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50¢ February 15, 2017

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INSIDE Classified . . . . . . . . a8 Community . . . . . . A7 County News . . . A2,A3 . . . . . . . . . . . A10, B2, B9 Court . . . . . . . . . . . A8 Marketplace . . . B4-6 Obituaries . . . . . . . A6 Opinion . . . . . . . . . A4 Op-Ed . . . . . . . . . . A5 Our Town . . . . . . . A9 Public Notice . . . . . A8 Society . . . . . . . . . . A7 Sports . . . . . . . . . . B1 Obituaries in this issue: Carlton, Crowder, Goewey, Greiwe, Lara, Liehr, Lipcamon, McEuen, Patterson, Yokem, Zarello. Pike Press © 2017 All rights reserved. This

Vol. 175, No. 7

Barry joins southern Pike burn ban

By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press After seven fires in 36 hours, all of which were grass and field fires, the Spring Creek and Pleasant Hill Council agrees Fire Departments have said, to ball field “Enough.” A burn ban was improvements. declared Monday evening. See page A2 Barry joined the ban Tuesday morning. A post on social media School leadership by the Pike County Sheriff’s office told of the initial ban program elicts and the addition of Barry to excitement. the ban. The post added the See page a3 rules and regulations of open burning, even when a burn ban is not in affect. Shannon Smith, Pleasant

Cook advances to State. See page b1

pikepress.com

Hill fire chief, and Trent Crane, Spring Creek fire chief, declared the ban which was put into place Monday, Feb. 13 at 9 p.m. and remains in effect until further notification. The Pike County Emergency Management Agency made the announcement. The previous day-and-ahalf had been a blur of continuous fire calls. “The first call was at Pearl,” Smith said. “The second near Heartland Lodge, the third on Rt. 54.” The department also provided mutual aid to a Calhoun call. Monday started off with both departments being called for mutual aid to Calhoun to

the fire that rekindled from Sunday. In total the Calhoun fire is estimated to have burned 1,000 acres. “People just don’t realize how dry it is,” Smith said. “There were also windy conditions. Those should always be considered before starting a fire.” The fire calls were being received so quickly, both Spring Creek and Pleasant Hill had to ask for mutual aid. The fire Sunday, on Rt.54 was actually in Pittsfield’s district, but Pleasant Hill assisted them in the fire which consumed a broad area. “While we were in Calhoun, there was a fire

“People just don’t realize how dry it is. There were also windy conditions. Those should always be considered before starting a fire.”

Shannon Smith Pleasant Hill fire chief northeast of Nebo,” Smith said. “We called East Pike to take that one for us and then there was one on the cut-off road by Spring Lake. We had to call Louisiana for mutual aid on that one.” Smith said the ground is unusually dry for this time of

year and he hopes the light rain that fell Monday night will help the situation. Anyone with any questions about the burn ban is asked to contact either the Pleasant Hill or Spring Creek Fire Departments.

Barry Township electoral board denies objection By BETH ZUMWALT’ Pike Press

T

he Barry Township electoral board, consisting of Randy Hurt, Charles Blackorby and Mark Hart, voted not to allow Samantha Puterbaugh to be an independent candidate in the township race for clerk. Puterbaugh filed her petition but not the receipt of the petition, according to Hurt. Hurt said there was good attendance at the meeting Feb. 7 and the vote was 3-0 to uphold the petition filed by Lillian Bowen, the current clerk, who is also running for reelection. Expecting the matter to be voted on after the deadline for filing as a writein candidate, Puterbaugh has filed the necessary paperwork and will run as a write-in candidate in the April election. “There was no discussion or questions after we voted,” Hurt said. This is the second controversy in Barry Township this election cycle. Larry Lewton, a candidate for road commissioner, challenged the incumbent, Troy Bradshaw’s candidacy. The electoral board voted 2-1 to allow Bradshaw to run. Lewton then appealed to the Pike County Circuit Court, which upheld the electoral board’s decision. Lewton said he does not plan to appeal the motion, although he is optimistic the appeals court would rule in his favor. “I feel case law does give support to my side,” Lewton said. “I think the county clerk’s office gained a lot of knowledge and that’s a good thing. But the high cost of an appeal, even though I think we would have a good shot, just makes it unreasonable.” Lewton said the cost of an appeal would be between $7,000 and $10,000. “It’s an expensive procedure and it would have to be expedited because of the time concerns,” Lewton said.

Beth Zumwalt/The Weekly Messenger

One

piece at a time

Eric Simonsen, three-year-old son of Drew and Jenna Simonsen, really enjoyed the spaghetti dinner Friday night at Pleasant Hill High School. The supper was a benefit for the Shonhart family, whose son Samuel is undergoing treatment for thyroid cancer. The dinner was “an amazing success,” according to Beth Arnold, one of the organizers.

Pike leads again — this time bobcats By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press Hunters and trappers took a preliminary total of 141 bobcats during the 201617 Illinois Bobcat Hunting and Trapping Season. And again, Pike County led Illinois in the hunting numbers, with the highest number of bobcats taken. Pike has led the state in deer hunting for the past few decades with few exceptions and with the first bobcat season in the books, continues to be a leader in hunting. “I’m not surprised,” Kurt McAllister, one of 11 local bobcat hunters who was successful, said. “That habitat here is perfect for them.” (See, bobcats, A2)

2016-17 Illinois Bobcat Hunting and Trapping Season results in West Central Illinois Archery Adams 1 Brown 0 Calhoun 0 Cass 0 Greene 0 Hancock 0 Jersey 0 Pike 2 Schuyler 0 Scott 0

Gun Trap Salvage Total 1 1 0 3 1 2 0 3 2 1 0 3 0 2 1 3 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4 5 0 11 2 1 1 4 2 1 0 3

General assistance programs lend a helping hand

material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

By JUSTIN A. COBB Pike Press Charity begins at home, but public assistance begins at the township level, at least in counties organized by township like Pike. “It’s kind of complicated,” Carla Allen, who administers general assistance for 21 of the 24 townships in Pike County, said by phone Feb. 8. Barry, Cincinnati, and Hardin townships

administer their own general assistance programs, according to Allen. In contrast to Pike County, Scott County has a county commission form of government and, thus, is not divided into townships so general assistance in Scott is administered at the county level, Scott County general assistance administrator Retha Anders said by phone Tuesday morning. “Ours is done at the county level, and part (See, Assistance, A2)

Dolbeare makes finalist cut in National Merit Scholarship Submitted photo

Saukettes

medal at state

The PHS Saukettes ended their competition season in Springfield this past weekend at the IDTA State Finals with third place. Members of the squad are, front row, left to right, Lindsey Bonnett and Juliana Fray (captains). Second row, Alayna Scranton, Taylor Anstedt, Bella Dorrity. Third row, Quinn Corgiat, Lainey Ten Eyck, Lauren Saxe, Cherise Anderson. The girls were coached by Heather Richards and Brittney Shoemaker. Throughout the season the Saukettes earned two second place titles and also a third place title in other competitions. 

By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press Derek Dolbeare thought he was in trouble Friday when he was called to the office at Pleasant Hill High School where he is a senior. “I walked in and there was Ms. Arnold, Mr. Lowe, Mr. Peebles, Ms Jones,” Dolbeare said. “And they all said ‘Congratulations.’ I said,‘Thank you and for what?’.” That’s when Dolbeare got the news he was a finalist in

the National Merit Scholarship competition. Dolbeare had been recognized in September as one of 16,000 selected to be a National Merit Scholarship Corporation semi-finalist. Friday’s notification was to tell him he is one of 15,000 finalists. In March that number will be slimmed to 7,500. The cut would qualify Dolbeare to receive a portion of $33 million that will be awarded in National Merit Scholarships. (See, dolbeare, A2)

derEk dolbeare


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Pike Press

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

News

Pittsfield, Illinois

Bobcats

(Continued from A1) McAllister said his family accounted for three of the harvest animals. “My brother Kory and his son, Weston, also got bobcats,” he said. “And I know Dean Corgiat got one, also.” The Illinois Department of Natural Resources instituted the hunting season, limiting the number of permits at 500. Each permit holder was allowed one bobcat. “We are very pleased with the response to Illinois’ new hunting and trapping season for bobcats,” said Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) Director Wayne Rosenthal.  “The recovery of the bobcat is a conservation success story in Illinois. We were pleased with the response of hunters and trappers that applied for permits, and we will continue to evaluate the program.”  More than 6,400 people applied for 500

permits to take bobcats.  Those awarded a permit in the lottery were required to register their harvest within 48 hours and purchase a Bobcat Pelt Temporary Permit.  They reported taking 69 bobcats by hunting, 49 by trapping, 12 by archery, and salvaging 11 from roads.  Bobcats were harvested in 44 counties in the open zone, which included western and southern parts of the state.  Top counties were Pike (11), Jackson (10), Jefferson (7), Carroll (6), and Randolph (6). The 2016-17 season for hunting bobcats with bow or gun was conducted November 10, 2016 through January 31, 2017 (closed during Firearm Deer Season), while permitted trappers were able to take bobcats Nov. 5, 2016 through Jan. 20, 2017 in the northern zone and Nov. 10, 2016 through Jan. 25, 2017 in the southern zone.

Assistance

Submitted photo

A structure similar to the one being proposed by the Pike County Girls Summer Softball League is already in place in Beardstown. The shaded, stacked level will provide seating or a spot for lawn chairs for visitors to the high school ball field.

Council agrees to buy materials for ball field improvements

By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press If all plans fall into place, fans of girls softball may have new seating options this summer at Vic Callender ball field. The Pittsfield City Council pledged $10,000 toward the project at its Feb. 7 meeting. According to Jason White, president of the Pike County Girls Summer Softball League (PCGSSL), who attended the meeting, the field has always been lacking in visibility, especially for fans who want to sit in lawn chairs and not on the bleachers. Two proposed structures will give fans an option. The PCGSSL is planning to build two structures, with four tiers at 36, 42, 46 and 48 inches. The structure would be 14 feet wide 36 feet long. The width of the tiers will be wide enough to accommodate lawn chairs and /or seating. “The structures will start at the infield side of the dugouts and work toward home plate.  They will end where the fence turns to straighten out behind home,” White said. “The current bleacher sections will be moved in behind the home plate area to provide more elevated seating.” White said he had talked to Paula Hawley, Pikeland superintendent, and she is on board with the project, as long as an architect looks over the plans to assure safety. The ball fields and adjoining areas are owned by Pikeland but used by the summer leagues. The ball field is also the home of the Pittsfield Lady Saukee softball team. White said that once the additional seating is in place, the facility could be considered as a host site for a sectional or state tournament. The Pittsfield Little League hosted a state tour-

nament last summer that brought eight teams to Pike County. Each team had approximately 12 players who, along with their families, stayed in local establishments, ate locally and shopped in the area. “And you have a much better parking facility at Pikeland Community School than they do at the Little League Park,” Hayden said. “Yes, and we have a great better concession stand,” White said. “We should be able to provide a good site for a tournament.” The council voted to take $10,000 out of the money left to the city by Ella Barnes. The Ella Barnes Trust was established to provide recreational opportunities in the community. ‘I will vote for the city to buy the materials if they PCGSSL will put a plaque on the structures recognizing the Ella Barnes Trust,” Ed Knight, alderman, said. White said that would be no problem. After the meeting, White said the structure would be built using volunteer labor and he hoped work could begin as soon as possible in order to have the structures in place by the start of the season. In other action, the council put into a written document to spend $400,000 to extend Fayette Street to accommodate Ace Hardware. “We have always said that, but we have never put it into the minutes,” John Hayden, mayor, said. “We will spend up to $400,000 to extend the street and another $100,000 to run utilities out there.” Ace Hardware has had a plan in place for several years to bring a store to Pittsfield but has never broken ground. Hayden says the hang-up is the developer would like Fayette Street to extend to the west and then curve north,

coming out on Washington Street on the former drive of the Pittsfield Sale Barn. “There is a problem getting the state to sign off on approval to have an entrance/exit on U.S. 54,” Hayden said. “The state has nit-picked it to death.” The new store, once completed, is expected to hire between 10-20 individuals. Hayden expressed sympathy to the Fred Clark family, adding that Clark had been a park ranger at the lake. Clark died Jan. 26. “He had it up and running in really great shape,” Hayden said. “We will start taking applications for his replacement and hope to have somebody hired by the time we open the lake.” The council also heard an update on the new firehouse. It is hoped the department will occupy the building soon and hold an open house in April. The project has seemingly come in under budget, although final numbers have not been totaled yet. The lagoon at King Park will be stocked with 150 lbs of trout for the spring trout season. There is a chance a fall trout season may be available in October. “The Illinois Department of Natural Resources may also bring some fish in from the lake,” Kevin Ketchum, alderman and the council’s liaison to the park board, said. Also, the council learned Niemann’s has let the bids for their new convenience store to be built near the site of the former Cardinal Inn. “They are supposed to notify the contractor this week,” Hayden said at the meeting. “They hope to start construction March 1.” The city plans to improve a platted alley between the convenience store and Pikeland Motors sometime throughout the construction process.

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(Continued from A1) of the tax money comes to provide services for this office,” Anders said. Allen in a follow-up phone interview Tuesday morning said her office issues “close to $50,000” in assistance each year across the 21 townships whose general assistance programs she oversees. Scott County appropriated $93,746 for general assistance in the budget for the current fiscal year. Across the 21 townships whose general assistance programs Allen administers, she said she sees approximately 400 applicants each year, and Scott County’s office sees “about that many” annually, according to Anders. Pike County has an estimated population of 15,989, 10.3 percent of whom are without health insurance, and a poverty rate of 15 percent, whereas Scott County has an estimated population of 5,092, 8.4 percent of whom lack health insurance, and a poverty rate of 11.3 percent, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. General assistance helps those in need with a variety of issues, ranging from utility disconnection and eviction notices to help affording medication or groceries or referral to a more suitable agency. “If I can’t help them, somebody else can,” Allen said Feb. 8. “Like if there’s something I can’t do like if you need a new roof or have furnace trouble, I usually refer them to USDA.” The U.S. Department of Agriculture office in Quincy offers low-interest loans to qualifying individuals, Allen said Tuesday morning. Some cases in Pike are referred to the Two Rivers Regional Council of Public Officials, particularly in emergency situations, according to Allen. “We do emergency assistance, too, but if Two Rivers has money, we want to spend their money because in May their money,” obtained through grants, “will go away,” Allen said. “We try to use their money first.” Many cases in Scott County are referred to MCS Community Services, which serves the counties

guidelines differ by township, Allen said Feb. 8. “It’s through the townships,” Allen said. “It’s just part of what the township is required to take care of.” Applicants in Scott County must provide documentation proving they reside within the county, as well as any current income, personal history, and bills or other documentation relevant to the request for aid, according to Anders. “If they’re asking for rent, they have to have something from the landlord, proof they live there and are behind on rent,” Anders said. “If they have an electric bill, they always have to provide the electric bill.” Generally, those receiving Supplementary Security Income (SSI) through the U.S. Social Security Administration do not qualify for help through general assistance, according to Allen. Allen said Tuesday morning this is because SSI is considered cash assistance. “They consider that cash assistance so they have

already helped them once so the government isn’t going to help them a second time,” Allen said. The assistance, if an applicant is approved, is sent directly to the vendor with whom the applicant is seeking help. “No check ever goes to a client,” Allen said. “It goes to the vendor, directly to them.” “There is never any cash that passes to the person,” Anders said. “It goes to— like if it is rent, the check goes directly to the landlord.” Both counties’ assistance programs are funded entirely through the annual property tax levy, with each township in Pike and the county as a whole in Scott levying according to its anticipated need, according to Allen. “Each township is different,” Allen said. “Pittsfield Township has the biggest amount of people we help, but it just varies every year. You never know. Some townships may not even have a case.” The townships are required by law to have enough money on hand to meet general assistance needs of their constituents, meaning if need exceeds the revenue extended from the levy for general assistance purposes, they would have to borrow it from other funds, such as the general fund, Allen said Tuesday morning. “They have to keep enough of a fund that they can’t run out of money,” Allen said. “They all know, and they’re all good about levying for their funds.” The influx of applicants tends to be steady throughout the year, with no particular time of year especially harder hit than others, according to Allen. In addition, Allen’s office administers the Pike County Christmas basket program, which last year assisted 440 families with toys and clothing, she said Tuesday morning. Allen answers to the township supervisor of each township, and the 21 townships she serves have a board that meets yearly, she said. The annual meeting takes place the first Thursday in October at 7 p.m., Allen said Tuesday morning.

write an essay. He also has to take the SAT in November. Arnold is not surprised by Dolbeare’s designation. “Derek has a GPA that is above perfect,” Arnold said. “He has taken every college and weighted class offered to him.” Arnold said Dolbeare also works 25-30 hours a week at the local grocery store. “And he serves as a role model and leader to seven younger siblings,” she said. At the time of his original designation, Dolbeare said

he attributed a lot of success to his grandmother, Karen Dolbeare, who instilled the love of reading into him. “I read a lot of books,” he said. “I study, I watch videos on how to do things. I do a lot of self-learning stuff.” Dolbeare says he enjoys learning and using different methods to accomplish that goal. Dolbeare says he is looking at attending the University of Illinois in Champaign or maybe Illinois College in Jacksonville and studying physics and math.

of Cass, Morgan, and Scott, and those seeking assistance must often apply there first before Anders’s office can help them, she said. For standard, non-emergency cases, those seeking help in Pike must complete an application, and the office then has 30 days to process it for approval or denial, according to Allen. In Scott County, the general assistance office accepts applications, and then each application is subject to approval by a vote of the county commissioners, according to Anders. Applicants must meet income guidelines, but in Pike County, since general assistance is administered at the township level, those

“It’s just part of what the township is required to take care of.”

Carla Allen Administrator, Pike County General Assistance Office

Dolbeare

(Continued from A1) To become a finalist, the semifinalist and his or her high school must submit a detailed scholarship application, in which they provide information about the semifinalist’s academic record, participation in school and community activities, demonstrated leadership abilities, employment, and honors and awards received. A semifinalist must have an outstanding academic record out high school, be through­ endorsed and recommended by a high school official and

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NEWS

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

LaHood keynote speaker at Lincoln Day fundraiser Congressman Darin LaHood will be the keynote speaker at the Pike County Republican Central Committee Lincoln Day fundraiser Thursday, Feb. 23 at the Crossroads Center in Pittsfield. LaHood, a Central Illinois native, is a dedicated family man, a community volunteer and committed public servant. Born and raised in Peoria, LaHood attended Spalding Institute/Academy of Our Lady High School before graduating from Loras College with a B.A. He continued his education by earning his J.D. from John Marshall Law School. LaHood currently serves as a member of Congress, representing constituents from Illinois’ 18th Congressional District. LaHood defeated Democrat candidate Rob Mellon, with a sweeping percentage of the votes in the Sept. 10 special general election. LaHood was sworn into office Sept. 17, 2015. In 2011, LaHood was appointed to serve the 37th Senate District in the Illinois State Senate and was elected to serve a four-year term in 2012. As a senator, LaHood fought to increase transparency and promote ethical behavior in Springfield by sponsoring legislation to create term limits for elected officials and establish higher ethical standards for lobbyist and elected officials. Prior to joining the state senate, LaHood spent more than nine years serving as a state and federal prosecutor. From 2001-2006, LaHood worked as an Assistant United State’s Attorney in Las Vegas, NV. In that position, LaHood served in several capacities including as the Chief Terrorism Prosecutor and as the lead coordinator for the Project Safe Neighborhoods Program. LaHood has also served as Assistant State’s Attorney in Cook County in the Narcotics Unit and a felony prosecutor with the Tazewell

By JUSTIN A. COBB Pike Press

school leadership program sponsored by the Tracy Family Foundation in Mount Sterling has local educators very excited.

CONGRESSMAN DARIN LAHOOD County State’s Attorney’s Office. In 2005, LaHood was recognized by both the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in Nevada for his “outstanding work in fighting terrorism” and making America safer. Since 2006, LaHood has practiced with the Peoria law firm of Miller, Hall and Triggs. Currently, LaHood resides in Dunlap with his wife, Kristen, and their three sons: McKay, Luke and Teddy. LaHood and his family are parishioners at St. Vincent de Paul in Peoria. Despite his busy schedule, LaHood still coaches his son’s basketball and soccer teams. He’s also an avid runner and has completed five marathons. In addition, he serves on the board of directors for the Red Cross of Central and West Central Illinois and is involved with the Salvation Army, Easter Seals and St. Jude. Other elected officials such as State Senator Sam McCann, State Representative C.D. Davidsmeyer and local elected officials will be in attendance. The doors open at 5:30 p.m. with dinner commencing at 6 p.m. Reservations need to be made by Feb. 17 to John Birch, chairman, at 217-8332880.

Submitted photo

2016 Pike County deer pins available for purchase purchased for $3 at the Pike County Archery Shop or by contacting Brenda Middendorf, Access Illinois Outdoors Coordinator at 217-2852464 or email:bmiddendorf @2riversrcd.org” . For more information about Access Illinois Outdoors, go to www.accessil.org or call 217-285-2464.

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Pittsfield, Illinois

School leadership program elicits local excitement A

2016 Pike County Deer Pins may be purchased for $3 with the proceeds shared between the Tax Accommodations Grant Fund and the Access Food program which pays for processing donated deer for local food pantry distribution. Above, Jack Sibley was the winner of the Mathews Halon Bow. He was entered into the drawing by bringing his deer to the checkpoint and getting his pin.

Access Illinois Outdoors is offering the remaining inventory of the 2016 Pike County collectible deer pins for purchase with the proceeds being shared with the Tax Accommodations grant fund and the Access Food program fund. Access Illinois Outdoors, with the cooperation of the Pike County Archery Shop, created a deer check station where hunters could bring their deer through both archery and firearms seasons and receive a Pike County collectible pin and a chance for a Matthew Halon Bow. Jack Sibley was the winner of the bow. Thanks to everyone who participated and made it a fun event. Remaining pins may be

Pike Press

The West Central Illinois School Leadership Initiative is an 18-month training program intended to make school leaders more effective, the first cohort of which recently graduated, according to a Saturday evening press release. Western School District curriculum director Jessica Funk, who will become the district’s superintendent in July, was one of five educators from Pike County who graduated in the first cohort. “We went for two days a month roughly back to back to Mount Sterling,” Funk said by phone Monday afternoon. “First we talked about education overall, as in a global perspective, and then it got more focused, with units on literacy, math, and science.” Other educators from Pike County who participated in the first cohort were Western Elementary and High School principal Connie Thomas, Pikeland School District superintendent Paula Hawley, and Pittsfield High School and South Elementary School princi-

pals Angie Greger and Angie Ruebush, according to the press release. The program provides training developed by the National Institute

“For science, our speaker there was actually someone who had been accepted into NASA.”

Jessica Funk Curriculum director, Western School District for School Leadership, according to Winchester High School guidance counselor Celeste Lashmett, speaking by phone Tuesday morning, who with Winchester High School and Winchester Grade School principals Denny Vortman and Andy Stumpf will participate in the cohort starting in June. “The Tracy Family Foundation has put a lot of time into researching success in schools, and all the research had come back and said good leadership is integral in successful schools,” Lashmett said. “They took a lot of time to figure out the best program. NISL is

Bill Durall speaks for PCAWM By MICHAEL BOREN Pike Press In the second of its series of “Evenings at the Museum,” the Pike County All Wars Museum (PCAWM) featured retired Air Force Colonel Bill Durall of Pittsfield. His presentation about his 37 years in the United States Air Force was heard by a near-capacity audience. Durall, a graduate of Pittsfield High School and Knox College in Galesburg, served in the Air Force from 1972 to 2009, mostly during the Cold War era. He gave a brief history of the Cold War, a contest from the late 1940s to 1991, which was won by the United States primarily because our economy was so much stronger than that of the Communist Soviet Union. Durall described how he and his wife, the former Peggy Stillwell, moved 21 times, as they were stationed in such places as South Korea, Canada, Britain, Germany (twice, including West Berlin), and many stateside bases, including a cold 2 ½ years in Grand Forks, North Dakota. He spent the first 10 years in the Air Force as an enlisted Russian language specialist, listening in on Soviet radio and other types of communications

Submitted photo

Guest speaker at last week’s Pike County All Wars Museum event was Colonel Bill Durall of Pittsfield. The new museum is located adjacent to Historic East School in Pittsfield.

all around the margins of the largest nation on the earth, sometimes airborne, and sometimes at ground locations. In 1982 he was selected for Officer Training School, became a commissioned officer, and was involved in U.S. Air Force communications all over the world. His last assignment was at Scott Air Force base, here in Illinois, where he retired as a colonel in 2009, and he and Peggy returned to make their home in Pike County.

Love

Colonel Durall took several questions after his prepared presentation. He spoke about the current increase in tensions between the United States and Russia, and included the following quote: “The strong do what they will, the weak do what they can.” PCAWM President Lloyd Lawber opened the meeting, and vice president Denny Dodd introduced the speaker. Board member Chandra Foster reminded the audience of the “Wall of Honor”

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Submitted photo

The 2016 deer pin.

a nationwide program, not just people throwing stuff together.” The program brings experts from all over the country to present to school leaders enrolled in the program, according to Lashmett. “I’m really exited. Plus, there’s an opportunity to earn graduate credit hours,” Lashmett, who is currently pursuing a master’s degree in educational leadership, said. Each session of the program covers a different aspect of school leadership, such as mentoring and best pedagogical practices in mathematics and science, according to Funk. “For science, our speaker there was actually someone who had been accepted into NASA,” Funk said. “He walked us through what an inquiry less would be like. Instead of just reading from a textbook it’s ‘let’s find the information together’ so really modeling some of the lessons to us that we can go back and put into practice in our classrooms.” Funk said she and Thomas have already been able to implement lessons learned from the program to increase the rigor of the curriculum throughout the district. Asked whether she would recommend it to others, “Absolutely, without a doubt!” she said. “It’s intense and demanding but worth every second of it.”

in the museum, where portraits of Pike County veterans can be displayed for $35 as a fundraiser for the museum. It was announced that the next speaker on Tuesday, March 14 at 7 p.m., will be retired Marine Lt. Colonel Craig Rush, who piloted the presidential helicopter, “Marine One,” for President George W. Bush. Everyone is welcome to attend, and come 30 minutes early to see the many military displays in the museum.


OPINION Pike Press

A4

Wednesday, February 15, 2017, Pittsfield, Illinois

There are many layers to living in the midwest!

Our View SOUTHERN PIKE BURN BAN

Pay attention to conditions and warnings Pike County weather can be deceptive. Not only is it feeling like it’s spring when it’s way too early, but conditions in fields and fencerows are dry, even after the melting of the last snow. Yes, it’s dry – dry enough to spawn dangerous grass and field fires. Dry enough to prompt a burn ban in parts of Pike County until further notice. Most importantly, it’s dry enough for every Pike Countian to take note and act accordingly. Volunteer firefighters from north to south and river to river are ready to risk their own safety when emergencies occur. But we can all agree that it makes no sense to create an unnecessary emergency. Events this past weekend resulted in a blur of field and brush fires in southern Pike, also including burns in Calhoun County. As firefighters became increasingly weary, the fire trucks continued to roll out. So, please, take note. Outdoor burning can be a dangerous proposition. Pay attention to conditions, the weather and warnings from your local fire experts – your volunteer firefighters. By staying aware, our fields, our structures and our firefighters will all remain safer. This Week's

Poll Question Week of February 15, 2017

President Donald Trump Q: Ascompletes his first month in

office, controversy continues to surround him. 1. I think we should all step back and give President Trump a chance to succeed. 2. I agree with every protest and delaying tactic being used; President Trump deserves it. 3. I think this is the worst political climate I have ever seen. 4. I find myself avoiding national news because I don’t want to hear any more.

7:00 am

Finish Your Story: By John Ottwell 

Big words   

W

hen my father was writing he made a statement that had something to do with a hoar frost. Dad had found a new word, hoar, and now he was trying to use it properly. He would often do that. I can remember remarking as an old steam locomotive was going over an overpass in St.Louis, “Isn’t that romantic?” “That’s not the right word,” Dad said.

Progress is being made on a replacement structure for the Champ Clark Bridge. 25%

0%

75%

A. I still feel safe crossing the current Champ Clark Bridge. B. I do not think the current bridge is safe. I do not use it. C. I am afraid that money problems will hamper the construction of a replacement bridge.

This poll is not scientific and reflects the opinion of those who chose to respond.

I think he was correct. I have a friend that has a calendar and each day it has a new word and it uses it in a sentence. Most of the words are never used in daily life. The majority of them I’ve never heard of. He used to like to read them to me as if he’d discovered plutonium. I wasn’t impressed. My old roommate is a news anchorman at WWJ Detroit, Michigan. Once dad was giving him some advice on

Timothy F. Campbell President

Julie Boren

Publisher & Editor

big words that you don’t know so they seem educated, smart, and a little better than you. Hoar isn’t a big word. It means “grayish white.” Educated people may know that or they may think I’m just a country boy who likes to say “whore.” n John Ottwell graduated from Pittsfield High School in 1984 and lives in Shrewsbury, Mo. His website is www.Finishyourstory.com

Political changes in pike    P

ike County entered the year 2017 with several political changes that should be noted. The changes could be summarized as: more women, more Republicans and less Pittsfield. For the first time ever, the Pike County Board includes three women, making it onethird female. There had been two women on the previous board, as Carrie Martin (vice chair of the board) was elected in 2014, and Patrice Mills was appointed to replace Tami Webel, who had been elected in 2012. Webel resigned in July, 2015 to become Pike County ambulance administrator, and Mills was appointed at the July 27 county board meeting, and then elected in 2016. Amy Gates was also elected in November, 2016 to become the third woman on the board. With three ladies on the Pike County Board, and Democrat Debbie Dugan elected to her fourth term as Circuit Clerk, and Republican Cindy Shaw in her fourth term as Supervisor of Assessments, a record number of five women now hold county elective office. Of course, females hold many appointive positions in county government, such as Ambulance Director

Tami Webel, Health Department Administrator Anita Andress, Public Defender Keisha Morris, Assistant State’s Attorney Leecia Carnes, and Health Department Director of Environmental Services, Jane Johnson. The new Pike County Board, including Chairman Andy Borrowman, Fred Bradshaw, Bryce Gleckler, Rodger Hannel, Derek Ross and Jim Sheppard, is the second board to be entirely Republican, as was the previous board. The unprecedented difference in the November 2016 election is that there was not a single Democrat candidate for the Pike County Board; that has never happened before. Another interesting fact is that no current board member lives in Pittsfield. As recently as 2014-2015 there was concern that Pittsfield was dominating the board, as five members had Pittsfield addresses. In the 2017 board, Jim Sheppard, with a Pittsfield address, lives near Time and Carrie Martin lives in Jim Town Hollow. Andy Borrowman, of Nebo, has lived in Pittsfield, and served on the Pittsfield City Council. Rodger Hannel, of Kinderhook, has also lived in Pittsfield. Fred Bradshaw

is a Griggsville area farmer. Barry has quite a voice on the new board, as Patrice Mills and Derek Ross are from there, Amy Gates has a Barry address, and Bryce Gleckler, of Griggsville, grew up in Barry. Democrats who have long dominated Pike politics, now hold only the offices of County Clerk, with Donnie Apps in his fourth term; Circuit Clerk, with Debbie Dugan in her fourth term; and county Sheriff, with Paul Petty in his fifth term. Republicans hold the offices of County Treasurer, with former County Board Chairman Scott Syrcle in his first term; Supervisor of Assessments, with Cindy Shaw in her fourth term; and State’s Attorney, with Zachary Boren in his second term. Boren, who is only the fourth GOP State’s Attorney in the history of Pike County is also the first GOP State’s Attorney ever to be re-elected. On the presidential level, Pike County in the past was remarkably loyal to the Democrat party, as the people of Pike voted for every Democratic presidential candidate from 1844 to 1916. In 1920, Warren Harding was the first Republican to ever carry Pike County (even Abraham

Guest Column: By Scott R eeder 

Dynasties W

hat is it about Illinois Democrats and political dynasties? I’ve never quite understood it. But for whatever reason the Illinois Democratic Party seems strangely drawn not just to individuals but to whole families. Think about it: the Madigans, the Daleys, the Stevensons, the Simons, the Hynes, the Jacksons and the Cullertons. And, of course, the Republicans are in no way immune to dynasties. Look no further than the Bush family on a national level. But when you get down to the state level in the Land of Lincoln, the Democrats seem to have a leg up on making politics a family affair. And now, with Chris Kennedy announcing his candidacy for Illinois governor, it looks like

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Lincoln lost in Pike in 1860 and 1864). Pike voted for Herbert Hoover in 1928, but not for another Republican until Dwight Eisenhower in 1952 and 1956. Richard Nixon was popular in Pike County, carrying it three times, in 1960, 1968 and 1972, as no other Republican ever has. (Lyndon Johnson carried Pike in the Democratic landslide of 1964.) Democrat Jimmy Carter carried Pike in the Bicentennial year. The next Republican to win in Pike was Ronald Reagan in 1980 and 1984. Democrats won with Michael Dukakis in 1988, and Bill Clinton carried Pike in 1992 and 1996. He was the last Democrat to ever carry Pike County. “Old Pike,” in the nineteenth century, after 1840, was almost totally dominated by Democrats, and the twenty-first century has been mainly dominated by Republicans. If current trends continue, it seems likely that the “Grand Old Party” will continue to dominate “The Kingdom of Pike.” n Michael Boren, a retired social studies teacher, is vicepresident of the Pike County Historical Society.

are not the solution 

they are on the way to importing a dynasty from elsewhere. (Chris is the son of U.S. Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and the nephew of President John F. Kennedy.) Members of the Kennedy clan have not only been elected in their home base of Massachusetts but also in New York, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Maryland, and California. I guess some folks are asking: Why not add Illinois to that list? Well, Illinois government is a mess. And I’m not sure if someone who views politics as a birthright is always the best choice. The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. But I’ll admit to occasionally voting for members of political dynasties. For example, when I

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public speaking, “Try to use ‘small’ words so people understand what you’re saying,” he advised. Eric Ottwell would often tell teachers in high school, “That’s a big word. It’s bigger than cucumber.” I am all about education and learning. The Good Lord gave you a brain, use it. Expand what you know and increase your vocabulary. But it’s been my experience some people like to use

Guest Column: By Michael Boren

Share your answer at pikepress.com

Last week's poll results

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lived in Rock Island I voted for state Sen. Denny Jacobs. His dad, Oral, was a longtime state representative. And his son, Mike, took over Denny’s seat in the state Senate. But I can’t say I ever voted for someone because I liked who they were related to. But many people apparently do. And politicians count on it. For example, former Illinois lieutenant governor Sheila Simon tried to get elected to the state senate last year. She, of course, is the daughter of Paul Simon, who served the U.S. Senate and was a beloved Illinois political figure. So, this was the top headline on her campaign website during her latest run: “Like father, like daughter: Comparing Sheila and Paul Simon.” Ugh.

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She was running for office – not her dad. Voters must not have been too impressed, either. They chose Republican Paul Schimpf, who had never held political office before, over the daughter of a former U.S. senator. Many folks are figuring it’s the political establishment who got us in this mess in the first place, why vote for someone with an all-too-familiar name? After all, when choosing our leaders, we ought to ask more than, “Who’s your daddy?” n Scott Reeder is a veteran statehouse journalist. He works as a freelance reporter in the Springfield area and produces the podcast Suspect Convictions. He can be reached at ScottReeder1965@gmail.com. Mail: 115 West Jefferson P.O. Box 70 Pittsfield, IL 62363 The Pike Press is published weekly by Campbell Publishing Co., Inc., USPS 602-540, Timothy F. Campbell, president. Periodicals postage paid at Pittsfield, IL.

2016


OP-ED Pike Press

Wednesday, February 15, 2017, Pittsfield, Illinois

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The Coonridge Digest: Freida Marie Crump

Technology all parents can embrace Greetings from the Ridge While many parents complain about how technology has taken over the minds of their children, once in a great while the nerds of the digital age will come out with something that actually helps Mom and Dad. Honda recently announced production of a new mini-van with a backseat spy cam. When a commotion arises in the rear of the van a parent can flip a switch and get a real-life picture of what the heck is going on. While they were at it, the Honda-ites have installed a P.A. system that will blast Daddy’s voice into the backseat, overriding any onboard videos or headphones. The children of the world have yet to weigh in on their opinion of this, but it’s got to be a boon to any parent who’s hauled children long distances. But as often happens the carmaker stopped short of its true potential. The automotive news article made me think back to the long trips our family would take across country in search of a motel with air conditioning on the way to Wisconsin Dells or the Grand Canyon. I wondered what devices my parents would have installed in their cars if the technology had been available. I’m sure that my father would have gladly shelled out a few extra bucks for the “Whiner Whacker.” I’m pretty confident that Buick didn’t offer such an option, but if they

had it would resemble a slightly padded artificial hand located above the heads of his kids in the backseat. The Whiner Whacker could have easily been tripped by a little pedal just adjacent to the clutch. When little Johnny is warned for the third time to stay on his side of the seat from brother Bubba who didn’t want to be bothered then Dad would just tap his foot on the lever and Whack! Of course, this is a device that would have been warmly welcomed in 1955 and would cause a multitude of lawsuits in 2017. ‘Tis a pity. But at least Dad would have been OK’ed to install the “How Much Longer Digital Display” that kept a running tally of the miles remaining to the family’s nightly destination. And since miles mean absolutely nothing if you’re eight years old, the device could also include a built in clock. Stop asking me how much longer! Just look at the clock! And if that doesn’t work Dad just taps his Whacker. My mother was an absolute acrobat when it came time to serve refreshments to the rear passengers. She could hold a quart of milk over a glass on a bumpy Missouri back road while holding a package of Oreos between her knees and passing the glasses to her hungry crowd in the rear. But for the times when our Buick’s springs and shocks couldn’t keep up with cattle crossings and potholes we ended up with a sort of Oreo soup. So how hard would it be to simply

T

hat’s why I’d advise Honda and its competitors to install a voice-activated device in each rear seat ... Every time a question is heard in the rear of the car a booming voice would simply shout, “No!”

install a small vending machine in the rear compartment of the new Hondas? For those mamas afraid of spills I’m sure they could come up with a few little drop-down hoses. And perhaps there could be an onboard announcement, “If the hoses drop down put yours on first then attach the hose to the hungriest child.” Our long stretches of Interstate highways have deprived us of anything resembling interesting scenery and I can’t blame any little one who might become bored out of his skull by watching mile after mile of green directional signs and exit ramps. You can always buy little Freddy a video game but if you want to stimulate his mind in a more educational manner you might want to have Honda hardwire his brain into an online version of the Encyclopedia Britannica or “Rare Birds of Northern Idaho.” A day-long car ride can jangle the nerves of any mother and the simple act of answering eight hours’ worth of questions can get any vacation off to a rugged start. That’s why I’d

advise Honda and its competitors to install a voice-activated device in each rear seat. It’ll be simple to design. Every time a question is heard in the rear of the car a booming voice would simply shout, “No!” And of course the most frequent cause of trip interruptions is little Herbert who swears he doesn’t have to go until you get onto the Interstate then claims that something magical and mysterious just happened to his digestive system and if Dad doesn’t stop the car right now then the little rascal won’t be responsible for what’s about to happen. No matter what Honda comes up with to solve Herbert’s problem, I know that I don’t want it in the back seat of my car. You ever in Coonridge, stop by. We may not answer the door but you’ll enjoy the trip. ■  The imaginative commentary of Freida Marie Crump comes to us from Coonridge – a town that’s a lot like your own.

PICKINGS FROM PIKE’S PAST

50 YEARS AGO: PAUL FINDLEY ADDRESSES JOINT SESSION OF ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE 150 Years Ago Feb. 14, 1867 New Hartford lodge of A.F. & A.M. held an oyster supper with oration by the Rev. J. T. Worthington and appropriate music from the New Hartford Cornet Brass Band. J.J. Wilcoxen has announced that he is giving his whole attention to his profession of music teacher, and offers his services to all who desire to learn to sing for themselves. Mr. Francis Keys of Newburg was badly hurt by his horse falling with him one dark night last week. There was a report of a robbery near Perry, but the Democrat was unable to report any particulars. We have about come to the conclusion that the Democrat, although having a large list of subscribers in Perry, has no friend there willing to aid it by sending us items of local news as important to the county and people at large as this one about a robbery. 125 Years Ago Feb. 17, 1892 All sorts of weather since our last edition, rain, snow, and some shiny. Today the weather is fine, but the surface of the earth is very rough and slippery. The new skating rink at Nebo seems to offer considerable surgical practice. Week before last, H. E. Smithe had a leg broken, and last week Charles Cannon had a wrist dislocated. Dr. Williams says he will just sit up nights when they are skating, have the necessary bandages and splints ready, and they can just bring the cripples to him. The New Hartford and Summer Hill area might as well be called “Musictown,” as we have 13 organs and a singing school in the vicinity. The fox is getting to be a frequent night prowler, and a fox drive would be a very profitable thing, especially to the sheep men. John Shaw is doing a landoffice business in the maple sugar line, and from all pros-

pects will be able to supply all the sweetness necessary in this part of the county. It is hoped that the new stock law will be enforced in New Canton, and that hereafter the contents of stables, hog pens, cowsheds, etc. will be absolutely prohibited from the streets of town. On Friday morning last, at his home in Griggsville, a very worthy citizen of that city, Mr. Joseph Rhodes, passed to his final rest. He was the father of Mr. Charles Rhodes of Griggsville, and died of kidney trouble. The cigar makers have about completed all their arrangements for their first annual ball. It will take place at the opera house on the night of the 22nd of February, and will be well attended. Parks’ orchestra of Louisiana, Mo., will furnish the music, which in itself is a sufficient guarantee that it will be well to be there. 100 Years Ago Feb. 14, 1917 Hog prices are going up as the war continues in Europe. Some are predicting that hogs will go to $15 a hundred before the end of 1917. Strauss and Bro. have purchased 250 blue serge suits. Every garment is guaranteed to hold its color and shape. Your wardrobe will not be complete without a Hart, Schaffner and Marx blue serge for $22.50. The basket ball team of Pittsfield high school defeated the team of the Waverly high school in Pittsfield Friday evening, by a score of 20 to 10. This was the last game of the season for the Pittsfield team, but practice will be maintained until the tournament to be held at Jacksonville on Feb. 23 and 24. Pittsfield has had a very successful season, the team having played some of the fastest teams in this section of the state and having won a large percentage of the games played. The local troop of Boy Scouts attended the Pittsfield Christian church in a body last Sunday morning. It was an

impressive sight to see those 20 manly boys march in, and we felt the truth of what one of our national leaders has said: “They are our greatest national resource.” County Superintendent of Schools John N. Clark was a guest at the home of his daughter, Mrs. James Witty, north of Nebo, Sunday. Seats for the newly remodeled Methodist Episcopal church at Detroit arrived last Saturday and are now being placed in position. Arrangements are being made to have the dedication Sunday, Feb. 25. Subscribe to the St. Louis Globe-Democrat every day except Sunday for $2.50 per year. 75 Years Ago Feb. 18, 1942 Five new nurses have reported for duty at Illini Community Hospital. The number of patients remains close to 30, as a total of 84 have been admitted since the opening of the hospital. William Blacklock was one of the Pike county men who had served in World War I, and was still below 45 years of age. He was born in England and came to this county after the war. He was one of the 1,341 Pike county men who registered for selective service Feb. 16, 1942. The Lions Club of Pleasant Hill challenged the Lions of Pittsfield to a basketball game. The Pleasant Hill group number five or six who could play a pretty good brand of ball. The Pittsfield string numbered from one to 16 on the floor at one time. Coach Edgar Voshall of the Pittsfield team used 1950 rules, with anything considered all right. Uniforms ranged form night shirts to dress shirts with a couple of hula dancers thrown in. The game went over big with the crowd and ended when all players were exhausted. Charles Renoud died at his home in Nebo at 11:20 Friday night, Feb. 13. His last words, after a long period of anguish,

were: “Let’s all be quiet. Let everyone be still.” Then, in the stillness that followed, this fine old gentleman of an elder school passed into eternity. He was 80 years old. Mr. and Mrs. C. P. (Plem) Draper of Nebo, first Gold Star parents of World War No. 2 in this area, visited the Pike County Republican office late yesterday to tell of the loss of their son, Everett Burdette Draper, 22, who has fallen in action under the gallant defender, General Douglas MacArthur, in the far-off Philippines. 50 Years Ago February 15, 1967 The Pleasant Hill park district has purchased 29 acres of land at the east edge of Pleasant Hill, part of the late Mayo Galloway’s farm, and plans to lay out a park, complete with swimming pool. Joann Oitker, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Estel Jackson of rural Liberty, and Tom Coulson, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Coulson of Versailles, were married Sunday afternoon in the Quincy Unitarian Church. Mrs. Melvin Bowker of Quincy, sister of the bride, was matron of honor. Jim Halpin of Pittsfield was best man. Following the ceremony, a wedding party was held Sunday evening at the home of Tom Ray, Jim Sanderson, and Ray Barrett in Pittsfield. Hostesses at the party were Marilyn Mullins and Vicki Branson of Pittsfield, Lilly Brown of Peoria and Mrs. John Ormond of Timewell. U. S. Rep. Paul Findley spoke at a joint session of the Illinois General Assembly Tuesday as part of the observance of Lincoln’s birthday. Findley was invited to address the General Assembly by Speaker Ralph Smith of Alton. It marks the first time in memory that a U.S. Congressman has spoken before a joint session of the legislature. Pike County winners in Saturday’s district speech contest held at Quincy Notre Dame high school were: Terry Had-

dock of Barry, first in Serious Reading and in Prose reading; Jeannie Kendrick, West Pike, first in Verse Reading; Ken Bradbury, Perry, first in Extempore Speaking; Mike Reed, West Pike, second in Comedy Reading; Valerie Borrowman, West Pike, second in Oratorical Declamation; Julie Parks, East Pike, third in After Dinner Speaking; Don Johnson, Pleasant Hill, third in Extempore Speaking; Beth Gates, Barry, third in Verse Reading; and Stewart Reeve, Barry, third in Oratorical Declamation. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ransom of Pittsfield have announced the engagement of their daughter, Roberta Sue, to Edward Charles Randorf, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Randorf of Oak Park. An August wedding is being planned. 25 Years Ago Feb. 12, 1992 Vic Callender, founder of Callender Construction Co. Inc. of Pittsfield, was honored as the Pike County Chamber of Commerce’s business person of the year Saturday evening. Callender started the company in 1946 when he bought an old dump truck and began hauling gravel from creek beds. Today the company employs 51 persons and as many as 100 during the peak construction season. Pike County native Terry Denison was the main speaker for the annual Pike County Chamber of Commerce meeting. He has served as executive director of the Lawrence County Industrial Council for the past year. Pittsfield High School junior Renita Curfman has been selected to sing the National Anthem at the Assembly Hall in Champaign for the state high school basketball finals. She sings in the PHS Swing Choir and the First Christian Church choir in Pittsfield, but surprisingly does not take voice lessons. She is the second PHS student chosen for the honor, as Rhonda Krueger sang the anthem at the girls class A fi-

nals last year. The Higbee Braves eighth grade boys basketball team used a strong defensive effort to beat Jacksonville Turner and Chatham-Glenwood to win the Pittsfield regional title. The players are Michael McCartney, Justin Noble, Jason Rinehart, Rodney Guthrie, Jess Smithers, Jeremy Priest, Billy Gerard, Mike Walston, Shane Nelson, Brandon Belford, Mark Personett, Jamie Reel, Jason Pressey, Brad Wade and Matt Borrowman. They are coached by Mark Amann. 10 Years Ago Feb. 14, 2007 Pike County was hit hard with a blizzard early Tuesday morning that dropped roughly six inches of snow in the area. High winds created snow drifts that kept snow plowers busy. For the second time in three weeks, Pike County State’s Attorney J. Frank McCartney convened a grand jury. McCartney presented seven cases to the grand jury on Friday, and received true bills on all seven. “For the convenience of the investigating officers, I decided that we would use the grand jury rather than go to a preliminary hearing before a judge,” McCartney said. A once-in-a-lifetime spectacle was part of the drama at Griggsville-Perry’s Homecoming last Friday night. Two sets of identical twins and a set of fraternal triplets were among the homecoming court. Making the crowd see double and triple were Katie Sharrow, Brian Baker, Kelsey Sharrow, Zach Baker, Jordan Freeman, Addie Freeman and Cody Freeman. Jim Gay of Rockport was recently recognized as a longtime supporter of the biodiesel industry. He received the “Pioneer Award.” He was the original vice president of the National BioDiesel Board, and started his service to the industry in 1992. ■ Pickings from Pike’s Past is compiled by Michael Boren.

Guest Column: By Dr. Glenn Mollette

Hard work and right living equals singing and dancing   

Y

ears ago I heard a story about a butterfly that was tirelessly working to break from its cocoon. A man observed the struggling butterfly for several minutes. Feeling sorry for the soon-to-be flying beautiful creature, he took his pocketknife and slit the cocoon to assist its freedom. The butterfly fell out of the cocoon and flapped its wings a couple of times and died. The man's good intentions crippled and killed the butterfly, preventing its own natural progression of development that would lead to its soaring through the air.  Often it's pressure, hard work and struggle that enables us to develop our internal fortitude to push forward, hang on and succeed in life. Such fortitude comes with ups and downs, pressures and failures. Eventually we develop the internal muscles and a spirit to walk on our own two feet and even to soar like the butterfly.  Muhammad Ali, the famous boxer, is remembered for his saying that he would float like a butterfly and sting

like a bee. Ali's ability to float like a butterfly came from years of strenuous workouts and punishment to become the greatest athlete of all time.  Joy, laughter and celebration come at the end of a hard day's work. Our greatest feelings of triumph come after a long period of work and struggle to finally realize an accomplishment or a success. Throughout life I have heard over and over that where there is no pain there is no gain.  I remember my dad buying a small record player when I was a kid. He bought a dozen or so records to go with it. We wore those records out. Another day came when he bought a big stereo record player that was also worn out over the years. He would work in a coal mine all week but he and my mother and another couple would often sing for two to three hours on the front porch of our house. Two to three times a week they would sing in church. Mom and Dad worked tirelessly throughout the week but at the end of the week they wanted to

cut loose and sing and many churches gladly received them.  Singing and dancing comes from the soul. There has to be an internal emotion that is within the heart that desires to leap out in joyful expression. In other words you have to want to do it and feel like doing it. I am not sure how many people today feel so good that they want to sing and dance and celebrate living. Too many no longer have even a faint hum or occasional shuffle. Many Americans no longer have a twinkle in their eyes. Many of us watch the news and we see a lot of unhappiness. We see a lot of rancor and critical, degrading talk on social media. There is too much unhappiness. A lot of unhappiness comes from the world of religion. Where did religious entities and many churches ever get the idea that good religion means an unhappy, joyless person? A lot of Middle Eastern religious groups are all about people being glum and joyless. This is probably why some

groups don't want to hear much about Jesus who told funny stories and was the life of the party. A lot of America's problems started on April 21, 1964 when President Lyndon Johnson declared his war on poverty. He came to Martin County, Ky. and sat on Tom Fletcher's porch while the media captured the iconic picture that put a face on President Johnson's war on poverty. I was in Inez that day, just a child and clueless as to what it was all about. President Johnson's idea that federal dollars handed out to millions of people would solve America's poverty problems sounded good to many but it has failed. Tom Fletcher never got out of poverty nor have 40 percent of the people in Martin County, especially since coal mining is now essentially over in the region.  Waiting on a government check, food stamp allotment and government medical assistance does not bring much happiness to America's 50 million people living in poverty. Today the face of poverty can be found in

any town in America and it›s still as bleak as it was in 1964. People must have work to do. A daily job, some work, a real paycheck, and a life to live gives meaning and from meaning is a feeling of purpose and happiness. When we feel good about ourselves we hum and sing a little, dance a little and celebrate a little. We have to get ourselves back to feeling better. It starts with our thinking, followed by our deeds, and that develops our lifestyles and our destinies. Please, let's start now. Sow a good thought. Reap a good act. Sow a good act. Reap a happier lifestyle. Sow a good lifestyle. Reap a better destiny. We can change the direction of our nation but it begins with you and me and inside the head of every American.  n Glenn Mollette is a syndicated columnist based in Washington, D.C. and is the author of eleven books. Contact him at GMollette@aol.com.  


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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Marion Yokem Marion D. Yokem, of Wellington, Colorado, passed away unexpectedly and peacefully on Sunday, February 5th, 2017 at his home, and is now in the loving embrace of his Heavenly Father. Marion was born on January 4, 1936, in Atlas, Illinois to his parents Henry William Yokem and Marie Dober Yokem. He graduated from Pittsfield, Illinois High School in 1953. Marion was a lifelong sports fan. He starred in baseball, basketball, and football for Pittsfield High, playing for legendary Pittsfield coach, Glenn Smith and his undefeated football team of 1952. Following high school, Marion played semipro baseball for the Nite Hawks, traveling through Illinois, Missouri, and Iowa.  In 1953 Marion married his high school sweetheart, Barbara Melton and together they raised three children, Gregory Yokem (Elaine) of Mansfield, Ohio, Tracey Yokem Cox (David) of Fort Collins and Timothy Yokem (Sarah) of Wellington, Colorado. Marion graduated with honors from the Calvary Bible College of Kansas City, Missouri in 1961. He worked his way through college by driving for Wheelock Trucking in Kansas City. After graduation, Barb and Marion moved to Ohio where Marion pastored The Community Bible Church in Mansfield for six years. They then moved their family to Colorado where he pastored Poudre Park Community Church for several years. After leaving his pastoral calling, Marion drove trucks over the road for Nationsway Transport until his retirement. Over the years, Marion also was a realtor for Kinzli & Company of Wellington. Continuing his love of sports, Marion coached youth recreation league teams and never had a losing season. In Mansfield, Marion coached city championship teams in football, basketball, and baseball. In Fort Collins, he

coached a recreation league basketball team to two undefeated seasons. Marion was an avid Ohio State Buckeyes fan, and always rooted for the Denver Broncos. He was a life-long fan of the St. Louis Cardinals. A point of great sadness is that Marion passed away just minutes before the start of Super Bowl LI, a game he always looked forward to. Marion was a lover of people. He walked daily in his neighborhood and soon knew everyone he met and was able to recall their names, their family and where they lived.  Marion was preceded in death by his parents, a sister, Dorothy Skinner, of Billings, Montana, and a sister, Donna Foreman, of Pittsfield, Illinois. Marion is survived by his wife, Barbara, of Wellington, Colorado, his sister, Mildred McCartney, of Pittsfield, Illinois, his three children and their spouses, ten grandchildren, 2 stepgrandchildren, eight greatgrandchildren, and three step-great-grandchildren.  A Memorial Service will be held Wednesday, February 15th at 2:00 pm at Wellington Community Church, 8445 Third Street in Wellington, Colorado. An additional Memorial Service will be held in late April in Pittsfield, Illinois and his remains will be interred in West Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Wellington Community Church Building Fund. Please visit www.goesfuneralcare.com to share memories of Marion and leave condolences for his family.

Mary Greiwe Mary Ellen Greiwe, 82, of rural Chambersburg passed away late Saturday night February 11, 2017 at her home. She was born October 19, 1934 the daughter of the late Oliver and Margaret Stinebaker Durbin. She married W. Cordell Greiwe in 1958 in Quincy. Mary attended Brown County High School, she worked as a beautician in Perry, sold real estate for Two Rivers Realty and she was a homemaker. She enjoyed hunting mushrooms, and watching movies. She loved playing with her grandchildren and hosting Sunday family dinners. Surviving is her husband Cordell at home, son Monty Vince Logsdon of Quincy, daughter Pamela Miller of Perry, a brother Donald (Joann) Durbin of Quincy, 10 grandchildren, Alicia Thomas, Kristi Miller, Ethan Miller, Jessi Weatherby, Landon Miller, Stephanie Embree, William Quincy, Cindy Hulig, Charlenia Bay, and Wilbur Quincy, 22 great-

grandchildren and several great-great grandchildren. Preceding her in death was her daughter, Debra Quincy (surviving husband William of Perry) A memorial reception with the family will be held on Sunday February 19, 2017 at the Airsman-Hires Funeral Chapel in Griggsville from 2 until 5 pm. Private interment will be held. Memorials can be made to the Wilson McCord Cemetery Association or to the Perry United Methodist Church Monday Dinners. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.airsmanhires.com

Phillip Crowder Funeral arrangements are pending at the Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield for Phillip Crowder, 68, of Pittsfield. Phillip died

Monday morning, Feb. 13, 2017 at Eastside Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center in Pittsfield.

Frank Zarello Frank L. Zarello, Jr., 68, of Pleasant Hill, IL passed away Monday morning, Feb. 6, 2017, at his home. Cremation rites are being accorded. A “Celebration of Life” service was held Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. at The Crossing Pike County con-

ducted by Pastors Clint Weir and Andreas Mannhardt. Memorials may be made to The Crossing Pike County’s Church Camp Fund. Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill is handling the arrangements.

Robert “Bob” Goewey Sr. Robert “Bob” Charles Goewey, Sr., 84, of Nebo, died Tuesday morning Feb. 7, 2017, at his home. Funeral services were held Friday, Feb. 10, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. at the Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill conducted by Pastor Clint Weir. Burial followed at the Nebo Cem-

etery. Visitation was held Thursday evening from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at the funeral home. Memorials may be made to the Spring Creek Fire Department or to the D.O.G. House in Nebo. Lummis Funeral home in Pleasant Hill is handling the arrangements.

Pike Press

Blanche Liehr Blanche Lacksheide Liehr, 89, died Thursday February 9th, 2017 at Blessing Hospital in Quincy, Il, surrounded by her family. She was born on February 27, 1927 in Perry, IL. She was the daughter of the late Henry and Lova Morgan Lacksheide. She married Dean Liehr on October 27, 1945 in Bowling Green, MO. He preceded her in death on October 19, 1999. She was also preceded in death by her son, Jerry Liehr and her sisters Mary Slight and Vedia Shaw and her five brothers Arthur “Rudy”, Frankie, Sylvester “Firp”, Cecil, and Robert Lacksheide. She is survived by her daughters, Temberly (Robert) McKinney of Perry, IL and Chattie (Ivan) Miranda of Salem, OR; Five grandchildren: Shawn McKinney of Dupo, IL, Brandon McKinney of Pittsburgh, PA, Neilly Liehr Bergman of Naperville, IL, Natalie Liehr of Bloomington, IL, and Ivana Miranda of Salem, OR. She also had two great-grandchildren and several nieces, nephews, and cousins. Blanche graduated from Perry High School in 1945. She had an extensive work history, including the restaurant, “Happy Liehrs” where she was employed while in high school and for a period afterward. After marrying Dean, she assisted in many of the duties of their sawmill business. In the early years, it was not odd to find her helping him in the timber and stacking lumber. After their business was up and running, she tended the books. Not one to take a break, she worked for “Community Care” in the late 1980s and 1990s only to retire in 1999 to care for her husband,

Dean. She loved to play cards at the senior center and with family members, gardening, flowers, birds, mowing her yard on her prized John Deere mower, decorating for every holiday, and “picking up sticks” from her yard. She was an avid local sports fan especially when watching her daughter and grandchildren. She was known in the community as “Dimp”, a nickname given to her by her brother when she was a baby. It stood for “dimples.” She was well known for her generosity, humor, spirit, and love for people. There will never be another like her. Funeral services were held at 2:00 p.m. Tuesday, February 14, 2017 at the Airsman-Hires Funeral Chapel in Griggsville with burial afterwards in the Wilson Cemetery in Perry.There was a dinner at the Perry UMC following the committal service. Visitation was held from 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. on Monday, February 13th at the Airsman-Hires Funeral Chapel in Griggsville. Memorials may be made to Perry Methodist Monday Dinner Committee or Wilson/McCord Cemetery Association c/o AirsmanHires Funeral Home. Condolences may be sent to the family online at www. airsman-hires.com

Jean McEuen Jean Ernest McEuen, 88 of Pittsfield passed away on Monday February 13, 2017. Jean was born on February 6, 1929 in Pearl, a son of Jesse and Pearl Elliott McEuen. He married Rose Dark on August 17, 1950 and later married Virginia Ottwell on February 14, 1976 in New Hartford; she preceded him in death on August 8, 2000. Jean was raised in Montezuma and attended and graduated from Milton High School in 1947. He worked for REA for four years and then was drafted into the Army on March 15, 1952, serving for two years. After his discharge from the Army Jean worked for Midwest Dried Whey Company which later was known as International Distributor, retiring on May 28, 1994 after forty years. Jean was a member of Pittsfield American Legion Post #152 and Jacksonville VFW. He is survived by a son, Ed (Mona) McEuen of Des Moines, IA; a daughter, Marie (Donald) Harrell of Merritt, IL; four step children, Tammy (Mike) Howell of Barry; Noren “Bub” (Vonda) Ottwell of Springfield, MO; Patty Touchette of Barry; and Noreene Ottwell of Springfield, MO. Seven grandchildren, twelve step grandchildren, two great grandchildren

and seven step great grandchildren also survive. Jean was preceded in death by his parents, his wife, Virginia, two brothers, Johnny and Paul McEuen, a stepdaughter, Jenna Lea Waters and a great grandson, Michael Scott Steiner. Funeral services will be held at 12 p.m. on Thursday, February 16, 2017 at the Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield. Visitation will be held from 10 a.m. until time of the service at the funeral home. Interment will be in the Douglas Cemetery near Milton with military honors accorded by Pittsfield American Legion Post #152.. Memorials are suggested to be made to Blessing Hospice. Condolences may be sent to the family at www. nieburfh.com. The Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield has been entrusted with the service.

Delphine Lipcamon Delphine Lipcamon, 73, of Pittsfield died Monday, February 13, 2017 at Liberty Village in Pittsfield. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017 at the Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield with Jimmy Hodges officiating. A visitation with family members will be held from 10-11 a.m. at the funeral

home. Interment will be private. Memorials are suggested to be made to McCord Cemetery. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.nieburfh.com. The Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield has been entrusted with the service.

Margaret Carlton Margaret (Chamberlain) Carlton, 82, of Barry, died February 7, 2017 at Blessing Hospital in Quincy. Cremation was designated, per her wishes and a celebration of life was held Saturday, February 11, 2017 at 3 p.m. at the Nebo Church of Christ with a visitation from 1-3 p.m. prior to the service.

OBITUARIES

Pittsfield, Illinois

There will be a private burial at the Nebo Cemetery at a later date. Niebur Funeral Chapel is entrusted with the arrangements. Memorials are suggested to Blessing Hospice and Nebo Cemetery. Online condolences may be left at nieburfh. com.

Dr. Carlos Lara Dr. Carlos B. Lara, 94, of Pittsfield, passed away Wednesday, February 8, 2017 at Blessing Hospital in Quincy. Dr. Lara was born on May 19, 1922 in Merida, Mexico to Pablo and Rosalia Lara Palomeque, a poor but well educated family. In 1945 he married Beatriz Lara; she preceded him in death on December 16, 2016 following 71 years of marriage. Dr. Lara’s parents had plans for him to become a doctor but due to their poverty, the whole family had to support him to go to medical school. He began his practice in Mexico in 1950 as well as completing community service for a year. He then moved to the United States where he was required to repeat his internship and residency followed by surgical training at Ohio State University, eventually qualifying as a surgeon and General Practitioner. He opened his practice in Pittsfield in December of 1962. The first years were challenging, but conditions improved as he met more people with additional office hours in Perry and Pleasant Hill. He was an old fashioned doctor who made house calls and took ongoing interest in his patients until their full recovery. Nevertheless, Dr. Lara valued continuing education. To stay current with the latest techniques he would drive to St. Louis every Thursday to attend rounds at Barnes Hospital. He also loved farming, eventually operating his own farms while studying current methods. He loved the land in Pike County and appreciated the hard work and dedication that farmers put into their business. He also

enjoyed current events and kept up with politics and government affairs in the United States and the world. He was proud of becoming a United States citizen and of his accomplishments in his new country. He maintained the validity of his medical license until his death. Dr. Lara is survived by his children: Pablo (Sue) Lara and Carlos (Marcine) Lara both of Pittsfield; Rosalia (Ronald) Johnson of Hamilton, Ontario Canada; grandchildren, David Lara of Pittsfield; Anthony (Ashley) Lara of Quincy; Lea (Phillip) Reel of Springfield and a great-granddaughter, Claire Elizabeth Reel. He was preceded in death by his parents, a granddaughter, Alicia Lara and two sisters, Julia Lara de Cardena and Maria Luisa Lara. Private family services will be held at the Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield with Father Mark Schulte officiating. Interment will be in the Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers memorials are suggested to be made to the Pike County Crimestoppers or the Pike County Health Department. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.nieburfh. com. The Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield has been entrusted with the service.

Barbara Patterson Barbara Patterson, 74, of Pittsfield passed away Friday, February 10, 2017 at Blessing Hospital in Quincy. Barbara was born on July 8, 1942 in Pike County, IL, a daughter of the late Glen and Pauline Miller Cawthon. Barbara married Henry Lee Patterson in 1969 in Beardstown; he preceded her in death on November 14, 2013. Barbara was of the Nazarene faith and attended church at the Pittsfield Church of the Nazarene and also at the Griggsville Church of the Nazarene. Barbara started working in area nursing homes at the age of sixteen and later earned her Certified Nursing Assistant certification. She also worked for Mr. and Mrs. Jim Logan for several years. She loved her job and the people she came in contact with. Barbara enjoyed word search puzzles, watching soap operas and cooking for her family. She dearly loved her family and spending time with them, especially her grandkids, great grandkids and her companion, “Gizmo”, her Pomeranian Chihuahua. Surviving are a son, Charles “Chuck” Bradshaw of Pittsfield; step-daughter, Kathy (Kenneth Westfall) Patterson of Perry; grandchildren, Charlenia Bay of Pittsfield; Gatlin Bradshaw of Jacksonville; step grandchildren, Jarrod Patterson of Perry, Mark Patterson of Springfield, Miki Elledge of Mendon; and two great grandchildren, Ellen Perkins

and Coban Williams. Barbara is survived by siblings, Gerald (Connie) Cawthon of Griggsville; Steven Cawthon of Jacksonville; Betty (David) Shoemaker of Perry; and Sharon Hurst of Perry; in addition to several nieces and nephews. In addition to her parents and husband, Barbara was preceded in death by brothers, Glen Cawthon, Sanford “Buzz” Cawthon, Mike Cawthon, Butch Cawthon and Rick Cawthon; and two sisters, Carol Orr and Brenda Mowens. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 at the Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield with Pastor Greg McClain officiating. Interment will be in the Burbridge Cemetery. Visitation will be held from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. prior to the service. Memorials are suggested to be made to the Burbridge Cemetery. Condolences may be sent to the family at www. nieburfh.com. The Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield has been entrusted with the service.

John Lummis John Michael Lummis, 68, of Galesburg died Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017 at his home. A visitation will be held from 5-8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017 at WatsonThomas Funeral Home and Crematory in Galesburg. A funeral service will be held 10:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 17 at

Lummis-Hamilton Funeral Home in Camp Point with family meeting friends from 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday at the funeral home. Memorials are suggested to Camp Callahan. The Lummis-Hamilton Funeral Home in Camp Point is in charge of the arrangements.

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SOCIETY

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Pike Press

Rockport Everything is fine in Rockport this week Saturday night we had a family gathering at my grandson’s house in Pleasant Hill. Braden Damon, his wife, Janessa, and their baby had Judy Damon, Doug and Missy Damon, Corby Edwards, Kathy and Lyndell Baughman and me over. It was a really nice time and we had a lot of fun visiting. There have been quite a

few deaths in the area lately. Our sympathies go out to the family of Frank Zarello, Vernon Prater and Mike Lummis. I also want to ask for prayers for the little boy in Pleasant Hill with cancer, Samuel Shonhart. I know his mom real well. I’ve been praying a lot for them. Happy Birthday to

By FRANCES  PENCE 217-242-3511 Nicole Damon, wife of Cory Damon. They live in Coreville. Happy Birthday, Feb.11. God bless you.

Milton

Howland benefit this weekend at Springer’s Dale Howland Benefit and Auction will be held Saturday, Feb. 18 at the Springer Building on Illinois Route 100 in Milton. Pulled pork sandwiches from 4:306:30 p.m. followed by an auction. Auction items include: 4 PBR tickets, one breeding to a South Texas McCoy Quarter horse stallion, wicker table and chairs, western style area rug, cattle prodding sticks, St. Louis Cardinal tickets, overnight stay at Heartland Lodge, overnight stay at Pere Marquette Lodge and continuing to add more auction items. Please come out for

great food and fabulous auction items with 100% of the proceeds going to support Dale’s medical expenses.  The ladies of Milton Christian Church are hosting a Pinterest Party/luncheon Saturday, Feb. 25 at 11 a.m  in the church annex. All area ladies are invited to attend! Here’s your chance to try one of those party foods you’ve pinned but never completed.  But here’s the catch. Do not tweak or alter your recipe in any way. Prepare your selected recipe just as it is printed on Pinterest. The fun in this gathering is to share

By KARRIE SPANN 217-723-4262 your treat and see if Pinterest is a win or a fail! We will also have Pinterest inspired crafts to make. Not a Pinterest junkie?  That’s great, too! Come join us and see what all the fun is about!  We will serve a light lunch that day. We can’t wait to see you Feb 25!  Please R.S.V.P. to Nanette Bess,  217-3709575 by Monday, Feb. 20.

Griggsville

Girl Scouts visit Griggsville Estates for Valentines’ Day The Griggsville Day Unit of HCE will meet this Thursday, Feb. 16, at the home of Carolyn Myers. The meeting will begin at 1:30 p.m. Mark your calendars! Griggsville-Perry High School Anatomy/ Physiology and Health Occupation classes will sponsor a blood drive March 3 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. The blood drive will be held in Nichol gym in Griggsville. Please call the office at (217) 8332352 to make an appointment to donate! On the day of the blood drive, you will need to bring a valid photo ID. Cub Scout Pack 17 held their annual Pinewood Derby recently. Eli Musgrave claimed first place, while Casen Shoemaker and Conor Buchanan took second and third place respectively. We wish Eli good luck as he advances to the district Pinewood derby next month! Our sympathy is extended to the family of Blanche Liehr of Perry who passed away on Thursday, Feb. 9 at Blessing hospital in Quincy. The residents at Griggsville Estates enjoyed a visit from Girl Scout Troop 5123 last Thursday. The girls decorated the residents doors with Valentine hearts and played a game of bingo with them. Anne Slight has returned to her home after spending some time in the hospital. Anne got home just in time to celebrate her birthday! Girl Scouts are celebrating 100 years of selling their famous Girl Scout cookies! Be sure to find a Girl Scout and buy a box of cookies! The girls will certainly appreciate your support! Sales will continue until March 23. Cub Scout Pack 17 celebrated Cub Scout Sunday by attending church at the Griggsville Christian Church Feb. 5.

Congratulations to Brant and Missy Mountain on the birth of their first child! Rosalie Mae Mountain was born on Feb.7 She weighed 7 lbs. and 12 oz. and was 20inches long. Be sure to head to Gianni’s Pizzeria Feb 28 to support the GriggsvillePerry Class of 2020. A percentage of proceeds will be donated back to the class. Happy belated birthday wishes go out to Aubrey Kirgan who celebrated her fifth birthday Tuesday, Feb. 14! Belated wishes also go to Susan Clough who celebrated her birthday Feb. 12. Sympathy is extended to the family of Ronald White of Barry who passed away last Wednesday, Feb. 8 in Barry. Bob and Vicki Norris enjoyed a visit from Bob’s son Marc Norris of Bluffs Saturday. Happy birthday wishes go out to Peggy Stanley Friday, Feb. 17 and Kelli Jones Saturday, Feb, 18. Sympathy is extended to the family of Mary Griewe of rural Perry who passed away Saturday night. Ten Griggsville-Perry Middle School students competed in the Science Olympiad Regional Feb. 11 at WIU in Macomb. They competed in 11 of the 22 events, against 10 teams for a chance to go to the state competition held in April. The students not only received scores for the competitions they were able to participate in, they were also graded for those that they were unable to partake in. The scores for all 22 events are compiled and the top three teams progress to the state level competiton. The students took home awards in the four events. Fiona Kelly and Claire Tate received second place for their scrambler, Kaylee Spencer and Emily Dunham received a second place for their bottle rocket, David Tucker got

By NADINE  KESSINGER 217-407-4502 kessy@casscomm.com

second place in optics, and Claire Tate got third place in Reach For the Stars, which is a junior high astronomy test. Jesse Miller and Russell Surratt built and competed in the towers event. Their tower was able to withstand the weight of a 15 kg (33.069 lb) bucket of sand. Christian Clayton-Mowen and Julia Eccles constructed a model airplane that was able to fly almost two seconds, even after it broke in the trial run the morning of competition. Other events included test and written exams taken by various teammates on subjects such as maps, meteorology, diseases, ecology, and fast facts. The students were able to learn, have fun, and experience a college campus. They were able to discuss the highs and lows of the day, and went home knowing more than they did that morning! The students are already looking forward to next years events! Sonny Sneeden underwent cataract surgery at Passavant Hospital in Jacksonville on Monday. Jill, Chloe and Conor Buchanan, along with Lance and Gayla Risley and sons Cade and Jase visited the Jurassic Quest in Springfield on Sunday. Sympathy is extended to the family of Barbara (Cawthon) Patterson of Pittsfield who passed away Friday, Feb.10 at Blessing Hospital in Quincy. Barb grew up and attended school in Griggsville. Let go of what’s bitter and move on.- Bill Cosby

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Pittsfield, Illinois

Cards of Thanks

THANK YOU We thank everyone for their cards, calls and prayers during this sad time. Family of Connie Bradburn Don, Sue and Barb THANK YOU The family of Donald Wayne Stephens would like to thank all those people who sent cards, phone calls, prayers, and condolences during our recent loss. Thank you to those who attended services for him as well. We would also like to thank Blessing Hospice for caring for Don in his final hours. A big thank you also too, Airsmen-Hire Funeral Home for helping with services.

THANK YOU To everyone who has supported us following the loss of our loved one Jerry, we would like to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to Father Roberts, Altar Boys and Girl, Altar Society, Tim, Phil and Riley, Sarah Kinder and Choir, Pallbearers, Village of Hardin, Hardin Fire Department, Florist, Golden Eagle Ferry, Family and Friends. Your many acts of kindness and sympathy are greatly appreciated during our time of sorrow. The Jerry Rose Family

Anniversary

Frazier's celebrate 60th anniversary

Roger and Ina Frazier will celebrate 60 years of marriage, Feb. 24. The couple was married Feb. 24, 1947. Their five daughters and their husbands are Gina and Mike Melbourne, Jonie and Mark Gerard, Jill and Steve Clement, Sandy and Brian Curless and Jennifer and Bill Hull. They have 16 grandchil-

dren and 12 great-grandchildren. Mrs. Frazier is the owner of Ina’s West Side Salon and Mr. Frazier is retired from the Illinois Department of Conservation. The family is planning an open house Feb. 25 from 2:30 to 5 at the Courtyard Cafe in Pittsfield.

New Salem

and other area news Looking for Griggsville’s Lighthouse Church history  I N F O R M AT I O N PLEASE: The Lighthouse Baptist Church (formerly the Regular Baptist Church) in Griggsville is hoping for some help from the public far and near. They are wanting to compile information about the history of the church. If anyone has anything that could help them with this, please call 1-217490-3443. If you see any information that needs to be changed on the Birthdays and Anniversaries, please give me a call. Birthdays and anniversaries for this week: Feb.15 -Tom Dell,Feb.16 -- Kathryn Burrows, Joyce Fusselman, Ryan Motley, Feb.17 -Derrick Hankins, Feb.18 -- Shari Bush, Keith Davis, Feb.19 -- Shirley Stinson, Tanya Wyatt, Steve Shelton, Feb.20 -- Angela Kirk, Feb. 21 -- Emma Burrows, Susan Collins, Austin Francis Prayer request list Brother Joe Gammon, Christine Henthorn, Connie McFall, Dianna Ruble, Ed Thomas, Frances Larson, Ginger and George Whitlock, Jerry Gully, Josh Bennett, Kaitlyn Fletcher, Leroy Leonard, Mark Welch, Mike Peters, Mary Crane, Ona Ogle, Pastor Gary Dice, Radar Grim, Roger Robbins, Roger Bonnett, Roger Woods, Sue Yackley, Steve Manker, Teresa Manker, Ted Waddell, Tom Barger, Valerie Cooper, and OUR UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Don’t forget to be collecting those General Mills Box Tops to benefit participating schools. Each Tuesday and Thursday at the Findley Place in Pittsfield from 10:30-11 a.m. an exercise class is provided free to anyone who attends. It is a low impact class which helps

improve balance, strength, and mobility. You are never too old or too young to improve your health or to attend these classes. East Pike Lending Library in Detroit is open on Saturdays from 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you in due time. Casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you.Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about seeking whom he may devour. 1 Peter 5:6-8 Trivia Questions for This Week: 1. What did God provide to get Paul and Silas out of restraints when they were in prison? 2. From which group of people, the Africans, the Aztecs, or the Eastern Indians, did the Europeans first learn about chocolate? 3. There are 604,800 of what in one week? 4. Which character in the TV show portrayed the similarities of the late actor James Dean, and on which show was that? 5. According to the Proverbs, how many things are an abomination to God? Detroit Christian Church held their annual Valentine Dinner at the Senior Citizens building on Saturday evening, February 11th. A great meal was provided along with the drawing for several door prizes for fun. There was a good crowd at the Cardinal Inn Saturday evening, Feb.11, for the concert by Silver Wings. Guest star was Dennis Ebers who did a fine job singing several songs. Saturday, Feb. 11, Jim and Margaret Garner of Casey, and Kathy Dunbar and Jenna of Hannibal called on their

By WYVETTA DAVIS 217-285-4880 w9yti@irtc.net

uncle and aunt Ona and Don Ogle of New London, Mo.. Sunday afternoon, Feb. 12, Becky and Mark Winner, Kristina, and JJ, all of Pittsfield, and Steve and Wyvetta Davis of New Salem all visited with Don and Ona Ogle of New London, Mo. God bless each of you, and have a great week. Check out our Briday Registry at casteelcolorwheel.com

WEDDING REGISTRY Katie Pantry and Mikey Cordray May 27 Megan Goodman and Lucas Stoller June 10 Mackenzie James and Ethan Borrowman June 24 Addie Cunningham and Aaron Rodhouse July 8 Need to add to your bridal collection? China, Fiesta, Noritake, stemware, or silverware. We have rock bottom prices.

We Have Cards For All Occassions! Stop by & check out our baby clothes and accessories. Know someone having a baby? Have them sign-up for our baby registry!

CASTEEL’S

110 W. Adams • Pittsfield 217-285-2822 • 217-285-4488


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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Pike Press

Accident on I-72 injures one

By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press Pike County Sheriff’s deputies, the Barry Fire and Rescue, Illinois State Police and Pike County EMS all responded to a two vehicle accident Feb. 10 at 1:10 p.m. on I-72 at mile marker 18. According to police reports, Brenda CarilloAlbarran, 30, of Kenosha, Wisc. was traveling westbound on Interstate

72 driving a 2006 Mazda. Carillo-Albarran crossed the median and into the eastbound lane of Interstate 72 and struck a 2014 Chevrolet pickup being driven by Joshua Lund, 31, of Bethel, Mo. whom was traveling east. After striking the Lund vehicle, Carillo-Albarran continued to cross the eastbound lanes of traffic before her vehicle came to rest against the boundary

Police Beat The police records released by the Pike County Sheriff’s office include the following arrests and bookings. The records state that these are accusations and each individual is presumed innocent until proven guilty. BOOKINGS Ray L. Andrus, 53, Baylis, was arrested Feb. 6 on a Pike County traffic warrant alleging failure to appear. He posted $250 and was released pending court appearance. Jacob M. Frasier, 30, Pleasant Hill, was arrested Feb. 6 on a felony Pike County warrant alleging failure to appear at a petition to revoke hearing. He posted $200 and was released pending court appearance. Randall B. Sutherland, 39, Pittsfield, was arrested Feb. 7 on a three misdemeanor Adams County warrants. Bond was $1,000, $150, and $400 respectively. He was released to Adams County. Pattrick G. Morris, 24, Pittsfield, was arrested Feb. 7 on a petition to revoke supervision on a misdemeanor charge. He posted $250 and was released pending court appearance. Kensey R. Mesey, 23, Milton, was arrested Feb. 7 on a petition to revoke bail bond on a felony charge. Bond was set at $7,500 and she remains lodged. Terina R. Ledbetter, 38, Providence, Ky., was arrested Feb. 7 on Pike County traffic warrant. She posted $300 and was released pending court appearance. Kevin M. Cooper, 42, Aurora, was arrested on a felony Pike County body attachment. He remains lodged in lieu of $250. Brent A. Davidson, 18, Nebo, was arrested Feb. 8 on a misdemeanor Pike County warrant alleging failure to appear at a pay or appear on criminal damage to property charge. He posted $150 and was released pending court appearance. Cera L. Forshey, 28, Baylis, was arrested Feb. 9 on two Marion Co. Mo., felony warrants charging attempt to obtain a controlled substance and possession of a controlled substance. She posted $25,000 on each charge and was released pending court appearance. Stephen R. Howard, 35, Winchester, was arrested Feb. 10 on a Pike County warrant alleging failure to appear on misdemeanor charges and also an in-state warrant from Brown County. He posted $300 on each charge and was released pending court appearance. Matthew D. Lister, 25, Griggsville, was arrested Feb. 11 on a felony Pike County warrant alleging failure to appear. He posted $300 and was released pending court appearance. Ashley L. Moore, 27, Pleasant Hill, was arrested Feb. 11 on two charges of failure to vaccinate or register a dog and a Pike County traffic warrant

fence. After being struck, Lund’s vehicle rolled over on the drivers side and came to rest along the south side of the Interstate. Carillo-Albarran was taken to Illini Community Hospital by Pike County EMS. Lund refused treatment at the scene.   Carillo-Albarran was cited for improper lane usage.

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alleging failure to secure a child under the age of 8. She posted $100 on each of the ordinance violations and $300 on the traffic charge and was released pending court appearance. Joshua R. Bricker, 26, Pearl, was arrested Feb. 11 on an in-state warrant alleging failure to appear on allowing a dog to run at large. He posted $150 and was released pending court appearance. Bruce A. Penn, 53, Pleasant Hill, was arrested Feb. 11 on a Pike County body attachment. He posted $100 and was released pending court appearance. Jennifer N. Perkins, 31, Milton, was arrested Feb. 11 on a felony Pike County warrant alleging possession of a controlled substance. She posted $200 and was released pending court appearance. Dylan M. Piper, 19, Pittsfield, was arrested Feb. 11 on a misdemeanor charges of illegal consumption of alcohol by a minor and criminal damage to property. He posted $150 on the criminal damage charge and was released pending court appearance. Jeremy T. Johnson, 45, Manito, was arrested Feb. 11 on two felony instate warrants. Bond on one warrant was $800 and $7,500 on the second. He remains lodged. Todd L. Crawford, 50, Lockport, was arrested Feb. 12 on two Pike County misdemeanor warrants. The first warrant was a petition or revocation of supervision and bond was $300. The second was failure to appear on a driving under the influence charge and bond was $300. He posted $600 and was released pending court appearance. Andrew L. Baughman, 23, Detroit, was arrested Feb. 12 on a misdemeanor Brown County warrant. He posted $250 bond and was released pending court appearance. Kegan E. McGlasson, 21, Franklin, was arrested Feb. 12 on a misdemeanor charge of driving under the influence of drugs. He posted $100 and was released pending court appearance. Has your charge been amended, reduced or dropped or have you been found not guilty? Email ppnews@campbellpublications.net to be considered for a status update on your court proceeding. Please include name and case number.

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MISDEMEANOR Gina M. Embree, Griggsville, DOB 10/1/1964, criminal trespass by remaining on land, nolle prosequi.

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The social hour begins at 5 p.m. and dinner is at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $45 each and $25 for a spouse or child 15 and under. Ticket will not be sold at the door. To order tickets locally, call Doug Pruett at 217-242-1249 or the WTU National Headquarters at 80024-5471. Tickets are also available on-line at wwww.whitetailsunlimited.com. Brian Hill at 217-617-2129, The Archery Shop and Central State Bank at 217-734-2356 also have tickets for purchase.

— NOW HIRING — Seasonal Full-Time & Part-Time Opportunities

Customer Support Team Representatives: Stark Bro’s Nurseries & Orchards Co. is currently seeking enthusiastic, creative, reliable individuals to process customer orders and offer customer support in our Call Center. Must have excellent communication skills, a pleasant telephone voice and basic computer skills. Prior call center experience is preferred.

Customer Support Team (Email/Live Chat): We are also seeking a part-time live-chat operator who can assist with customer emails. Good communication skills required. Experience preferred. These positions are temporary, from March through May. Full-time is 40 hours/week in five 8-hour shifts, including weekends. Part-time hours vary. Must be able to pass a background check and pre-employment testing. We offer competitive wages based on experience. Benefits include: • Paid Holidays (after 60 consecutive days of employment) • Opportunity to participate in 401k retirement plan • Potential to earn paid time off (PTO) • Generous product discounts

Apply in person at our Main Office Mon-Fri from 8am-4pm or submit your résumé to hr@starkbros.com Stark Bro’s Nurseries & Orchards Co. 20954 Highway 54 • Louisiana, MO • 63353 An Equal Opportunity Employer

Traffic SPEEDING VIOLATIONS ($120 total unless otherwise posted) L. L. Knight, Pleasant Hill, DOB 1/12/1959, 15-20 mph above limit. Georgia K. Sandidge, Pittsfield, DOB 12/16/1951, 1520 mph above limit. SEATBELT VIOLATIONS ($60 total unless otherwise posted) James Edward Durlin, Barry, DOB 12/19/1987, driver. MISCELLAENOUS VIOLATIONS Dustin L. Johns, Pittsfield, DOB 8/22/1985, unsafe equipment, $454 fine. Kassye J. Lemons, Nebo, DOB 9/18/1995, operating uninsured motor vehicle, $437 fine, six months supervision. Larry L. Neese, Pittsfield, DOB 1/1/1950, failure to reduce speed, $120 fine. Hannah L. Richardson, Pittsfield, DOB 9/17/1989, expired registration, $120 fine. Tiffeny L. Sidwell, Milton, DOB 9/19/1987, operating uninsured motor vehicle, nolle prosequi.

Outdoor news always available online

Keep up with local hunting news online at tworiversoutdoors.com. Two Rivers Outdoors covers hunting and outdoor news for Calhoun, Greene, Jersey, Pike and Scott counties, as well as statewide happenings.

Crime Stoppers Crime of the Week Pike County Sheriff’s Department and North Pike Fire Department responded to a vehicle fire one mile east of New Salem on Feb. 7 at 7:38 a.m.  Deputies are attempting to locate the owner or driver of this vehicle, which appears to have

Dispositions

Whitetail Unlimited banquet March 4 Whitetails Unlimited is sponsoring the Pike County Chapter Banquet Saturday, March 4 at the old JDL Building, Highway 54 North, Pittsfield. This special event will feature a prime rib dinner, auction and prizes with a wide array of products such as firearms, outfitter packages, hunting and outdoor related equipment, artwork and collectibles available only to WTU events. A WTU mission related grant from this event will go toward local youth and other conservation projects.

COURT/NEWS

Pittsfield, Illinois

been a late ‘90s Mercury Mountaineer (color unknown).  If you have any information about this vehicle, please contact Crime Stoppers at 217-285-1500, as the vehicle sustained heavy fire damage and identification of vehicle has been unsuccessful so far.

GOT NEWS? SEND IT TO US! ppnews@campbellpublications.net

WAREHOUSE JOB OPPORTUNITIES Stark Bro’s Nurseries & Orchards Co., a premier shipper of quality nursery stock, is looking for people with a positive attitude to work in the warehouse during our busy spring shipping season. Warehouse duties generally include: Receiving product and pulling product from storage locations • Product prep, order filling and checking customer orders • Box assembly • Boxing and manifesting customer orders Qualifications: • Conditioned for physical work • Job may include working in a cold, damp environment • Excellent attendance, which could include overtime as needed • Eagerness to learn and perform a variety of positions Starting pay is $8.25 per hour. Opportunities for higher pay are available to applicants with prior experience and/or proven performance with our company. Benefits include: • Paid holidays (after 60 consecutive days of employment) • Generous product discount • Opportunity to participate in our 401K retirement plan • Potential to earn paid time off (PTO)

Apply in person at the main office Mon - Fri • 8am - 4pm Stark Bro’s Nurseries & Orchards Co. • 20947 Highway 54, Louisiana, MO An Equal Opportunity Employer

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Advertise with Pike Press 217-285-2345


OUR TOWN

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Pike Press

What’s Happening

BARRY n Bring your old prom dresses to the Barry Apple Festival's Apple Quarters on March 1 & 2 from 4-6 p.m. and we will register you. You price your own dress. Sale Begins March 4 from 10 a.m.4 p.m. If you have questions or need a special drop off time call: Meleah Flynn 217440-0771 Melinda Johnson 217-257-6233 Sandy Kirgan 217-257-7126 n The youth of the Barry UMC (FROG class) will have a fish fry, with the proceeds going to their Heifer Project, on Sunday, Feb. 19 at 11:30 a.m. at the Barry UMC. Donations will be accepted. For more information, call Janet Main at 217-335-2048. NEBO n Spring Creek Fire Protection District Sausage and Pancake Supper on Feb. 25 from 4-8 p.m. at the Spring Creek Firehouse in Nebo. Cost is free will donation deliveries available call 734-9363 GRIGGSVILLE n Griggsville Perry High School Blood Drive is being sponsored by the Anatomy/ Physiology and Health Occupation classes on March 3 from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. The blood drive will be held in the large gym at Griggsville Perry High School. Please call the office at 217-833-2352 to sign up for an appointment to give blood. PERRY n John Wood Community College's Agriculture Alumni

Association will host an Open House Monday evening, Feb. 20, at the JWCC Agricultural Education Center near Perry. Tours of the JWCC Agricultural Education Center and the adjacent University of Illinois Crop Sciences and Beef Research farms will be available beginning at 4:30 p.m. Registration is from 6-6:15 p.m. followed by a meal. Advance registration is requested by calling 217.641.4558 or by email at ag@jwcc.edu. PITTSFIELD n The American Red Cross will host a Blood Drive on Monday, Feb. 20, at the Crossroads Center gymnasium 1-6 p.m. There is a critical need for donors and your blood donation can save a life. Contact the Red Cross at 1-800-733-2767 for eligibility questions. n Pike County Emergency Management is hosting a Severe Weather Spotter and Safety Class at the Crossroads Center Wednesday, Feb. 22 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Drinks and refreshments will be provided. n Fearless Fermentation (make & take workshop) Saturday, Feb. 18 from 12:302 p.m. at Free Press Coffee in Pittsfield. RSVP to Karla De Vries 630-672-8793. n University of Illinois Extension is partnering with John Wood Community College to present a six-session farm management course called "Annie's Project",for farm women starting Feb. 28.

This program will meet every Tuesday and Thursday afternoon for three weeks from 1-4 p.m. The final session will be held on Thursday, March 16. Sessions will be held in the John Wood Community College Center. Please register online at http:// web.extension.illinois.edu/ abhps/ by Feb. 22 or contact Cheryl Westfall at the Pike County Extension Office at 217-285-5543 or cwestfal@ illinois.edu n The Pike County Historical Society will present a program by Elizabeth (Schimmel) Miller on quilts and quilting Thursday evening, Feb. 16 at the Cardinal Inn. Mrs. Miller will have several quilts on display, and will talk about the history and techniques of quilting. All are invited to dine with us at the buffet from 5:30-6:30, or come for the program which begins at 6:30 p.m. n The Alzheimer’s Association, Central Illinois Chapter’s educational program Managing Shortterm Hospitalization of Your Loved One with Dementia will take place on Thursday, Feb. 16 from 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. at the Findley Place Apartments Community Room. Registration is required to reserve meal. To register for this program, call 217-2281111 by Tues., Jan. 14. n Caregiver Lunch N' Learn on Thursday, Feb. 16, 11:30-12:30 a.m. at the Findley Place Apartments Community Room.

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Pittsfield, Illinois

in and around the Pike County Area Registration required: Please call 217-228-1111 by Feb. 13. Presenter: Susan Johnson, MS, Alzheimer's Association. n There will not be Country Music or Blue Grass Music for the month of Jan. or Feb. at the Pike County Senior Citizen center. They will resume in March. n 4-H Cake Decorating SPIN Club meets one Saturday a month through April. If you are between 8 and 18, (If you turned 8 before Sept. 1) and would like to know more, please e-mail dwelbour@illinois.edu or call 217-285-5543 and ask for Dorothy. ONGOING n 12 Step Al-Anon Family Support Group for alcohol and narcotic addiction every Monday at 8 p.m. at the First Christian Church in Pittsfield (Breezeway entrance). For more information, call Betty at 217- 285-6191. n Exercise classes available at the Pittsfield Senior Center every Tuesday and Thursday from 5:15-6:15 p.m. Strenuous enough to help, but easy enough for anyone to do. For additional information call 217-285-4524. n Liberty Village Hawthorne Inn will be hosting Senior Bingo the third Wednesday of every month from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Snacks and prizes will be provided. n Expect Extraordinary Community Gatherings are held every 4th Tuesday

from 6-7 p.m. in the Findley Place Community Room. What if people with developmental disabilities lived, learned, worked, played and worshiped in all the regular places of our community? Join us to make it possible! People with developmental disabilities, their families and friends, caring neighbors, and all members of the community are invited. n Bright Star Methodist Cooperative Parish (Oxville, Florence, Detroit, Griggsville, Perry, New Salem and Baylis Methodist Churches) county wide Bible Study every Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. at Griggsille United Methodist Church and every Tuesday evening at Perry United Methodist Church at 6:30 p.m. This is absolutely free and everyone in Pike County are welcome to attend. If you have questions, feel free to contact Pastor Dave at 217-833-2575 or 217-833-2457. n The Bible studies for 2016 will be held every Tuesday evening at 6:30 p.m. at Perry UMC and every Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. at Griggsville UMC. n To learn more about the Catholic Church, Rev. Mark Schulte will be leading discussions covering the 10 Commandments, the Apostles Creed, The Sacraments, Prayer, Church History and Tradition every Monday evening at St. Mary's Parish Hall at 7 p.m. Members of all Faiths and Denominations are welcome

to attend. n Free meals served every third Saturday of each month at the Pittsfield United Methodist Church from 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Carry-outs are available. n A non-denominational, Bible class meets for one hour on Tuesdays, 2:30 p.m., at the Findley Place Apartments, 400 W. Jefferson street. Dr. Calvin Warpula is leading a study of the book of Romans. Everyone is invited. n Liberty Village of Pittsfield Hawthorn Inn will be hosting Senior Bingo Day the third Wednesday of every month from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Snacks and prizes will be provided. n Set Free is a non-traditional recovery program for adults (ages 18+), based on doing life together. Join us for Set Free every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Pittsfield Assembly of God. There is free childcare, from birth-6th grade. Learn more: Set Free Recovery Group on Facebook.com. n The Pittsfield Masonic Lodge meets the second Monday of every month at the Masonic Lodge. n Meals Plus for Seniors serves lunch at noon, Mon. through Fri. at Findley Place. Over 60, meals are based on donations. Call Connie by 8:50 a.m. on the day you would like to make reservations at 217-285-6150. Milk and bread offered with every meal.

Like our newspaper? HIRING EVENT • Walk-Ins Welcome • Jacksonville Manufacturing Positions Available • NEW PAY RATE - $10.50/hour • Also Assemblers needed for 1 st and 2 n d shift • $9-$9.50.hour

CALL KELLY SERVICES FOR DETAILS

217-303-6270 EOE

JOBS IN JACKSONVILLE AVAILABLE NOW!

THE JOB CENTER

Next to Brickhouse on the Square in Jacksonville EVERY Thursday in February from 9am-2PM

Knights of Columbus and Altar Society

SPAGHETTI SUPPER Saturday, Feb. 18 4-8 p.m. St Mary’s Parish Hall 219 N. Jackson St. • Pittsfield 217-285-4321

Adults-$8 10 & under-$4 3 & under-FREE ($7 for advance tickets) To encourage Pike County High School seniors to dream big, Whitetail Properties Real Estate is proud to offer the We Grow Dreams Scholarship for seniors pursuing a career in agriculture, conservation, real estate or wildlife biology. “As a land company, it’s important to use to help educate the next generation of farmers, realtors and land managers,” said Dan Perez, Whitetail Properties CEO. “We’re also proud to be headquartered in Pittsfield and we want to invest in our local area whenever possible.” The We Grow Dreams Scholarship is a one-time award of $1,000 to be used toward cost-of-living and tuition. Applicants must possess a cumulative high school GPA of 3.0 or higher. The scholarship will be a one-time award of $1,000 and will be disbursed prior to the start of 2nd semester once proof of 1st semester GPA from college and 2nd semester class schedule have been provided to the scholarship committee. This scholarship is to be used towards one or a combination of the following: Room & Board/Supplies/Tuition The applicant’s GPA must be 3.0 or higher to apply. Application due date is March 1st. Applications can be picked up at your local high school guidance office or the Whitetail Properties office

Mail or send electronically: Kelly Johnson kelly.johnson@whitetailproperties.com 121 S. Madison • Pittsfield, IL 62363

Pike County Republican Central Committee Keynote speaker for the evening will be

H 2017 H LINCOLN DAY FUNDRAISER

CONGRESSMAN DARIN LAHOOD Come support our elected officials: State Senator Sam McCann State Representative C.D. Davidsmeyer Local Candidates

Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017

at Crossroads Center - 125 W. Jefferson St. - Pittsfield Doors Open at 5:30 p.m. • Dinner at 6 p.m.

$25 per person - $100 for event sponsors (includes acknowledgment & dinner for two) Please make reservations by Feb. 17 to: John R. Birch, Chairman 29449 State Hwy. 107, Griggsville, IL 62340 or call (217) 833-2880 Please make checks payable to: Pike County Republican Central Committee “Sponsored by the Pike County Republican Central Committee” A copy of our report field with the State Board of Elections is (or will be) available for purchase from the State Board of Elections, Springfield, Illinois


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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Pike Press

Pittsfield, Illinois

News

Good turnout for lunch and learn

By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press Approximately 30 people attended last week’s lunch and learn program on cyber attack prevention. The program was jointly sponsored by the Pike County Economic Development Corporation and John Wood Community College. The event was held Thursday, Feb. 9 at John Wood with a complimentary lunch furnished by Cass Communications. Focus of the meeting was protecting small business from a cyper attack. “We have all heard about the Target and Sony hacks,” Gary Hetick, one of the presenters, said. “Big companies make headlines, small businesses are increasingly being targeted by cybercriminals seeking economic gain through the exploitation of cyber systems. Recent reports indicate upwards of 50 percent of small businesses have had their data breached in the last year. These efforts place a small business owner at risk of losing customers’ information, loss of reputation, and loss of intellectual property – all of which have real financial consequences.” Hetick said less than onefourth of business who have been compromised notice with in a few days evidence of the breach. “The time it takes a hacker to gain access and take data can be seconds,” Hetick said. Hetick said lately a lot of discussion has been about Russian hackers and justifiably so. “They make more money from cyber crime than they do narcotics,” Hetick said. “Organized crime does 89 percent of the phishing, where they

Beth Zumwalt/Pike Press

CEO Beth Zumwalt/Pike Press

Dan Borrowman, right, of United Community Bank, shakes hands with Ron Kinscheriff, one of the presenters at last week’s seminar on business and cyper attacks. The luncheon meeting was held at the John Wood building in Pittsfield.

try to learn as much info about your company and your system as possible.” Hetick said hackers will use every available resource possible. “Someone from your company may post pictures on the Internet of the office Christmas party,” Hetick said. “Hackers can look at those pictures and see your computers in the background and figure out what programs you are running.” Hetick said some criminals will try to infiltrate a system, lock it down and demand a ransom to unlock it. “This happened to a hospital,” Hetick said.”It was devastating. Patient files couldn’t be accessed, they had to revert to using paper temporarily. It was a nightmare.” Hetick said he was opposed to paying the ransom. “First, how do you know they will not come back again and again?” he said. “And second,

how do you know how much data they stole while they had control?” Other hackers will try to steal information, especially now that tax information is being processed. “They will try to get as many W-2s as they can and file income taxes and have the money sent to a bank account.” Hetick said. “Once the money hits the account, it is immediately transferred to an account overseas.” Hetick said it is important to maintain good passwords and not use the same password for multiple devices or accounts. He also said there is advanced technology that is on the market. He also urged businesses to test themselves and to always been on guard by continuous awareness training. The session lasted from noon until 2 with a questions and answer session afterwards.

Chamber seeks nominations for annual awards dinner

Pike County Chamber of Commerce will hold its 30th annual meeting and awards dinner Tuesday, March 28, at the Griggsville American Legion. Networking begins at 6 p.m, with dinner at 6:30 p.m. In conjunction with the annual dinner meeting, Pike County Chamber of Commerce is seeking nominations for its annual Business of the Year, Volunteer of the Year, and Community Betterment honors, which will be awarded at the meet-

ing on March 28. Business of the Year recognizes a successful Pike County business that has demonstrated integrity and community involvemeAnt. Volunteer of the Year can be any Pike County resident who volunteers his or her time to support Pike County and his or her community. The eighth annual Community Betterment Award is intended to recognize the contribution of an individual or group of individuals whose vision and actions have bettered the

city or village in which they live. To facilitate nominations, the Chamber has developed a simple, optional nomination form, available by contacting Kaye Iftner at 217-285-2971 or by email at info@ pikeil.org. Nomination forms are also available on the Chamber’s website, pikeil.org, or at the Chamber office at 224 W. Washington St. in Pittsfield. Deadline for submission is Friday, March 10.

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Daniel Bingham, a member of the CEO class, standing, greets guests at the CEO dinner Saturday night at Pikeland Community School. The prime-rib dinner was catered by Stroemers of Barry. Entertainment was provided by Cindy Piper, Brad Miller and Isiah Christian. The fundraiser was to raise money for the trade show the class will have later in the spring.

Lots of fun at the Daddy/ Daughter Dance Sunday

Beth Zumwalt/Pike Press

A melee ensued after one of the dad knocked down a piñata during the Daddy/ Daughter Dance, which included games, crafts, refreshments and, of course, dancing.

Beth Zumwalt/PIke Press

PICK ANY SMARTPHONE AND GET UP TO

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dinner an amazing success

Dozens of little girls and their daddies attended the Daddy/Daughter dance Sunday afternoon at the Western YMCA. Brett Schafer and his daughter, Henley, took a spin around the dance floor.


Sports Pike Press

Wednesday, February 15, 2017 Pittsfield, Illinois

B1

Saukees live up to their statements

By Jacob Bradshaw Pike Press Known as a team who often shows defensive tenacity, the Pittsfield Saukees improved their record, nabbing up two road victories. Their first win came against Beardstown, and the Saukees handled business, taking the victory with a final score of 63-33. Nick Reel set a tone early offensively for the Saukees, ending the night

scoring 15 points on five three-pointers. Korbyn Personett led the team with 21 points, and Noah Mendenhall chipped in with 14 points. With a big road game, the Saukees traveled to play Western. The tone was set early and often for Pittsfield. Patience with the ball and defense were their main keys. On two occasions, the Saukees defense kept Western from scoring for over two minute posses-

sions. The final score was 41-26, a Saukees win. “We know what we needed to do,” Senior guard Nick Reel stated. “We came out with a good mindset, and we executed. Staying within ourselves and taking it one game at a time is what will keep us going.” Personett had 18 points on the night. The Saukees, nearing post season, plan to stay humble and work hard, since that’s what got them where they are now.

Joel Cook advances to state Photo submitted by Doug Pool

Max Stinebaker puts up two points for the Tornadoes Friday, Feb. 10 in the game against Payson.

By Steven Spencer Pike Press After taking second place in regionals, Pittsfield junior Joel Cook went to sectionals to take second place in the 160pound weight class last Saturday, Feb. 11. Cook said there has been some difficulties and injuries this year, but that didn’t stop him from advancing to the state competition in Champaign this weekend.

“There have been a lot of ups and downs,” Cook said, “I finally got back and was able to wrestle in the postseason after being out for a while. I Pushed my way through and ended up qualifying for state.” Wrestling for 13 years now, Cook’s goal is to place at state this year. “If I wrestle smart, and do what my coaches are instructing me to do I should do really well,” he said.

Submitted photo

Junior Joel Cook took second place in sectionals and is heading to state for the Pittsfield Saukees.

Lady Saukees season comes to an end

Photo submitted by Doug Pool

Ian Smith takes two points as the Tornadoes lose against Payson Friday, Feb. 10.

Tornadoes grab another win

By Ashley Miller Pike Press The Tornadoes were able to grab another win last week in their game against ISD before falling to Payson Friday, Feb. 10, giving them a 7-12 record at print. Tuesday, the Tornadoes traveled to ISD to take on the Tigers where they came out with the 79-60 win. Ryan Kelley lead the team with 15

points followed by Ian Smith and Max Stinebaker with 13. The Tornadoes went 9 for 15 at the line. Friday GP took on Payson at home, where they fought for the eventual 65-63 loss to the Indians. The Tornadoes went into the half down 33-31 but managed to come back out and take a 10-point lead at one point before the Indians were able to come back for the win. Stinebaker led the team with

22 points. He was followed by Smith who had 19, while Jonathon Myers had 13. GP went 17 for 30 at the line. Monday the Tornadoes will face Pittsfield on their home court before traveling to Triopia Tuesday. Friday GP will finish off the regular season in a home game against Calhoun. Seeded 10th in the regional the Tornadoes will face Western on Tuesday, February 21.

Lady Wildcats go 6-1 in conference By Steven Spencer Pike Press Beating Routt 34-27 in the first round of regional play put Western up against the West Central Cougars Thursday, Feb. 9, to see who would advance to sectionals. Western found themselves down by eight points after the first quarter. The Wildcats came

back in the second quarter determined to turn things around. Scoring 11 points wasn’t enough to take control of the game, but it cut West Central’s lead down to three points with the score at 16-13 going into halftime. The Cougars hit the Wildcats hard in the third quarter and continued to increase their advantage. Scoring 21 points in the second half wasn’t enough for

the Wildcats to steal control of the game, and with 31 points the Cougars took the win over Western 47-34. Junior Blair Borrowman led the Wildcats in scoring, putting up 20 of the team’s 34 points, and led the team with eight defensive rebounds and two offensive boards. The loss puts the Wildcats at 22-8 for the season overall.

By Jacob Bradshaw Pike Press The Pittsfield-Pleasant Hill Lady Saukees season ends against the top seeded team in their regional. The Lady Saukees made it to the semifinals, as they were able to defeat Piasa Southwestern 45-39. Down seven points at half time, the Lady Saukees came out in a ball of energy. The Lady Saukees held Piasa to only two 3rd quarter points. During this span, they took a 28-24 lead, and they didn’t look back from that point on. Lilly Pepper had 16

points, and Maddie Palmer had 14 points. “A different intensity is what we needed,” Coach Jeff Shireman stated. “I told them not to change anything we had done up to this point, but to play as if it’s your last game.” The season came to an end for the ladies, losing to the top seeded Buffalo Tri-City, 52-28. The Lady Saukees managed to keep it close, trailing 22-15 at the half, but a second half boost couldn’t be found. The Lady Saukees ended their season with a 13-17 record, very respectable, and the team defied a

lot of odds throughout the season. No reason to hang their heads over anything. Itching to see what next year’s team has in store. “It’s really tough, seeing this year end.” Senior Maddie Palmer stated. “I’ve always loved basketball, more than any other sport. I knew how important it was to me the past few years, but you never really realize how much something means to you until it’s over. It was tough turning to the sidelines to see that last buzzer go off. I enjoyed every second of being a Lady Saukee. I’m proud of what our team accomplished this year.”

Women's bowling league Tuesday afternoon ladies league bowling standings Fashion Flowers - 24 - 8 Gray House B&B - 20 - 12 Rolling Pins - 19 - 13 Late Comers - 17 - 15 Pin Pals - 16 - 16 Bowling Bags - 16 - 16 Five Aces - 15 - 17 Road Runners - 14 - 18 Gutter Gals - 10 - 22 Individual high averages 162.97 - Beth Wade

153.09 - Kay Taliaferro 152.61 - Jan Kelly 146.65 - Deana Graham 145.94 - Doris Webel Wednesday league standings Five of a Kind - 45 - 11 Hatcher’s Guest - 40 - 16 Bowling Stones - 36 - 20 $um it up - 36 - 20 Happy Hookers - 34 - 22 Dominoes - 26 - 30 Belles of the Ba - 26 - 30

Jokers Wild - 20 - 36 Country Fixin’s - 20 - 36 Alley Oop’s - 20 - 36 Ambrosia Dynasty - 19 - 37 BiPolar Rollers - 14 - 42 Individual high averages 166. 19 - Beth Wade 156.17 - Chris Higgins 155.52 - Amy Johnson 155.51 - Kristy Jeffers 155.27 - Cindy Lawber

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Advertise with Pike Press 217-285-2345

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Submitted photo

Braves

take second place

Pikeland Braves took second place at the Pikeland Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports tournament, PBIS. Saturday, Feb. 4, the Braves went up against Triopia for the championship game. Pikeland beat both North Greene and Bluffs, but faced an upset from Triopia, 24-16, to take second place in the tournament.

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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Saukee Citizen of the Month

Savannah Harris, a junior at Pittsfield High School, has been selected as the January Saukee Citizen of the Month. She is the daughter of Dave and Amanda Harris. Her activities include volleyball and being a hall monitor. Harris was voted Saukee citizen by the faculty and staff at PHS. Selection was based on helping others, courtesy, going above and beyond in helping the school environment as well as the community.

Savannah Harris

PCCA announces honor roll Pike County Christian Academy has announced the honor roll for the first semester.  Students who made high honor roll with a GPA of 4.5 or higher and no D’s for the first semester. Third grade – Mary McClain, Mia Moore Fourth grade – Emma Moss, Seren Davenport Fifth grade – Lainie Marable

These are students who made honor roll with a GPA of 4.0 – 4.5 no D’s for the first semester. Third grade – Tristyn Ruzich Fourth grade – Drew Workman, Desirae Wager Fifth grade – Leah McClain Sixth grade – Isabella Irving, Lexie McClain Ninth grade – Daniel Workman.

Pike Press

Applications are available for the Pike County Home and Community Education Scholarship The Pike County Home and Community Education (HCE) scholarship is available for full-time undergraduate students in a college or technical school. The Pike County HCE is awarding two $250 scholarship as a memorial to the many women who have contributed their educational leadership resources toward the continuing development of the association. Applications are available online at HYPERLINK “http:// web.extension.illinois.edu/ abhps/downloads/57031.pdf” http://web.extension.illinois. edu/abhps/downloads/57031. pdf Applications are also available at the University of Illinois

Joseph Jeral Miller of Pittsfield graduated from the University of Missouri at the end of the fall 2016 semester. Miller received a bachelor’s

Submitted photo

Annita Lane Best recently retired from the U.S. Marine Corp after 30 years of service.  She retired as a Colonel at a ceremony at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C. Colonel Priscilla Failmezger was the retiring officer and Sergeant Major Yolanda Mayo served as Sergeant Major. Colonel Best has four daughters and purposefully chose women to help her celebrate her retirement as an example to them that they can accomplish anything they desire. Colonel Best particularly thanked her father retired Marine Corps Master Sergeant Lawrence Lane for instilling the desire to serve in her and her sister Roberta Fox and brother Eric Lane, who also served in the USMC.

Africa Training Cruise and Shared Accord. Her formal schools include Amphibious Warfare School, Command and Staff and Naval War College Joint Reserve Officer Course. She has been activated several times since 9/11 as a public affairs director in various locations throughout the Marine Corps. She graduated from Pitts-

Extension - Pike County office and at the Griggsville, Pittsfield, Pleasant Hill and Western high school guidance offices. Guidelines: Student must be in good scholastic standing with at least a “C” average; Parents or guardians of the applicant must be residents of Pike County; The scholarship will not be awarded to an individual more than once; All applicants must have been an active 4-H member for four or more years. Deadline is April 1. Contact the University of Illinois Extension in Pike County at 217-285-5543 for more information.

Miller receives degrees from Mizzou

Best retires from Marine Corps Reserves

Pike County native Annita Best recently retired after 30 years in the U.S. Marines. Colonel Best most recently served as a public affairs officer with Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps Public Affairs, The Pentagon, Washington, D.C. Colonel Best joined the Marine Corps Reserve in 1986 in Phoenix, Ariz. and attended officer candidate school in Quantico, Va. In June 1987 she graduated from The basic school and received her orders to Navy Supply School in Athens, Ga. Upon graduation, she served as an aviation supply officer at Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 29, Marine Corps Air Station New River, N.C. In 1989 she was chosen to serve as the junior aide de camp/protocol officer for the commanding general of 2d Marine Aircraft Wing at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C. She transferred to the Individual Ready Reserve for three years and in 1993 joined the Selected Marine Corps Reserve as a public affairs officer for 2d Marine Expeditionary Brigade at Camp Lejeune, NC. She attended the Defense Information School at Ft. Meade, Maryland and received her public affairs officer designation and has since served several years in the IMA detachment at Headquarters Marine Corps Public Affairs; Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina; Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; and Marine Forces Europe, Stuttgart, Germany; and Marine Forces Pacific at Camp Smith, Hawaii. She participated in various exercises throughout her career, to include Western

News

Pittsfield, Illinois

field High School, has a B.S. in journalism from Culver-Stockton College, Canton, Mo.and an MBA from Boston University, Boston, Mass. She is the daughter of a retired Marine Corps Master Sergeant and the wife of Dr. Henry Best and mother of Rachel, Emily, Rebekah and Lydia in North Carolina.

degree in accountancy, cum laude, with a minor in agricultural economics, as well as a master’s degree in accountancy.

Alexis Groom

Grace Henry

Pikeland Community School picks SOMs The PCS Student Council February Students of the month are Alexis Groom for the middle school. Her nominating teacher said this of her: “I often refer to this young lady as a righthand-type student in my class. She constantly volunteers to do extra work for me when needed, and generates some very worthy and often times successful ideas that benefit many, yet seldom seeks credit for them. She is a super hard worker in class, on the court, and even beyond PCS. This young lady is so incredibly helpful and incredibly insightful! She is an organizing genius, but never one to be in the forefront. This kind of humility not only makes her a very suitable candidate for February student of the month, but will make her a very likable and decent human being

long after she has left here! This girl is one every teacher would like to have a classroom full of! I am truly going to miss her next year as she goes into high school” The 3-5 winner is Grace Henry. She was nominated multiple times this month. Her nominating teachers said this of her:”She is always going out of her way to help any students in my and Mrs. Kurfman’s class. She tries to make them feel as special as possible. She sits with them at lunch and plays with them everyday at recess. She is so sweet.” Other nominees included: Molly Gerard, Katie Cox, Eli Smithers, Grant McCartney, Keller Personett, Tori Stambaugh, Marissa Burdick, Brett Ator, Westin McCallister, Zac Swan, and Julia Collver.

UIS announces fall semester 2016 dean’s list Two local girls have been named to the dean’s list at the University of Illinois, Springfield. Kaitlyn Murphy of Barry and Karley Losch of Pittsfield were both included on the prestigious list.  The University of Illinois Springfield has released the Dean’s List for Fall Semester 2016. A total of 580 students were selected; 85 are students in the College of Business and Manage-

ment, 39 are students in the College of Education and Human Services, 384 are enrolled in programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 54 are enrolled in programs in the College of Public Affairs and Administration, and 18 are non-degree seeking or undecided. In order to qualify for the Dean’s List, a student must be an undergraduate who took at least eight

U of A names Mallincrodt to dean’s list

Geiselman makes dean’s list

A total of 11,758 students enrolled during the 2016 fall semester at The University of Alabama were named to the dean’s list with an academic record of 3.5 (or above) or the president’s list with an academic record of 4.0 (all A’s). The UA Dean’s and President’s lists recognize full-time undergraduate students. The lists do not apply to graduate students or undergraduate students who take less than a full course load. Jeremy Carl Mallinckrodt, Pittsfield, was named to the dean’s list. He is the son of Deon and Chris Mallencrodt.

Ellen Geiselman has been named to the Fall 2016 Dean’s list at Iowa Wesleyan University in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, with a 4.0 GPA. The Dean’s list consists of degree seeking students, exemplifying academic excellence while taking 12 or more hours per semester with a GPA of 3.5 or higher. Ellen is the daughter of Jimmy and Rachel Geiselman of Pittsfield.

graded semester hours and maintained a gradepoint average of at least 3.75 for the semester. Student’s names are listed in the attached documents based on the city of residence on file with UIS Records and Registration. For more information, contact Blake Wood, UIS assistant director of public relations, at 217/2066716 orbwood8@uis.edu. 

Ellen Geiselman

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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Pike Press

Pittsfield, Illinois

B3


Campbell Publications

THEClassifieds PEOPLE'S MARKETPLACE

GENERAL INFORMATION

Reaching 75,000 Readers Each Week! Calhoun news-herald

Pike Press

P.O. Box 367, Hardin, IL 62047 Ph: 618-576-2345 Fax: 630-206-0320 Mon.: 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Tues.: 9-11 a.m.; Fri.: 1-4 p.m.

P.O. Box 70, Pittsfield, IL 62363 Ph: 217-285-2345 Fax: 630-206-0320 E-Mail: pikeoffice@campbellpublications.net 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday

Greene Prairie Press

Scott County Times

E-Mail: cnhnews@campbellpublications.net

P.O. Box 265, Carrollton, IL 62016 Ph: 217-942-9100 Fax: 630-206-0320

P.O. Box 138, Winchester, IL 62694

Ph: 217-742-3313 • Fax: 630-206-0320

E-Mail: sctnews@campbellpublications.net

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

The Weekly Messenger

3:45-5 p.m. Monday, Thursday

P.O. Box 340, Pleasant Hill, IL 62366 Ph: 217-285-2345 • Fax: 630-206-0320

832 South State, Jerseyville, IL. 62052 Ph: 618-498-1234 • Fax: 630-206-0320 E-mail: jcjnews@campbellpublications.net

8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday *Certain classifications of ads appearing in The People’s Marketplace also appear on www.pikepress.com on the Internet at no additional charge.

400D FOR RENT Pike County 439 WEST Adams St. Pittsfield. 3 Bedroom house, no smoking, no pets, must have references. $550 per month plus deposit. 217-285-1767 leave message. 2.15.17 HOUSE FOR rent in Pittsfield. 6 rooms, full basement, attached garage. Appliances furnished. Call 217-285-4674 leave message or 217-491-4286.

400D FOR RENT Pike County NEWLY REMODELED house for rent. Rural Spring Creek Township. 2 bedroom/ 1 bath. $1,200 Deposit, $400/month rent. 217-491-0384. 3.1.17 THREE BEDROOM, two bath home for rent. $700 a month, $700 security deposit required. Call 217285-4502. TFN UPSTAIRS OFFICE space for rent in Pittsfield, near the square. Just decorated. Call 217-285-4488 and ask for Carolyn. TFN READ THE classifieds every week for great details on cars, boats, hunting land and housing! Call and place your ad today.

600 HELP WANTED

2002 INT'L Tandem Grain Truck. International 4900. 22' aluminum Kann bed. Int'l DT 530 engine with 214,000 miles. Great truck. Asking $36,000. 217-4731343 call or text. TFN 1990 PRESTIGE double wide mobile home, 22x40. 3 BR, 2 BA. Call 217-3702629. TFN

CDL-A TRUCK Drivers: $3,000 sign-on! Midwest runs. Full benefits. Paid weekly. Co. drivers & owner operators. 888-300-9935.

plastic. $175. Can deliver. 618-772-2710. 4.12.17 1979 BOBCAT skid steer 751. Diesel, low hours on new motor, 5' bucket, roll cage, tires and paint good, 1 set of SCV's 2814 hours. Serial number 514713407 $9,900.00 Price Reduced. 217-734-2604. 2.22.17 HANDMADE QUILTED Quilts 618-376-4067 Charlotte Rulon 104 W. Main Fieldon, IL 62031. 2.15.17 FOR SALE: 31 ft., 2003 Yukon Wilderness travel trailer. Slide out. Very good condition. Call 618-5354306. $7,000 OBO. 2.22.17 SELLING COUNTRY home to downsize, just outside of Pittsfield, on Highway 54. 2.9 acres $20,000 below appraisal. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2125 sq. ft., new windows, roof, and wiring. 68x40 detached garage. $195,000. Call 217-6533700 or 217-285-6520. 2.22.17

LOOKING FOR SOM ETHING?

3.8.17

DRIVERS CDL-A: Get home & get paid! Excellent home time! All miles paid! No touch freight! No forced dispatch. 855-349-5261. 2.22.17

600 HELP WANTED

2.22.17

2 BEDROOM home for rent. No smoking, no pets, security deposit required. 217-285-4502. TFN 2 BEDROOM apartment for rent. No smoking. No pets. Security deposit required. 217-285-4502. TFN ONE BEDROOM apartment for rent. No pets, no 300 smoking, security deposit Farm Market required. Call 217-285SQUARE HAY bales- 4502. TFN mixed grass. $3.50 Bale. 217-370-0324. TFN 500 ROUND BALES. Green FOR SALE grass hay, no rain, shedded, delivery available. BED QUEEN pillowtop 217-491-0697. 2.15.17 mattress set. New in the

WANTED PART time police chief in Bluffs, IL. Call 217754-3033 or apply at Bluffs City Hall. 3.8.17 MATERIAL HANDLER Day shift, M-F. Forklift experience a plus. Good pay, benefits, and more close to Jerseyville. Call Steve 618498-4442 x700. 3.8.17 MIG WELDER/GRINDER needed. MIG welding position, day shift, M-F. Close to Jerseyville, great pay, benefits, paid holidays, and more. Please contact Steve at 618-498-4442 x700. 3.8.``7 PERSONAL ASSISTANT needed in Pittsfield, IL. Individual needing help has had multiple sclerosis and is wheelchair bound. She has assistive equipmentknowledge of mechanical lift a plus, but not required. This position is for weekends and occasional prn, but could develop into full time. Applicant must possess a valid driver's license and have a reliable form of transportation. Needs to love cats and be a nonsmoker. Must have earned a HS diploma or G.E.D. to be considered. If interested you may call 217-285-6382 between the hours of 1-7 p.m., but please no calls after 9 p.m. 3.22.17 HELP AT home Inc. hiring homecare aides to do in home care. $10.05 per hour, paid mileage and travel. 1-866-617-6100.

!!!

2.22.17

DRIVER: CDL-A Truck Driver – Up to $60k/yr and $8k Sign-on plus bonus! Call for details! 855-2393949 DRIVERS: NEW Orientation completion bonus! $4,000.00 flatbed! $3,000.00 Dedicated, regional, OTR & point to point lanes! (New hires guaranteed minimum $$$ week)! 1yr CDL-A: 855-350-5571. 3.1.17

ous or does not infringe on the privacy of any individual or entity. All advertisements are accepted and published by the newspaper upon the representation that the agency and/or advertiser will indemnify and hold harmless the newspaper from any loss or expense, including the cost of defense and any settlement and/or judgment resulting from claims based upon the contents of any advertisement, including claims or suits for defamation, libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism or copyright infringement. All advertisements created by the newspaper are not considered a “work made for hire” and the newspaper retains the copyright to all advertisements created by the newspaper for the advertiser. The advertisement may not be reproduced without the written permission of the newspaper. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination EQUAL based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial sta- HOUSING tus or national origin, or an intention to make any such OPPORTUNITY preferences, limitations or discrimination, in the sale, rental or financing of housing. In addition, the Illinois Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination based on age, ancestry, marital status, or unfavorable discharge. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which violates the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call the Chicago area Fair Housing Alliance toll free at 1-800-659-OPEN.

• 615 Hunting • 620 Kids For Hire • 700 Lost/Found • 710 Meeting Reminders • 800 Miscellaneous* • 900 No Trespassing A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County • 1000 Pets* • 1100 Real Estate* A: Calhoun County

615 HUNTING

LAND FOR lease 315 acres with house. Northern Calhoun County. Will lease for entire hunting season. Call 314-258-4824. 3.29.17 PIKE COUNTY deer. Archery/Shotgun. About 230 acres timber/CRP. Need QDMA. Hunt club insured. No outfitters. $10,000 firm. 217-336-2191. 3.1.17 LOOKING FOR land to lease for hunting. Please call 217-652-7233. 3.15.17 LOOKING FOR ground in Northern Calhoun or Southern Pike to lease short term or long term. No size too big! 618-550-9406.

B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County • 1200 Services* • 1300 Wanted* • 1310 Web Sites* • 1400 Work Wanted • 1500 Yard Sales A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County

900A 600 NO TRESPASSING HELP WANTED Calhoun County

1100E REAL ESTATE Scott County

NO HUNTING or Trespassing allowed on 315 acres property in Batchtown Illinois owned by Jim and Carol Squires. All violators will be prosecuted. 8.30.17 NO TRESPASSING no hunting on property owned by Martha Knight (also known as Marty Aderton), Lincoln Valley Road, Hardin. 12.6.17 NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown owned by Steve and Cindy Meszaros. Violators will be prosecuted. 5.24.17 NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown owned by Marcy Klockenkemper, Judy Lamer, Jeremy Russell, Bonnie Stepanek, and Cindy Meszaros. Violators will be prosecuted. 5.24.17

TWO ADJOINING buildings located near a busy intersection in Winchester, Illinois. Ideal for new business and storage. The north building is 2170 square feet with: Two offices (16 ft x 13 ft and 10.5 ft x 13.5 ft) A bath and storage room (9.5 ft x 8.5 ft) Gas forced-air furnace, Central air, 200 amp breaker box, Double doors in back for easy loading and unloading. The south building is approximately 1175 square feet; it is great for a new business or for use as a storage room. Two buildings for one price! The vacant lot to the north could possibly be purchased, making a great addition to the property. Darrell Moore darrellm@worrell-landservices.com (217) 473-5486 Worrell Land Services, LLC 2240 West Morton Jacksonville, IL 62650. Office: (217) 245-1618 Fax: (217) 245-5318 info@worrelllandservices.com TFN

HELP WANTED: Hiring 900C Experienced Welders Only. Must have previous weldNO TRESPASSING ing experience Apply at Pike County Hofmeister Welding INC 402 N Wall St. Griggsville, NO HUNTING or trespassing on the Linda Bennett IL. No phone calls. 2.15.17 farm, rural Griggsville. Violators will be prosecuted. 11.2.17

MY LAND lo­cat­ed in Sec­ tion 18 SW of Pearl is pri­ vate prop­er­ty. Hunt­ing, fish­ing, trap­ping, tres­ pass­ ing, for any pur­ pose, with­out the writ­ten, signed per­mis­sion of the own­er, is strict­ly for­bid­den. Vio­la­tors will be pros­e­cut­ed. Ti­mothy Brink­man. 5.20.17 ABSOLUTELY NO trespassing on any ground owned by Double Creek Farms, Inc. 10.18.17 NEED EXTRA cash? Sell your used items in The People's Marketplace Classifieds. One phone call puts your ad in six newspapers....a total circulation of almost 22,000 readers!

1200 SERVICES NORTH SCOTT Park District in Bluffs, IL is accepting bids for mowing and weed eating for the park and ball diamond on a weekly basis. Applicants must provide proof of insurance. For requirements and a description of work to be completed please send letter of interest to North Scott Park District, PO Box 112, Bluffs, IL 62621 or emailed to northscottparkboard@gmail.com. by March 1, 2017. Bids must be received by March 13, 2017. North Scott Park Board reserves the right to refuse any bids. 2.22.17

1200 SERVICES MOWING SEASON is just around the corner. If you are looking for someone to mow your yard, give us a call at 1-217-320-8390. TFN NEED YARD work done? Cutting Edge Lawn Care serving Pike County & northern Calhoun County. Big or Small mowing/ weed-eating jobs. Call Lacy Brown or Ethan Brown at 217-248-8158. 4.26.17 FORESTRY MULCHING. Boom spraying. Call Long Forestry. 618-639-TREE. www.longforestry.com. 6.28.17

1300 WANTED ARROWHEADS WANTED: Local avocational archaeologist is looking to purchase either one arrowhead or an entire collection. Love Indian artifacts! Please call 314-608-2692. 2.15.17 STANDING TIMBER R. McKinnon Logging buying. Walnut, White Oak, etc. No yard trees. Not affiliated with Pleasant Hill McKinnons. 217-242-5401. 8.18.17 NO TRESPASSING ads are $60 for one year! Call to place yours today. In Calhoun: 618-576-2345; Greene: 217-942-9100; Jersey: 618-498-1234; Pike: 217-285-2345 and Scott: 217-742-3313. Keep unwanted people off your property! Great way to keep people off your land! FIND THE job you've been looking for in The People's Marketplace Classifieds. Calhoun News-Herald, Greene Prairie Press, Jersey County Journal, Pike Press, Scott County Times, The Weekly Messenger. Look online every week, too! calhounnewsheraldcom, greeneprairiepress. com, jerseycountyjournal. com or pikepress.com

20 words for only $6

3.15.17

IEDS!

E CLASSIF

READ TH

• 100 Automotive * • 200 Business* • 220 Collectibles* • 300 Farm Market* • 400 For Rent* A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County F: Miscellaneous • 500 For Sale* • 600 Help Wanted* • 610 Hobby Shop/Handicrafts*

500 FOR SALE

CALL US: 217-285-2345

200 Business

DEADLINES: Classified ads, Monday 3:30 p.m. (For placement and for cancellation.) CLASSIFIED RATES: First insertion, 25¢ per word, minimum $6. Consecutive repeat insertion, 15¢ per word, minimum $5. Prepayment is required. Any change in original ad will be considered start of a new ad. Blind Ad, $4 service charge, plus postage if replies are to be mailed. Yard Sales, $6 up to 20 words. No Trespassing notice, one year, up to 20 words, $60. ADVERTISING POLICY The following are policies of: Calhoun News-Herald, Greene Prairie Press, Jersey County Journal, Pike Press, Scott County Times and The Weekly Messenger: We are not responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of display and classified advertising. One free insertion will be allowed for a classified ad with a significant mistake. Please let us know immediately. The newspaper reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement submitted for publication. Yard Sale and Work Wanted ads are payable in advance. Proper identification is required of persons placing ads. A F.O.I.D. card will be asked for when selling a firearm. No exceptions will be allowed. Newspaper reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including the right to do so after the ad has been accepted for publication but before publication occurs. The advertiser’s sole remedy for such refusal shall be the refund of the funds paid to purchase the ad. Advertisements are accepted by the newspaper upon the representation that the agency and/or advertiser is authorized to publish the contents and subject matter of the advertisement and that it is not libel-

CLASSIFICATIONS

E-Mail: gppnews@campbellpublications.net

Mon.: 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Tues.: 9 a.m.-noon; Fri.: 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

KAMS LAWNCARE Service. Fully insured. Wanting yards to mow for the 2017 year. Family has been in business for over 20 years. Call for an estimate: 217440-3238. 3.1.17 SELLBEST, 101 W. Quincy St., Griggsville. Quality Used Furniture & Appliances- Washers, Dryers, Freezers, Fridges, Microwave, Electric Stoves, Twin, Full, Queen Beds, New Mattress Sets, Bedroom Furniture, Tables & Chairs, Upholstered Furniture, Tools. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed for lunch 12-1 p.m. Or by appointment. Call 217-242-2252. TFN

The People’s Marketplace Classifieds

Wednesday, February 15, 2017


Campbell

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

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The People’s Marketplace Classifieds

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The People’s Marketplace

BUSINESS AND STORAGE BUILDING - WINCHESTER

Two adjoining buildings located near a busy intersection in Winchester, Illinois. Ideal for new business and storage. The north building is 2170 square feet with: • Two offices (16 ft x 13 ft and 10.5 ft x 13.5 ft) • A bath and storage room (9.5 ft x 8.5 ft) • Gas forced-air furnace • Central air • 200 amp breaker box • Double doors in back for easy loading and unloading.

SALE TO BE HELD AT THE AMERICAN LEGION • 275 PUMYEA ST. • FAIRVIEW, IL 61432

(Subject to Survey)

3 Tracts

The Newcomb Farm is located approximately 1 1/2 miles north of Fairview, IL on Highway 97, then west approximately 1 mile on access road and is further described as being located in Sections 17, 20 & 21 of Fairview Township, Fulton County, IL. The property contains a total of approximately 235 acres (subject to survey in progress) and will be sold in 3 parcels ranging in size from 60 acres to 95 acres. Tracts represent productive tillable farmland, hunting & recreational land & pastureland. The Newcomb Farm offers the investor a tremendous opportunity to purchase productive farmland and excellent hunting, fishing and outdoor recreational property.

THE NEWCOMB FARM

WALTER & LISA NEWCOMB – SELLERS

REPRESENTING ATTORNEY: MICHAEL J. HONEGGER 12900 WEST FARMINGTON ROAD • HANNA CITY, IL • PH: (309) 565-7172 SULLIVAN AUCTIONEERS, LLC • TOLL FREE (844) 847-2161

217-285-2345

SELL YOUR OLD JUNK WITH US! $6 FOR ONLY 20 WORDS! CALL THE PEOPLE'S MARKETPLACE CLASSIFIEDS TODAY!

The south building is approximately 1175 square feet; it is great for a new business or for use as a storage room. Two buildings for one price! The vacant lot to the north could possibly be purchased, making a great addition to the property. Worrell Land Services, LLC Darrell Moore darrellm@worrell-landservices.com 2240 West Morton Jacksonville, IL 62650 Office: (217) 245-1618 (217) 473-5486 Fax: (217) 245-5318 info@worrell-landservices.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 10 AT 1:00 P.M.

Charles & Irene Church

newspapers

FOR SALE

F U LT O N C O U N T Y, I L L I N O I S

Personal Property Auction

www.sullivanauctioneers.com • IL Lic. #444000107

Snapper Riding Mower, Furniture & Household

Sat., Feb. 25th, 2017 @ 10:00 a.m. 303 S. Cemetery, Hardin, IL 62047. South of the Hardin Bridge.

Take Park St. turn right to J. F. Kennedy make left onto S. County Rd. Then left on to S. Cemetery. (watch for signs)

Furniture & Household: Couch , Love Seat, Recliner, Lift Chair, Chairs, Dinning Room Table w/6 chair & Leaf, Sm Table w/4 chairs, Hamilton Beach Microwave, Lazy Susan, 2 TVs, Entertainment Center, Mantel Clock , 31 Day Windup Wall Clock, Occasional Tables, Lamps, King Size Bed, Dresser , Chest of Drawers, Hope Chest, Night Stands, Full Bed, Dresser, Wardrobe, Safe, Computer Desk, Old Computer, Paper Shredder, New Handy Cap Walker w/seat, Pots & Pans, Sunbeam Mixer, Coffee Maker, Dishes, Home Interior, Pictures, Frames, Camera, Glider, Picnic Table, Other Items, & Misc. Collectables: Vol. 1 & 2 Quarter Collection, Dollar Presidential Coins, Miniature Oil Lamps, Wooden & Paper Mache Decoys, Budweiser Wagon w/team, Set of Noritake Stoneware Dishes, “Shortcake” Dishes by Debbie Geordie, “1944” Aviator Glasses, WWII Army Foot Locker & Uniform, Goose Decanter, Costume Jewelry, Linens, Avon, Cook Books, Crock, Whiskey Jug, Snapper Riding Mower, Fishing Tackle, Tools & Misc.: 12 ½ hp. Riding Mower (like new), 6hp Self Propelled Push Mower, Elect. Hedge Trimmer, Elect. Chain Saw, Cordless Drill, Skill Saw, Vice, Floor Jacks, Portal Work Table, Wheel Barrow, Push Plow, Shop Mate Bench Grinder, Tool Boxes, Mr. Heater (floor model), Yard Tools, Step Ladders, Weber Grill, Fishing Rods, Reels, Poles, Tackle, Tackle Boxes, Minnow Buckets, Boat Seats, Yard Tools, Step Ladders, Weber Grill, Other Items To Numerous Too Mention. LUNCH WILL BE SERVED. Check Web For Pictures. www.klockesauction.com

“Have Gavel Will Travel” Klocke’s Auction Service Auctioneer Terry Klocke LIC# 440000568 Rt. 1 Box 13, Batchtown, IL 62006 Ph# (618)396-2563

NO-RESERVE FARM MACHINERY RETIREMENT Auction to be held at the farm, near Roodhouse, IL (approximately 20 miles south of Jacksonville, IL)

Directions: In Roodhouse, IL at the intersection at Hwy. 67 & Palm St. go east 2 1/2 miles on Palm St. / CR-2 to the farm. Be watching for sale day directional signs.

WED., FEBRUARY 22ND @ 10:00 A.M. TRACTORS: ’07 C-IH 305 Magnum MFWD tractor, PS trans., 4 hyd. outlets, high flow hyd. system, 1000 PTO, 480/80R50 rear tires w/duals, 380/80R38 front tires w/duals, Guidance ready, deluxe cab, front fenders, front & rear weights, heavy duty drawbar, 3,718 hours, SN Z7RZ03910; ’10 JD 9330 4WD tractor, PS trans., 4 hyd. outlets, 620/70R42 tires w/duals, AutoTrac ready, HID lights, deluxe cab, rear wheel weights, 1,720 hours, SN 1RW9330PKAP018512; ’89 JD 4955 MFWD tractor, PS trans., 3 hyd. outlets, 1000 PTO, 18.4R42 rear tires w/duals, 16.9R28 front tires, front and rear weights, new style step, 6,897 hours, SN RW4955P001851. COMBINE & HEADS: ’08 JD 9770STS 4wd combine, ContourMaster feederhouse w/high torque variable speed drive, 3 spd. trans., chopper, Bullet Rotor, 22.5’ high rate unloading auger, bin extension, HD final drives, sidehill cleaning shoe pkg., 76×50-32 drive tires, 28L-26 steer tires, premier cab, 2,425 eng./ 1,581 sep. hours, SN H09770S727948; ’09 JD 608C 8 row 30” corn head, fluted rolls, height sensors, single point hookup, hyd. deck plates, SN H0608CX730997; ’04 JD 625F 25’ HydraFlex platform, full finger auger, hyd. fore/aft, single point hookup, stubble lights, SN H00625F710649; 25’ head cart, 7.50-10 tires, SN D19980110; EZ Trail 672 20’ head cart, 20.5×8.0-10 tires; 8 row down corn reel. TRUCK & TRAILER: ’88 Kenworth day cab semi, Cummins N14, Fuller trans., air ride, 22.5” steel wheels, 190” wheelbase, 707,713 miles, VIN 2XKWD29X8JM502886; 20′ flatbed trailer, bumper hitch, tandem axle, ramps, wood floor. FARM EQUIPMENT: ’98 JD 6500 self propelled sprayer, 60’ booms, 30” nozzle spacing, 420 gal. poly tank, 12.4-38 tires, 11L-15 front tire, foamer, drops, JD flow control for monitor, 2,715 hrs., SN N06500X010176; Kinze 3600 16/31 planter, ground drive, finger pickup, 1.6 bushel boxes, no till coulters, seed firmers, heavy duty down pressure springs, markers, corn & bean units, KPM II monitor, SN 618977; ’10 J&M 1000-20 GrainStorm grain cart, hyd. spout, roll tarp, lights, 900/60R32 tires, large 1000 PTO, SN 2892; C-IH 330 True-Tandem 33’ vertical tillage tool, single point depth control, gauge wheels, rolling basket, SN JFH0042658; DMI ecolo-tiger 730B 7-shank disc ripper, hyd. fold, rear leveler w/ hyd. fold, hyd. adjust gangs, SN JFH0015557; DMI TigerMate II 38’ field cultivator, walking tandems on main frame & wings, gauge wheels, 5-bar spike tooth harrow, SN 920055; Brandt GrainBelt 15”x 45’ conveyor auger, Kohler self contained motor, SN 92896-10; Rhino SR15 15’ batwing mower, (6) laminated tires, 1000 PTO, front & rear chains, SN 10557; JD 709 7’ 3-pt. rotary mower, 540 PTO; Arps 8’ 3-pt. blade, 1 cylinder; JD F687 Z-Trak front deck lawn mower, 7-Iron 54” deck, SN TCF687X020106; JD GS2 2600 display; JD original GreenStar display; JD StarFire 3000 receiver; JD StarFire ITC receiver. AUCTIONEERS NOTE: Duane is retiring from farming and has rented his land. This will be a quick auction lasting less than two hours — don’t be late! Live internet bidding will be available on major items – visit our website for details. Lunch will be available. Not responsible for accidents, errors, or omissions. Everything sells As-Is. Announcements sale day take precedence.

DUANE BELL OWNER

AUCTION MANAGER:

MATT SULLIVAN (309) 221-7001

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND PHOTOS AVAILABLE ONLINE @:

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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

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ADVERTISE WITH US! IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT GREENE COUNTY - CARROLLTON ILLINOIS Wells Fargo Bank, NA Plaintiff, vs. 2016CH 11 Geri Ann Poncia; Richard Leo Poncia, AKA Richard L. Poncia Defendants. RR 3 Box 214, Carrollton, IL 62016 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on September 22, 2016, the Greene County Sheriff’s Office will on March 8, 2017, at the hour of 1:00PM at the Greene County Sheriff’s Office, Greene County Courthouse, 519 N. Main Street, Carrollton, IL 62016, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: Commonly known as RR 3 Box 214, Carrollton, IL 62016 Parcel Number(s): 02-83-23-8-1 The real estate is improved with a Single Family Residence.

the time of sale, a cashier’s or certified check for 10% of the successful bid amount. The balance of the successful bid shall be paid within 24 hours, by similar funds. The subject property is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. The property will NOT be open for inspection. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than the mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). For information call Plaintiff’s Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski LLC, One East Wacker, Suite 1250, Chicago, IL 60601. Phone number: 312-651-6700. Attorney file number: 16-008015. Zachariah L. Manchester MANLEY DEAS KOCHALSKI LLC Attorneys for Plaintiff One East Wacker, Suite 1250 Chicago, IL 60601 Telephone: 312-651-6700 Fax: 614-220-5613 Attorney. No.: 6303885 Email: MDKIllinoisFilings@manleydeas.com I713369

Sale terms: Bidders must present, at

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY, ILLINOIS WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, D/B/A CHRISTIANA TRUST, NOT INDIVIDUALLY BUT AS TRUSTEE FOR HILLDALE TRUST Plaintiff, -v.- 16 CH 22 BELINDA Y BOREN, GREG S BOREN, CAPITAL ONE BANK, USA NA Defendant NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on December 12, 2016, the Sheriff of Jersey County will at 8:30 AM on March 14, 2017, at the Jerseyville County Courthouse, 201 WEST PEARL STREET, (South Door), JERSEYVILLE, IL, 62052, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 17754 OTTERVILLE RD, Grafton, IL 62037

2.1.17, 2.8.17, 2.15.17

property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in AS IS condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1).

Property Index No. 0612300100 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment $104,093.31.

amount

was

Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; the balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated on residential real estate at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY - JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. PLAINTIFF Vs. 16 CH 00018 Adam Blankenship; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 11/30/2016, the Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois will on 3/22/17 at the hour of 8:15AM at Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 04-404-002-00 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: Snedeker Street Jerseyville, IL 62052

306

Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court.

IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff s attorney: MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C. , 134 N LaSalle St., STE 1900, Chicago, IL 60602, (312) 940-8580. Please refer to file number 16-01745. E-Mail: mlgil@mlgdefaultlaw.com 2.8.17, 2.15.17, 2.22.

F15070111 WELLS

The People’s Marketplace Classifieds

Ryan R. Culton aka Ryan Culton; Carrie B. Boyd aka Carrie Beth Boyd aka Carrie Beth Culton aka Carrie Boyd aka Carrie Culton; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendants.

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), AND 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE PURCHASER OF THE PROPERTY, OTHER THAN A MORTGAGEE, SHALL PAY THE ASSESSMENTS AND LEGAL FEES REQUIRED BY SUBSECTIONS (g)(1) AND (g)(4) OF SECTION 9 AND THE ASSESSMENTS AND COURT COSTS REQUIRED BY SUBSECTION (g-1) OF SECTION 18.5 OF THE ILLINOIS CONDOMINIUM PROPERTY ACT. Terms of Sale: CASH - 10% down at the time of sale and the balance due within 24 hours of the sale. All payments for the amount bid shall be in certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Pike County.

Property Address: 254 South Monroe Street, Pittsfield, Illinois 62363

The person to contact for information regarding this property is:

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PIKE COUNTY- PITTSFIELD, ILLINOIS Wells Fargo Bank, NA Plaintiff, vs. CASE NO. 15 CH 39

NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the above-entitled cause on January 6, 2017, I, Sheriff, Paul Petty of Pike County, Illinois, will hold a sale on March 31, 2017 , commencing at 9:15am, at the Pike County Courthouse, 100 East Washington Street, Pittsfield, IL 62363, to sell to the highest bidder or bidders the following described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, towit: Commonly known as: 254 South Monroe Street, Pittsfield, Illinois 62363 P.I.N.: 54-033-06; 54-033-01A First Lien Position; Single-Family Residence; Judgment Amount $235554.49 IN ACCORDANCE WITH 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) AND (H-2), 765

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS First Bank d/b/a First Bank Mortgage PLAINTIFF

This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ANSELMO LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 120 Naperville, IL 60563-4947 630-453-6960 | 866-402-8661 | 630-428-4620 (fax) Attorney No. Cook 58852, DuPage 293191, Kane 031-26104, Peoria 1794, Winnebago 3802, IL 03126232 foreclosure@ALOLawGroup.com THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR. R410 2.15.17, 2.22.17, 3.1.17

the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1).

Vs. 16 CH 00029 Jason A. Ingold; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 10/12/2016, the Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois will on 3/22/17 at the hour of 8:15AM at Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 01-250-306-00 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: Lake Drive Elsah, IL 62028

Sales Department at ANSELMO LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 West Diehl Road, Suite 120, Naperville, IL 60563 (866)402-8661. For bidding instructions, visit www.alolawgroup.com 24 hours prior to sale.

23342

Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court.

If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-16-06535. I714203

MADE YOU LOOK Advertise your ad in all six newspapers here! Call Nikki at 217-285-2345

or Jack at 618-498-1234

to advertise! IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY - JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS Federal National Mortgage Association PLAINTIFF

If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1).

Vs. 16 CH 00016 Donald A. Davis; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 11/30/2016, the Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois will on 3/22/17 at the hour of 8:15AM at Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 07-075-013-00 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: Teney Hollow Road Brighton, IL 62012

32893

Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court.

2.8.17, 2.15.17, 2.22.17

If the property is a condominium and If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-16-04632. I714195 2.8.17, 2.15.17, 2.22.17

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY - JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation PLAINTIFF Vs. 16 CH 00036 Emin Alimi; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 10/12/2016, the Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois will on 3/22/17 at the hour of 8:15AM at Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 04-211-024-52 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1203 Megan Street Jerseyville, IL 62052 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court.

the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4).

If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-11-24272. I714193 2.8.17, 2.15.17, 2.22.17

If the property is a condominium and If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/ expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-16-08385. I714208 2.8.17, 2.15.17, 2.22.17

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY - JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association PLAINTIFF Vs. 16 CH 00028 Matthew W. Campbell; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 9/14/2016, the Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois will on 3/22/17 at the hour of 8:15AM at Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 04-570-001-00 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 522 W. Spruce Street Jerseyville, IL 62052 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court.

If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/ expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-16-07606. I714205 2.8.17, 2.15.17, 2.22.17


REAL ESTATE

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Pike Press

B7

Pittsfield, Illinois

Town & Countr y Tour... Covering Real Estate in your area STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PIKE COUNTY

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM EDWARD COLLOM, Deceased. NO. 17 - P - 3 CLAIM NOTICE Notice is hereby given of the death of William Edward Collom, of Florence, Illinois. Letters of Office were issued on January 17, 2017, to William Davis, of 1999 Plum Street, Jacksonville, Illinois 63650, as Administrator with the Will Annexed, whose attorney is John D. Coonrod, 44 East Side Square, Winchester, Illinois 62694. Claims may be filed on or before August 2, 2017. Any claim not filed on or before that date is barred, except that the claim of a creditor who has been notified by mail or delivery of notice shall be barred on said date or three months from the date of such mailing or delivery, whichever is later. Claims may be filed in the Office of the Clerk of said Court at the Pike County Courthouse, Pittsfield, Illinois, or with a representative, or both. Dated this 26 day of January, 2017. th

William Davis, Administrator with the Will Annexed By: s/John D. Coonrod His attorney John D. Coonrod Administrator with the Will Annexed P.O. Box 197 Winchester, IL 62694 Telephone: (217) 742-3455 2.1.17, 2.8.17, 2.15.17

Feeling

TAKING OFFERS ON THE FOLLOWING: D 206SE. • 208 E. Quincy OLQuincy Beautiful 3 bedroom, bath withClay large utility room D home 300 • 301 Lopen O2Clay SHas and 1 car garage. floor plan and nice view. Desirable204 location close andPearl park! $85,000. College • 304 St. D to school L SO NEW LISTING: Great starter home or retirement home 204 Fairgrounds located on 2 lots at 605 Clinton St. in Pleasant Hill! Living room, dining room, kitchen, BR, utility room and bath. Cabin in2Belleview Fully furnished. Move right in! PRICES WILL NEVER BE LOWER! MUST SEE! Stately, older home located on 2 lots in Pleasant Hill! DownstairsTAKE featuresADVANTAGE foyer, formal living room, dining room OF formal THESE (or den), library, kitchen, 1 bedroom and 1 bath. Upstairs has 3 BR and bath. Beautiful woodwork. Detached 3 car garage. REMAINING HOUSES!

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STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF PIKE

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF NO. 2016-P-73 WALLACE B. RENOUD, DECEASED. NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION CLAIMS Notice is given of the death of WALLACE B. RENOUD, of Pittsfield, Pike County, Illinois. Letters of office were issued on January 30, 2017, to NORA M. RENOUD, 33396 210th Avenue, Pittsfield, Illinois, whose attorney is Rammelkamp Bradney, P.C., 232 West State Street, P.O. Box 550, Jacksonville, Illinois 62651. Claims against the Estate may be filed in the Office of the Clerk of the Court at Pike County Courthouse, Pittsfield, Illinois 62363, or with the representative, or both, within 6 months from the 8th day of February, 2017, being the date of first publication of this Notice and any claim not filed within that period is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the representative and to the attorney within 10 days after it has been filed. Dated this 31st day of January, 2017. NORA M. RENOUD, Executor of the Estate of WALLACE B. RENOUD, Deceased BY: RAMMELKAMP BRADNEY, P.C. Attorneys for Estate: Rammelkamp Bradney, P.C. Richard Freeman #6198969 232 West State Street; P. O. Box 550 Jacksonville, IL 62650 Telephone: (217) 245-6177 Email: rfreeman@rblawyers.net 2.8.17, 2.15.17, 2.22.17

Lynne Springer/Broker Cell: 217-430-3739 lspringer3739@gmail.com

Email: cappsrealestate@outlook.com

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PIKE COUNTY- PITTSFIELD, ILLINOIS Wells Fargo Bank, NA Plaintiff, vs. CASE NO. 15 CH 39 Ryan R. Culton aka Ryan Culton; Carrie B. Boyd aka Carrie Beth Boyd aka Carrie Beth Culton aka Carrie Boyd aka Carrie Culton; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendants.

SOLD SOLD

Commonly known as: 254 South Monroe Street, Pittsfield, Illinois 62363 P.I.N.: 54-033-06; 54-033-01A

Property Address: 254 South Monroe Street, Pittsfield, Illinois 62363

First Lien Position; Single-Family Residence; Judgment Amount $235554.49

NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE

IN ACCORDANCE WITH 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) AND (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), AND 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE PURCHASER OF THE PROPERTY, OTHER THAN A MORTGAGEE, SHALL PAY THE ASSESSMENTS AND LEGAL FEES REQUIRED BY SUBSECTIONS (g)(1) AND (g)(4) OF SECTION 9 AND THE ASSESSMENTS AND COURT COSTS REQUIRED BY SUBSECTION (g-1) OF SECTION 18.5 OF THE ILLINOIS CONDOMINIUM PROPERTY ACT. Terms of Sale: CASH - 10% down at the time of sale and the balance due within 24 hours of the sale. All payments for the amount bid shall be in certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Pike County.

Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the above-entitled cause on January 6, 2017, I, Sheriff, Paul Petty of Pike County, Illinois, will hold a sale on March 31, 2017 , commencing at 9:15am, at the Pike County Courthouse, 100 East Washington Street, Pittsfield, IL 62363, to sell to the highest bidder or bidders the following described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit: TRACT 1: THAT PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, OF TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST OF THE FOURTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, PIKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, DESCRIBED BY METES AND BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS: TAKING A POINT 160 FEET SOUTH OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF OUT LOT 26 OF THE ORIGINAL TOWN, NOW CITY OF PITTSFIELD, IN THE COUNTY OF PIKE AND STATE OF ILLINOIS FOR A PLACE OF BEGINNING, RUNNING THENCE WESTERLY ON A LINE PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH LINE OF SAID QUARTER SECTION 160 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 80 FEET, THENCE EAST 160 FEET, THENCE NORTH 80 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, SITUATED IN THE CITY OF PITTSFIELD, COUNTY OF PIKE, AND STATE OF ILLINOIS. TRACT 2: THE NORTH 20 FEET OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF REAL ESTATE, TO-WIT: THAT PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, OF TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH OF RANGE 4 WEST OF THE FOURTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, DESCRIBED BY METES AND BOUNDS

The person to contact for information regarding this property is: Sales Department at ANSELMO LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 West Diehl Road, Suite 120, Naperville, IL 60563 (866)402-8661. For bidding instructions, visit www.alolawgroup.com 24 hours prior to sale. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ANSELMO LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 120 Naperville, IL 60563-4947 630-453-6960 | 866-402-8661 | 630-428-4620 (fax) Attorney No. Cook 58852, DuPage 293191, Kane 031-26104, Peoria 1794, Winnebago 3802, IL 03126232 foreclosure@ALOLawGroup.com THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR. R410 2.15.17, 2.22.17, 3.1.17

Submit bid for yearly Monthly by 12 3 year contract 2.15.17

WANTED :

Supply Chain Routing Analyst Dot Foods is now hiring a Supply Chain Routing Analyst. Job Responsibilities:

• Routes, schedules, and coordinates the planning of customer deliveries, supplier pickups and custom haul loads. • Maintains service levels to customers and suppliers. • Maintain productivity standards on DTI Key Performance Indicators (i.e. cube, routing efficiency including maximizing driver hours, on-time, etc.) • Create loads that allow our driver supervisors to successfully plan company assets to achieve service levels and cost objectives. • Will work with internal and external customers/suppliers to increase delivery and pickup flexibility.

Job Requirements:

• Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent Dot Foods experience required. • Superior mathematical, analytical and problem solving skills are a must. • Training in statistical analysis necessary. • Excellent written and verbal communication skills.

Dot Foods is an equal opportunity employer.

Rick Barton

Robin Callihan

(217) 473-8303 Managing Broker

(217) 370-3451 Broker Associate

OFFICE: (217) 285-2400 103 N. Madison, Pittsfield, IL 62363 www.barton-homes.com EQUAL HOUSING EQUAL

AS FOLLOWS: TAKING A POINT 240 FEET SOUTH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF OUT LOT 26 OF THE ORIGINAL TOWN, NOW CITY OF PITTSFIELD, IN PIKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, FOR A PLACE OF BEGINNING, RUNNING THENCE SOUTH 160 FEET, THENCE EAST 160 FEET, THENCE NORTH 160 FEET, THENCE WEST 160 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF PIKE AND STATE OF ILLINOIS.

Thank you, Nina Crockett Secretary Nebo Cemetary Association February 6, 2017 217-473-6520

Follow Us On

LENDER

F15070111 WELLS

1. Clean up cemetary, remove all flowers & etc. from around grave site after April 1st before first mowing season. I will put in newspaper two weeks before February 15, February 22. 2. Take care of mowing (usually once a week) 3. Take care of weedeating around grave stones. 4. Clean both banks 3 times a year. 5. Fill in around graves when they need dirt. Send bids to Nina Crockett 209 W. Jefferson St. Pittsfield, Illinois 62363 to Nebo Cemetary Association. Bids must be submitted by March 1st, 2017. Submit name, address and phone number in bid. Board meets back on March 1st, 2017 to make a decision and you will be contacted after that. Last contract 7,500 year.

Hiring in Mt. Sterling, IL. Apply now at DotFoods.com/careers or call 800-366-3687.

205 E. Quincy St. Pleasant Hill, IL Judy Capps/Managing Broker Cell: 217-242-0001 Office: 217-734-2327

Yearly Bid for Three Year Period 2017

New Listing: 820 Cherry St., Quincy. 4 plex. Priced to sell. $36,900 327 Sycamore St., Pittsfield. Nice brick ranch with 3 bedrooms, attached garage, central air, and a full waterproofed basement. Too much to list but mover in ready. $129,900 229 4th Street, Rockport. Spacious 3 bedroom home with room to expand. Two full baths, formal dining area, full/partial finished basement, & attractive kitchen. Lots of room for a garden or place for the kids to play. (4 lots) Newer 32 x 27 open faced garage. Great price! $65,000 664 Grand Ave., Barry. 2-3 bedroom home with fenced in yard, garage. Priced to sell! $39,900 587 Davis St., Barry. Attractive two story home on corner lot. Nice kitchen, 3 bedroom, 2 baths, & more. Fenced yard & 24x24 garage. Call for a showing. $68,500 631 N. Jackson St., Pittsfield. Nice 3 bedroom 1.5 story home with fireplace in unique 2nd level. Central air, lots of kitchen cabinets. Dining room and garage. $64,500 420 N. Dutton St., Pittsfield. Lovely immaculate 2 bedroom cape cod. Features kitchen appliances and washer and dryer. Many updates. Central air, clean basement, and a large carport. $48,500 209 N. Union St. Griggsville. Spacious 3 bedroom ranch home on a nice lot. Many updates, central air and a 2 car garage. $69,000 205 S. Congress St., Perry. Split level ranch at the edge of town. Open floor plan and basement has extra bedroom and rec. room. $52,000 190 E. Farmers St., New Canton. Sharp 3 bedroom home with 2 bathrooms, covered porch and ready to move right in. $36,200 Building lot on N. Monroe, Pittsfield. $6,500 Edge of Summer Hill. Beautiful 2 bedroom home on SOLD nearly 2 acres. $97,900 Rural home on nearly 4 acres DING east of Pittsfield. PEN 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, fireplace and more $55,490 1260 HampshireSSt., Small lot. D OLQuincy. Rural Hamburg. Beautiful ranch home on approx. 5 SOLD central air, 2 car garage and acres. Full finished basement, more. $149,900 OLD 3 bedroom fixer upper price 404 W. Main St.,S Detroit. to sell. 625 Jefferson St., Quincy. SOLD 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch style home. Needs to TLC.

THANK YOU TO OUR CLIENTS FOR A SUCCESSFUL 2016. SALES HAVE BEEN STRONG AND WE NEED MORE LISTINGS TO MEET WITH BUYER DEMAND. CALL US FOR A FREE MARKET ANALYSIS OF YOUR HOME

#ChooseBlue


B8

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Pike Press

What’s the right age for parents to get their kids a cell phone? By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press Everybody has a cell phone and few people have residential landlines. So how to keep in touch with your children when they are out of sight, visiting with friends, participating in social or extra-curricular events? “We are seeing most children get cellphones between 10-12,” Sami Baker, store manager at AT&T in Pittsfield. “Parents are letting kids stay home alone at a younger age and a form of communication is needed.” Baker said there is no exact age for being ready for a cell phone. “It’s up to the parents and whether or not they think their child is responsible enough,” Baker said. Age isn’t as important a kid’s maturity level, ability to follow home (and their schools’) rules, and their sense of responsibility. Baker said there are options available to parents who need to give their child a form of communication. “AT&T doesn’t sell them but a SmartWatch for a child is an option,” Baker said.”We are seeing more and more of those especially for younger children, say 6-8.” Baker said the Smart Watch can be added to a customers AT&T plan just like a new phone. Smartwatches vary in what they can do. Some allow only five or so designated numbers that can be called and from which calls

can be accepted. Some have GPS tracking units, others give parents the power to set boundaries and will send notifications if the child leaves the area. Smartwatches vary in cost with some as low as $80 and other upwards of $300 depending on whether you want a functional phone and what options are needed. Most are dust proof and some are moisture proof, but not water proof, meaning they will take a splash or sweat but not submersion. They come in a variety of colors But no cool, savy, tween or teen wants a purple smartwatch, so by those ages, a cell phone is a constant demand and in some cases a necessity. Parents need to remember when they hand a child a cell phone, that child is receiving a powerful communication and media-production tools. They can create text, images, and videos that can be widely distributed and uploaded to websites instantly. Parents really need to consider whether their kids are ready to use their phones responsibly and respectfully. If you think your kids’ technological savvy is greater than their ability to use it wisely, pay attention to the gap. You may need to say, “No, not yet.” But Here are some questions to consider: Do your kids show a sense of responsibility, such as letting you know when they leave the house? Do

File photo

they show up when they say they will? Do your kids tend to lose things, such as backpacks or homework folders? If so, expect they might lose an (expensive!) phone, too. Do your kids need to be in touch for safety reasons? Would having easy access to friends benefit them for social reasons? Do you think they’ll use

Create kid-friendly spaces at home Maintaining a home that is welcoming and kid-friendly can be challenging. Kids are full of energy and oftentimes put fun ahead of tidiness. But no matter how energetic their youngsters are, parents can still employ several strategies to ensure their homes are both sophisticated and child-friendly. n Consider an open floor plan. Rooms that flow into one another make it easier to keep tabs on children. Such rooms also allow residents and guests to mingle in separate rooms but not be too far away from one another. n Choose washable fabrics. Upholstery will need to stand up to the abuse kids can dish out. Sofas and chairs with slipcovers can be advantageous because many slipcovers can be easily removed and laundered. Patterned fabrics will

hide some stains, while treated fabrics may resist liquid spills for easier cleanup. n Create a catch-all spot. Special bins or other organizational tools in the entryway can help to cull clutter when children come in the house from school or play. Be sure the keep cubbies, containers and coat hooks at a childfriendly height. n Look for high-traffic rugs. Rugs designed for high-traffic areas will be more forgiving when children march across them several times per day. There are no rules that say you can't bring an outdoor rug inside, and these rugs tend to be easier to clean. n Ensure there is plenty of seating. Sectionals give children ample room to spread out. And ample seating ensures there is enough room for kids to invite their friends over to

hang out. n Think outside pink and blue. For children's rooms, make sure they're colorful, but consider other hues to give the rooms some personality. Focus on a hobby or activity and borrow the color scheme from the accessories used for decorating. n Hang whimsical artwork. Employ framing and lighting to make kids' artwork look like professional pieces. Routinely change the pictures when a new look is desired. n Designate a place for play. Devote an entire room or a nook in a house for imaginative play. Store toys here so these items will not create clutter in individual bedrooms. Creating child-friendly spaces while ensuring a home maintains a sophisticated feel is easier than parents might think.

SPECIAL

Pittsfield, Illinois

cell phones responsibly -for example, not texting during class or disturbing others with their phone conversations? Can they adhere to limits you set for minutes talked and apps downloaded? Will they use text, photo, and video functions responsibly and not to embarrass or harass others?

How first-time parents can cope with colic First-time parents face many challenges upon bringing their new babies home. One of the more frustrating challenges new parents may face is colic, a confusing condition that can be uncomfortable for both parents and their babies. What is colic? According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, roughly 20 percent of all babies will develop colic, a condition in which children may cry inconsolably, scream, extend or pull up their legs, and pass gas. When a baby develops colic, the causes of which are unknown, his or her stomach may be enlarged or distended with gas. What are the symptoms of colic? Babies tend to be finicky, so those that are fussy are not necessarily dealing with colic. But when healthy babies who are well-fed experience the following symptoms, colic might be the culprit. n Predictable periods of fussiness: Babies who have fussy periods each day during similar time frames may be experiencing colic. The AAP notes that these periods of fussiness are particularly common among babies with colic between the hours of 6 p.m. and midnight. n Intense or inconsolable crying: The Mayo Clinic says babies with colic may experience intense, highpitched crying that sounds distressed. During these

bouts of crying, babies' faces may be flushed, and it may be nearly impossible for parents to console their babies. n Changes in posture: During a colic episode, babies' legs may curl up and they may clench their fists. Abdominal muscles also may tighten during colic episodes. When does colic begin? Babies with colic will typically begin to exhibit symptoms within a few weeks of being born. While the condition is frustrating for parents and babies, colic often improves by three months of age. How to handle a baby with colic The AAP recommends that parents who suspect their baby has colic first consult their pediatricians to confirm that the baby's crying is not linked to a serious medical condition. Once something more serious has been ruled out, parents can discuss multiple topics with their pediatricians: n Nursing: Mothers who are nursing may try eliminating potentially irritating products, such as caffeine, onions and cabbage, from their diets. n Formula: The AAP suggests parents discuss protein hydrolysate formulas with their pediatricians if food sensitivity is causing the discomfort. More information about colic is available at www. healthychildren.org.


News

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Brothers earn Eagle Scout Award Zachary P. Maulding, and Kaleb S. Maulding, Plainfield, have both achieved Boy Scouting’s highest rank advancement of Eagle Scout. Zachary, a sophomore at Plainfield South High School, and Kaleb, an eighthgrade student at Drauden Point Middle School, are the sons of Shaun and Karen Maulding of Plainfield, and are the grandchildren of Phillip Maulding of Sugar Grove, John and Ricky Shick of Yorkville, Clifford and Kathy Wainman of Pittsfield, and Bob and Jean Sleight of Griggsville. The brothers have each been active in scouting since first grade. Throughout their scouting careers they have been members of Pack 85,

state’s hiring board features more than 100,000 help-wanted ads. Job seekers can build multiple resumes to emphasize different skills and experiences. Business owners can use keyword matching technology to search resumes and find the best candidate. Illinoisjoblink.com is free for workers and employers. It compares favorably to private efforts that cost hundreds of dollars. For more information please feel free to contact Brenda Middendorf, PCEDC, 217-440-5101 or Bob Gough, Public Information Officer, IDES, Springfield, 217-685-4454.

t to get the w Wan ord out about y

Keep up on hometown news - buy a subscription today!

our business?

Pike County Real Estate Richard Smith John Borrowman Chris Nichols Tere Boes Barb Goertz

GRAIN BIN SUPPLY COMPANY, LLC “The Grain Bin People”

217.473.3286 217.430.0645 217.473.3777 217.491.2267 217.257.7865

Elaine Smith Todd Smith Chris Little Scott Andress Robert Evans

Sold

nding

e Sale P

Price

d

e Reduc

VANDALIA 573-594-2167 107 N. Union Griggsville $33,900

215 S. Church New Canton $49,000

515 E. Bridge St. Nebo $59,000

isting

516 Lawrence St. Barry $60,000

107 N. Rodgers St. Bluffs $59,500

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ist New L

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331 S. 2nd Florence $65,000

328 Crossman Lane Pittsfield $69,000

407 Water St. Hamburg $70,000

205 Washington Hamburg $85,000

419 N. Jackson Pittsfield $92,500

isting ending Sale P New L

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 5 & 6 INCH AVAILABLE • Leaf Guards • Free Estimates • Repairs • Fully Insured

STA-BILT ENTERPRISES

201 N. Union St. Griggsville $76,000

36282 400th Lane Perry $78,000

ending Sale P

Sold

sta_biltgutters@yahoo.com

Call Jeff Wallis (217) 473-1491

COMPLETE FARM MANAGEMENT n Bobcat & Excavator Services n No-Till pasture renovation/Food Plots

711 S. Memorial Pittsfield $96,500

48186 166th Ave. Pearl $99,000

1192 Rodgers St. Barry $114,000

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3A Dove Lane Pittsfield $142,000

n Install roads, trails, culverts

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402 E. Walnut St. Griggsville $155,000

3 Pheasant Lane Pittsfield $199,000

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n Fence-row clean-up and removal

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326 S. Jackson Pittsfield $136,000

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#14 Hope Ave. Pittsfield $219,00

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n Brush cutting/clearing & mowing

CALL

RYAN BLAND

618-550-9406

217.473.3288 217.285.4720 217.653.3697 217.371.0635 217.491.2391

Rodney Borrowman Nikki Fish Cyndi Borrowman

630-247-0667 217-371-2858 217-779-1861

Gallery of Homes

Grain Bins • Legs • Dryers Motor Repair • Millwright • On-Farm Service

grainbinsupply.com

Pike County 40 acres +/- New Salem TWP. Nice hunting property with big timber, creek and 7 acres CRP. PRICE REDUCED - Pike County 15 acres +/- Montezuma TWP. Awesome hunting farm with spring fed creek and 2BR cabin. SALE PENDING - Pike County 80 acres +/- Derry TWP. Great hunting farm with CRP income. In cooperation with Whitetail Properties. SALE PENDING - NEW LISTING-Brown County 159 acres +/- Versailles TWP. Nice farm that runs along McKee Creek with 123 acres tillable. SALE PENDING - Pike County 117.83 acres +/- Hadley TWP. Nice investment farm with 110 acres tillable. SOLD - Pike County 94 acres +/- Pleasant Vale TWP. Great hunting and recreational property with 2BR ranch home. In cooperation with Whitetail Properties. SOLD - Pike County 93 acres +/- Pittsfield TWP. Nice hunting farm with 60 acres tillable. SOLD - Adams and Pike County 400.77 acres +/-. Great investment opportunity with over 70% tillable. SOLD - Pike County 93.03 acres +/- Pleasant Vale TWP. Great hunting farm that has been in the same family for over a century! SOLD - Pike County 120 acres +/- Hadley TWP. Fantastic 120 acre investment farm with 114 tillable acres with the remaining 6 acres in timber. SOLD - Pike County 315 acres +/- Pleasant Hill TWP. Beautiful recreational farm with 185 tillable acres and 2 ponds.

NEW LISTING - Calhoun County 75 acres +/- Crater TWP. Nice recreational farm with 35 acres tillable and 38 acres timber with beautiful 3BR home with 2 car attached garage. Adams County 10 acres +/- Richfield TWP. Located minutes from Barry on blacktop. Would make a great building site.PRICE REDUCED - Calhoun County 390 acres +/- Hardin TWP. Huge hunting farm with 70 acres tillable, secluded on dead end road with older home and outbuildings. Calhoun County 310 acres +/- Hardin TWP. Huge hunting farm with 55 acres tillable and the balance in timber located at the end of a dead end road. Calhoun County 80 acres +/- Hardin TWP. Excellent hunting farm with 15 acres tillable. PRICE REDUCED - Pike County 166 acres +/- Spring Creek TWP. Big timber hunting farm with 3BR ranch home. Pike County 162 acres +/- Montezuma TWP. Beautiful investment farm with excellent tillable dirt, awesome deer hunting, and an older farmhouse and barn. Pike County 135 acres +/- Pleasant Vale TWP. Awesome hunting property with 35 acres tillable in secluded location. Pike County 113 acres +/- Pleasant Hill TWP. 3BR 2BA house sitting on 7 acre lake with great hunting and nice mix of timber, tillable and CRP. PRICE REDUCED - Pike County 54.93 acres +/- New Salem TWP. Secluded hunting farm located at the end of a dead end road surrounded by big timber with a major creek.

Call Nikki at 217.285.2345 to advertise with us

CAIRO 660-263-6700

B9

Pittsfield, Illinois

Pack 13, and Troop 13. In addition to holding necessary leadership positions and fulfilling merit badge requirements, a service project benefiting the community is required for the rank of Eagle. Zachary fundraised and lead the construction of a limestone path for volunteers walking dogs at the Will County Humane Society, and Kaleb’s project was improving on existing structures and the building of an additional activities platform for the Little Sprouts Early Learning program located at the Pilcher Park Nature Center in Joliet. A Court of Honor will be held to March 12 to present them with their awards.

Are you looking for a career? Pike County Economic Development Corporation and the Illinois Department of Employment Security will be hosting a resume and job seeker workshop, Wednesday, Feb. 22, from 2 - 4 p.m. at Pike County Farm Bureau, 1301 E Washington, Pittsfield. This workshop will focus on creating and fine-tuning resumes and will also discuss networking, applications, interviewing and other important job seeking skills. Participants will also learn how to use Illinoisjoblink. com. Illinois businesses are hiring and they are looking for workers on Illinoisjoblink.com The

Pike Press

1211 Rodgers St. Barry $234,000

16777 340th St. Pleasant Hill $225,000

10 Teal Lane Pittsfield $259,000

R.R. 1, Box 131A Kampsville $499,000

Barry - 1260 Mason - 3BR 1BA home with new flooring that is move-in ready. Would make a good first home or rental. $40’s. PRICE REDUCED - Barry - 23841 295th Ave. - 4BR 2 story home with nice 4 season room sitting on 1 acre. $100’s. PRICE REDUCED - Barry - 1201 Rodgers St. - 2BR 1BA home with 1.5 car attached garage sitting on a large lot with a beautiful yard in a great location. Motivated Seller!! $100’s. PRICE REDUCED - Baylis - 210 S. Main - 4BR home with detached 1car garage sitting on 2 lots. Home needs some TLC and is sold “as is.” $9,000. Griggsville - 301 N. Union - 3 unit apartment building earning significant income. Great investment opportunity! $70’s. PRICE REDUCED - Milton - 248 Tucker St.-Excellent property for a large family or to use as a hunting lodge, bed and breakfast, etc. Highly Motivated Seller!! $100’s. Nebo - 13192 Co. Hwy. 7 - Nice 3BR 2BA home with new heating and cooling on 1.5 lots. $60’s. Pittsfield - 10 Douglas Dr. - A must see 6 yr. old. ranch home with up to 6 bedrooms, full finished basement with walk-out, and beautiful in-ground pool, all sitting on 4.5 acres. $300’s. Pittsfield - 2 Quail Ridge Dr. - Beautiful 4 bedroom, 3 bath home sitting on 2 lots in one of Pittsfield’s finest locations. $200’s. Pittsfield - #3 Hope Ave. - Very nice maintenance free 2BR duplex that is handicapped accessible close to town. $100’s. Pittsfield - 521 N. Dutton - Large 5BR, 2BA two story home with a family room in the lower level/basement that opens out to the back yard! $60’s. PRICE REDUCED - Pittsfield - 218 W. North St. - 2BR 1BA home with nice fenced in yard and 1 car attached garage. Priced to sell!!! $40’s. Pittsfield - 2.5 acres platted as 3 wooded residential building lots near Petty Place. Buy 1 or all 3. Call our office for more details! PRICE REDUCED - Pittsfield - 180 Washington Ct. - Nice 2BR home with 1 car detached garage on quiet street. Would make a great rental or starter home. $50’s. Pittsfield - Corner of N. Orchard and Oklahoma - 4 mobile home lots, three of which are rented. Call office for details! Pittsfield - 510 W. Adams - Great building lot to build your dream home on! Pittsfield - 220 W. Jefferson - Great building lot close to downtown Pittsfield. Pittsfield - 830 N. Orchard - Nice home building site that consists of 2 80’ x 160’ lots. Pleasant Hill - Deer Ridge Estates - Large building lot with City sewer and water available. Pleasant Hill - 204 Fairgounds Rd. - Totally remodeled 2BR home with 1 car attached garage. Like new!! $40’s. Pleasant Hill - 13290 Hwy. 96 - Nice 3BR home with 2 car attached garage and detached garage with workshop on the edge of town with many updates. $60’s. Pleasant Hill - 15463 383rd St. - 5BR 2BA home sitting on approximately 20 acres with a 3 car detached garage and an additional large 3 bay machine shed. $200’s. SALE PENDING - New Salem - 500 Griggsville Rd. - 2 BR 1BA home sitting in a quiet location right on the very edge of town. In cooperation with DeSollar & Wessler Bros., LLC. SALE PENDING - Pleasant Hill - 102 5th St. - Nice 3BR 1BA ranch home with 1 car attached garage on corner lot. SALE PENDING - PRICE REDUCED - Pittsfield - 617 S. Memorial-Beautiful 3BR 2BA ranch home totally updated with full basement sitting on 2 lots. $100’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 536 N. Memorial - Affordable 3BR 1.5 BA home with updated high efficiency heating and cooling. $80’s. SALE PENDING - Barry - 130 Bainbridge - Completely remodeled 3BR 1BA home with almost everything new! Great starter home with no updates required!! Cheaper than rent! $50’s. SALE PENDING - PRICE REDUCED - Griggsville - 215 N. Union St.-Large 4BR 2BA house with many updates. Would make a great family home. $70’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 3BR 3BA manufactured home in nice country setting. SOLD-Hamburg - Nice modern brick 3BR home. SOLD - Pittsfield - Nice 3BR home with outbuildings in rural setting.

www.pikecorealestate.com

• (217) 285-5800


B10

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Pike Press

Renovate!

Pittsfield, Illinois

Invest your income tax refund in a new look!

Matt& &Jerrod Jerrod Matt

Refund Refund

SALE STARTS TAX REFUND SELLOFFS TAX REFUND TODAY!

Renovate! Renovate!

Invest your income tax refund Investinyour a newincome look! tax refund

in a new look!

“We personally promise to make it worth your time to “Weduring personally promise to make it worth shop this sale!” shop during this sale!” – Matt and Jerrod Capps

–have Matt and Jerrod Capps The names you come to Jersyville Jersyville Carpet & Furniture trust from us: Carpet & Furniture Flexsteel, La-Z-Boy, Mohawk, TAX REFUND TAX REFUND SELLOFF Karastan, Simmons, and Selec SELLOFF Spring Air, just to name a few.you’v Select from Name brands you’ve trusted for years...

King Mattress Set Spring Air Allure

LA-Z-BOY • FLEXSTEEL • SIMMONS MOHAWK FLOORING & MANY MORE!

Pillow Top #413

SALE STARTS $1,199.Free00measure and estimates on all flooring SALE STARTS $ 00 TODAY! $ 001,199. 599. The names you have come to TODAY! $ your time00 “We personally promise to make it worth toFiNANciNg! 0% trust from us: 599. “We personally promise to to make it worth your time to The names you have come during shop duringthis thissale!” sale!” Flexsteel, La-Z-Boy,shop Mohawk, 0% trust from us: ––Matt and Jerrod Capps BE SMART, BUY NOW! Matt and Jerrod Capps Karastan, Simmons, and King Mattress Set Spring Air Allure

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Everything you need SpEcIAL SALE TERMS Recliners, Desks, E

*Also available in Twin, Full, and Queen sizes.

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Flexsteel, La-Z-Boy, Mohawk, Spring Air, just to name a few. Jersyville Jersyville Karastan, Simmons, and 9 AM - 5 pM | SUNDAy : 11 AM - 2 pM MONDAy - FRiDAy : 9 AM - 7 pM | SATURDAy: Carpet & Furniture Carpet & Furniture Spring Air, to name a few. Free measure andjust estimates on all flooring, professional installation available.

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King King Mattress MattressSet Set Spring SpringAir Air Allure Allure

Pillow Pillow Top Top #413 #413

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The names you have come to *Also available ininTwin, *Alsofrom availableus: Twin,Full, Full,and andQueen Queensizes. sizes. trust Flexsteel, La-Z-Boy, Mohawk, Karastan, Simmons, and Spring Air, just to name a few.

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Jersyville Carpet & Furniture

TAX REFUND SELLOFF King Mattress Set Spring Air Allure

Select from Name brands you’ve trusted for years... LA-Z-BOY • FLEXSTEEL • SIMMONS MOHAWK FLOORING & MANY MORE!

Pillow Top #413

Everything youyou need to furnish youryour home: Living Room Sets,Sets, Tables, Everything need to furnish home: Living Room Tables, Recliners, Desks, Entertainment Units, Bedrooms, Dining Room $Recliners, 00 Desks, Entertainment Units, Bedrooms, Dining Room Accessories, Mattresses & Box Springs. Accessories, Mattresses & Box Springs. YouYou justjust can’t beat the selection of savings! can’t beat the selection of savings!

1,199.

SpEcIAL SALE TERMS 599.

$SpEcIAL 00 SALE TERMS

Everything you need to furnish your home: Living Room Sets, Tables, Recliners, Desks, Entertainment Units, Bedrooms, Dining Room Accessories, Mattresses & Box Springs. You just can’t beat the selection of savings!

SpEcIAL SALE TERMS 0% FiNANciNg! 0% FiNANciNg! 0% FiNANciNg! To qualified buyers

*Also available in Twin, Full, and Queen sizes.

To qualified buyers To qualified buyers

BE SMART, SMART, BUY BUYNOW! NOW! BE SMART, BUY NOW!

MONDAy - FRiDAy : 9 AM - 7 pM | SATURDAy: 9 AM - 5 pM | SUNDAy : 11 AM - 2 pM

Free measure and estimates on all flooring, professional installation available.


PP 2.15.17