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Assistance Dogs for: Hearing Loss • Mobility Challenges • Seizure Disorders • Type 1 Diabetes • Childhood Autism

“A Boy’s Best Friend” page 7

Summer 2014 Volume 25 Issue 3


Freedom Independence Peace of Mind Freedom Independence Peace of Mind

From the Executive Director

In 1988, Lucky, pictured above, was the first dog we adopted from an animal shelter. She was homeless and was scheduled to be euthanized that day. Lucky served as our demonstration dog for 11 years. She is symbolic of our commitment to save homeless dogs while fulfilling our mission to serve people with disabilities.

Tails From Minnesota Published quarterly for friends and supporters of

As announced in my last column, we have moved 11 puppies into a third prison located in Duluth, giving us a total of 35 dogs in training at the three prisons. However, the need for puppy raisers was still pressing, as we had multiple litters born in the last quarter; we needed even more puppy raisers.

25 Year Anniversary Can Do Canines is celebrating 25 years of training and placing assistance dogs in our community during 2014. As part of the celebration, a formal dedication and blessing of our facility and the unveiling of a permanent campaign donor wall in our building took place on May 17, 2014 in conjunction with our Spring Graduation.

Can Do Canines is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for people with disabilities by creating mutually beneficial partnerships with specially trained dogs. We envision a future in which every person who needs and wants an assistance dog can have one. Assistance dogs provide the gifts of freedom, independence, and peace of mind to our clients and their families. Our fully trained dogs, often adopted from local animal shelters, are provided to our clients who live with disabilities that involve mobility challenges, hearing loss or deafness, seizure disorders, autism, or diabetes complicated by hypoglycemia unawareness. Dogs, training and equipment are provided to each client free of charge. Board of Directors: MarySue Krueger President John Sturgess Vice President Mike Branch Secretary Greg Stevens Treasurer Dianne Walsh Astry Mary Decheine-Rhatigan Kevin Florence Susan Forsberg Kiersten Hegna Lauren Segal Len Washko Robert White To reach a staff member via phone, dial 763-331-3000. When you hear the greeting, press the extension number you need or press 2 for an employee directory. Can Do Canines 9440 Science Center Drive New Hope, Minnesota 55428 e-mail info@can-do-canines.org website www.can-do-canines.org

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Can Do Canines

The campaign donor wall recognizes all those who contributed to the Campaign for Independence. Also unveiled that day was the Commemorative Wall of Honor, containing 37 brass plaques that honor or remember specific individuals. Stop by our facility and see these great displays for yourself!

More Puppies, More Graduates Last year our Board of Directors and staff worked together, with significant input from clients and contributors, to craft a new strategic plan and to set new goals for the future. The most significant goal is to increase the number of graduates from 36 in 2013 to 46 in 2014. I am proud to say, we are right on track! As part of this growth we have bred more puppies and adopted more dogs. We also are adding five additional staff this year.

We asked for help from our friends in the media to spread the word that even more volunteers were needed. They responded wonderfully, resulting in 22 TV spots, seven print stories and two radio spots.

Seventeen of these TV features reported specifically on the prison programs or the need for puppy raisers. In the end, we heard from 300 people who wanted to help, have received 85 completed puppy raiser applications so far, and have screened and approved more than 40 new puppy raisers! While our need seems to be temporarily met, the goal for 2015 is increasing to 56 graduates, so we will need more puppy raisers soon. How about you?

Annual Report Our Annual Report for 2013 is nearly complete and will be available for download on our website by July 15, 2014. We are very proud of our accomplishments! If you prefer to have a paper copy, just give us a call and we will send you a copy right away. ď ™


Our Dogs Fetch Amazing Things

Much More Than a Boy and His Pal Jonathan Prenevost and Autism Assist Dog Duncan

by Bill Johnson

A seven-year-old boy and his dog … sounds like the classic all-American tale of affection and adventure, right? Except there’s much more to the heartwarming story of Jonathan Prenevost and Duncan, a two-year-old Labrador-Boxer mix. As an Autism Assist Dog, Duncan has made a profound difference in the life of Jonathan, who was diagnosed with autism at three years old.

IN THIS ISSUE  Jonathan and Duncan Page 3

Jonathan Prenevost and Autism Assist Dog Duncan

Like many children with autism, Jonathan possesses exceptional intelligence. He’s also portrayed by those closest to him as an empathetic, sweet boy with a big heart. But, autism has undermined Jonathan’s speech and language abilities, as well as delayed his social and emotional development. In addition, his mother, Pia, describes him as “behaviorally impulsive.” Jonathan’s parents, Dan and Pia, learned about Can Do Canines and the Autism Assist Dog program through an article in the Star Tribune. After careful consideration, they submitted an application to Can Do Canines when Jonathan was four years old. Three years later, Duncan arrived at the family’s Coon Rapids, Minn. home. In a short time, he certainly has lived up to the Prenevost’s expectations. For starters, they’ve become a more social family, thanks to less frequent and shorter meltdowns. “For a long time, we didn’t go out a lot. It was easier just to be homebodies,” explains Pia. “If we went to Target, for example, and Jonathan wanted a toy, we had no option but to buy it for him. We would go to certain restaurants that we knew were ‘safe,’ but we didn’t hang out at friends’ houses or with large groups because we didn’t know how it would go.”

Duncan’s presence has made outings easier and more enjoyable. She continues, “Jonathan tends to not get stuck on something in public like he used to. If he sees something he wants at Target, we don’t have to buy it. We’ll say, ‘Jonathan, get your dog and let’s go,’ and it doesn’t turn into this big thing.” The biggest benefit from Jonathan’s perspective, according to Pia, is his friendship with Duncan. “This is his buddy now, and he has a job to do. Jonathan has to get Duncan’s bowl and get his food ready. When we go out in public, it’s his job to hold Duncan. This helps keep him focused on something outside his head, where he lives a lot of the time. It makes him be more present.” The Prenevosts appreciate everyone who was involved in Duncan’s journey to their family. “Everything we’ve seen has been so out-of-this-world fabulous!” exclaims Pia. Adds Dan: “Without Can Do Canines, we never would have been able to afford an assistance dog.”  Curious to hear more about how an Autism Assist Dog helps? Visit bit.ly/autism-dog to find out.

Ann and Dixie Page 4

Julia and Ivy Page 5

Gail and Roger Page 6

Preston and Kona Page 7

We Thank Those Who Made This Placement Possible: c c c c c

Vet Services – Animal Wellness Center; Veterinary Ophthalmology Specialty Puppy Raiser – The Bloomquist Family Foster Home – The Inmate Handlers at the Minnesota Correctional Facility at Faribault Dog Source – Animal Humane Society Team Sponsor – Mary Weisel

Angela and Kelly Page 8

www.can-do-canines.org

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Freedom

Independence

Peace of Mind

Not Just a “Hearing Machine” Ann Ord and Hearing Assist Dog Dixie Ann Ord, a registered nurse from Cloquet, Minn. has not had it easy. Born prematurely, the doctors believe a high concentration of oxygen destroyed the nerves in her ears at birth. This left her with only 40 percent of her hearing and as Ann has gotten older her hearing has deteriorated to around 10 percent. While not being able to hear everyday sounds is a threat to a person’s independence, it’s also a threat to a person’s safety.

“It was really hard after Ringo passed.” Ann says. “I couldn’t hear tea kettles; I missed phone calls. I could be sitting in my living room while someone was ringing the doorbell or banging on the door and I wouldn’t hear a thing.”

“If I don’t wear my hearing aid, I’m lucky to hear the garbage truck go by,” Ann says laughing. It was time to try something different. It was time for a Can Do Canine. In 2004, after Ann’s children recommended ‘getting one of those helper dogs,’ Ann applied and was soon paired with a poodle-mix Hearing Assist Dog named Ringo. The two made an inseparable team and Ann’s life began to improve greatly. She was alerted to the sounds around her she’d been missing and began sleeping better every night knowing Ringo was by her side in case of an emergency. But after the helpful service of over eight years, Ringo passed away in January 2013. Ann tried her best to carry on and live a life of freedom and independence on her own … but once again, it just wasn’t working.

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Can Do Canines

To all the puppy raisers, foster volunteers and supporters who helped make this placement possible Ann has nothing but warm rounds of thanks. “I just have tears of gratitude because having a life-long disability is hard and it doesn’t get any easier when you get older. To have this gift of Dixie— you know—she’s not just a “hearing machine” for me. She’s my little fluffy ball of personality.” 

“Before having a hearing dog I slept through two fires,” says Ann. “I can’t hear fire alarms so once I even had to be rescued!” Ann struggled for a solution and relied on a hearing aid, which worked for the majority of her life. But after more than 50 years her body started to reject the device, leaving her with ear pain when she wore it for most of the day. So to cope, she tried just not wearing the hearing aid as often. Bad idea.

“She brings me things I drop because my back is bad. She’s small, so it’s easy for her to jump up on my lap and bring them to me,” Ann says. “Oh, she’s just priceless.”

Did you know Minnesota was the first place to begin training Hearing Assist Dogs? Help us keep this training tradition alive by setting up a recurring monthly contribution. Contact Janet Cobus at 612-331-3000 x153, jcobus@can-do-canines.org to make it happen.

We Thank Those Who Made This Placement Possible: Ann Ord and Hearing Assist Dog Dixie

So she applied for a successor dog and in the spring of 2014 was matched with a young Corgi mix named Dixie.

c Puppy Raiser – Laurie Carlson c Foster Home – The Inmate Handlers at the Minnesota Correctional Facility at Faribault c Dog Source – Arisa Ressemann

Dixie, donated to Can Do Canines and receiving sound alert training in the Prison Puppy Program, is a BIG dog in a little package. With gusto and enthusiasm to match, Dixie alerts Ann to those all-important sounds such as the smoke alarm, tea kettle, doorbell, alarm clock and oven timer. With an assistance dog back in her life, Ann says she can get a good night’s sleep once again. “I really wasn’t sleeping well unless I had someone visit. Now I feel safe.” But Dixie’s help doesn’t stop there. Like many Can Do Canines, Dixie is equipped with additional Mobility Assist Dog skills—from picking up dropped items to delivering the phone in case of an emergency—Dixie is always ready to lend a paw with a “yip” and a smile.

Can Do Canines is pleased to have NutriSource Super Premium Pet Foods as our dog food sponsor.


Our Dogs Fetch Amazing Things

The Calming Effect

Julia Rogne and Autism Assist Dog Ivy The Rognes are a typical family from Apple Valley, Minn. With three children—six-year-old Pierce and four-year-old twins Allison and Julia— Melanie is a stay-at-home mom while Paul works long hours to provide for the family. But here is where the description, “typical family” begins to fade. All three Rogne children have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This adds a much higher level of complexity to their jobs as parents than most people could ever realize. ASD is a group of complex disorders of brain development that can range from mild to severe. Some of the most common characteristics of ASD are difficulty with social interactions, verbal and non-verbal communication and repetitive behaviors. ASD can also affect intellect, motor coordination, attention span and physical health. With all Rogne children being diagnosed with autism, family outings had become an extreme challenge. Constant vigilance to make sure no one bolted or wandered off and dealing with frequent meltdowns made Melanie realize something had to change. Melanie first heard about Can Do Canines from her sister-in-law and applied for an autism assistance dog for Julia. Although all the children have autism, Julia appeared to have an innate connection with animals, so teaming her with a canine helper seemed to be a natural fit.

to me, it quickly became an enjoyable process.” When in public, Ivy is tethered to Julia to prevent her from running while Melanie holds the leash. Family outings, which used to be a debacle, are now much more manageable. In addition to these skills, Ivy has a calming effect on Julia. When Julia starts to get scared, Melanie says “Don’t worry, Ivy will protect you,” and Julia’s fear recedes. When Julia comes home from school and lets Ivy out of the kennel, the first thing she wants to do is lie down next to her with the sun streaming through the window. Calmed to sleep, Julia has even curled up and taken a nap—and the Rogne’s haven’t been able to get Julia to take a nap for over a year! But the “calming effect” doesn’t stop there. Before Ivy, Paul and Melanie took turns sleeping on the floor in the girls’ room when one of them became upset during the night. But since Ivy’s first night, the girls have slept so well neither parent has spent a single night on the floor. All three children enjoy spending time snuggling and playing with Ivy, which frees Melanie up to do housework, or work online from home.

by Susan Lindsay

Melanie speaks for the entire family when she says to the donors who helped fund Ivy’s training, and to all those involved with Ivy as she grew up, “We can’t thank you enough for what you did to raise and train Ivy. She is such a sweet girl that I can’t imagine how hard it was to get to know her, spend all of that time with her, then finally hand her over to us. We feel honored to have been chosen to have her live with us and help our children.”  Autism Assist Dogs require the longest wait on Can Do Canines 180 person waiting list. To help shorten that wait and help us train more dogs visit can-do-canines.org/donate and make a contribution today. You can make a difference for a person with a disability today!

We Thank Those Who Made This Placement Possible: c Vet Services – Maryland Avenue Pet Hospital c Puppy Raiser – The Johnson Family c Foster Home – The Inmate Handlers at the Minnesota Correctional Facility at Faribault c Dog Source – Can Do Canines Breeding Program & Gateway Labs c Breeder Host Family – Stephanie & Seth Scott

Enter Ivy, a two-year-old yellow Labrador retriever. She was puppy raised by volunteers and inmates in the Prison Puppy Program before completing her final training at Can Do Canines’ facility in New Hope. When placed in the Rogne home for training, the most difficult part for Melanie was getting comfortable giving her commands. “I never had a dog when I was growing up (only cats!), so it was a new experience for me,” Melanie says. “But once I realized Ivy would respond

Julia Rogne and Autism Assist Dog Ivy

www.can-do-canines.org

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Freedom

Independence

Peace of Mind

Roger’s Got It!

Gail Anderson and Mobility Assist Dog Roger

“He’s very popular at work,” Gail says, “but he’s also very good keeping out of the way when he needs to and letting people work.”

Friends and co-workers glow with compliments when they describe Gail Anderson. “Engaging, personable, responsible,” are just a few of the words they use. These are the terms that define the 55 year old Minnetonka, Minn. resident, not her disability.

Recently matched, Gail is still learning all the amazing ways Roger can help, but so far, her favorite is how Roger can pick up ANYTHING she needs. A coin? The remote? A dust pan? Roger’s got it. He helps Gail get out of the house and to work on time, which in the past was a big source of stress.

Gail, who has quadriplegia from a gymnastics accident when she was 15, has limited use of her arms and hands, and very limited use of her fingers. Despite these limitations, Gail leads an active lifestyle through the use of a power wheelchair and an adapted van, which allows her to drive independently. She works as a computer programmer outside her home and loves spending time outside. But as things progress, Gail has experienced more difficulty with dropping items and “the novelty of figuring out how to pick them up” has waned. Able to retain some independence through the use of a part-time, livein personal care attendant during the work week—on weekends Gail worried she may not be able to get help in the event of an emergency and needed more assistance with everyday tasks. Luckily, Gail was fortunate to have a large, supportive, family insisting she check out Can Do Canines when these concerns arose. “I’d been getting brochures in the mail from family for years,” she says with a smile on her face. When asked about the decision to apply for an assistance dog, Gail replied, “Originally you are just trying to be as independent as you can and figure things out how to make

by Jenna Paananen

Gail is grateful to have Roger and can’t wait to experience the many more positive ways he will improve her life and increase her independence.

Gail Anderson and Mobility Assist Dog Roger

things work on your own. But then after so many years, all the little things keep adding up to become bigger and bigger things.” So Gail applied with Can Do Canines and was soon matched with Roger, a two-year-old, black Labrador retriever. Well-mannered and highly affectionate, Roger received his name through the “Name-A-Puppy” Program and was raised by inmates in the Prison Puppy Program. When it comes to work, Roger’s inmate handlers describe him as always ready to learn. He loves to “show-off” his skills. Trained to retrieve dropped items, open the door to the garage, tug off Gail’s jacket, and retrieve her cell phone from her wheelchair, Roger also accompanies Gail to work and has made quite a few friends in the office.

“I appreciate the contributions made to Can Do Canines to help get us where we couldn’t have otherwise,” Gail says. “I’ve only had Roger for two months, but I know he’ll make a big change in my life.”  To hear first-hand how Can Do Canines assistance dogs transform people’s lives, come to a Tails to Tell Tour at our facility. Find upcoming tour dates on the back cover of this newsletter.

We Thank Those Who Made This Placement Possible: c Puppy Raiser – The Inmate Handlers at the Federal Correctional Facility at Waseca c Foster Home – Susan Forsberg & Doug Anderson c Field Trainer – Julia Breza c Dog Source – Can Do Canines Breeding Program c Breeder Host – The Larsen & Van Landschoot Families c Name-A-Puppy Donor: Rock Creek Lions Club

Gifts In Honor Of Gifts given in honor of and received between March 1, 2014 and June 1, 2014

Donated by....................................... In Honor of

Jackie Alschuler...........Jackie and Jan’s marriage celebration Aquinas Class of ‘61......................................Verda Grabinski William Campion.................................................Frank Kuhar Kay Carlson................................... “Al the cat” - a special pal Chapter E, of PEO......................................Judy Christensen Bruce Coppedge.............................................Emilia Albanese Louise Donham....................Fliearman boys’ 12th birthdays Pamela Endean....................................... “Lin” and “Darwin” Karen Glander.............................................................. “Erma” Bruce Halverson.......................................................... “Calvin”

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Can Do Canines

Kelly Jackson.................................................................... “Java” Betty Johnson....................................................Erik’s birthday Kelly Keller.......................................................................“Rae” Dr. Jennifer Martin............................................ Diana Ensign Julia Miller..........The birthdays of Mitch and Hannah Foss Tommie Mudd........................................“Doug’s” graduation Rebecca Parker.................................................Molly Williams Janna Severance.......Jay E. Severance and Jean F. Severance Kathleen Skeie...............................Marge and Dave Skeie for all they do for the dogs

Susan Sobelson................ The marriage of Brenda Douville and Kathy Capra Craig Steinmetz..................... Elizabeth Steinmetz’s birthday Cindy Sundet........................Alan Peters for 25 years of love and devotion to Can Do Canines Julie Swedberg..........................................................Craig Roen Melanie Thorn........................................................ Lori Thorn Darryl Thorvilson................................................Frank Kuhar Carole Weatherby......................................................“Tommy” Laura Wingate................Lars and Megan Bredahl’s wedding Margaret Wiita.......................... Marriage of Jackie Alschuler and Jan Baker


Our Dogs Fetch Amazing Things

A Boy’s Best Friend

Preston Laase & Autism Assist Dog Kona

by Pam Streiff

The Center for Disease Control reported in March, 2014 that 1 in 68 children have some form of autism, a 30 percent increase from only two years ago. This rise may help explain why Autism Assist Dogs have the longest waiting time on Can Do Canines 180 person waiting list. The Laase family from Cambridge, Minn. are one of those families. Corey and Nicole Laase first began to worry they needed help when their son Preston, then two years old, started to regress in a variety of ways. He lost speech, stopped responding to his name and quit making eye contact. He lost his appetite, had trouble sleeping and started squealing to self-stimulate. To make matters worse, Preston’s family who loves the outdoors, couldn’t safely go outside. “Preston has always been a runner,” explains Nicole, Preston’s mother. “Once he gets going it is hard to stop him.” Frustrated and unsure where to turn, the Laase family sought more “traditional help” first, including speech and occupational therapy, but were met with limited success. After hearing about Can Do Canines, the family applied, hoping an assistance dog would be the solution to their problems. They were right. Help came in the form of a yellow Labrador retriever named Kona. While at the Can Do Canines facility for his final training Kona immediately stood out as a candidate for the autism program. So trainers matched him with Preston, now seven, and they began to train together.

Preston Laase & Autism Assist Dog Kona

Nicole says training went much easier than she expected. “Kona is just so smart,” Nicole says. “Well, except when it comes to good dental hygiene. He tries to cover his face when it’s time to brush his teeth.” But doggy dental care aside, Kona leads the way and the family is doing better than they have been in years. “Preston used to sleep maybe three hours a night,” Nicole explains. Now Kona alerts her if Preston wakes up for refrigerator raids, lays next to him to calm him during the night, and acts as his companion at therapy. The family, which used to enjoy walks in the park and camping and fishing together, can once again go on trips. “Before, when he rode in the car, he would scream and bang his head. Now we go out as a family, problem-free. He can travel, he can walk—we have much more independence,” Nicole says.

What is an Autism Assist Dog? Autism Assist Dogs are trained to act as a gentle, steady anchor for children with autism. Some children will bolt into dangerous situations when overwhelmed. The child is tethered to the dog’s harness to keep him/her from wandering or bolting away. The dog is handled by a parent who holds the leash while the child is encouraged to hold a special handle on the dog’s harness. While we place the assistance dogs primarily for safety concerns, many families report positive emotional and behavioral changes, as well as their child bonds with their dog.

Once a source of fear, now Preston gets excited to leave the house, and says, “Red, red!”–a reference to the Can Do Canines vest. The vest tethers Kona to Preston while Nicole holds the leash. Kona acts as an anchor if Preston tries to run and Nicole keeps everything under control with just the turn of her wrist. Nicole gets overwhelmed with appreciation for the transformation of her family’s life and their newfound freedom. She says “Thank you,” to the many Can Do Canines volunteers and donors, but finds these words inadequate to express the depth of her gratitude. The family is immeasurably thankful to Can Do Canines and the tremendous impact the newest family member continues to have on their lives.  Kona was named through our Name-A-Puppy Program. Would you like to name a Can Do Canine? Contact Janet Cobus at jcobus@can-do-canines.org to learn how.

We Thank Those Who Made This Placement Possible: c Vet Services – Animal Wellness Center c Puppy Raiser – Darryl & Diane Scott c Foster Home – Verna & Dave Ittner; The Inmate Handlers at the Minnesota Correctional Facility at Faribault; The Inmate Handlers at the Federal Correctional Facility at Waseca c Dog Source – Can Do Canines Breeding Program & Gateway Labs c Breeder Host Family – Stephanie & Seth Scott c Name-A-Puppy Donor – Anne Woolsey

www.can-do-canines.org

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Freedom

Independence

Peace of Mind

You’ve Got a Friend in Me

Angela Johnson and Mobility Assistance Dog Kelly Being a young married couple has its ups and downs. But, when both parties have Cerebral Palsy, the downs can be more problematic. While Angela Johnson’s husband Mark works, Angela does as much as she can around the house despite her symptoms and fibromyalgia. Most days she felt exhausted from dropping things, upset by her constant balance problems and frustrated by the extra effort the simplest of tasks take to complete. One day Angela decided she was ready for something to boost her mood and help her hold on to her independence. “I primarily wanted a dog for companionship,” Angela says. But after researching and discovering Can Do Canines, she began to conclude a dog could do so much more. “Once I realized everything a dog could do for me, that a dog could help me pick up the things I dropped or help me put on my socks, I thought it would be a great idea to apply.” So, apply she did. Now the Bloomington, Minn. resident says she doesn’t know what she would do without Kelly, her happy, enthusiastic helper. The two-year-old black Labrador retriever is quick to learn new skills and has adapted to Angela’s lifestyle in every way, including riding the bus. Kelly even loves helping with laundry, a task Angela’s balance issues, fear of falling, and tendency to drop items had made problematic. Kelly picks up dropped clothes, pulls the laundry bag, and even helps unload

the dryer, making what was once an excruciating task, a pain-free process. Before Kelly, Angela was hesitant to leave the house alone for fear of falling, but with Kelly at her side she is able to go out daily on errands. Her friend, Robin, says Angela is “someone who sees her disabilities as a challenge, not as a reason to give up,” and Kelly has helped her continue to fight for happiness and an independent lifestyle, every four-legged step of the way. With an assistance dog by her side Angela says, “I can get more done in a day because I don’t have to do the little things that caused me pain.” She and her husband both feel better knowing Kelly is there to help when Mark is away at work.

Angela Johnson and Mobility Assistance Dog Kelly

Angela is grateful to the donors and puppy raisers who helped with the placement, saying “I’m certain they know what they’re doing is good, but I don’t think they realize how much their support changes people’s lives.” And Angela’s life has indeed been changed for the better thanks to Kelly, who is not only a great companion, but also an assistant in leading a more independent, happy life.  Want to help raise more amazing dogs like Kelly? Become a volunteer puppy raiser! Visit bit.ly/puppy-raiser for more information and to apply.

Lions MD5M Convention

Pictured (at left) with Lion Al and Can Do Canines trainee, Sam, is District

Can Do Canines

We Thank Those Who Made This Placement Possible: c Vet Services – Animal Wellness Center; Veterinary Ophthalmology Specialty c Puppy Raiser – Inmate Handlers at the Federal Correctional Facility at Waseca c Foster Home – Christopher & Cheryl Gibbons; c Dog Source – Can Do Canines Breeding Program c Breeder Host – The Larsen & Van Landschoot Families c Name-A-Puppy Donor: Patricia Hughes & Paul Pittman

April 25-27, 2014

Hundreds of Lions from Minnesota and Canada gathered on the weekend of April 25-27, 2014 for the Lions Multiple District Convention at Jackpot Junction Casino Hotel in Morton, Minn. Executive Director, Lion Alan Peters, was one of the featured speakers, addressing the group during the Sunday brunch.

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by Brita Nelson

Morton, Minn.

Governor Joan Blank and Can Do Canines Chairs Lions Vern and Darlene Breamer who received a Top Dog Award for leadership in achieving the highest percent fundraising participation by clubs in their district during 2012-2013. Unable to attend the event was Lion Patrick Heffernan and Lion Deborah Koehnen who also received Top Dog Awards for leadership during 20122013. Congratulations!


Our Dogs Fetch Amazing Things

Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon Tails of Independence Luncheon More than 100 guests attended the Can Do Canines Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon, held April 5, 2014 at the Mahon Center in Edina. The annual event celebrates the hard work and dedication of more than 300 amazing volunteers. Special honorees (pictured above) this year were: c Mark Falstad: Volunteer of the Year (for sharing his filmmaking talent!)

c Judy and John Schwab: Foster Home Provider of the Year

c Patty Van Landschoot: Breeder Host of the Year

c Mike Ferber and Betty Otto: Puppy Raisers of the Year

10 years and counting, our Tails of Independence Luncheon on May 6, 2014 was another “pawsome” success! More than 300 people joined us at the Golden Valley Country Club and their contributions and pledges totaled more than $150,000. That’s enough to train six new assistance dog teams! Thanks to all in attendance for their incredible support. A special thank you to our partners:

Thank you to Chuck & Don’s for sponsoring the event.

2014 Spring Graduation Congratulations to our 17 Can Do Canines teams who received diplomas in recognition of graduating from Can Do Canines assistance dog program. The Graduation took place on Saturday, May 17, 2014 at Can Do Canines facility in New Hope, Minnesota. Can Do Canines graduated nine Mobility Assist, four Diabetes Assist, three Autism Assist Dogs and one very talented Mobility/Hearing Assist Dog. Congratulations to all our graduates. We wish you the best in the years ahead.

Thank you to Chuck & Don’s for sponsoring the event.

Gifts in Memory Of Gifts given in memory of and received between March 1, 2014 and June 1, 2014

Donated by....................................In Memory of

E. Louise Anderson..................................... Dennis Hollerud Kate Andersen...............................................................“Stella” Virginia Anderson............................“Share” my hearing dog Animal Wellness Center.......................................“Geppetto” Baldwin, “Hercules” Beaman, “Simaba” Bick, “Lucky” Bishop, “Mickey” Cervantes, “Milo” Chick, “Sable” Conlon, “Venus” Culver, “Cashew” Davenport, “Sydney” Dexheimer, “Gabby” Dussi, “Grace” Elliott, “Bear” Fackler, “Charlotte” Fitzgerald, “Bailey” Gallagher, “Chloe” Glawe, “Ollie” Guy, “Nalya” Haggerty, “Epiphany” Hlava, “Bailey” Hodsdon, “Duchess” Honeck, “Corki” Jackson, “Tank” Judkins, “Maddy” Kjos, “Bonton” Kroll, “Journey” Kuhn, “Daisy” Lauterback, “Bella” Lawrance, “Tobin” LeVahn, “Willy” Mayclin, “Ginger” Medick, “Gargy” Miller, “Harry” Paulsen, “Sophie” Potter, “Jack” Pruitt, “Jerry” Puumala, “Sabrina” Rejman, “Mia” Roberts, “Crash” Sargent, “Paws” Schillinger, “Zaza” Schwartz, “Tessa” Szyplinski, “Koko” Topp, “Finnian” Weber, “Selune” Wheatley, “Lucy” Wentland, “Baby” Yoon Anne Barasch......... “Beau,” beloved dog of Anne Woolsey Mildred Beaudoin................................................“Eddy” Terp Jennifer Britton....................................................Cooper Orth Lockwood and Darlene Carlson Fund.................Lee Perish Nicole Christoph.................................... Bob Papa McManus Paul Couvrette............................Margaret Barzen Couvrette Rita Davis.................................................................Inez Davis Sandra Deno........................................................Gerald Deno Becky Eckert......................................................Robert Eckert Doris Eckert......................................................Robert Eckert Kathy Eckert......................................................Robert Eckert

Farmington Lions Club..................................... Delores Maki Berit Gerhardson..............................................Robert Eckert Berit Gerhardson.......................................... Sydney and Skip Debra Grote.............................. Anne Woolsey’s dog “Beau” Sara Hayden....................................................... Shirley Linder John Hollerud............................................... Dennis Hollerud Karen Holt.....................................................Bill McNeely, Sr. Howard Lake Lions Club............................... Welton Zander Patricia Hughes.............................................................. “Riley” Carol Jennings....................................................Robert Eckert Katherine Johnson........................................ Husband, Bruce Denise Kesselring......................................................Shel Wahl Pete Kleingartner.......................................... Margaret’s mom Janice Larson........................................................“Eddy” Terp Patricia Lovelette.............................................Dianne Clinton Gwen McMahon..............Jim Gooley, Dennis Fredrickson, Loretta O’Connor Maryann Merideth............“Beau”, “Sparky” and “Chance” Twyla Misselhorn......................................................“Cassidy” Twyla Misselhorn..................................................... “Gunnar” Monticello Lions Club..........Elizabeth “Bette” Grossnickle Steven Novotny....................................Katie Christopherson Beverly Phillips............................................. Wesley Burnham Kathy Potter...........................................Al and Frances Grun Mary Sandness........................... Dorothy Johnson’s birthday Jennifer Schroeder............................................ Matthew Hoyt Florence Schurman...........................Virgil “Bud” Schurman Cynthia Seavey.............................................. Dennis Hollerud Susan Spohn...................................................................“Eddy” Kathy Stark.................. Rebecca Stark and her pets Tuxedo, Carmel and Pepsi Bridget Usilton...............................................................“Indy”

Sara Vander Lugt................................................ Ann Niemela Marian Veaasen..................................................... Ole Veaasen Carole Weatherby....................................................... “Buddy” Linda Wedul........................................................ Glen Morgan Toni Yeamans............................................................Karon W. In Memory of “Tanner” ..........................Bonnie Anderson, Kathryn Arnal, Joan Arnold, Debra Benson, Mary Billington, Virginia Braunwarth, Doris & Rex Brown, Alicia & Tim Blank, Gwen Blomseth, LaVonda Boettcher, Virginia Cahow, Kathleen Cameron, Betty Carlen, Laurie Carlson, Scott Carlson, Terry & Roberta Carlson, Duane Davis, Brian Deschneau, Arlene Drier, Carol Duoos, Peggy Ellis, Lindsey Fabian, James Fennell, Donna Ferrier, Marcia Fisher, Bob Fleischmann, Bruce Gustafson, Gail Hart, Wayne Haselhorst, Susan Hilmer, Carolyn Hofrichter, Tony Houfek, Carol Hoiby, Bruce & Nancy Jahnke, Kathleen Keller, John Kimmes, Sally Kline, Royce King, Tami Kinney, Evelyn Kriesel, Phyllis & Roger Kvitrud, Beatrice Laubach, Jacqueline Lundemo, Ruth & Bob Lundquist, Elise Mackenzie, Geralyn & Douglas McDonald, Shelley & Jim McDonald, Willa Jo Medin, Janice Mollet, Laurel Nelson, Dorraine Olson, Shirley Peterson, Kathleen Proell, Brenda Reeves, Linda Reller, Patricia Schluender, Dale Tilden, Robert Thomas, Kimberly Trapp, Carol Uecker, Jeana Vassallo, William Voedisch, Renee Williams, Nancy Winter, Jenna Witherbee, Laurie Wollenburg, Mary Zampogna, Janet Zastrow In Memory of Julia Bland ........................... Lynn Boerhave, Virginia Olson, Jennifer Peters, Mary Beth Peterson, Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi LLP, Karen Squier, Barb Tickner

www.can-do-canines.org

9


Freedom

Independence

Peace of Mind

Wish List Dog Supplies  Gift cards to pet supply stores  I.Click Training Clickers  Car Seat Belt Harnesses – M & L  Halti Head Collars sizes 2 & 3  4’ Leashes  18’ Martingale collars  Medium Gentle Leaders  Soft Treats (BilJac, Zukes)  Small and medium biscuit style treats  Giant Nylabones and Large Kongs  L or XL Vari-Kennels  36” and 42” Wire Dog Kennels (new or gently used)  Frontline Flea and Tick Preventative  Nature’s Miracle Cleaner  Easy Walk, Freedom or Halti Harnesses  Rubber Chuck-It Balls  Large Kick-It Balls (by Chuck-It)  Stuffing free, Chuck-It or JW dog toys  Donated veterinary services  Purebred puppies Electronics  Laptops & Computers, Windows 7 and/or Mac 10.7 or newer  Adobe InDesign CS4 or newer  Conference Room Speakerphone  Flat screen TV (30” or larger)  LCD Computer Monitors Automotive  Any used auto, motorcycle or boat  Gasoline cards  Auto repair/maintenance Miscellaneous  20' combination ladder  Two-stage snow blower  Weed Trimmer (gas powered)  No-Iron Black Tablecloth/Draping for 6’ tables  Silverware set and sharp kitchen knives  General hand tools  Gift cards to: Grocery stores Office supply stores Michael’s craft store Party City Home improvement stores  Office supplies (paper, markers, stamps)  Bleach, glass cleaner  HE laundry detergent Items in bold are our most pressing needs! For more wish list items, please go to can-do-canines.org. A special thanks to all of you who previously supplied us with wish list items! You made our wishes come true! 

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Can Do Canines

Development News To learn more about any Development News items, please contact Development Director, Janet Cobus, at 763-331-3000 ext. 153 or email jcobus@can-do-canines.org

Yum Yum – It’s Chocolate Time! Everyone loves a good chocolate bar! Ok, except for dogs.

Let the Dogs Out and Help Support Can Do Canines This will be Can Do Canines 8th year providing volunteer support at the Minnesota Renaissance Festival’s Pet Gate! You can have fun checking in all kinds of dogs and cats visiting the festival. Available weekends are from August 16 through September 28, and also Labor Day (September 1st) and Festival Friday (September 26th).

Would you help us sell our candy bars again this year? You can check out a box of 60 and sell them for $1.00 each. They are delicious! They are available now and you can request your box by contacting Kathy Broten at 763-331-3000, ext. 152 or kbroten@can-do-canines.org.

Each volunteer works a four-hour shift and receives free admission into the festival with a $6 food coupon and one free admission ticket to come back another day. Can Do Canines receives up to $3,000 for your volunteer efforts—a great fundraising opportunity! To volunteer contact Patty Wirz at pattywirz@yahoo.com to reserve your spot. For the safety of puppies in training and graduate dogs, you will need to leave them home for this opportunity.

Indulge your sweet tooth the weekend of September 13th & 14th, 2014 at the Minnesota Renaissance Festival’s Chocolate and Wine festival featuring local chocolatiers and wineries! Participate in one of the many ‘sweet’ events held all weekend including a chocolate pie eating contest and FREE wine tastings. AND help support Can Do Canines by donating items for the Festival’s auction or by bidding on fun prizes! 100% of the proceeds will benefit Can Do Canines programs.


Our Dogs Fetch Amazing Things

Volunteer Spotlight – The Herr Family In 2011, Kolleen Herr was searching for ways to make a difference and stumbled upon Can Do Canines Puppy Raiser Program. The opportunity to raise and train a young puppy to become an assistance dog sounded like a great way for the whole family to get involved. Once approved, the Herr family welcomed their first Can Do Canines puppy, a black Labrador retriever named Geena, into their clan and their hearts. They began attending puppy training classes to learn all the nuances that go into raising a future assistance dog and the boys, Dylan and Jake, showed a real talent for dog training. Once Geena had moved out of the house to become a Mobility Assist Dog, the Herrs said, “Ok, who’s next?” To date the family has raised (or are in the midst of raising) four dogs for our program—sometimes with overlapping dogs coming through their household! But, the Herrs outstanding commitment to Can Do Canines didn’t stop with puppy raising. The family has helped out at events, staffed booths and even spoke to groups about our assistance dog work. The family jumps in whenever possible with Kolleen and Jake volunteering at the Fetching Ball and Dylan “manning” the front desk during puppy classes. As one of Can Do Canines ‘seasoned’ volunteers, Kolleen was invited to join the Puppy Raiser Committee to help enhance the volunteer experience for all our Puppy Raiser volunteers. She also conducts home interviews to approve potential volunteers wanting to foster or puppy raise for our organization.

Dogs pictured from left to right; Sierra, Ellie(pet),Maggie,Lilly People pictured from left to right: Jake, Dan, Kolleen, Dylan

Can Do Canines sincerely thanks Kolleen, Dan, Jake and Dylan for their commitment and enthusiasm in volunteering. You’ve helped make a difference in the lives of the many people we serve.  What about you? Can you help donate a few hours to the cause? Contact Volunteer Laurie Carlson at lcarlson@can-do-canines.org or 763-331-3000 ext. 113 to get started.

Join our MONTHLY HEROES Giving Club! Did you know that when you decide to give monthly to Can Do Canines, you change someone’s life on a daily basis? Linda Sackreiter, a new member of our Monthly Heroes Giving Club, recently decided to do just that—as a long-time dog lover, Linda is “amazed” by Canine Do Canines programs and how the organization trains dogs to help people live independently every day. “It’s a great way that I feel I can give back,” Linda says, when asked why she decided to become a Can Do Canines Monthly Hero. When you join Linda, along with 65 other Monthly Heroes, you’ll enjoy rewarding benefits, including: • Convenient, automatic donations from your credit card or checking account via a secure website—hassle-free! • Comprehensive statements for tax purposes • Special quarterly e-news additions By the end of this year, we hope to have 100 Monthly Heroes! Help us meet this goal by visiting can-do-canines.org/donate and sign up to become a monthly donor today!

www.can-do-canines.org

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Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Twin Cities, MN Permit NO. 4744

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9440 Science Center Drive New Hope, MN 55428

online! t me i s i You can read and share

Tails from Minnesota online and receive every issue in your email inbox! Go to www.can-do-canines.org/newsletter and tell us how to deliver your copy of Tails.

Stay Connected With Us Here are a few ways you can stay connected with us on a daily, weekly or monthly basis Join us on Facebook by searching “Can Do Canines” and select under Places Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/CanDoCanines

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Upcoming Events July 8 Tails to Tell Tour, 7 p.m. August 9 Tails to Tell Tour, 10 a.m. September 13 Can Do Woofaroo, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. October 11 Fall Graduation, 1 p.m. November 15 The Fetching Ball, 6 p.m.

Sign up at can-do-canines.org to receive The Howler and Tails from Minnesota

*All Tails to Tell tours take place at our facility, located at 9440 Science Center Drive, New Hope, MN 55428

Donate online 24/7 at can-do-canines.org and click on the Donate button

Please call our office at 763-331-3000 or email tour@can-do-canines.org to reserve your spot!

Whether you are 5 or 75 ... Whether you use crayons or computers ...

Can Do Canines Wants YOU to Design our next Woofaroo T-Shirt!

Subscribe to our monthly eNews, The Howler, to read real Can Do Canines stories about our graduates, volunteers and latest events. You’ll get all the latest Can Do Canines news delivered straight to your inbox!

Sign up at can-do-canines.org

The Woofaroo is Can Do Canines awesome, annual fundraising Walk and Festival. This year we want YOU to design our special t-shirt ... an opportunity to see your design worn by hundreds of people. The design should capture the spirit of the Woofaroo, a celebration which represents teamwork, family, helping others and of course—our amazing dogs. Deadline for submissions are July 31, 2014. For more details visit bit.ly/woofaroo-t-shirt-contest.

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Whether you are a recreational doodler or a profession graphic designer ...

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Learn more about Canines Do Canines by scanning the QR code with your smart phone

Can

Do C

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Saturday, September 13, 2014 at Can Do Canines See the enclosed brochure for more information Proudly Presented by

Rogers Lions

Tails from Minnesota - Summer 2014  

The quarterly publication of Can Do Canines. Learn more at can-do-canines.org.

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