, Inc. Construction Employers’ Association; Associated General Contractors, Nevada Chapter; Building Industry Association of Southern California; Engineering & Utility Contractors Association; Industrial Contractors, UMIC, Inc.; Associated General Contractors, Las Vegas Chapter; Associated General Contractors, San Diego Chapter; Southern California Contractors Association; Steel Fabricators Association of Southern California; Western Steel Council; Associated General Contractors of California; United General Contractors, Inc. Upstate Iron Workers Employers Association Kankakee Area Contractors Association, Inc.; Contractors Association of Will & Grundy Counties; Illinois Valley Contractors Association Steel Contractors Association of Delaware; Delaware Contractors Association Mid-South Erectors Association, Inc. Iron Workers Employers Association of the Tennessee Valley and Vicinity, Inc. Building Contractors Association of New Jersey; New Jersey Steel Association, Inc.; Associated General Contractors of New Jersey; Construction Contractors Labor Employers Association of New Jersey Texas Iron Workers Employers Association Building Contractors Association of New Jersey; New Jersey Steel Association, Inc.; Associated General Contractors of New Jersey; Construction Contractors Labor Employers Association of New Jersey Ironworker Employers Association of Northeastern Pennsylvania Iron Workers Employers Association of the Tennessee Valley and Vicinity, Inc. Associated General Contractors, New Mexico Building Branch Northern Illinois Building Contractors Association Signatory Contractors Steel Fabricators Association of Southern California

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

“At this point, nearly all Iron Workers Local Unions participate in IMPACT and are realizing the benefits of the shift to the new model of labor relations, labor-management cooperation.”

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

51


MEMBERSHIP

IMPACT Local Unions and Signatory Contractor Associations 512

Twin Cities, Minneapolis Minnesota Steel Erectors Association; Associated General Contractors of and St. Paul North Dakota; Associated General Contractors of Minnesota 549 Wheeling Constructors’ Labor Council of West Virginia, Inc.; Ohio Valley Construction Employers Council, Inc. 550 Canton Signatory Contractors 568 Cumberland Constructors’ Labor Council of West Virginia, Inc.; Western Maryland Contractors Association 580 New York Allied Building Metal Industries, Inc. 584 Tulsa Oklahoma Commercial and Industrial Builders and Steel Erectors Association 597 Jacksonville Northeastern Florida Construction Management Council 623 Baton Rouge Mid-South Erectors Association, Inc. 698 Miami Signatory Contractors 700 Windsor Ontario Erectors Association, Inc.; Industrial Contractors Association of Canada; Reinforcing Steel Institute of Ontario; Construction Labour Relations Association of Ontario 704 Chattanooga Iron Workers Employers Association of the Tennessee Valley and Vicinity, Inc. 709 Savannah South Georgia Mechanical & Erectors Association; Montana Steel Erectors and Contractors Association 720 Edmonton Construction Labour Relations Association of Alberta 721 Toronto Ontario Erectors Association, Inc.; Industrial Contractors Association of Canada; Reinforcing Steel Institute of Ontario; Construction Labour Relations Association of Ontario 728 Winnipeg Construction Labour Relations Association of Manitoba 732 Pocatello Idaho Steel Erectors Association 736 Hamilton Ontario Erectors Association, Inc.; Industrial Contractors Association of Canada; Reinforcing Steel Institute of Ontario; Construction Labour Relations Association of Ontario 751 Anchorage Associated General Contractors of Alaska 752 Halifax Nova Scotia Construction Labour Relations Association 759 Thunder Bay Ontario Erectors Association, Inc.; Industrial Contractors Association of Canada; Reinforcing Steel Institute of Ontario; Construction Labour Relations Association of Ontario 764 St. Johns, Newfoundland Construction Labour Relations Association of Newfoundland and Labrador, Inc. 765 Ottawa Ontario Erectors Association, Inc.; Industrial Contractors Association of Canada; Reinforcing Steel Institute of Ontario; Construction Labour Relations Association of Ontario 769 Ashland Constructors’ Labor Council of West Virginia, Inc.; Tri-State Contractors Association 771 Regina Construction Labour Relations Association of Saskatchewan 782 Paducah Western Kentucky Construction Employers Association; Egyptian Contractors Association, Inc.; Southeast Missouri Contractors Association, Inc. 786 Sudbury Ontario Erectors Association, Inc.; Industrial Contractors Association of Canada; Reinforcing Steel Institute of Ontario; Construction Labour Relations Association of Ontario 787 Parkersburg Constructors’ Labor Council of West Virginia, Inc.; Parkersburg-Marietta Contractors Association 798 Mobile Coastal Contractors and Erectors Association 790 San Francisco-Oakland Signatory Contractors 808 Orlando Mid-Florida Steel Erectors Association 838 Regina Signatory Contractors 844 Hercules Construction Employers’ Association; Associated General Contractors, Nevada Chapter; Building Industry Association of Southern California; Engineering & Utility Contractors Association; Industrial Contractors, UMIC, Inc.; Associated General Contractors, Las Vegas Chapter; Associated General Contractors, San Diego Chapter; Southern California Contractors Association; Steel Fabricators Association of Southern California; Western Steel Council; Associated General Contractors of California; United General Contractors, Inc. 846 Lakeland Signatory Contractors 847 Phoenix Signatory Contractors 848 Charleston Carolina Contractors Committee 849 Luck Signatory Contractors

IMPACT increases funding to Regions by 5% to assist local efforts during construction depression.

52

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org


2011 LOOKING AHEAD

Dawn of Our Renewed Success We are planning for success moving forward. All

IMPACT will continue to harness every asset

indications point to 2011 being the historical point

available to insure that those pension plans that

where the employment situation for Ironworkers

are struggling have a resource to access. The Board

hopefully bottoms out and rebounds. This will be

of Trustees of IMPACT have said repeatedly that

our opportunity to gain valuable momentum toward

accepting a mission as challenging as the pension

achieving our goal of doubling our market share in

crisis is one of the reasons IMPACT was created.

the next ten years.

We welcome that challenge. An IMPACT labor-

IMPACT welcomes a new Labor Co-Chair and General President in the person of Walt Wise.

management Task Force is working on the issue with other industry partners.

Walt’s reputation speaks for itself. One only look as

In 2011, to expand the course offerings at the

far as one of his recent bios with its signature quote,

National Training Fund’s Annual Instructor Training

used while leading his local union, “A card signed

Conference. The move to Ann Arbor proved both

today keeps the tall man away!”

professionally and fiscally to be an awesome success.

More Work More Ironworkers More Contractors More Customers

We will need to be the best. If we are to be the best IMPACT will have to offer the best, value-added programs in the entire construction industry. If you control the supervision, then you will control the market! 2011 will see the institution of the IMPACT Superintendent/General Foreman training. Never let it be said again that Ironworkers don’t have the people skills to run the major jobs. The final center section of the Blennerhassett Arch Bridge in Parkersburg, West Virginia.

As we place more Ironworkers in those project leadership positions around the continent our workhours will march upward. Drug testing has burned itself into the minds of most Ironworkers as being synonymous with IMPACT. If that is the case we need to have the best program. In 2010, IMPACT took aim at the

We now want to parlay that success into offering professional development courses that can benefit the Ironworkers, as usual, but also help sharpen the skills and business knowledge of our contractors.

top, by taking a mature program and enhancing it

We intend to engage the Ironworkers membership

through a new pilot program. The Pilot has elimi-

and the contractors more closely. They are both a

nated annual testing and mail-out notifications. It

valuable asset and resource. Last year we utilized

has embraced a model of true random testing that

tools such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

test only Ironworkers employed on a jobsite. The

We also conducted our first webinar. We intend to

revised program was crafted by marshalling some

ramp this communication in 2011 while increasing

of the brightest minds of both the Ironworker and

our transparency and utility.

employer communities. It has been a success and we look for that success to grow in 2011.

The Board of Trustees, the RAB Executive Committees, the National Staff and the Regional Directors of

Every person reading this article wants to be able

IMPACT will continue in 2011 to keep our mission

to retire with a secure and well funded pension.

at the forefront of our mind.

Follow IMPACT on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube & www.impact-net.org

Our mission is really a command. It does not ask a question, and it is not a mere request. We will fulfill this command in 2011, moving from victory to victory, raising hope and expectations and putting more ironworkers and contractors to work!

ANNUAL REPORT 2010

53


Annual Instructors Training July 17 – 22, 2011

u

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Iron Workers International 42nd Convention August 15 – 19, 2011

u

Chicago, Illinois

North American Iron Workers/IMPACT Labor Management Conference 2012 January 29 – February 2, 2012

Follow IMPACT on:

u

Paris

u

Las Vegas, Nevada

1750 New York Ave. N.W. Washing ton, DC 20006 202.383.4800

u

800.545.4921

www.ironworkers.org www.impact-net.org

www.impact-net.org

This Annual Report is printed on FSC Certified Paper using Vegetable-Based Inks by MOSAIC, a Union Printer, and is 100% Wind Powered, Carbon Neutral, an EPA Green Power Partner and EPA Climate Leader.


IMPACT Annual Report 2010