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Personal information

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Pedestrian-oriented Mixed Use Complex

Residential Building Schematic Design

Historical Building Ad -Interior&Exterior

12 CORNERS COMPLEX

ANJDEKO HOUSE IN CHARLOTTE

HIVE VILLAGE

4-5

6-13

14-21

22-

66-75

76-81

82-91

92-

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08

09

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Suburban Commercial Building Redevelopment

Hardscape Beautification

High-Yield Educational Greenhouse

Conceptual design a

12 CORNERS REDEVELOPMENT 2

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MIDTOWN RISING PARKING LOT

GANDHI INSTITUTE GREENHOUSE

MORANDI MUS MATION CENTER


daptive Reuse

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Historical Building Adaptive Reuse -Interior&Site

Transition from Urban to Suburban

Greenfield Rehabilitation

PULASKI YOUTH CENTER

40 FRANKLIN COMPLEX

URBAN VILLAGE

-31

32-41

42-53

54-65

-97

98-103

104-111

112-127

SEUM INFORR LECTERN

and representation

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FLOWER CITY CO-HOUSING

Community Schematic Design

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COMMUNITY CENTER Brownfield Rehabilitation

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INTEGRATED BUILDING SYSTEM Design Illuminative/Acoustic/Thermal

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PERSONAL INFORMATION Name: Date of Birth: Address: Tel:

Candice Jiang 07 September, 1990 2660 Chili Ave, Rochester, NY. Tel: 774-420-9763

Links Email: xj5029@rit.edu candice5277@gmail.com Issuu:

Hello, My name is Xiaofan Jiang, but I prefer you call me Candice! I am candidate of Master of Architecture in Rochester Institute of Technology. My program is focusing on practices of sustainability which is very valuable to the new architecture world and next generation in the future. I am eager to get the knowledge about sustainable design and technology, and also, I am Always exited to learn something new especially in architecture, urban design and landscape. Tough architecture alway get heavy work, I never get bored because I love it.

"Architecture is not only about design and construction, it is a well comprehensive mass providing space, functions, creating atmosphere, changing life style, even influencing the future generations."

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EDUCATION 2016

Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT)

2013

University of Shanghai for Science and Technology (USST)

Department of Architecture Candidate for Master of Architecture GPA: 3.67/4.0 Expected graduation: 2017

Department of Design Bachelor of Arts in Visual Communication GPA: 3.7/4.0

EXPERIENCE 2016

Suzhou Gold Mantis Landscape Co. Ltd. Landscape Architect Internship

2015

Taichi Bubble Tea INC. Logo and Interior Design

2012

Flower City Co-housing Group Schematic Design & Rendering

2011

“Femina”(Belongs to ELLE)Magazine

2010

Ogilvy & Mather Shanghai China Graphic Designer Internship

Prepare graphic representations of proposed plans using computer-aided design and drafting (CAD) software

Graphic Designer Internship

-Creating Layouts for magazine spreads -Photoshop the images to magazine quality

SOFTWARE

-Branding/Logo creation in the team

SCHOLARSHIP & AWARDS

Autodesk Revit Autodesk Auto CAD

2014

“Design Merit” Scholarship of Architecture RIT

2013

Scholarship of City of Shanghai

2013

First Class Scholarship of USST(1/56) (2009-2013, 6 Time)

2012

China Post Direct Mail Design Contest, Honorable Mention

2012

Design Against Fur, Honorable Mention

2012

ST Decaux Charity Poster Contest, Honorable Mention

2011

Logo Design Contest of Capital Airline, The Bronze Medal

2011

Logo Design Contest of American Culture Center of USST, The First Prize

ORGANIZATION EXPERIENCE 2015

2012

Vice President of AIAS RIT

Organizes the agenda for all meetings at the College of Architecture. The Vice Presidents assumes all duties of the President at the absence of the current president. Duties involve facilitating all national conferences such as Quad, Forum and Grassroots.

Minister of Publicity Department of Student Union (USST)

-Lead a team in creating promotional materials for the university -Lead a team in creating “USST Campus newspaper” and printing and publishing

Google SketchUp Adobe Illustrator Adobe Photoshop Adobe Indesign Lumion Rhinoceros Grasshopper Adobe 3D Studio Max Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Word Microsoft Excel 5


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TWELVE CORONERS COMPLEX

“Pedestrian-oriented Mixed Use Complex” RESIDENTIAL/ COMMERCIAL MIXED USED THIRD YEAR STUDIO / MAY 2016 PROFESSOR: JULES CHIAVAROLI, AIA 1191 MONROE AVE, ROCHESTER, NY, USA 14618

The Monroe Avenue corridor is arguably one of the most interesting in the area. Stretching from downtown Rochester, through the Town of Brighton, and ending in the Village of Pittsford it contains a wide variety of neighborhoods, retail centers, and open land. In fact it was the subject of a study conducted by the Community Design Center Rochester in 2011. This project involves the demolition of an existing one-story retail building and replacing it with a multi-story, multi-use building. The project site is in Brighton, NY at the Town center known as Twelve Corners. The site is at the heart of the Monroe Avenue corridor.

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SITE ANALYSIS

PROGRAMMING ECONOMY

WALKABILITY Enhance the walkability; slow down the traffic on Monroe Ave; try to pull up the frontage to the curb and draw people’s attention.

SOCIAL

ENVIRONMENT

MIXED USE

SUSTAINABLE

Make a mix-use building integrating commercial and residential, which will generate the profit and stimulate the surrounding economy

Apply sustainable technology and take advantage of the natural to get more credits on LEED v4. Evaluation.

3 CONCEPTS

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PROS

1. Interesting frontage 2. Welcoming restaurant and cafe 3. Nice winter green house

1. Organic&Energetic Atmosphere 2. Simple apartment floor plan 3. Open to community

1. More rentable space 2. Thematic concept

CONS

1. Extremely greenhouse effect in The summer

1. Demolish the whole existing 2. Bad accessibility

1. Less rentable apartment space 2. Complex apartment floor plan

CRYSTAL CORRIDOR

URBAN VILLAGE

RETAIL ALLEY


SITE PLAN

LEGEND

1. INNER YARD 2. SECOND ROOFTOP GARDEN 3. ROOFTOP SOLAR PANEL 4. THIRD FLOOR ROOFTOP GARDEN 5. OUTDOOR WOOD DECDING AREA 6. BACK LALIC GARDEN 7. ELEVATOR 8 FLASHER PARKING 9. BENCH AND SEATING AREA 10. BUS STATION 11. BICK RACK 12. FIRE PIT 13. UNDERGROUND GARAGE ENTRANCE .

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FLOOR PLAN

BASEMENT

1ST FLOOR

102 PARKING SPACES 8 ADA PARKING SPACES

7 SMALL RETAIL 1800 sf. - 2300 sf. 7 MEDIUM RETAIL 2300 sf. - 3300 sf. 4 LARGE RETAIL 3300sf. - 4700 sf.

2ND FLOOR

3RD FLOOR

10 SMALL OFFICES 900 sf. - 1200 sf.

9 ONE BEDROOM APARTMENTS 900 sf. 1300 sf.

6 MEDIUM OFFICE 1200 sf. - 1500 sf.

15 TWO BEDROOMS APARTMENTS 1200 sf. - 1500 sf.

6 LARGE OFFICES 1500 sf. - 2100 sf.

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SECTION PERSPECTIVE


MATERIAL AND STRUCTURE

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HOW DOES THE COURTYARD DEAL WITH THE SNOW?

PAVING RADIANT HEATING PIPE SEPARATE LAYER INSULATION CONCRETE SLAB

COURTYARD SECTION BUTTERFLY ROOF With the angle of the butterfly roof, a skylight has been created which benefits the north facing apartment. Meanwhile, the roof angle collaborates with the rain harvesting system, will be helpful to reduce the water consumption

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BUILDING SECTION

FLOOR CONSTRUCTION LAYERS RAIN HARVESTING SYSTEM Collecting the rainfall from the roof tops, storing the water underground in the water tank. And the stored water will be used for landscape irrigation and toilet flushing.

DRAINAGE SECTION

Optimum Tilt of Solar Panels by Month

JAN 31

FEB 39

MAR 47

JUL 63

AUG 55

SEPT 47

APR 55

OCT 39

MAY 3

JUN 70

NOV 31

DEC 23

ENERGY SAVING CALCULATION - Efficiency: up to 15.7% - Wattage: 310W - Each solar panel generates about 220 kWh a year - 468 solar panels - 468x220= 102960 kWh (saving)


12 Corners Integrated Design Jules Chiavaroli Spring 2016

Each building has direct access to the rooftop garden. Though the rooftop garden is open to the community, you don’t have to worry about the security the security door for the rooftop garden will be close at the night, only the tenants in the complex have the access to the rooftop garden.

As you can see in the picture, the arm-like element actually is part of the building decoration. At first, it was right at the front of the building, but I pull it out and make it into a signage, which makes 12 Corners Complex more tight and closed. Though it is not very human scale, but the pedestrian feel they are covered by the these arms, which makes this place warm and safe. What’s more the huge structure signage is attractive when people see from far away.

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Andrejko HOUSE IN CHARLOTTE, NC “Residential BUILDING Schematic Design” RESIDENTIAL FIRST YEAR STUDIO / APRIL 2015 Professor: DAVID CHAMBERLAIN Charlotte, NC, USA

Before starting the schematic design, we got a scenario that the chairman of our architecture department, Dennis. A. Andrejko won a lottery of one million dollar, and he is going to build a new house in a suburban area around a selected American city. This house should satisfy the Andrejko’s couples' requirements and hobbies, which are list as following: 1. Mr. Andrejko do Taichi every morning 2. Mr. Andrejko should have a space for his architecture work 3. Mrs. Andrejko raise orchid 4. Mrs. Andrejko play piano and flute 5. They usually swim in the summer 6. They have too big dogs 7. Andrejko Family owns two cars 8. They usually hold big party 9. There should be two guest bedroom 10. The house should optimize the sustainability performance

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19' Half Level 8'

Top Level Level

15' 12'

Legend

1. Solar panel 2. Water tank on the roof 3. Taichi Platform 4. Spring Pool 5. Swimming Pool 6. Sun Shade 7. Back garden 8. Balcony 9. Asphalt Road 10. River

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Andrejko House in Charlotte David Chamberlain Fall 2013

Climate Charlotte has a very comfortable marine climate, which keeps a humid and gentle climate throughout the year. The year average temperature is 53 Fo , but the seasons there are still four distinct seasons. Normally, people can wear t-shirt for 9-10 month, usually there 2-3 time snow during the winter.

Budget The project budget is 1 million, 17%-19% will be used on the architecture design, construction will cost 50%-65%, which includes material, equipments and labor. 8%-10% will be used on sustainable system. The tax will be around 5%

Big idea

Base on Charlotte's climate and Andrejko family’s requirements and hobbies, I integrated the surrounding water, the swimming pool, and the interior water feature together to create a comprehensive water garden on the site, which is also the big idea for this design.

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2 1

3 4

7 6

5 10

9 8

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Legend

1. entrance and foyer 2. water feature (fountain) 3. living room 4. water curtain 5. dog room 6. dinning room 7. water feature ( waterfall) 8. downstairs 9. upstairs 10. bathroom 11. guest bathroom

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12. guest bedroom 13. master bedroom 14. laudry 15. walk-in closet 16. balcony 17. sun shade in the pool 18. swimming pool 19. hot water pool 20. taichi platform 21. outdoor dining 22. relaxing area

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3

23. decking 24. alsphalt road 25. garage 26. machanical room 27. Water feature 28. relaxing room 29. studio 30. restroom 31. music room 32. study room 33. patio

5

33 31

30

28 25

23 19 24

Southeast perspectives 18

17 22

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Andrejko House in Charlotte David Chamberlain Fall 2013

Top level

Half level 1

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15

8

12

14

11

5

2

4

6

7

3

16 13

9

10

Water garden The water garden is not only being outside but inside the house. The water features are assigned to foyer, living room, dining room, and circulation space, even in the wall. Water feature does not only add humidity to the air, but adjust the room temperature in a comfortable range. The water feature make some white noise for the atmosphere, which is good for relax and sleep. The interior water usually comes from the rainfall collected from the rooftop; and the water for the swimming pool comes from the stream but have been purified.

21 20 8

29

32

26 25 23

27

33

31

30

19

28 17

18 24 22

Ground level 19


Water garden element

The water feature see through from back door

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The fish tank in the wall, fish people could see through from one side to the other side.


Andrejko House in Charlotte David Chamberlain Fall 2013

The water flow runs from the top level to the lower level.

People can see the water feature through The moon gate right at the foyer.

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HIVE VILLAGE “Historical Building Adaptive Reuse interior&exterior” ADAPTIVE REUSE THIRD YEAR STUDIO / APRIL 2015 PROFESSOR: NANA ANDOH, AIA 151 ST. PAUL STREET, Rochester, NY, usa 14604

The purpose of this project is to revitalize the area of St. Paul Street previously known as the “St. Paul Quarter” to become The Hive Village. Dan Morgenstern Group has purchased five buildings and owns land that is currently used for parking adjacent to the building site. The design intent is to re-purpose three of the buildings providing one fire area and interconnectivity for a mixed-use occupancy. The three buildings will be designed for affordable housing, retail, restaurant and assembly occupancies. Also proposed is to demolish two of the existing buildings in order to provide/accommodate additional parking, a commodity that is needed and welcomed for visitors/dwellers. Morgenstern Groups’ vision extends beyond the limits of the mixed-use development and these future ideas have the potential to reinforce the development of “The Hive Village”. All the buildings purchased on the corner of St. Paul and Andrews street are located in the historical “Riverfront District”. The buildings are 156 Andrews Street, 162-164 Andrews Street, 143-153 St. Paul Street, 155-163 St. Paul Street, and 169-173 St. Paul Street. Two of the buildings, 155 and 169, are on the historical record.

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AREA INTRODUCTION

Brick

Alley

Painting

Design Strategies

1. Save the historical building and brick style to the most extend. 2. Using curtain walls to increase the transparency of this narrow alley, meanwhile increase the security of this spot. 3. Maintain the artistic atmosphere of this area, provide more affordable openspace studios, meanwhile apply more functions to create an artist-center area in downtown.

When the City of Rochester changed its zoning ordinance to allow mixed residential and commercial use in the late 1980s, the Hive Village began to come into its own and was referred to as The Saint Paul Quarter. The Old Rochesterville development along the river entailed the conversion of a series of buildings into apartments, with offices and restaurants on the lower floors. This area now contains hundreds of residential units ranging from modern apartments to classic New York-style lofts (at Rochester’s reasonable rental rates). The Hive Village is squarely in the middle of downtown’s most densely populated neighborhood. The HIVE Village is a 4 block downtown area radiating from the intersection of St. Paul Street and Andrews. Within this neighborhood are established businesses, gourmet dining and 9 apartment buildings within historic landmarks. It is 6-story building built with the red bricks. On the St Paul Street, we can see the dense street elevation, Hive Village is not too attractive. However on the Andrews Street, this building seems relative tall and attractive to other buildings. Also, we can see he Andrews Street is lacking of green space and pedestrians. The alley behind the Hive Village which called Carthage Alley is narrow and downgrade, therefore, it is kind of dark and secrete spot for the criminals, which is regarded as a unsafe area in downtown. Additionally, this area is most occupied by the artists living in downtown, and the rent is relative lower compared to the suburban. This place is fulfilled with folk art atmosphere, that we can tell from the surrounding wall painting

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Hive Village Nana Andoh Fall 2015

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Unsafe SPOT

St. P aul

street

SITE PLAN

Andrews street

Andrews street view

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Conceptual design ideas

Hive Village Nana Andoh Fall 2015

During the conceptual design, we can see from the above sketches, the idea about rooftop garden, glass wall and open space appear a lot, these element can improve the security and create the artistic atmosphere. We can leave some walls or decorations just like what it is today to preserve the history of the building, at the same time save materials and money. Preserving the open plan space and leaving interventions light in order to maximize flexibility of the space for future users as well as to encourage collaboration among staffs and minimize material usage, achieved through the elimination of private offices. We try to connect the building to the neighborhood building, but we give it up at last, since no matter where it locates, it will block people sight, and the "crystal box" will not be that shining in the night.

St. Paul street view

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floor PLAN

Design statement

The big idea for this historical building is transparency. Glass is one the most matching design elements for the brick building. The transparency of glass gives the piece of fresh air to the bricks, and the strength of the bricks gives some sturdy to the glass element. The core of the design is to solve the safe problem of this narrow alley. Here, the crystal box like building make this alley wider visually, and also the people inside of the building could see what happens outside, which seems like a kind of camera to the criminals. At the night, the light inside of the building will glow up the narrow alley, and the sunken garden unintentionally give more harmonious atmosphere to the surrounding environment, these will cultivate this area be a safe and peaceful place. Learning and Experience center is a square glass-box like building attached to these two buildings. It consists 4 different zones divided by steps, each zone is a kind of learning and experience zone, such as ceramic, painting, glass and sculpture. 70% of this building is covered by the glass, even the roof top, and the rooftop is like a big funnel that leading the rainfall to the water feature system. In the winter the electric coil in the glass will heat up the snow, and the melting snow will not be a problem in the cold winter. What's more, on the second floor of the Learning Center will be used as 3D exhibition gallery, the art work will be displayed by the 3D projector, and this "glass box" will glow up the narrow alley, which makes it beautiful and safe in the night. The basement extents the first floor's functions, there are a back kitchen belongs to the restaurant, a dining area, and a storage for whole Hive Village.

BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN

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BASEMENT


Hive Village Nana Andoh Fall 2015

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

THIRD-FIFTH FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

SIXTH FLOOR PLAN

The first floor is occupied by restaurants, retails and offices, the attached building's first floor is a multi-functional gallery space, which can not only used as a gallery, but a banquet hall. The second floor is occupied by the art space and the common space, the equipments and the dived walls are provided for the artists exhibition and communication. The third floor to fifth floor share same floor plan, there are two one bedroom apartment units, one two bedroom apartment unit, and one studio unit. And also, the laundry room and the garage room will be provided. The common space for the artists is facing to the narrow alley, they can see the glass gallery when they look down. The sixth floor is luxury apartments floor, there are three two bedroom apartment units and one studio unit is on this floor. The garage room and the common space share the same position with the third floor plan, but the laundry room has been provided in the apartment unit inside.

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Sunken garden

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Living wall

Learning center

Art gallery

View from neighborhood


Hive Village Nana Andoh Fall 2015

Summary

When the art gallery and the learning and experience center will be established, this place will be the "base" for Rochester artists, more and more artists and visitors will come around, to visit, to learn, to play, to have dinner and party. Thus Hive Village will generate money and stimulate the surrounding economy. Since the upper floor of this area are occupied by residential uses, the sunken garden , which shares the same level with the basement, will provide relative quite space. The side wall is covered by the plants, called “living wall�; the floor is covered with wood decking, and the benches attach to the planting beds. The rainfall water comes from the rooftop follow the water feature to the rain garden.

Sunken garden

The Learning and Experience Center is a split-level building that built around a stair case. This stair goes from the basement dining area to the 3D exhibition platform on the second floor. The ramps for the wheelchair is next to the curtain wall, which meets the ADA minimum requirements.

View from the outside of the gallery space, it looks like a greenhouse decorated with some bricks. We can see the outside green space that half surrounded by the glass. Also, inside of the glass gallery can be seen from outside. Outside could be planted with some indigenous plants, and the inside could have some tropical plants since the temperature and the humid can be adjust in the greenhouse.

The roof of the glass gallery is sloppy because of two points. One is the slope roof will help the rainfall running to the outside green space. The other is the solar panel installed on the sloppy roof just give the perfect angle to the sun direction, which will optimize the solar panel's performance.

Learning center

Art gallery outside

Art gallery inside

Section

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PULASKI YOUTH CENTER

“Historical LIBRARY Adaptive Reuse interior&site� ADAPTIVE REUSE THIRD YEAR STUDIO / DEC 2015 PROFESSOR: NANA ANDOH, AIA 1191 HUDSON Ave, Rochester, NY, usa

Listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places, the Pulaski Library is architecturally significant as an intact representative example of Italian Renaissance style design applied to an important neighborhood civic building. It was designed by Rochester architects Herbert Bohacket and Lewis Brew, who were chosen, in part, because of the success of their designs for the recently constructed Monroe Avenue branch library and East Side Presbyterian Church. The Italian Renaissance design of the building reflects other important civic buildings erected during this era, including the Eastman Theatre/School of Music and the Monroe Avenue Branch Library. . The City of Rochester is seeking proposals for the rehabilitation and adaptive re-use of the historic Pulaski Library building. The masonry building contains approximately 6,500 square feet on the first floor, and has a full basement and a small mezzanine area. Originally constructed as a neighborhood branch library, the building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002. Following an extended period of vacancy and lack of repair, the building has suffered extensive deterioration. Based on an investigation of the structural condition, it has been determined that the building shell is relatively good condition despite the deteriorated roofing system and damage from water infiltration. The building is salvageable provided that critical repairs are made with a short time frame. 32


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History introduction

Built in 1931, the Pulaski Library (originally the Hudson Avenue Branch Library) was the second permanent library constructed by the City of Rochester. Prior to its construction, the library system consisted of twelve temporary sites and the newly constructed permanent Monroe Avenue branch. The central library (Rundel Memorial Building) did not yet exist. The construction of a library on this site was further supported by completion of Benjamin Franklin High School directly across the street. A highly visible anchor in the 14621 neighborhood, the library is historically significant for its association with the growth and importance of the Polish community in Rochester’s North Side. During construction, it was proposed that the library be renamed in honor of Revolutionary War hero Brigadier General Casmir Pulaski, a native of Poland, who died in that conflict. On the 50th anniversary of this building, it was renamed “Pulaski Library” in honor of General Pulaski.

Adaptive reuse content SITE ANALYSIS

Te Pulaski Library is situated at the highly visible intersection of Hudson Avenue and Norton Street in the northeast section of the City of Rochester. The Hudson Avenue corridor is a primary north-south arterial and a major connection between downtown Rochester and the Town of Irondequoit. The avenue is heavily traveled by pedestrian and vehicular traffic. RGRTA provides bus service between downtown and the terminus of Hudson Avenue in Irondequoit. There is a bus stop on Hudson Avenue directly in front of the Pulaski Library. Surrounding uses are a mixture of neighborhood commercial and residential structures. Commercial uses in the immediate area include automotive sales and repair, convenience stores, hair salons and beauty supplies, taverns, eat-in and take-out restaurants, professional businesses such as tax accounting and tutoring centers, and a federal credit union. Two significant institution share this street intersection. On the southeast corner of the intersection, St. Stanislaus Church has been designated as a local landmark by the Rochester Preservation Board. St. Stanislaus Parish has been recognized by the Landmark Society of Western New York and the Preservation League of New York State for the dedicated care of its historic church, and is also known for meticulous care of its gardens and grounds. The parish historic church, and is also know for meticulous care of its gardens and grounds. The parish school buildings are leased to Action for a Better Community's Head Start preschool program.

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Since there is a high school nearby, I came up with an idea that turning this library into a youth center, which provides academic service, recreational facilities and interest classes for the children from the 8-16 years old. The above bubble diagram shows what should this youth center contains.


Pulaski Youth Center Nana Andoh Fall 2015

Legend 1. Main entrance 2. Secondary entrance 3. Back entrance 4. Main building 5. Back garden 6. Fire pit 7.residential 8. Parking lot 9. ADA parking

2 1

4

7 3 5 8

6

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Floor plan PLAYGROUND

MEN/WOMEN RESTROOM DANCE STUDIO

GRAND STAIRS

ARMIN. OFFICE

TV SPACE

LEISURE SPACE

WOMEN RESTROOM

STORAGE

BACK DOOR

STAIR CASE

OFFICE

TUTORING ZONE

Basement Basement contains tutoring rooms, administration, offices, dance studio and playground. The playground has the ceiling height about 25', which gives enough space for the playground facilities.

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East

COMMON SPACE

WII AREA

STAIR CASE

COMPUTER LAB

First level The first level has two entrances. Step into the center from the main entrance, you can see an arm-like staircase is welcoming you, and turn right is the activity space, turn left is the computer lab. The secondary entrance is the direct path to the playground.

South


Pulaski Youth Center Nana Andoh Fall 2015

SEATING AREA

ART CRAFT ROOM

DINING AREA

LIBRARIAN STATION

MAIN ENTRANCE

MEN RESTROOM

WAITING AREA

STAIR SHAFT RAILING

1.5 level The grand stairs leads people to the art craft room on 1.5 level . The art craft room provides the easels, art craft desks and several couches.

North

LIBRARY

Second level Go up to the second level from the arm-like staircase, you can see the librarian administration is enclosed by the stairs. On the left hand is the small library, and on the right hand is the dining area and kitchenette. Also, there is an elevator in the stair shaft, which is convenient for the wheelchair.

West

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Pulaski Youth Center Nana Andoh Fall 2015

Dining area

The staircase leads you to the second floor dining area and the small library. In the dining area, there is a big dining table equipped with sink and microwave, and some couches are scattering around for teenager to relax.

Dining area

Book shelf buffer area

When you step from the main entrance, the welcoming arm-like staircase says hell to you, Four book shelves support the staircase and the hold up the second floor. These book shelf will display some souvenirs, some old books, also small bulletin, this element directly gives people the feeling of a library. And this area provide the function as a buffer, the teenager can stop and have a rest, then decide what they are going to do next.

Book shelf buffer area

Activity area

If you go through the book shelves buffer area, turn right you will see a colorful world that divided into 3 main sections by the curved walls. The signage on the floor gives you directions of the space. The blue zone is the wii area, the green zone is the leisure space, and the pink zone is the TV area.

Activity area

Common space

Next to the wii area, there is a common space provided for kids or their parents. In this area, the adults can see what happens in the playground through the curtain wall, so they can keep eyes on their children when they are playing.

Common space 39


Restroom

Reception area

Summary

Pulaski Youth Center is a comprehensive space integrating the academy(tutoring/ software teaching), recreation (playground/ activity area/ dining area) and the interesting classes (dance studio/ art craft room) together. The interior space has been tightly used, but the glass wall gives people a good vision from one area to another.

Out door led light

Out door led light

THIS IS HOW DOES THE FLOOR Inspired by the building in Washington DC., This siteDEAL WITH THE BIG WINDOW, will be installed the blue LED light fixture at the bottomT H E R E I S A G L A S S S H A F T of the building, and also, the exterior accent lights willWHICH CREATE A SKYLIGHT ON be installed on the exterior wall. The light will glow upTHE SECOND FLOOR this historical architecture in the night, which will make it more magnificent and beautiful. Additionally, we are not going to make a very beautiful garden in this area, since the neighborhood might not maintain it properly. Instead, we are going plant some simple evergreen shrubs around building.

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Historical structure

Floor direction


direction

Dance studio

Grand stair

Playground

This picture shows how does the floor deal with the big window. The glass shaft which create a skylight on the second floor, let the sunshine coming through, but keeps the outside air out, and never interfere with the first floor window.

Pulaski Youth Center Nana Andoh Fall 2015

Art craft room

We c r e a t e a c o n t i n u o u s stairs connecting the first level, the half level and the second level together. For the accessibility, we are going to install a step lift attached to landing area for the wheelchair.

Glass shaft

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05 40 FRANKLIN COMPLEX

“ Transition from Urban to Suburban” RESIDENTIAL/ COMMERCIAL MIXED USE SECOND YEAR STUDIO / MAY 2015 PROFESSOR: JAMES YARRINGTON 40 FRANKLIN STREET, ROCHESTER, NY, USA

This is an addition on the rear of the 40 Franklin Street Rochester Savings Bank site owned by RIT in central Rochester. The building, designed by McKim, Mead and White of New York with J. Foster Warner of Rochester as Architect of Record, is a City of Rochester Landmark and is on the State and Federal Register of Historic structures. Much of the immediate context of the bank’s neighborhood has been destroyed by urban renewal. However, due to several largescale investments in the immediate area, there is more hope for urban infill and restoration that at any time for decades. Therefore, our project has not only the usual problems of placing buildings in urban settings, or of creating additions next to iconic historic buildings, but also needs to serve as a design harbinger for the way this parcel, and surrounding blocks, could be restored as vital streets-capes and urban neighborhoods.

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BOA DRIVE THROUGH ATM

HIGH

TRANSIT AREA •

Form a connecting link between "High Rise Urban Area" and "Low Rise Suburban Area"

SITE LOCATION Conditions of the problem: • • • •

The landmark bank structure remains asis and will be unaltered by your design. The drive-up ATM facility of the bank will be assumed to be replaced by walk-up. ATM service in the bank building. The parking for the site will be one level below grade.

LOW RISE SUBURBAN AREA 40 FRANKLIN HISTORICAL BUILDING

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40 Franklin Complex James Yarrington Spring 2015

Four major components:

RISE URBAN AREA Vision • •

Creating a dynamic mixed-use complex which is a fitting addition to the landmark bank. Creating a pattern of development which is appropriate to the site and which demonstrates a strategy which may be extrapolated to restore the surrounding opportunity sites to function as a dynamic and satisfying center city community.

A. RIT Entrepreneurial Partner commercial space:

128,000 net square feet of space. Include 8,000 NSF of building mechanical/electrical space in that total. Gross-up factor of 1.35 is to include entry lobby, restrooms for tenants, elevator(assume traction-type with penthouse), corridors, stairs, data/telephone/ electrical rooms each floor of 120 sf per floor.

B. Work/Live units: Total of 10 units

Footprint of unit is 20’-6” x 40’-0” – assume this approximately for each floor Parking assigned to units but not directly accessible from individual units Public and private/family access must be considered o First floor Workshop, office, studio, sales space Mechanical/electrical of 80 sf. Work room/storage room Powder room with toilet and lavatory o Second Floor Living space Kitchen Den/dining space Coat closet Pantry/storage Bathroom with toilet/lavatory/shower o Third Floor Master bedroom with closet Second bedroom with closet Home office/den/sewing room Storage Bathroom with toilet/lavatory/tub-shower

C. RIT Downtown Student Commons: RIT Downtown Center offices – 3 @ 96 sf = 288 sf Men’s/women’s restrooms – 440 sf Lobby/entry – 400 sf Vending – 120 sf Storage – 100 sf Meeting room – 300 sf Total – 1,648 NSF

D. Underground structured parking:

110 spaces controlled with door and card access to exterior o Elevator lobby o Exit stairs o Mechanical space for garage of 250 sf o Work/live units will have reserved parking but direct access to units not Required

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40 Franklin Complex James Yarrington Spring 2015

FRONT SQUARE Site plan:

On 2D site plan, we can see the curved element is regarded as the main entrance facing to the suburban side. The welcoming curved entrance square seems like saying hello to the people come more the low rise suburban area to the high rise urban area. Meanwhile the curved elements has been emphasized on 3D direction, which represents as a curved roof profile dropping down from the urban area to the suburban area.

CURVY EDGE ENTRANCE

Curvy edge element:

Curved element usually makes the thing gentle, soft and welcoming, especially, adding up some curved element in the linear architecture often brighten up the whole work. I did some research about this point, that is why people love curved element in a building. The researchers captured the brain activity that occurred when the study participants in the imaging machine considered the pictures. Turns out people looking at curved design had significantly more activity in a brain area called the anterior cingulate cortex, compared to people who were looking at linear decorations. The ACC has many cognitive functions, but one is especially noteworthy in the context of Vartanian's study: its involvement in emotion. So curved design uses our brains to tug at our hearts. Some of us cry outside great buildings as a result. Some of us reach for another brand of dental floss. Some of us, beyond all rational judgment, type in Comic Sans font. "Our preference for curves can not be explained entirely in terms of a 'cold' cognitive assessment of the qualities of curved objects," Vartanian tells Co. Design. "Curvature appears to affect our feelings, which in turn could drive our preference." Another brain imaging study, conducted several years ago by Moshe Bar of Harvard Medical School, found that viewing objects with sharp elements—once again, square watches, pointy couches, and the like—activated the amygdala. That's the part of the brain that processes fear. Bar and collaborator Maital Neta proposed that since sharp objects have long signaled physical danger, human brains now associate sharp lines with a threat. Curves, meanwhile, may be seen as harmless by comparison. "In other words," says Vartanian, "we prefer curves because they signal lack of threat, i.e. safety."

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Office and commercial area

The first floor consists work-live units, RIT Student Center and the commercial area (Retail and offices). Expect from the work-live units, the commercial area is supposed to be left as open space for later division. Second floor is almost same to the first floor. From the third floor, all the space are occupied by offices. FORTH FLOOR

2 7

3 THIRD FLOOR 3 4 5 6

SECOND FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR 8

9

9 2

2 7

3

FIRST FLOOR

3 1

10

4 5 6

UNDERGROUND PARKING FIRST FLOOR 48


40 Franklin Complex James Yarrington Spring 2015

WORK-LIVE UNIT

Work-live unit designated lofts animate the lane-way and feature a double height space to accommodate diverse studio activities. The penthouse includes two-story 'through units' with windows on both the north and south sides allowing for natural air-flow and ventilation. The upper floors also features wrap-around terraces leading to the public garden on the rooftop . NINTH FLOOR

EIGHTH FLOOR

SEVENTH FLOOR

LEGEND

1. RIT STUDENT CENTER 2. WORK LIVE UNITS 3 STAIRS CASE 4. ELEVATOR 5. LOUNGE 6. RESTROOM 7. OFFICE AND SALE SPACE 8. MAIN ENTRANCE 9. WORK LIVE UNIT PRIVATE ENTRANCE 10. UNDERGROUND PARKING ENTRANCE

SIXTH FLOOR

FIFTH FLOOR

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East elevation

North elevation

West elevation 50


40 Franklin Complex James Yarrington Spring 2015

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CLASSICAL AND MODERN The ancient Romans learned the arch from the Etruscans, refined it and were the first builders to tap its full potential for above ground buildings: The Romans were the first builders in Europe, perhaps the first in the world, fully to appreciate the advantages of the arch, the vault and the dome. Here, I inherit the arch windows from the adjacent building, but simplify a little bit to fit this modern design.

HERITAGE OF THE ARCH WINDOW

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40 Franklin Complex James Yarrington Spring 2015

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06 Urban village “Greenfield Redevelopment” RESIDENTIAL/ COMMERCIAL MIXED USE SECOND YEAR STUDIO / DECEMBER 2014 PROFESSOR: MARY Scipioni, rla CLINTON AVE, ROCHESTER, NY, USA

This project puts the architect in the Developer’s seat: the future of an 11-acre greenfield site in an inner ring suburban context presents a considerable challenge: what is the best and highest use for this parcel that will generate value for the community, income for the developer, and a source of tax revenue for the town? This project will focus on the “upstream” activities that are becoming Increasing valued in the built environment design professions and Place architects, planners, engineers, and landscape architects in the room together. You will examine the site in the context of surrounding development clusters that mix suburban and urban characteristics. The current nearby land uses and amenities will be surveyed and Inventoried. Zoning requirements will be examined, with a focus on The opportunities offered by incentive zoning. You will develop a Community-based vision for the site, and go through all of the stages of the process from programming to schematic design.

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site context ananlysis This greenfield lay on the transition area from suburban to downtown, right along the Clinton Ave, between Elmwood Ave. and Westfall Rd, opposite to the Top's Plaza. We take the section from we Westfall Rd. to Goodman St. to do the site analysis, the result shows as following diagrams. Put in a nut shell, this area are covered by the residential uses a lot, also some commercial uses but not busy. The green space is moderate, so base on these I summarize some aggreate.

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Urban Village Mary Scipioni Fall 2014

OCCUPANCY Segregated occupancy • • • • •

Difference in density (Urbanized north, suburban south). Difference in Housing Stock (single family to apartment complex). Pedestrian infrastructure is underused or unnecessary in certain sections. Uneven income distribution (low-income north, middle to high income south). Difference infrastructure age (north is old, south is relatively new).

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VISION

To create an energetic and positive place where different uses merged, from living to shopping and recreation. And this site will cultivate the people to interact in a healthy way, and will stimulate the local economy and contribute revenue for the town of Brighton.

PROGRAMING MATRIX

Base on the site context analysis and the vision, I setup some strategies to achieve the goals, as the goals have been achieved, the vision of the urban village will be realized.

Concept

Base on the vision and the context analysis, I use the sound wave as my design concept. Sound wave is dynamic and energetic. It looks like the ripple that generate by the stone. Here, the main building in the middle of the site is like that stone, which will lead the other building establish out. The sound wave concept can be seen from the plan view, also it can be recognized from the street view. Different from the other building block, this dynamic street view will draw a lot attention to the pedestrian.

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Urban Village Mary Scipioni Fall 2014

PROGRAMMING RESIDENTIAL

Commercials

Community Public Space

1 Bedroom Apartment 30 units 2 Bedrooms Apartment 20 units Studio 50 units

Offices (upper level) High-end restaurant (first level-second level) BBQ (first level-second level) Seafood (first level-second level) Casual restaurant (first level) Art shops (first level) DIY shops (ground level/upper level) CafĂŠ (ground level) Frozen Yogurt (ground level) Fitness (upper level) Gallery for exhibition and sell (ground level/upper level)

Gathering Space Garden Water feature Seating (on the ground) Recreation Swimming pool (Water park) Bike ramp (Around water park) Parking Driving theater

(range from 1~4 stories, 6 buildings (100 units)

(range from 1~4 stories)

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master plan

9

5

5

5

5

4

2

Residential apartment

3

1

Commercial

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1

1

1

1

CLINTON


Urban Village Mary Scipioni Fall 2014

9

Inner garden 5

8

N AVENUE

5

5

2

Pond 7 6

1

LEGEND

1 1

1

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

COMMERCIAL BUILDING (RETAIL/RESTAURANT/OFFICE) PARKING/ CAR THEATER GYM COMMUNITY CENTER RESIDENTIAL POND PATH INNER GARDEN BACK GARDEN

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GRADING

62

HARDSCAPE

COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL

INNER GARDEN

NEW GRADING

EXISTING GRADING


Urban Village Mary Scipioni Fall 2014

Floor plan arrangement

Apartment building typical Floor plan

Commercial building typical floor plan 63


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Urban Village Mary Yarrington Fall 2014

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07 12 corners redevelopment

“Suburban Commercial Building Redevelopment� RESIDENTIAL/ COMMERCIAL MIXED USE SECOND YEAR STUDIO / MARCH 2015 PROFESSOR: JAMES YARRINGTON, AIA 1191 MONROE AVE, ROCHESTER, NY, USA 14618

This project is located in Brighton, NY. Brighton is an inner-ring suburb of Rochester of about 37,000 people with a housing stock developed primarily between World War I and 1970. Current development is concentrated in areas which were not available formerly for large-scale development. Redevelopment of existing sites has been limited to date, but is the focus of this project. Much of the development potential of Brighton, and other mature suburbs, exists in redevelopment of existing sites. Development solutions for Brighton than have been typical to date. Our project site is the Twelve Corners and the Twelve Corners plaza totaling approximately 2.6 acres in area. This vicinity functions as the commercial heart of the town since the earlier village of Brighton on East Avenue was annexed by the City of Rochester in the early 20th century. The Twelve Corners Plaza site was developed as a One-level shopping center in 1940 and, albeit with various minor additions and face-lifts, has remained essentially similar in scale and function these 75 years.

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67


M

avenue

Chelmsford

onroe

7

7

9

1

Legend

10

Winton

1. Main entrance 2. Car entrance 3. Underground garage entrance 4. Parking 5. Retail 6. Commercial/office 7.residential 8. Rooftop cafe 9. Elevator 10. Water feature 11. Courtyard green space 12. Seating area

11 6 5

avenue

8 1

South

5

Elmwood

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avenue


12 Corners Redevelopment James Yarrington Spring 2015

The vision for the project is:

Road

2

• • • • • • • • • • •

Higher-density mixed-use development. Sustainable design elements incorporated effectively into the architectural Vocabulary. Site development which uses, and celebrates, the importance of the Twelve Corners in the overall urban pattern of Brighton. Site strategy that accounts for the needs and wishes of surrounding residents. Zoning assumptions which respect community norms and expectations while Allowing for a more productive use of the parcel. Architectural vocabulary which is evidently of our time but appropriate to the Function and characteristics of the surrounding neighborhood and of Monroe Avenue in Brighton

.

9

9

7

7

12

4 3

2

Program Outline • • • • • • • • • • • •

Commercial office/retail rentable area – 34,000 s.f. (Gross-up minimal as most Areas would be leased as retail with conveniences like bathrooms within the Tenancy. Allow net program time 1.05.) Allow mail building utility space of 300 s.f. Within the total Building mechanical/electrical space allowance of 7% of total area for Commercial spaces and 5% for residential areas Medical office – 2,850 s.f. (Allow gross-up of 1.4) Luxury apartments – minimum of 40: (Apartment charrette on schedule) -Dedicated parking at 1.5 per unit -Two bedrooms totaling 300 s.f. -Two bathrooms totaling 110 s.f. -En-suite laundry – 80 s.f. -Kitchen – 100 s.f. -Living/working/dining spaces totaling – 320 s.f. -Mechanical space – 40 s.f. In each unit -Exterior balconies or terraces if helpful to your design -Total apt. Area 950 s.f. -Mail room for all apartments totaling 150 s.f. -Lobby/elevator lobby to serve apartments – reasonable size per program -Building utility space for each apartment floor – 50 s.f. Parking (generally within Code requirements with noted exception; see below) Vehicular paths, sidewalks, hardscape and landscape appropriate to the site at its Various borders and sub-zones and which supports your guiding design concept. Streets: -Major streets and their Row’s may not be altered – Monroe Avenue, Winton -Road, Elmwood Avenue. -Assume that the number of curb cuts related to the parcel shall remain the Same. -The minor residential street, Chelmsford Road, should not be altered in is -Residential use area. Minor changes in the commercial use area may be -Considered if they are helpful to your concept. -Private streets within the parcel may be created if they are helpful to your Concept.

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PARKING • • • •

Retail/commercial office - 1 space/300 sf Medical office - 1 space /150 sf Residential - 1.5 spaces /unit (Note - Code requires 2 spaces per unit, but we will argue that residents may commute to work with one car and that the commercial parking would be available to residents in the evening when residential parking demand is high and retail/commercial parking demand is low. Assume that commercial parking is on-grade and that residential parking is structured parking.)

Zoning Ordinance Assumptions:

Our site is a combination of two zoning districts, one residential (“RLB”) and one commercial (“BF-1”). We are going to interpret the border of these two districts a bit more generously than the official zoning map; assume that RLB is the general area abutting the residential use neighbors and that BF-1 is the balance of the site. The following section shows how does the building heights change when people view from the Chelmsford Rd. The building heights drop down from the middle to both sides, because the left building locates in the RLB residential Low B area, the relative lower 3-story building will not bother the nearby single family house too much; also the relative lower frontage is more gentle and closer to human scale.

39'

70

SITE PLAN 51'

63'


12 Corners Redevelopment James Yarrington Spring 2015

Basement Underground parking

1st floor Commercial/Retail

2nd floor Commercial/Retail

3rd floor Residential apartment

Typical apartment building floor plan The apartment building owns stair-centered floor plan. Every apartment floor has 4 apartment units, and each apartment unit owns a balcony.

51' 36'

18'

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Occupancy Mass diagram

Commercial/Retail

72

Office/cafe


12 Corners Redevelopment James Yarrington Spring 2015

Residential

Elevator

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Courtyard water feature

Residential building

In the courtyard, there is an ground water feature, which w gateway lead people to the inner garden, and the bamboos directions. The vertical bamboo break the boring flat courty the wind blows, the bamboo leaves make beautiful sound an

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Facade


12 Cornerstone Redevelopment James Yarrington Spring 2015

12 Corners is right at an intersection, a plenty of traffics make this area hardly walkable. The Town of Bright intends to improve the walkability and the accessibility of this area. Pulling up the frontage to the curb, hiding the boring hardscape to the underground or in the back are the popular ways to rejuvenate the dull place. And meanwhile, establish the mixed use building which includes both residential and commercial will attract people or tenant come to this area also. When this complex has been established, the people will live and consume in a positive cycle, the surrounding economy will be stimulated and improved.

will add more energy to this complex. The s in the plant bed divide the paving into two yard, and also give a little bit shade. When nd sing with water feature sounds.

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08 Midtown parking plaza

“Hardscape Beautification” MUNICIPAL USE SECOND YEAR STUDIO / OCT 2014 PROFESSOR: Mary Scipioni, RLA CHESTNUT STREET, ROCHESTER, NY, USA

This urban development project entails the design, embellishment, and furnishing of a small parking lot in Rochester’s city center. Based on our client’s current civil engineering drawings. There are many surface parking lots in Downtown Rochester. These spaces reduce the architectural density associated with a vibrant urban core, add to the heat island effect, and dull the pedestrian experience. This parking lot must meet the highest urban design standards: it must be the most beautiful parking lot in the city.

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Concept

8

The concept origins from the cell. Cell is the smallest element of the living beings, it is reproducible, energetic and dynamic, and it is also a symbol of a new life. Our Midtown Plaza program is aiming at revitalize the Rochester downtown and draw the people back to downtown again. The cell concept just matches this meaning and intention, which means giving some new blood to the downtown Rochester.

2

7

4 3

Midtown plaza site plan

midtown plaza

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Midtown Parking Plaza Mary Scipioni Fall 2014

Legend

Design statement

The site includes about 3,500 square feet of space for public use, planting, screening, seating, and other amenities. There is also a bulkhead structure providing access to the underground parking garage, called the “Hut.” This project is designing the “skin” of this structure to create an appealing artifact; also hiding the hardscape from the pedestrians' view, beautify the parking lot to the most extend. A sidewalk is planned on the west edge of the site, connecting Broad Street with Elm Street. The sidewalk passes alongside the loading dock, and a vertical barrier or screen will be required there.

1. hut 2. hut entrance 3. car entrance 4. human entrance 5. extratuf skulpture 6. bench/seating 7. paving corridor 8. lighting sidewalk 9. parking 10. seating area

10

5

9

1 2

So as you seen in the site plan, the beautification work is divided into 3 main sections. The first is the hut, here I apply the cell concept to the hut design, trying to mimic the cells is reproducing and dividing; The second section is the sculpture covered by extra turf, which is like the extension of the "Cell Hut", and the human entrance just use a half ring instead of a full ring, that gives people a welcoming arm to the coming customers. The chessboard pattern paving in the horizontal direction makes a lot contrast to the vertical circle elements; and the last part is the parking lot itself, the asphalt will be painted with the ring pattern, and a seating area will be built in the parking lot. Additionally, continue to use the cell concept the sidewalk connecting the Broad Street with Elm Street will be equipped with a ring-like LED lighting, the lighting is color changing, therefore, the pedestrians will experience a beautiful light show when they pass by.

6 5

plaza parking site plan

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Human entrance

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Lighting path

Extra turf


turf seating

Midtown Parking Plaza Mary Scipioni Fall 2014

Extra turf bench

Extra turf parking hut

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09

GANDHI INSTITUTE GREENHOUSE “HIGH-YIELD & EDUCATIONAL GREENHOUSE” TECHNOLOGY SYSTEM APPLICATION SECOND YEAR URBAN DESIGN STUDIO / APRIL 2015 STUDENT URBAN DESIGN GROUP 929 S Plymouth Ave, Rochester, NY 14608

Following the initial communications in the fall of 2014, the Student Urban Design Group and the Gandhi Institute continued in dialogue to establish the program and parameters for the greenhouse project. The spirit of the greenhouse project is to build a source for fresh fruits and vegetables for PLEX residents, while also fostering a sense of community resilience. Although the primary objective is to address the food island concern, other important objectives are those of education in gardening, sustainability and nutrition; the establishment of a community gathering place to foster awareness and positive relationships; and, building a sense of responsibility and work ethic within the community, where residents might work and gather at the greenhouse. The intent is that the 250 pounds of produce per year will be grown in the greenhouse and be made available by sale or otherwise to local residents. Also,a low-cost solution is preferable, where the cost to build and maintain is minimized, and with the use of local materials and supplies wherever possible. The program should also address the Gandhi’s Institutes’s existing resources, such as its community book nook program, the outdoor garden, and the direct access to the street and sidewalk.

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SOLAR INCIDENCE

SHADING ANALYSIS

SUMMER

SPRING / FALL

WINTER SHADOW

SUN

Location of the greenhouse to maximize sunlight in the morning hours is best, since this will enhance plant growth throughout the day. The eastern side will capture the most sunlight in the months of November – February, when the sun is lower in the sky. North-facing exposure will receive the least amount of sunlight, and West-facing is the second least amount. Optimization of sunlight as much as possible throughout the day is generally preferred although not essential, particularly if certain plants do better with less light or less direct light.

TREES SHOULD BE REMOVED

Address: 929 South Plymouth Avenue, Rochester, NY 14608 A r e a: 5,500 sf.

Deciduous trees are best for shade, since they will lose leaves in the winter when more sunlight is needed. Avoid placement of trees on eastern side, where the morning light is preferred. Sun will be lower in winter, creating more shadows from surrounding buildings and trees. It is best to build the greenhouse above the surrounding ground so that rainwater and irrigation will drain away.

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SITE PLAN

Gandhi Institute Greenhouse Group Design Fall 2015

Legend 1. Gandhi institute 2. Existing garden 3. Aquaponic greenhouse 4. Outdoor classroom 5painted driveway / communication 6. Community book exchange

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GATEWAY At the southwest corner of the property, it is proposed that a gateway should be constructed, with the goal of welcoming visitors to the site, drawing attention to the site and the greenhouse, and providing a space for public gatherings and display of the produce. The gateway will consist of wood planks arranged in a linear fashion facing the sidewalk, with a gathering space at the base of the planks on the sidewalk elevation. The planks will act as benches, steps to the higher portion of the site, and a place where the book nook could be housed. As an additional visibility feature, a set of lights could be installed to frame the gateway and to be used in the evening. Costs for the gateway include the cost of the lumber, brick gathering space, excavation, and lighting.

COST

Product Price Beams (6”x6”x8’): $100.00 Ply-Wood Panels (1/2”x2’x4’): $593.73 Bench Seating (2”x6”x8): $234.72 Brick Pavement (170sq ft): $593.30 String Lights (50ft): $80.00 Total: $1,601.75

PLAN

SECTION

GATEWAY

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DRIVE WAY AND PARKING DECORATION

NON-VIOLENCE AND SUSTAINABLE THEME

Gandhi Institute Greenhouse Group Design Fall 2015

PARKING

At the southwest corner of the property, it is proposed that a gateway should be constructed, with the goal of The proposed solution for the driveway is quite straightforward and cost-effective. In order to add color and visibility to the site and to introduce the greenhouse theme in a way that connotes positive relationships, the students propose painting the driveway with bright colors. The pattern would consist of a floral design, using stencils. The painting project could take the form of a community event, to bring further awareness to the greenhouse

COST 24x24� Stencil Template 1 Gallon Green Asphalt Paint Total

DRIVEWAY

9 pieces 4 Cans

$75.00 $160.00 $ 235.00

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TRELLIS

TRELLIS COST ANALYSIS

ROOF

1. TRELLIS WOOD COST PANELS

2. METAL FITTINGS COST: $250~$500 3. WOODEN BENCHES COST: $200~ $600 4. GREENING MEASURES COST: $150~$300

BEAMS

COLUMNS

TRELLIS PLAN BENCHES

TRELLIS SECTION

HOUSE

TRELLIS

STRUCTURE DETAILS

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TRELLIS ELEVATION

TRELLIS COMPONENT ANALYSIS


GREENHOUSE ENVELOPE

Gandhi Institute Greenhouse Group Design Fall 2015

LEGEND

1. Thermo-clear Panel Diffuses Light & Retains Heat 15 Year Warranty 2. Operable Windows Natural and Forced Air Flow 3. Insulated Concrete Wall Thermal Control 4. Solar Panels Produces 9,000 Kwh Per Year 5. Opaque Roof Reduces Electricity Demand by 34%

1. Different Angle Roof Maximizes Solar Gain

1. Tilted 12 Degreed Maximizes Solar Gain Decrease Non-natural Growing Methods

1.4’ Underground Natural Thermal Control

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Greenhouse ventilation

GROWING SYSTEM

Summer air flow

Water Bed Plan

Growing Bed Plan

Shading and ventilation will preven riously overheating, but it is evapor greenhouse that will actually cool ing water soaks up heat like a spo when water changes from a liquid tion from fans increases evaporatio

Winter air flow

Solar wrap Greenhouse film is tr saves energy, offers UV protectio ity with transparency that extend unique bubble design is what allow to allow for year-round production traditional greenhouse films. Sola that withstands the most extreme c

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Section perspective


ventilation system

Greenhouse growing system

Gandhi Institute Greenhouse Group Design Fall 2015

nt the greenhouse from seration of moisture inside the the greenhouse. Evaporatonge because heat is used to a gas. Good air circulaon.

ruly revolutionary in that it on and unmatched durabilds the growing season. Th ws Solar-Wrap the capability n at a fraction of the cost of ar-Wrap is an insulated film climates.

Overlooking platform

NUTRIENT FILM TECHNIQUE • • • • •

Water flows in a thin film through an enclosed channel Closed channels prevent evaporation Perfect for lettuce-not so good for tomatoes Enclosed channels prevent water from evaporating- very water efficient Roots may become thick and stagnate flow, causing root problems in stagnated areas

FLOOD AND DRAINAGE TECHNIQUE • • • • • •

Growing system

Pump has an “On” and “Off” Cycle Water floods the grow tank when the pump is On Grow tank empties when pump is off Root development benefits from aeration and Roots develop stronger Good for almost any crop (tomatoes like this)

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10

Information building for MORANDI MUSEUM “Conceptual design and representation” CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND MANUAL REPRESENTATION FIRST YEAR STUDIO / SEPTEMBER 2013 PROFESSOR: Michelle M. Murnane, AIA 1 LOMB MEMORIAL DRIVE , Rochester, NY 14608

Begin with an artist , imagine there is a museum for your selected artist, and this project is going to design a information booth as part of the museum that is being constructed to honor the work of your Chosen artist, an Information Building is being planned to orient visitors to the site. The purpose of the building is similar in nature to that of the Information Building by Bob Macon, AIA on RIT’s campus. The task is to design the Information Building in a way that embodies and communicates the essence of this artist and his/her work. This building should NOT look like your artist designed it, but rather it should be an homage to your artist. Look to your buzzwords about the artist and design a structure using those words for guidance. This project will use the circle where RIT’s Information Building is located as your site.

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SITE PLAN The information building is located in a small garden. The drive through ticketing window is facing to the west. There is a small fountain in front of the entrance. And the parking area is on the north side of the building. The Morandi Museum is on the east side of the building. There is a small garden with a path go through to the southeast of the building.

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NORTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION


Information Building for Morandi Museum Michelle M. Murnane Fall 2013

Introduction of Giorgio morandi

Giorgio Morandi was an Italian painter, with great sensitivity to tone, color, and compositional balance. His drawing often approach abstraction in their own rhythm, simplicity and tranquil! He love to draw the bottles standing on a level table, with different colors and shapes, these bottles and vase convey a unique harmony and silence, you can tell from the above picture.

Design statement

Base on Morandi's bottle and vase element, I chose a vase in his painting and developed the vase into a building and tried to establish it on the ground. The vase is lying on the ground, the bottom where the ticketing booth located is facing to the west, the vase top that installed with the mechanical and HVAC equipments, is facing to the east, The building entrance is facing to the south, and there is a wood decking patio in front of the entrance. Step into the building, you can see the curved wall separate this space into seating area, information selling area working area, kitchenette and restroom. You can tell from the floor plan, the curve walls enclosed the space but in different sections which is convenient for the circulation. In the floor plan, the brown circle is the shelf for the Morandi's Museum information and some related products for sale. The working area covered with glass window is like the echo for the front entrance's curtain wall. The vase shape building are covered with wood roofing, the wood panels follow the vase shape and create a unique rhythm just like Morandi's painting.

SOUTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

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Lectern for an Artist: Conceptual/Analytical Sketching

Based on the previous project, a museum has been establish for Morandi, now, this project is designing a lectern to be used within the auditorium of this museum that embodies the essence of this artist and his work. He love to draw the bottles standing on a level table, with different colors and shapes, these bottles and vase convey a unique harmony and silence, you can tell from the following picture. Therefore, I apply the bottles element to the lecture design, the initial lectern looks like his painting but with relief effect. Then, I simplify the design, use single vase instead of a whole painting, later, I am trying to reshape the vase to mimic Morandi's rhythm and dynamic. Finally, the hollow vase contributed with three leaves supporting the reading platform comes out.

Model

The lectern got 4' in height, 3' in the vase widest diameter, it is a good ergonomic design proportion. Above the reading platform, there is a LED light which will supply the light for the people when they give speech. 96


Information Building for Morandi Museum Michelle M. Murnane Fall 2013

TOP VIEW

LEFT VIEW

LED LIGHT

HOLLOW

REAR VIEW

RIGHT VIEW FRONT VIEW

Perspectives The vase shape in the lectern has been cut in half which is different from the typical symmetrical lecterns, also seems far away from Morandi's silence and balance atmosphere in his painting. However, his painting seem s like a quiet lake, actually, the bottles display in different height generate ripples in this quiet lake. Thus, I use this asymmetrical composition to create this dynamic, and two curve hollow decoration separate the vase into three leaves elements, which also conveys Morandi's theme. The lectern is made by wood and finished by the ceramic glaze, this will make the wood lectern looks like a ceramic vase but not that fragile.

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11 FLOWER CITY COHOUSING

“COMMUNITY SCHEMATIC DESIGN� RESIDENTIAL USE SECOND YEAR / SPRING 2015 ROCHESTER, NY, USA 14618

Cohousing is an intentional community of private homes clustered around shared space. Each attached or single family home has traditional amenities, including a private kitchen. Shared spaces typically feature a common house, which may include a large kitchen and dining area, laundry, and recreational spaces. Shared outdoor space may include parking, walkways, open space, and gardens. Neighbors also share resources like tools and lawnmowers. Households have independent incomes and private lives, but neighbors collaboratively plan and manage community activities and shared spaces. Community activities feature regularly-scheduled shared meals, meetings, and workdays. Neighbors gather for parties, games, movies, or other events. Cohousing makes it easy to form clubs, organize child and elder care, and carpool. Cohousing facilitates interaction among neighbors for social and practical benefits, economic and environmental benefits.

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ROOF FLOOR

First floor

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SECOND


D FLOOR

Flower City Cohousing Spring 2015

THIRD FLOOR

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Cohousing

Veggie-garden

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Flower City Cohousing Fall 2014

Community center

Courtyard 103


12 COMMUNITY CENTER IN ROCHESTER “BROWNFIELD REHABILITATION” MUNICIPAL USE SECOND YEAR STUDIO / SEPT 2014 PROFESSOR: MARY SCIPIONI, RLA CHESTNUT STREET, ROCHESTER, NY, USA

This Brownfield revitalization project is located in an urban neighborhood on a former industrial site. It is within one mile from High Falls, a stunning natural feature in Downtown Rochester. The original Erie Canal ran very close to this site. Other important nearby features include Frontier Stadium(baseball) and Shler Stadium(soccer); as well as the world wide corporate headquarters of Eastman Kodak company. The goal of the project is to create a vibrant community center that contributes to the health, safety, and welfare of the surrounding neighborhood by providing opportunities for active recreation and other types or enrichment.

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Community Center Professor Mary Scipioni Fall 2014

IDEA EVOLUTION Since Rochester usually experiences long winter and gets a big snowfall, we have to consider more about how could a community center attracts people in the winter; if this "winter idea" can be also used in the summer, and how much work for the maintenance year around. The water is liquid when the temperature is high, and turn to solid when the temperature is low. The idea about the water park comes to mind, in the summer the water can be used as water recreation facility, in the winter, the water will be freeze, and it will be a big skating park. As the flower city of lilac, it can't be more suitable to use lilac shape to create a the water garden. As you can seen in the following picture, three lilac shape water features are connected together.

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Community center floor plan

ADA RAMP

ELEVATOR

COMPUTER LAB

COMMON SPACE

GALLERY

WATER-FEATURE STORAGE

RESTROOM OFFICE DANCE STUDIO OFFICE RECEPTION STORAGE

ENTRANCE STORAGE

MULTI-FUNCTIONAL ROOM TABLE TENNIS

GYM

COMMON SPACE BATHROOM

GALLERY

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WATER FEATURE

COMMON SPACE

OFFICE


Community Center Professor Mary Scipioni Fall 2014

Exploded perspective WATER-FEATURE

ROOFTOP GARDEN

LEVEL 1.6

LEVEL 1.3

LEVEL 1

RECEPTION

ENTRANCE

STORAGE

ROOFTOP GARDEN

TABLE TENNIS ROOM

SOLAR LAMP

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Community Center Professor Mary Scipioni Fall 2014

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13 Integrated building system design “ILLUMINATIVE, ACOUSTIC AND THERMAL� THIRD YEAR STUDIO / MAY 2016 PROFESSOR: NANA ANDOH, AIA 1 LOMB MEMORIAL DRIVE, ROCHESTER, NY, USA 14623

This project is about integrating luminance, acoustic, thermal and electric aspects together to create a comprehensive system design that achieves its most performance. The project named as MAGIC Spell Studio, which mean "media, arts, games, iteration and creativity". The magic studio will work for media, art and games related major. Here I selected the sound stage as my design object that I was focusing on. Sound stage, in the other word, is a covered and sound proof closed big open space, which is used for filming and recording. What we are going to do is compare the proposed design with the assumed baseline of the selected room, according to some basic element (such as the wall material and the insulation), acoustic and luminance and thermal performance, and then observed that how does the varieties influence the room performance.

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BASELINE ASSUMPTION Space Type/Use Orientation Square Footage Floors Window to Wall Ratio Wall Construction Roof Construction Lighting HVAC System Annually Electric Rate

Sound Stage North 6,890 sq. ft. 1 ½ ' (Above Grade) 0% Brick Veneer on Wood Stud @ 14” o.c. R17.5 4” Poly Insulation on Metal Deck Per ASHRAE 90.1 Standard – 2010, 1.3w/ft2 Built Up HVAC System w/HW and CHW… $5,000

SOUND STAGE 6,890 SQ. FT.

Floor Plan

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PROPOSED ASSUMPTION Space Type/Use Orientation Square Footage Floors Window to Wall Ratio Wall Construction Roof Construction Lighting HVAC System Electric Rate

Sound Stage North 6,890 sq. ft. 1 ½' (Above Grade) Keep 0% Ratio Brick on Metal Stud Double Insulation Wall R-35 A more effective assembly Maximize the Lighting Performance in Different Situations, and Reduce 40% Energy Use Improve IAQ and Acoustics Conditions by 10% Reduction of the Baseline. $2,500

Overall, we are going to design a sound stage that work well in different occasions, while the lighting, acoustic and HVAC system that could reduce at least 30% energy consumption when compare to the baseline,

Scenarios Setup Ordinary Day to Day

Lighting

Acoustic

HVAC

1. Adjustable Bay-light Luminance for different occasions 2. Flexible Switch 3. Motion control 4. Wall Mounted Light

1. No Reverberation when people normal speak. 2. No loud noise(>60db) and obvious vibration generate when some accidental hits.

1. Comfortable room temperature and ventilation

1. No Daylight Influence 2. Easy to control bay-light I luminance

1. Silent and Soundproof Room for Filming 2. Easy to Collect the sound in some occasions

1. Take out the odor and the smoke generate by the filming product. 2. Enough cooling when many lighting equipment run on at the same time.

Filming

N 1. Bright enough for the musician to read their music scores. 2. Controllable height of the light source.

1. High quality of sound propagation

1. Should have a quiet environment when the HVAC system running on.

Orchestra Recording

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BUILDING ENVELOPE Primed and Painted Interior Finish Gypsum Board Gypsum Board Tape and Mud Vapor Barrier Batt Insulation 8" CMU Air Barrier Wrap

Proposed: Concrete on Metal Decking R-1

4" Rigid Insulation Mortar Net at Base of Air Cavity Brick Tile Brick Venner Flashing with Continuous Fastener Strip Stainless Steel Counter flashing

Proposed: Brick on Metal stud R-35 Primed and Painted Interior Finish Gypsum Board Gypsum Board Tape and Mud Fastener at Gypsum Board Joint Vapor Barrier Batt Insulation 2x6 Wood Stud, 16" O.C. 1/2" Exterior Sheathing House Wrap Brick Tile Brick Veneer Flashing with Continuous Fastener Strip Mortar Net at Base of Air Cavity Stainless Steel Counter flashing

Exterior Wall Baseline: Bricks on Wood Sud R-17.5 116

Baseline: Bricks on Wood Sud R-17.5 Proposed: Brick on Metal stud R-35


BUILDING ENVELOPE

19 Proposed:Concrete on Metal Decking R-19

Proposed: Concrete on Metal Decking R-19

Baseline: Concrete on Metal Decking R-15

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ROCHESTER CLIMATE Rochester Climate

According to the City of Rochester, the city has 537 miles (864 km) of public streets, 585 miles (941 km) of water mains, 44 vehicular and eight pedestrian bridges, 11 public libraries, two police stations (one for the east side, one for the west), and 15 firehouses. The principal source of water is Hemlock Lake, which, with its watershed, is owned by the state of New York. Other water sources include Canadian Lake and Lake Ontario. The 30-year annual average snowfall is just above 100 in (2.5 m).[14] The monthly daily average ranges from 24.7 °F (−4.1 °C) in January to 70.8 °F (21.6 °C) in July. The high amount of snow that Rochester receives can be accounted for by the city's proximity to Lake Ontario (see lake effect). Rochester lies in the humid continental climate zone (Köppen Dfb) [15] and has four distinct seasons, with cold and snowy winters; temperatures drop to 0 °F (−18 °C) on 4.2 nights annually. Autumn features brilliant foliage colors, and summer sees generally comfortable temperatures that usually stay in the range of 80 to 85 °F (27 to 29 °C) accompanied by moderate to high humidity; there are only 6.9 days annually of highs more than 90 °F (32 °C). Precipitation is plentiful year round.

Summer Wind

Predominant winds come from the Southwest at 20 km/hr. With a relative humidity of 80-95% humid. An average temperature of 20 degrees Celsius. And 280 mm of rain.

Winter Wind

Predominant winds come from the West at 35 km/hr. With a relative humidity of 80-95% humid. An average temperature of 0 degrees Celsius. And 280 mm of rain.

ROCHESTER SUN PATH

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THERMAL ANALYSIS

2012 AVERAGE MONTHLY LOW TEMPERATURES FOR ROCHESTER, Y

ROCHESTER WINTER WIND ROSE

ROCHESTER SUMMER WIND ROSE

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Baseline HVAC

Heating Load (Heat Loss in BTU/hr.)

ASHRAE STANDARD

Temperature Set Point:

Space temperatures will be targeted for 68° during the heating Season and 72° during the cooling

Cooling Load ( Heat Gain in BTU/hr.)

Relative Humidity Set Point: 50%

Disadvantages of Cooling and Heating System 1. Loud, make noise when warming up 2. Unevenly distribute the heating and cooling 3. Dry air especially in the winter 4. Encourage the convection evenly 5. Heat loss in the distributed duct

Forced Air Heating in such big space will result in the inefficient heating, since the heated the air cannot reach the people activity area.

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Baseline HVAC System Section

Conventional ventilation cannot reach the lower space, especially in the space like sound stage which has 25' ceiling height.


How Does Radiant Cooling and Heating Systems Work

Proposed HVAC Floor Section

Intelligent Commander The Advantage of the Radiant Cooling and Heating Systems 1. Quiet, with no fans, no ticking, no noise 2. Steady, with even temperatures from minute-to-minute 3. Keep the humidity in the winter 4. Encourage the convection evenly 5. Lower average air temperature and corrected temperature profile reduces heat loss 6. More efficient use of boiler or geothermal heat source 7. Total savings can be up to 30% or more when compare to air forced heating and cooling

Proposed HVAC System Section

Radiant Heating and Cooling System

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BASELINE LIGHTING

Guth Foot-candle Recommendation Illuminence Category D: 20-30-50 fc......... high contrast or large size

Disadvantage of the baseline: 1. Long time to start up 2. Cannot turn on the light individually 3. A lot more energy consumption

BASELINE

SAďźˆSuper-bay Series) 23800 292 W 40 fc. 1 0.6 50-60 Seconds 4500h 20 20 18.7 ft. 0.83 Watts/sf. 5.84 kWh $2,628

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Baseline Lighting Assumption Section

Brand/Series Rated Mean Lumen Per Lamp Watts Per Fixture Desired Foot-candle Number of lamps per fixture Coefficient of Utilization Startup Time Average Number of Hours on Per Year Estimated number of fixtures needed Estimated number of lamps needed Estimated fixture spacing Watts per square foot Watts Total power load KW Energy cost per year


PROPOSED LIGHTING

Proposed Lighting Smart lighting system: A. Motion control system B. Wall-mounted Light C. Adjustable light switch

PROPOSED

SA(Super-bay Series) Lamar (HBL2 Series) 35050 35856 110 W 110 W 20 20 1 2 0.6 0.6 20 Seconds 20 Seconds 3600h 3600h 8 8 8 16 20.3 ft. 21.6 ft. 0.24 Watts/sf. 0.24 Watts/sf. 1.65 kWh 1.65 kWh $560 $596

WAC Lighting 15856 1002 18 W 10 1 0.6 0.6 Seconds 900 h 16 16 21.6 ft. 0.15 Watts/sf. 1.65 kWh $596

TWO LAMPS SUSPEND

MOVING HEAD HEIGHT ADJUSTABLE

Proposed Lighting Section

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Baseline Acoustic

Acoustical Performance

Sound Absorption per ASTM C-423 Frequency, Hz 125 250 500 1000 2000 4000 NRC 0.13 0.43 0.89 0.93 0.69 0.45 0.85

STC 60+

Kinetics™ Acoustical Wall Panels The Wall Panel features a changeable fabric with a spline and groove attachment in the frame. The rigid extruded aluminum framing makes these panels a durable solution for reverberant noise problems in high traffic areas like bedrooms, restaurants, or multi-purpose rooms.

1. Face brick and mortar together. STC 59 50+ Very loud sounds such as musical instruments or a stereo can be faintly heard; 99% of population not annoyed.

Acoustical Performance

Sound Absorption per ASTM C-423 Frequency, Hz 125 250 500 1000 2000 4000 NRC 0.05 0.33 0.91 1.12 1.05 1.02 0.85

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Baseline Acoustic Section

STC 50-60

STC 50-60 CORRIDOR


Proposed Acoustic

Composition

1. 1/2" plywood core with standard (stock) gel coat colors or optional custom colors 2. Standard sizes up to 20' in length with width varying between 8'-4" to 10'

Acoustical Performance

Sound Absorption per ASTM C-423 Frequency, Hz 125 250 500 1000 2000 4000 NRC J Mounting 0.15 0.00 0.03 0.04 0.05 0.14 0.05 STC 50-60

Composition

1. 1/2" plywood core with standard (stock) gel coat colors or optional custom colors 2. 1" Acoustic Absorbent Foam

Acoustical Performance

Sound Absorption per ASTM C-423 Frequency, Hz 125 250 500 1000 2000 4000 NRC KUA-100 0.16 0.30 0.68 1.00 1.00 0.94 0.75 KUA-200 0.32 0.68 0.92 0.96 1.00 1.00 0.90

Proposed Acoustic Section

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PLUG&PROCESS LOAD

BASELINE ELECTRICITY PLAN

PROPOSED ELECTRICITY PLAN

-One light switch control all house lights. -Outlets on the peripheral walls.

-Wall mounted lights for lower energy use during quick Access to space. -Dimmer switch for all wall mounted lights. -House light on multiple settings switch for enhance Customization. -Floor and wall outlets for customized use -Switch for floor outlets to reduce energy use on offHours.

Potential renewable resource -Solar panel installed on the roof -Geothermal heating and cooling

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POTENTIAL RENEWABLE ENERGY

Lighting

Through the project we acknowledge that in terms of lighting, there is only a limited amount of improvement we could implement. The nature of the space indicated that it could be use for a varies of uses, all of which require their own particular amount of lighting which is set by the broader entertainment industry. So we focus on improvement in the static house light system. By giving it more flexibility at the switch we want to encourage crews to use the house light during the setup and deconstruction phases of the different uses in a more efficient way. Will proving extra lighting that is less energy intensive, in the way of wall mounted lights, that could be use during light or intermediate use of the space in between major production.

ACOUSTIC

Although not unheard of by providing adjustable acoustic paneling for both the ceiling and wall we believe we create a space which has a increased degree of flexibility attached to it. With which we hope to enhance any type of production taking place in the space. To and extent that it could become common practice in other sound stages in the future.

Havc

We insisted on partially doing away with forced air systems for the space hopping that a radiant heating and cooling system supplemented by a forced air system that fed the space from below would provide a increase drop in decibels and in energy use. Taking advantage of a double floor system we hope that the system would provide energy use. Taking advantage of a double floor system we hope that the system would provide enough of a cost and noise reduction advantage that it could be implemented industry wide.

Electric

Because of the multiplicity of uses our space would be use force, all of which require its own unique set of electronics and lighting. There was a limited amount of improvements that could be done in terms of direct electrical use. Here, like with light, we focuses providing the ability to switch off and on the outlet grid as to conserve some energy as well as proposing the development of a efficient building use plan that would limit the amount of time the space is use in an efficient and democratic way. So that there isn't a mayor lost in energy efficiency because of mismanagement of the space. 127

Candice Architecture Portfolio  
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