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NY-ANGUS.COM | New York Angus Association [ OFFICERS ]

President | Ric Coombe Grahamsville, NY 914.799.1091 tvangus@thunderviewfarms.com

Vice President | JoAnne King Cobleskill, NY 518-573-8421 krajoanne.king@gmail.com

Secretary | Jeanetta Laudermilk Treasurer Truxton, NY 607.345.6466 jeanetta@ny-angus.com

Past President | Jerry Emerich Mooers, NY 518.236.5907 jemerich@premierselect.com

[ DIRECTORS ]

2021 | Chad Hazekamp Rob Bannister NicoleDeBoer

2022 | John Van Derwerken Tim Pallokat Brian Acomb

Upcoming Events Summer Cattle Battle 2020 - Fonda Fairgrounds August 29-30, 2020 | Fond, NY Trowbridge Farms Red, Black and You Female Production Sale September 19, 2020 Advertising Deadline Fall Angus Angles October 15, 2020 2020 American Angus Convention November 7-9, 2020

2023 | Steve Loetterie Jeff Barber Skip Lear


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Stay up to date with all things New York Angus by visiting our website and facebook.


New York Angus Association | President’s Message

Dear Members: What a year so far and we are only halfway through it! Boy do we all miss the normalcy of summer, the opportunities to mingle with others at county fairs, Empire Farm Days, and all the other events in our communities throughout the state. As an Association it was very disappointing but not unexpected to hear the New York State Fair was cancelled. As breeders and parents we all miss the opportunity to showcase our cattle and the future leaders in our industry. 2020 has certainly been wrought with challenges in so many ways. Our families have been disrupted with kids being home from school, our social schedules virtually eliminated, and our beef markets stressed and forever changed. I suggest that you think of these challenges as opportunities. We have more time with our families, use it wisely. Value the deeper friendships and associations when activities resume; we should appreciate them more. Regarding the Angus/Beef business it is all about opportunities. Tough or diminished traditional markets while causing short term disruptions, have the long term potential to drive new markets. Being in New York we have a major advantage over producers in several smaller states; most of us have markets nearby. This pandemic and the beef/food concerns have driven many more people to think about where their food comes from. I believe many of the people that have had the opportunity to connect with local producers will be loyal for years to come. I know it is not easy to change direction, but if you have the chance to connect with consumers do your best to make them satisfied and wanting more. For many, getting processing is almost impossible given the shortage of small processors, so don’t be shy about approaching fellow producers who have experience in direct markets for ideas or potentially to partner in some way. The growth in these markets right now is unprecedented. If any of us in the Association can help in any way, please feel free to reach out. Remember we as farmers have always looked at adversity and faced it down with our work ethic and resolve and this time will be no different.

Ric Coombe

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New York Angus Association | Classifieds 3 EMBRYOS FOR SALE Sired by Basin Payweight 1682 (17038724). Dam is Visions Denver Pride 421 (18076686). Contact John Iovieno, Cheer-Up Farm. 860-395-4833. email, johniovieno@gmail.com

BUILDING ON A STRONG FOUNDATION FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION

Superior Local Angus Beef         & Quality Registered               Angus Gene�cs 

The Coombe Family   

62 Old Brodhead Rd  Grahamsville, NY 12740 

Ph: (845) 985‐2189 

tvangus@thunderviewfarms.com • www.thunderviewfarms.com

MAKING YOUTH OUR PRIORITY REGISTERED ANGUS

5493 Cheningo Rd Truxton, NY 13158 Carl Hinkle (607) 842-6936 Jeanetta Laudermilk, Mgr. (607) 345-6466 NewPennFarm@gmail.com

www.NewPennFarm.com 5


May 28, 2020

Contact: Miranda Reiman, Director, Producer Communications, 605-695-1678, mreiman@certifiedangusbeef.com, Certified Angus Beef LLC

PHOTOS: https://www.cabcattle.com/angus-bull-2/ https://www.cabcattle.com/targeting-the-brand/cattle-marketing/seedstock/ttb-epd-graphic-2/

New thresholds for Targeting the Brand By: Miranda Reiman When you have better data you, you can make better decisions. That’s why the Targeting the BrandTM program was recently updated: so that commercial cow-calf producers better find sires that help them hit Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand specifications. “If a bull buyer wants a calf crop that has a greater chance of making CAB, it helps him identify the genetics that will help him do that,” says John Grimes, owner of Maplecrest Farms, Hillsboro, Ohio, and CAB board chair. “The trait that sorts cattle out of CAB quicker than anything is lack of marbling.” Since 2017, breeders and bull studs have used the Targeting the Brand logo to denote bulls that excel in the marbling (Marb) EPD (expected progeny difference) and the Grid Dollar Value Index, or “dollar G” ($G). The standards had been based on bulls at breed average or better for both measures. “If we could keep moving average higher, that was a step in the right direction, and we based that on the best information we had,” says Kara Lee, CAB production brand manager. But 8,600 actual carcass records recently provided real-world measurements and supported the move to refine those thresholds. Angus Genetics Inc. analyzed the records to find the combined Marb and $G minimum levels likely to produce CAB from at least half of a calf crop. The updated Targeting the Brand requirements—now at +0.65 for Marb and +55 for $G—align with that analysis. Slightly higher than the previous breed average requirement, one in four non-parent Angus bulls now qualifies for the designation. Those numbers will be evaluated every two years, and adjusted based on the most current information. Why a 50% CAB acceptance rate? “Today’s nationwide average is 35%, but we are really looking at how we continue to meet and grow demand,” Lee says, noting a two-billion-pound sales goal the next decade or so. “If everyone wants to get a piece of the pie, we have to keep making the pie bigger,” she says. “That’s a cliché a lot of people use, but the bigger the CAB pie becomes, the more room for commercial producers to capitalize on the value of buying high-quality registered Angus bulls.” The more demand, the better the pull-through model works. “The one-billion-pound mark seemed unachievable not too long ago. What can we do to keep that growth curve going up?” Grimes asks. “Breeders have done a great job of increasing the percent of cattle that qualify for CAB, but to get to that lofty goal of two billion pounds? We’ve got to do better.” He encourages breeders to use the marks, and make sure their customers know what they mean. “These are just minimums,” Lee says. Producers who already get 50% or higher CAB acceptance rates should aim even higher.

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“We know marbling is highly heritable. We know that genetics impact roughly 40% of the marbling potential in those cattle; but that said, there’s another 60% not explained by genetics,” Lee says. When environment plays a role, high-quality management has to match to get intended results. “The Targeting the Brand logo is not a guarantee that progeny from any animal will hit CAB. It’s an indication that the genetic potential is higher with that animal.” And the sire is only half the equation. “There are some people out there who will say, ‘All Angus grade high,’ or, ‘The average Angus is good enough,’” Grimes says. “But we don’t feel like average is good enough. The database says we have to up our game.” Don’t mistake that for a marbling-only message though. “These numbers give producers a lot of latitude to place emphasis on carcass but still select for other traits that we know are really important,” Lee says. “We always discourage producers from single-trait selection.” History shows progress can be made on multiple fronts at the same time, Grimes says. “People used to think we couldn’t have calving ease and high growth, and breeders have shown that they can do that. So it’s not realistic to think we can’t do the same with elite carcass merit and maternal function,” he says. More than 130 sales used the logo during the 2019-2020 sale season—that number up 76% in two years—to identify more than 6,500 Angus bulls with a likelihood of siring brand qualifiers. “We have tremendous tools available to registered breeders through the Association, and they all serve a purpose, but we also know digesting all that information can be a challenge for the average commercial producer,” Lee says. “Targeting the Brand is a way to help those looking to keep a focus on carcass quality.” For more information on the program, visit CABcattle.com

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8/16/2020

Beef marketing system buffeted by challenges

vladans / Getty Images

Beef marketing system buffeted by challenges The COVID crash was fast and furious. How fast prices recover and return to normal depends on how well the U.S. keeps COVID-19 under control. Harlan Hughes | Jul 13, 2020 https://www.beefmagazine.com/print/115968

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Beef marketing system buffeted by challenges

Without a doubt, the delicate cattle and beef marketing system we have in the U.S. is being challenged like never before. This month, my study herd manager asked me to brief him on the beef market beyond the ranch, with specific emphasis on the consumer aspect of the beef market. I summarized some of the data I receive each week in a newsletter titled the Daily Livestock Report, published by Steiner Consulting Group. Here is what I sent to my study rancher. Meat production (beef, pork and poultry) was up in March 2020, with “all” meat production up 10% over last year in the last week of March 2020. Saturday slaughter was especially high in late March and served to increase slaughter in high demand times. There certainly was no indication of a protein shortage in late March, or even down the road. In fact, beef production was up 13.7% over a year ago in the last week of March. But in late March, things started to change — and change rapidly — for U.S. consumers. COVID-19 hit in several states, and some consumers immediately shifted into panic buying mode. Panic buying brought on spot shortages of some consumerdemanded products in some markets. First it was toilet paper, and then disinfectant and baby wipes. Home disinfectants soon joined the panic list. This was about the time my wife and I elected to migrate from our Arizona winter home to our Idaho summer home. Our unusual trip experience back to Idaho was summarized in the May 2020 Market Adviser. Even with increased COVID-19 in late March and early April, there was no indication of a protein shortage. Then, as the coronavirus got worse, stay-at-home orders were made; restaurants closed down, stopping all food service beef demand; and all meals were consumed at home.

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https://www.beefmagazine.com/print/115968

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8/16/2020

Beef marketing system buffeted by challenges

The supply chain, however, could not instantly change from restaurant-supplied meats to home-cooked meats. Consumers rapidly perceived a shortage of meats. The demand for home-prepared meals skyrocketed, causing the demand for homeconsumed meats to skyrocket. The marketing system had to make a dramatic change from restaurant deliveries to grocery store deliveries, but the products demanded were different. The supply channels were different. There was an ample supply of meat available, but not in the form consumers wanted. In order to ration grocery story meats, the price started to go up. Packers and suppliers needed to balance rapidly increasing grocery store retail demand with a sharp decline in food service demand. The “just in time� supply system was changing, and it was asked to do so overnight. It became impossible to supply all the meat demanded by grocery stores nationwide. At the same time, consumer meat prices approached double from a year ago, leading to consumer panic buying.

Beef plant shutdowns, more complications Then on April 13, the JBS Greeley beef plant closed due to some of its workers contracting COVID-19. Soon after, other slaughter plants followed with the same problem. Due to the limited number of slaughter plants in the U.S., by May 5, beef production was down 687 million pounds carcass weight and 481 million pounds retail weight (Figure 1). That was 12,000 truckloads of retail beef!

https://www.beefmagazine.com/print/115968

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Beef marketing system buffeted by challenges Harlan Hughes

As meat markets entered uncharted waters with COVID-19, concerns increased about the ability of packers to process meat in a timely manner. President Donald Trump declared meatpacking a “critical industry,� and the slaughter industry immediately started a massive coronavirus testing program, enabling meat processing plants to start back up processing in a relatively short period of time. By mid-May, the ground beef price was only about 14% higher than two weeks earlier. Retail margins, however, were negative. As markets adjust, retail prices will have to cover retail margins, so consumer prices will undoubtedly go up. On May 1, the total number of cattle on feed in lots of more than 1,000 head was 5.1% lower than last year. But there was a notable backup of cattle, both in the feedlots and outside the feedlots. Feedlots sharply reduced their placement of feeder cattle in March and April. This was driven by COVID-19. The supply of slaughter-ready cattle on April 1 was 9.2% above a year earlier, greatly affected by the decline in slaughter capacity in April. 12

https://www.beefmagazine.com/print/115968

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Beef marketing system buffeted by challenges

We can expect the number of 150-plus-day cattle on feed as of June 1 to go up substantially, putting downward pressure on June fed cattle futures even as wholesale beef values are at very high levels. It is going to take a while to work through the extra fed cattle numbers this summer. Let’s bring the discussion back to my study manager’s ranch business. The drama of the beef processing industry’s struggle with COVID-19, the switch away from restaurant consumption and consumer hoarding have directly impacted slaughter cattle prices and local sale barn feeder cattle prices. Figure 2 illustrates the slaughter cattle price impact going into May. The bars for June 2020 through December 2020 project the price impact for slaughter cattle through the end of the year. Harlan Hughes

I am not projecting a return anytime this year to the higher slaughter cattle prices we saw in January and February. How fast prices recover and return to normal depends on how well the U.S. keeps COVID-19 under control. The beef industry needs people to start eating again at restaurants! We need a COVID-19 vaccine, and we need it fast!

https://www.beefmagazine.com/print/115968

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Beef marketing system buffeted by challenges

Hughes is a North Dakota State University professor emeritus. He lives in Kuna, Idaho. Reach him at 701-238-9607 or at harlan.hughes@outlook.com.

WWW.NY-ANGUS.COM

Source URL: https://www.beefmagazine.com/marketing/beef-marketing-system-buffeted-challenges

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Juniors | New York Angus Association

Hello junior members and families, I hope that you all have a good summer, full of family time and good times spent in the barns. Our next junior angus zoom meeting will be in September and I will be sending an email out to you all with more information for that. Somethings that we have been working on and will discuss and get out to you all is we have created a membership form that will be starting later this year. We have created a clothing line on a pre-order basis only. I sent the forms out a few weeks ago so if you did not receive it please let us know, using the new email address for the assocation of newyorkjuniorangus@gmail.com . We also will be voting on a sponsorship form, to gain sponsorships throughout the year. I hope to see many of you at shows later this fall, or if not hopefully soon. I wish everyone a good school year and stay safe and healthy! Thank You, Anna King

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New York Junior Angus Clothing Order Form Order forms are due by September 21st to Mrs. King Mailed to: 473 Lawyersville Rd Cobleskill NY 12043 With Checks included Phone Number:

Name:

Email:

T-Shirts. : $10.00 Adult Gray

Youth

Quantity: ________ S

M

White & Gray Mix

L

Personalization:_________________

XL

Charcoal

Navy Blue

Screen-Printed

Embroidered

Hoodies : $20.00 Adult Youth Gray

S

Quantity:________ M

L

White & Gray Mix

Personalization:__________________

XL Charcoal

Navy Blue

Screen-Printed

Âź Zip. : $25.00 Adult Gray

Youth

Quantity:___________ S

M

L

White & Gray Mix

Adult

Youth

S

M

Charcoal

Gray

White & Gray Mix

L

Personalization:___________________

XL

Windbreaker : $30.00

Hat : $18.00

Embroidered

XL

Charcoal

Navy Blue

Screen-Printed

Embroidered

Quantity___________ Screen-Printed Embroidered Personalization:__________________ Navy Blue

Maroon Quantity:_______

Personalization: Screen-print: $5.00____________________ Embroidering: $8.00___________________ Total: $____________ Checks Only Checks Payable to: NYJAA

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Angus Angles Summer 2020  

Official publication of the New York Angus Angles.

Angus Angles Summer 2020  

Official publication of the New York Angus Angles.

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