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2012 RESPONSIBLE CANADIAN ENERGY TM

CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT


Projects The projects presented in this booklet are a compilation of all nominations for CAPP’s 2012 Responsible Canadian Energy Awards – recognizing improvement in environmental, health and safety, and social performance. Project summaries and accompanying photos have been submitted by individual companies. Projects are categorized but listed in no particular order. For more information about these projects, contact the respective companies directly.


: SOCIAL BP PETROLEUM :: ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENT

: RESPONSIBLE CANADIAN ENERGY On behalf of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) and all of our member companies, I am pleased to present Responsible Canadian Energy: Continuous Performance Improvement. Inside this booklet are profiles of CAPP member company projects and initiatives that demonstrate our commitment to continuous improvement in the areas of health and safety, environmental and social performance. These projects epitomize the Responsible Canadian Energy program – an association-wide performance reporting program developed to measure and assess whether we are achieving our goal of continuous improvement and to demonstrate transparency in the reporting of industry performance. CAPP members are dedicated to responsible resource development and adopt a balanced approach focused on the “3Es” – environmental performance, economic growth and energy security and reliability. Our reputation, along with our social license to operate, depends on our ability to deliver in each of these areas and to communicate and engage with our stakeholders and the public. The following projects represent our commitment to these principles and to the vision of the Responsible Canadian Energy Program. Behind each project stands a group of motivated employees who have shown personal leadership and a commitment to continuous performance improvement. We thank them for their work and for the high standards demonstrated through these initiatives. Sincerely,

Dave Collyer CAPP President

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: HEALTH & SAFETY

To find out more about our progress, visit www.rce2010.ca.


BONAVISTA : ENVIRONMENT

BENZENE REDUCTION PROJECT

Bonavista has, over the last number of years, been actively drilling in the Glauconite formation in central Alberta. This formation has a higher than average benzene concentration (up to 0.03 per cent). Flaring or incineration of these emissions would result in a 90 to 95 per cent reduction of benzene. While this would dramatically reduce the emissions, the current limit of one tonne per year would not be achieved in all cases even with a 95 per cent destruction efficiency.

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The addition of a condenser tank to reduce the entrained moisture to minimal levels and decrease the benzene component in the vapour, combined with modifying the reboiler burner to handle the richer fuel stream and associated plumbing, allowed us to reduce emissions to a near zero level while reducing the fuel used on site and minimizing our greenhouse gas footprint.


DEVON CANADA CORPORATION : ENVIRONMENT

IN-SITU WINTER WILDLIFE MONITORING PROGRAM

Devon Canada Corporation has been monitoring winter wildlife activity around its in-situ oil sands developments continuously since baseline data collection for Jackfish 1 began in 2002. While some winter track counts are required by regulators to determine baseline conditions, the monitoring program implemented and maintained by Devon over many years and many developments goes well beyond regulatory compliance, in terms of its spatial and temporal scope.

To date, Devon has used the results of this monitoring program to:

The resulting data now comprises one of the most comprehensive and robust wildlife monitoring data sets for the in situ oil sands recovery area of northeast Alberta.

Together such information is being used by Devon to plan our in-situ projects to minimize potential effects on wildlife, and to mitigate these effects wherever possible.

• Measure wildlife responses to seismic programs; • Measure wildlife resiliency to various phases of development; • Measure wildlife responses to above-ground pipelines; and • Determine potential locations of wildlife movement corridors.

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TALISMAN : ENVIRONMENT

ANSELL HIGH SPEED ENGINE FUEL MANAGEMENT PROJECT

Actively looking for new technologies to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions, Talisman Energy Inc. found a technology for the compressor engine at its Ansell Facility near Edson, Alberta. Compressors driven by natural gas fuelled engines are used to gather low-pressure natural gas from wells and increase the gas pressure for efficient transport and processing. Engines are relatively efficient when running above 90 per cent horsepower load, but become less efficient when loads drop (gas volumes decrease), meaning fuel is not consumed efficiently. This was happening in Talisman’s

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operations, so the team decided to implement a new technology. Talisman’s Ansell “CleenCom ePPC and PFI” system uses electronic fuel injection and cylinder skipping technology to reduce fuel consumption and emissions. Cylinder skipping technology shuts off the fuel supply to various cylinders when engine horsepower demands are low, similar to the technology used in car engines. To date Talisman has seen significant reductions in fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.


DEVON CANADA CORPORATION : ENVIRONMENT

LAND FOOTPRINT REDUCTIONS THROUGH THE USE OF SLANT RIGS FOR OIL SANDS EXPLORATION

During the 2010-2011 drilling season, Devon Canada Corporation adopted slant drilling at its Pike in-situ oil sands appraisal project in northeastern Alberta. Devon is one of the only exploration and production companies utilizing slant drilling in a significant way for oil sands delineation. Because multiple wells can be drilled from one location using a slant rig, it results in significantly less land footprint and environmental disturbance. This is primarily because only one area needs to be cleared for the rig to be set up, as opposed to several. In specific areas, slant drilling helped Devon

achieve 35 per cent a land footprint reduction ion the Pike appraisal well program compared to use of vertical rigs. Additional benefits include: • Reducing the size of landscape disturbance and conserving valuable plant and wildlife habitat; • Decreasing reclamation time and reducing reclamation costs; • Reducing the company’s carbon footprint; and • Improving relationships with stakeholders.

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BIRCHCLIFF ENERGY LTD. : ENVIRONMENT

POUCE COUPE SOUTH SOUR GAS PLANT PROJECT

As a result of a successful drilling program in its Pouce Coupe south field in northwestern Alberta, Birchcliff Energy Ltd. embarked on the approval for and is currently constructing the third phase of a four phase sour gas plant capable of processing 240 million cubic feet per day. In a climate of heightened public awareness and sensitivity to construction of any new sour gas processing facility, Birchcliff recognizes the need to put its environmental stewardship commitment first. By designing our plant to the highest safety and technical standards, and by using the most

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modern materials and technology available, we are significantly reducing emissions which demonstrates our environmental stewardship commitment. Our goals were to: • Complete the gas plant safely, on time and on budget; • Establish an open, co-operative and honest relationship with each of our stakeholders; and • Minimize all environmental impacts. We achieved each of these goals through a wellmanaged and co-ordinated team effort.


CONOCOPHILLIPS CANADA : ENVIRONMENT

REDUCING FUEL GAS CONSUMPTION AND EXCEEDING TARGETS AT ELMWORTH GAS PLANT

ConocoPhillips Canada has an extensive emissions reduction and energy efficiency program in its Western Canada Business Unit operations department. Recently the Elmworth Operations team installed a waste-heat exchanger at the Elmworth Gas Plant near Grande Prairie, Alberta. The exchanger, installed in the exhaust stream of the plant’s sales gas compressor, eliminates the need for fuel gas to the amine reboilers during normal operation. The team included provisions for further fuel gas savings in the project design

and continues to evaluate these future improvement opportunities. This project saved approximately 50,000m3 per day of fuel gas, representing greenhouse gas reductions of approximately 34,000 tonnes per year. The Elmworth plant is covered by the Alberta Specified Gas Emitters Regulation, which requires large facilities to reduce their greenhouse gas emissionsintensity by 12 per cent. This installation and other projects completed by the team have allowed the Elmworth Gas Plant to exceed this regulatory

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SHELL CANADA : ENVIRONMENT

GROUNDBIRCH WATER MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

requirement. At Shell’s Groundbirch gas asset in northeast British Columbia, we recognize the importance of managing water responsibly. This is why we developed the Groundbirch water strategy to minimize the impact of industry development on local freshwater sources. At Groundbirch, we recycle 90 per cent of flowback water and 70 to 80 per cent of all water that returns to surface. All water required for our operations is pipelined to sites, thereby reducing traffic (275,000

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kilometres of trucking since August 2011), dust and noise while improving safety on local roads. We have also formed an innovative partnership with the City of Dawson Creek to construct an $11.5 million reclaimed water facility that will treat 4,000 cubic metres of waste water daily. When operational in early 2012, the facility and associated infrastructure will meet all of Groundbirch’s water needs and supply the city with additional non-potable water and preserve local freshwater sources.


SOUTHERN PACIFIC : ENVIRONMENT

STP MCKAY THERMAL PROJECT WATER RECYCLE REDESIGN PROJECT

In 2011, Southern Pacific Resource Corporation implemented design changes to increase the produced water recycle rate on its steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) project called STP-McKay Phase 1. The original design had a 95 per cent recycle rate. The modified design will have a recycle rate of 97 per cent or better. The new design incorporates a wastewater concentrator into the process, which will reduce the amount of makeup water by at least 100 cubic metres per day. The

original design recycle rate was fully compliant and approved under current regulatory guidelines. However, Southern Pacific’s innovative engineers challenged the design and arrived at a new solution that minimized external water consumption and did it in a manner that was cost neutral to the project. The design was approved by Southern Pacific’s management and the modified design is currently under construction. It should be operational by mid-2012.

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NEXEN : ENVIRONMENT

WATER FLOWS

Appropriately, Nexen has a strong commitment to health, safety, environmental and social responsibility in all development activity. With respect to water, we’ve made this commitment because of a shared concern with our stakeholders about the sustainability of surface water sources used for the completion of shale gas wells. To date, the bulk of the oil and gas industry’s water requirements for exploration have been satisfied under short term Section 8, approvals through the B.C. Oil and Gas Commission. Given the short term nature of Section 8 approvals and the regulatory

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limitations of both Section 8 approvals and permanent allocations under the Water Act to reconcile real-time water availability with extraction volumes and rates, we believe a new approach is needed. Nexen has developed our Horn River Basin Surface Water Management Plan. We are moving from oneyear allocations, and allocations of constant volume, to a long-term allocation of a variable volume based on actual water availability with a lifetime monitoring commitment. The key to our approach is letting nature dictate how much water can be withdrawn from the system based on real-time flow monitoring.


CENOVUS : ENVIRONMENT

BLOWDOWN BOILER TECHNOLOGY

Believing that the status quo is unacceptable when it comes to environmental performance, Cenovus decided to find a way to reuse a greater percentage of the water it uses to generate steam at its oil sands operations.

treated, which adds cost and uses energy. The company developed a process to re-boil the leftover water without treatment. This second boiler – the blowdown boiler – converts the majority of the waste water into steam.

A typical steam generator converts about 80 per cent of the water it receives into steam. The remaining 20 per cent is disposed of due to the solids left behind. Cenovus challenged an industry belief that the leftover water could only be reused if it was

Overall, more than 90 per cent of the original input water can now be converted into steam and Cenovus can reduce its demand for makeup water by over 50 per cent, meaning the company draws much less water from nearby aquifers.

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CANADIAN NATURAL : ENVIRONMENT

HORIZON OIL SANDS WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Since 2009, Horizon Oil Sands has operated a leading edge bird deterrent program to avoid bird mortalities related to the Horizon External Tailings Facility (ETF). The Merlin Detect and Deter system was deployed at the Horizon ETF. It employs technology that was originally developed for birdaircraft strike prevention. Radar-controlled Long Range Acoustic Devices (LRADs) and lasers prevent bird landings at night and in poor visibility conditions.

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The Merlin Detect and Deter system demonstrated 97.5 per cent effectiveness in responding to birds approaching the ETF. Wildlife access is restricted to the ETF through the removal of habitat, the installation of a fence around the perimeter of the ETF, increased wildlife monitoring in the area and removal of wildlife. The system employed at Horizon has proven to be very effective, with zero bird mortalities occurring in 2010 and 2011.


SHELL CANADA : ENVIRONMENT

WATERTON SEMI-STRADDLE PLANT PROJECT

The Waterton Semi-Straddle Plant project was initiated to increase utilization of the deep cut unit at Shell’s Waterton Complex. In 2011, the unit began to operate as a semi-straddle plant by extracting natural gas liquids from TransCanada’s Southern Alberta Lateral sales gas pipeline in addition to the liquids continually extracted from Shell gas production in the area. Prior to this change, these liquids were

exported to the Alberta-British Columbia border. The semi-straddle plant increased energy efficiency of the liquids extraction process by 30 per cent while increasing throughput by approximately 50 per cent. The results of the Waterton Semi-Straddle Plant project provide benefits to the community and the Province of Alberta while helping Shell maintain its place as an industry leader in sustainable operation.

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NEXEN : ENVIRONMENT

ADDRESSING THE DECLINE OF BOREAL CARIBOU

Ten oil and gas companies operating in northeast British Columbia, along with the B.C. Science and Community Environmental Knowledge Fund and the Alberta Upstream Petroleum Research Fund, championed an innovative study that investigated the relationship between boreal caribou calves, their predators and overlapping habitat selection, and how this relationship influences boreal caribou populations. A four-year study by researchers at the University of Alberta involves placing GPS radio collars on boreal caribou and their predators to track activity during calving season. The findings will be used to assess the

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effectiveness of management actions in reducing the decline in boreal caribou populations. The project findings will be used to help confirm, adapt and develop management practices that: 1. Offer the most effective and efficient mitigation for boreal caribou; 2. Provide certainty for industry proposing development in caribou areas; 3. Enable economic activity balanced with the commitments of the B.C. boreal caribou implementation plan; and 4. Provide measureable actions that can be responsively adapted based on sound science.


STATOIL : ENVIRONMENT

SCAT DOGS SNIFF-OUT NEW ANSWERS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE IN THE OIL SANDS

Statoil has undertaken research to develop unique monitoring which can guide resource management and mitigate wildlife impacts. Natural disturbances and increased land use can exert stress on local caribou populations. Caribou numbers in Alberta’s oil sands are believed to have declined during the past decade. In an effort to learn, share and contribute toward an improved knowledge base relating to stress on wildlife populations, Statoil executed a scat detection program using dogs to find and collect caribou, moose and wolf scat during three winters.

The samples were used to assess habitat attributes, such as vegetation, land form and land use, as well as diet, DNA-based measures of population abundance and hormone-based measures of psychological, reproductive and nutritional health. The study enables researchers to suggest new ways to manage the oil sands landscape and presents an innovative and non-intrusive method to effectively monitor the complex interactions between humans and wildlife.

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CANADIAN NATURAL : ENVIRONMENT

SEPTIMUS ELECTRIFICATION

Canadian Natural Resources Limited commissioned the Septimus Gas Processing Plant in Q4 2010. Working with BC Hydro, the company installed a high voltage transmission line to the site to run the plant’s compressor motors. The compressors are equipped with variable frequency drives to further reduce energy usage by allowing them to run at less than full speed when appropriate. This project reduces emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane

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(CH4) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) within the project boundary by using grid electricity to drive the electric compressor motors as a substitute for natural gasdriven engines. As well, Canadian Natural installed LED yard lights for economic and environmental benefit. Due to the electrification of the Septimus plant, the equivalent of 31,542 tonnes of CO2 and 77 tonnes of NOx emissions were avoided in the first year of operation.


ARC RESOURCES : SOCIAL

SUMMER STUDENT COMMUNITY INVESTMENT PROJECT

With the goal of introducing summer students to ARC’s culture of giving, ARC created the Summer Student Community Investment Project in 2010. The project engages students to take a leadership role in the research, development and participation of a volunteer day at a local charity of their choice. The project was based on ARC’s belief that strong corporate citizenship is crucial to the success of an organization, and is a professional skill that must be developed and fostered the same way as technical work functions.

Held in 2010 and 2011, the project has proven successful in exposing the students to the importance of volunteerism and developing a commitment to strong corporate citizenship early on in their careers. The project exemplifies ARC’s commitment to community leadership and to enhancing the quality of life in the community in which we live and work.

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ENCANA : SOCIAL

CH’NOOK INITIATIVE: FOSTERING ABORIGINAL PARTICIPATION IN BUSINESS EDUCATION

A cornerstone of responsible development is fostering constructive partnerships in the Aboriginal communities in which we operate. Encana is committed to bolstering economic growth in the First Nations communities where we do business. Since 2008, Encana has been a lead funding sponsor of the Ch’nook Indigenous Business Education program, offered through the University of British Columbia’s Sauder School of Business. The program integrates a variety of topics including Aboriginal values, entrepreneurship and business strategy. The initiative

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has produced approximately 159 alumni from Fort Nelson to Victoria since its launch and has developed partnerships with 25 post-secondary business programs. This work has contributed to the growth of the Aboriginal leaders of tomorrow and is resulting in building sustainable management capacity in Aboriginal communities. Finally, the Sauder School of Business is entering into a partnership with Northern Lights College to expand its programs and make them more available to northeastern British Columbia.


ENCANA : SOCIAL

RACE AGAINST HUNGER

Encana partnered with the World Professional Chuckwagon Association (WPCA) two years ago to launch the Race Against Hunger (RAH) program, raising food, funds and awareness for food banks during summer months when need can outpace donations. The staff-run program is supported by WPCA chuckwagon drivers and has raised more than $57,000 and almost 14,000 pounds of nonperishable food for food banks in Encana’s key operating communities. The program supports two of Encana’s community investment program key

pillars: community enhancement, and family and community wellness. The RAH’s approach to fundraising includes focused sub-programs, such as the Food Driver of the Year challenge issued by Encana, which encourages WPCA drivers to engage their friends, fans and sponsors to donate food and cash to the program. RAH also provides Encana’s Community Relations team with opportunities to build relationships with various stakeholder groups and individuals, as well as engage local staff and contractors.

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DEVON CANADA CORPORATION : SOCIAL

CONKLIN GETS A HIGH SCHOOL

With no high school in Conklin, Alberta, secondary school students need to be relocated, housed and educated in Fort McMurray, a two hour drive north. As a result of being removed from the family environment and associated support mechanisms, the majority of students struggled to realize success. In response to this situation, Devon brought community partners together—the Northlands School Division, the Sunchild E-Learning Program (deliverers of an innovative, online teaching model), the Conklin local school board and the community leadership – and

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provided the financial, human resources and direct support needed to establish a high school in the community. The Conklin School opened its doors in 2010 and accepted its first cohort of 11 students that September. A year-and-a-half later, the majority of the students are still with the program. Without the high school, there would not be any students pursuing their diploma, but today the community is poised to deliver its first-ever graduating class in 2015.


TALISMAN : SOCIAL

WILLISTON RESERVOIR WATER PIPELINE

What does it mean to be a good neighbour? That’s the question Talisman Energy Inc. asks when conducting its operations. Talisman worked to find a long-term source of water for its Montney operations in northeastern British Columbia and came up with a water pipeline to carry water from the Williston Reservoir over 30 kilometers to its Farrell Creek field. Talisman’s stakeholder relations team went beyond what they were required to do and instead focused on doing what a good neighbour would do. They spent over a year having open and honest conversations

about the project with local community members in Hudson’s Hope, landowners along the pipeline right-of-way and First Nations communities to ensure they understood the company’s development plans, including the water pipeline. Talisman also discussed the benefits of the water pipeline such as reducing truck traffic, which in turn reduces noise, dust and emissions, makes roads safer for drivers and the community, and how land disturbance would be minimized by working with other industries in the area. The pipeline was constructed in the summer 2011.

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CONOCOPHILLIPS CANADA : SOCIAL

ABORIGINAL NETWORK

At ConocoPhillips Canada, employee networks have been formed to recognize diversity and celebrate the heritage, perspectives and unique talents of each employee. By tapping into the shared knowledge, perspectives and advice of Aboriginal employees, the company can also better inform its community engagement efforts. Recognizing these opportunities ConocoPhillips Canada launched the Aboriginal Network in October 2011. The ConocoPhillips Aboriginal Network is comprised of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal employees from a variety of disciplines across the organization. The network serves to empower Aboriginal employees to meet their full potential by supporting and facilitating

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their professional and cultural development. The Network also aims to provide input into ConocoPhillips strategies and objectives and to promote an understanding of Aboriginal culture and communities within the company. The network hosted its first event in October 2011. Over 120 ConocoPhillips employees (Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal) came together to learn about the Aseniwuche Winewak Nation (AWN) and the company’s relationship with the community. Members from AWN were in attendance to speak to employees. The event also included a traditional dance performance, an artifacts display and a traditional meal of moose stew and bannock.


SHELL CANADA : SOCIAL

REDUCED FLARING MULTI-PIG LAUNCHER PROJECT

In 2011, Shell’s Waterton Complex introduced an innovative way to increase operator safety and reduce flaring up to 90 per cent when pigging sour gas pipelines. The Reduced Flaring Multi-Pig Launcher Project adapted an existing technology that allows up to 11 pigs to be loaded and launched without flaring or breaking the system integrity of the pipeline. The project was initiated to address stakeholder concerns around flaring activity in the

Waterton area. The technology was modified to fit Shell’s needs and is Shell’s first implementation of the multi-pig launcher technology in sour gas operations. In its first nine months of operation, the multi-pig launcher reduced sour gas flaring by 90 per cent. If this project proves to have a long-term benefit, it will be further implemented throughout Shell’s natural gas portfolio to improve pipeline operations and stakeholder relations.

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SHELL CANADA : SOCIAL

ENERGY DIET CHALLENGE

Encouraged by the recommendation of some of Canada’s foremost NGOs that Shell use its leadership position to improve Canadians’ energy knowledge and use, the Energy Diet Challenge was created in partnership with Canadian Geographic. Its purpose was to engage the public to build energy literacy and create awareness around the impact of consumers’ lifestyle choices at home and in their transportation. The challenge recruited six diverse households from across Canada and pitted them

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against one another to see who would become the “slimmest” energy user. The competition ran from September 12 until December 4, 2011. The grand prize winner of a Toyota Prius V was determined by a judging panel based on the number of public votes the family achieved, their overall energy and water reductions, the quality and quantity of blog posts and the creativity and innovation shown to make lifestyle changes.


QUICKSILVER : SOCIAL

TIMBER UTILIZATION IN NORTHEASTERN BRITISH COLUMBIA

While Quicksilver’s timber utilization initiatives have been evolving over the past several years, at year-end 2011 Quicksilver, its stakeholders and First Nations in the Fort Nelson, Fort Liard and surrounding areas of northeastern British Columbia have forged relationships that now include business commitments, educational support, and environmental recycling and protection. Supporting these relationships with timber-recycling initiatives that make sense to the people involved, Quicksilver’s ongoing commitments to listen and dialogue with these stakeholders help ensure these initiatives

are kept relevant and meaningful. Initiatives have included projects for rig-matting, pipelineconstruction materials for trench filling/compaction, local-area cabin building and repairs, and wood working classes at a local school program sponsored by Quicksilver. Stakeholders engaged thus far have included Trans North Timber, Acho Dene Koe First Nation, Fort Nelson Forestry Roundtable and the Echo Dene School. In total, these stakeholders represent literally hundreds of individuals and community members.

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ENCANA : HEALTH & SAFETY

SAFETY ESSENTIALS AT ENCANA

To support an uncompromising approach to safety among its staff, Encana developed its Safety Essentials for Leaders (SEFL) training program. The course, based on Global Training Centre’s Safety Essentials for Supervisors and Managers, was piloted in early 2009, and the curriculum and delivery were customized to address Encana’s specific needs. The resulting three-day, 16-module course was designed to enhance and promote Encana’s safety culture and develop strong skills in safety leadership. The success

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of SEFL spurred the creation of a condensed one-day course for leaders without direct field accountability, called Safety Essentials for Leaders Lite (SEFL Lite), and a specialized training course for all office staff, titled Safety Essentials for Office Workers (SEFOW). This renewed focus on safety leadership made an immediate impact. In 2010 Encana’s Total Recordable Injury Frequency (TRIF) was measured at 0.68 – its best result in company history.


SHELL CANADA : HEALTH & SAFETY

WORKSITE HAZARD MANAGEMENT

The Worksite Hazard Management program is a safety training and awareness program that works to change the safety behaviours of Shell employees and contractors in the workplace. It consists of a 4.5 hour in-class training session followed by an on-site coaching session that focuses on situational awareness. Participants learn to work with their peers to change behaviours while controlling hazards in their workplace by pausing to assess hazards, raise concerns with supervisors and control

the safety of their environment. The program has also improved the way that leaders communicate with their staff regarding safe work environments and practices. In its short history, the program has had a positive influence on Shell operations as it has contributed to the reduction of recordable incidents. The program’s success in Canada has brought it to the attention of Royal Dutch Shell and is now to be implemented globally.

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SHELL CANADA : HEALTH & SAFETY

SCOTFORD TRI-PARTITE SAFETY LEADERSHIP INITIATIVE

The Scotford Tri-Partite Safety Leadership Initiative is a non-traditional collaboration of leaders representing Shell staff, contractors and building trades who operate at Shell’s Scotford site in Fort Saskatchewan. This collaborative program draws upon the experiences and expertise of each group to develop a strong safety culture for everyone working at Scotford. By meeting as a group and developing actions to progressively attain this ideal safety culture, the initiative works to improve

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workplace safety for employees and contractors working at Scotford. The program is another way for Shell to strive toward reaching their Goal Zero safety objective. Leadership at all levels of operations play a crucial role in the development and implementation of necessary safety cultural change. The program has positively influenced the Scotford site and it has contributed to the overall reduction of recordable incidents at the site in 2011.


SOUTHERN PACIFIC : HEALTH & SAFETY

HSE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION PROJECT

Southern Pacific Resource Corporation is one of the smaller yet rapidly growing companies within the membership of CAPP. Within high-growth companies, processes and structure commonly lag the operations in terms of the development pace within the company. At Southern Pacific, a successful health, safety and environment (HSE) management system was identified early on as paramount to the company’s overall success. With the endorsement of senior management, the staff at Southern Pacific have developed in a very short

period of time a robust yet-fit for-purpose HSE program that far exceeds regulatory thresholds, and more importantly has helped foster the commitment to safety from all staff and contractor personnel working on Southern Pacific’s projects. With successful implementation of the program and emphasis on safety come results. Southern Pacific is pleased to report its safety record is better than industry standards for 2011 despite record corporate levels of activity in the field.

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SUNCOR : HEALTH & SAFETY

LEADING BY METRICS

Define the required metrics of a safe industrial operation. Refer that question to any senior management executive and the most likely response may provide reference to recordable incident frequency – a highly utilized lagging metric within the safety profession. Lost-time injury and severity rates may also be acknowledged. This is the struggle for safety professionals. The success of the operations they support is most often determined by these lagging metrics, and it reveals “how little they failed” over a 12 month period.

in the first place. In-situ Drilling, Completions and Logistics (DCL) within Suncor Energy began utilizing two leading metrics in 2009 to assist with the management of safe operations. The Leading Indicator Safety Index (LISI) provides a quantitative indicator on the completion of proactive safety efforts in relation to hours worked. The Leadership Safety Contacts Ratio (LSC®) provides a reference on the support and visibility that Suncor management provided to field operations during the completion of these safety efforts.

Industry needs to alter its focus to the measurement of proactive efforts implemented on the frontline, which in turn prevent injuries from occurring

These two leading metrics have played an integral role within In-situ DCL’s Contractor Safety Management success over the past three years.

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: RESPONSIBLE CANADIAN ENERGY The Responsible Canadian Energy Program is an association-wide performance reporting program. It provides common metrics for performance measurement and reporting, supporting tools to assist CAPP members in the design and implementation of their internal systems and processes, and an opportunity to share success stories and best practices to help elevate overall industry performance. The Responsible Canadian Energy Awards recognize CAPP members who have demonstrated exceptional performance in their commitment to responsible development of Canada’s petroleum resources. The awards serve as an opportunity for our industry to demonstrate progress and to encourage a collaborative approach in pursuit of continous improvement in environmental, health and safety, and social performance.

2012 For more information about the Responsible Canadian Energy Program and to view full profiles and videos of the 2011 Responsible Canadian Energy award recipients, visit: www.rce2010.ca.

To order printed copies of this booklet, contact publications@capp.ca


About CAPP

The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) is the voice of Canada’s upstream petroleum industry. CAPP represents companies, large and small, that explore for, develop and produce natural gas and crude oil throughout Canada. CAPP’s member companies produce more than 90 per cent of Canada’s natural gas and crude oil. CAPP’s associate members provide a wide range of services that support the upstream crude oil and natural gas industry. Together CAPP’s members and associate members are an important part of a national industry with revenues of about $100 billion-a-year. CAPP’s mission is to enhance the economic sustainability of the Canadian upstream petroleum industry in a safe and environmentally and socially responsible manner, through constructive engagement and communication with governments, the public and stakeholders in the communities in which we operate. www.capp.ca


The Responsible Canadian Energy Advisory Group

Kenneth B. Ogilvie, Chair Pembina Institute, board member

Honourable A. Anne McLellan Bennett Jones LLP

Wally Baer Enform

Dr. Bob Page University of Calgary

Bonnie D. DuPont Corporate Director and Consultant

Gary Redmond Synergy Alberta

Dr. Stewart Elgie University of Ottawa

Chris Smillie Canadian Building Trades

John Lounds Nature Conservancy of Canada

Robert Walker NEI Investments


2012-0001

Responsible Canadian Energy: Continuous Performance Improvement  

Project summaries have been submitted by each individual company and have not been edited or altered by CAPP. For more information on these...