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INSIDE NEWS

Wendell promoted to Eagle Scout. See page C7

FRIENDS & NEIGHBORS

Anna's 5th birthday. See page C2

NEWS

Easter egg prize winners at Willow Rose. See page C2

SPORTS

Panthers keeping close with MVC foes. See page C8

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APRIL 23, 2014

JOURNAL VOL. 12, NO. 17 - 75¢

Jersey approves agreements for transportation, special ed. By BOB CROSSEN Jersey County Journal The Jersey Community Unit School District 100 Board approved intergovernmental agreements for transportation and special education with nearby school districts during a regular meeting April 16. Southwestern Community Unit School District 9 will pay District 100 for special education services per pupil in the amount of $16,000. The cost per pupil is intended to pay for the transportation of the students, as well as the instruction they receive. Jersey CUSD Superintendent Lori Hopkins said District 100 has one of the best special edu-

cation programs in the area, adding the agreement is in the best interest of the students. “They had a need for special education services and we just happen to have some of the best programs when it comes to teaching students with autism,” Hopkins said. Board Member Bill Yamnitz questioned how the agreement would affect District 100’s test scores if they are to be taught in the Jersey district. Curriculum Director Alan Churchman said the special education students take a test based on their individualized education program. Some students take specialized tests for their level of understanding while others take those standardized for all students. Technology Director Keith Norman said

the students from Southwestern will still have Southwestern denoted as their home school. The test scores reflect on the home school, he said, so District 100 would not see an impact – either positive or negative – from the students’ instruction at Jersey CUSD. Additionally, the board approved an intergovernmental agreement with Roxana Community Unit School District 1 and Calhoun Community Unit School District 40 for transportation. Each school has one student who either needs transport to the Illinois School for the Deaf in Jacksonville or Eastwood Elementary in East Alton. Corey Breden, transportation director, said the nearby schools agreed to transport the student to District 100’s bus depot.

Coalition hosting forum on teen alcohol, drug prevention May 1 By ROBERT LYONS Jersey County Journal As prom and graduation inch near, a panel of community leaders are getting together to discuss the issue of teenage alcohol and drug usage. On May 1, a town hall meeting will be held in Jersey Community High School’s auditorium, focusing on how to prevent underage drinking. Two members taking part in the meeting, including DARE Officer Sgt. Scott Woelfel, will talk about the link between drugs and alcohol. “I think that anytime you’re providing information to the community to help curtail drug abuse amongst teenagers, you’re effectively attacking a very dark place in our kids’ lives that they sometimes need assistance and guidance on,” Woelfel said. Woelfel said he looks forward to being on the discussion panel, which also includes State’s Attorney Ben Goetten, pharmacist Randy Newberry, WellSpring Resources’ Janette Heath and Jersey County Against Drugs Coalition chairperson Jen Rogers. Jersey Community School District Superintendent Lori Hopkins is the moderator. Other topics to be addressed include the correlation between underage drinking and prescription drug overdose, effects of alcohol on school performance, mental health problems stemming from alcohol use and Illinois laws regarding underage drinking. “One of the big things we’re going to be talking about is hosting after-

prom or after-graduation parties, and just the fact that it’s illegal for adults to serve alcohol to minors,” Rogers said. “I think a lot of people in Jerseyville know that kids drink, and have the mindset that they’re going to do it anyway.” Rogers said some parents assume allowing their teenagers to consume alcohol in the home setting is safer

“I’ve seen firsthand what it can do to a family. So, I want to help spread the message.”

Jen Rogers Chairperson, Jersey County Against Drugs Coalition than the teens going out to drink. Many adults also have the mentality that drinking was common when they were teenagers, so it’s not a big deal, she said. Though alcohol and drug use among teens is problematic all year long, it becomes more of an issue as the end of the school year approaches. Rogers said with all the stresses of high school nearing their end, even students who do not typically consume drugs or alcohol are more prone to doing so. The town hall meeting is a platform to educate parents and raise awareness among teens, Rogers said. She added a major problem, howev-

er, is that many parents are too naive and don’t believe their child would use harmful substances. “I’m leading the meeting because I’m the chairperson of Jersey County Against Drugs, but I’m also there because I have a stepchild who has went through all of this.” Rogers said. “I’ve seen firsthand what it can do to a family. So, I want to help spread the message.” Woelfel said he plans to present information on the growing role of social media in children’s lives and how that influences their decision making. “Our kids are running in a technology savvy, very modern society that some of us didn’t deal with at a younger age,” Woelfel said. “Some of the topics that I’ll address will be geared toward that when it comes to drinking and social media.” The discussion at JCHS is part of a national effort through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), which has helped provide funding for the event. Rogers said the meeting will provide parents tools they need to be effective in their child’s life. “I think our message to parents is to stay connected to their kids; know who they’re with, know where they’re going to be and stay up at night until they get home.” The town hall meeting is free and open to the public. It will begin at 7 p.m. For more information, contact Rogers at 618-498-3500 or Lynn Welling at the Health Department at 618-498-9565.

REACHING

Robert Lyons/Jersey County Journal

COUNTY

Treasurer clears the air on financial records Recycling program By BOB CROSSEN Jersey County Journal Grafton’s treasurer Joyce Harmon answered a series of questions Tuesday night submitted to her by Alderman Jerry Bauersachs during the city’s previous meeting.

During a regular meeting March 25, Bauersachs led an onslaught of questions directed at Harmon regarding discrepancies in the financial records of the city. In response to those questions, Harmon requested any alderman submit in writing their inquiries regarding book-

keeping during a regular meeting April 8. A number of the questions posed dealt with the business loan from the state to American Heartland Fish Products, a fish processing plant located on Illinois Route 3. Grafton does not have full control over all

the money to be issued to the plant – a total of $550,000 – but rather is a flow-through entity for that cash. The state sends a check for an agreed upon amount with AHFP to the city of Grafton, which then administers that money to the fish plant. (See, grAfton, A2)

1) Council condemns six vacant city properties 2) JCUSD students excel, despite funding crisis 3) House putting IHSA under microscope 4) Take back event aids in battle against drugs 5) Panthers bounce back after streak gets snapped

INDEX Court. . . . . . . . . . . . . D1 News . . . . . . . . . . A2,A3,C2 Obituaries . . . . . . . . B4 Editorial . . . . . . . . . . A4 Our Town . . . . . . . . . B3 Public Notice . . . . . . D1 Sports. . . . . . . . . . .C7,8 OBITUARIES:

FREEMAN, MARSHALL, MONTGOMERY, SPENCER, WATSON.

jerseycountyjournal .com Robert Lyons/Jersey County Journal

© 2014 JOURNAL

All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

FOR THE TOP

Jersey Community High School student Dylan Wilfong ascends a rock wall Wednesday morning during a U.S. Army community event at the high school. Students were also given an opportunity to drive pedal powered go karts around the track at JCHS.

Week of April 16-22

JERSEY COUNTY

From there, the students will get on their respective buses and be ferried to school for the day before coming back to Jerseyville where the pupils will be picked up by their home districts. Breden said the district already sends some of its own students to each school, so there is no added expense, rather the districts will pay $104 per day for a student transported to ISD and $50 per day for a student transported to Eastwood Elementary. Breden said he is continually looking for additional ways to improve efficiency in transportation of students for the district to save money or make money. He said he is looking at transportation within a mile-and-a-half of the schools (See, diStrict 100, A2)

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HOPPING GOOD TIME

Robert Roentz, 3, jumps in a bounce house Friday morning during the Willow Rose Easter celebration. The nursing and rehabilitation center's annual event featured an Easter egg hunt with 5,000 eggs. C

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looks toward expansion By BOB CROSSEN Jersey County Journal Despite having been limited to six hours on Tuesdays, the recycling program offered at the Jersey County Highway Department building has found a semblance of sustainability. Now, more opportunities for recycling are being made available. Donna Moore, environmental committee chair for the Jersey County Board, said the county is getting continued help from Robert “Bob” Sanders Waste Management for the program. The Alton-based waste management company supplies and picks up a Dumpster filled with recyclables every week at no cost to the county. Moore said the county board is happy to see the program so successful. “We’re thrilled to death,” Moore said. “They are filling it up every week in one day, so it’s going well. I just wish we could do a little more, but right now if we can extend those hours and make that better, that’ll be a big plus.” She said the popularity of the program, as well as requests from those who work during the recycling hours, has led the county to expand its recycling hours to include Saturdays. Starting May 3, Moore said those interested in recycling can drop off their recyclables from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Saturdays, as well. Last spring, the recycling program struggled to find sustainability. The county entered into an agreement with Mars Paper and Plastic, which ran the program for approximately six months before it could not

be sustained. The recycling company ended its agreement with the

“We’re thrilled to death. They are filling it up every week in one day, so it’s going well. I just wish we could do a little more, but right now if we can extend those hours and make that better, that’ll be a big plus.”

Donna Moore Environmental committee chair, Jersey County Board

county, resulting in the limited recycling hours at the county’s highway department. Moore said the county intends to keep the program running as long as the volume of recyclables can sustain the costs of the program. She said there is even an event in the works for recycling of electronics scheduled for May 17. “We intended to do it last year and didn’t get it done,” Moore said. “If it goes well, we’ll see what we can do in the fall.” She said the recycling event would be located on the corner of Washington Street and Spruce Street in a vacant lot owned by the county.


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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

NEWS

Jerseyville, Illinois

Take back event aids in battle against drugs By RoBeRt Lyons Jersey County Journal Spring cleaning can include getting rid of old medicine. The Jerseyville Police Department, Jersey County Against Drugs Coalition and Walgreens are hosting a drug take back event Saturday. “This is a good time to clean out the cabinet and old medication,” Jerseyville Police Chief Brad Blackorby said. Residents can take medicines which have expired or that they no longer need to Walgreens in Jerseyville between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. on the day of the event, and the medicines will be disposed of by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). “Anything but needles. We can’t accept syringes of any kind,” Jen Rogers, Jersey County Against Drugs Coalition member, said. “Any other controlled, non-controlled and over-the-counter substance can be disposed.” Rogers said the potential abuse of prescription drugs laying around the house makes this weekend’s event important in the battle against drugs in the community. “Behind marijuana, prescription drugs are the No. 1 most abused thing in America,” she said. “To me that’s a huge problem.” Abuse of prescription medicines can be especially dangerous among youth who do not understand what they are taking, Rogers said. “A lot of kids take it because they think if it can be bought or prescribed from a doctor it must be safer,”

Rogers said. “It’s easy to get. They’re going through parents’ or grandparents’ medicine cabinets to get it. So, they think it’s not that dangerous, and, of course, it is.” Medications can be in their original containers or removed from the container and directly disposed of into the disposal box. Liquids such as cough syrup should remain in their original container and be tightly sealed. Last year, five large tubs were filled with medications dropped off by residents. Rogers is hoping for a similar turnout this year. She said a police officer will be present during the take back event, but said the officer should not deter anyone from getting rid of drugs, even if they haven’t been prescribed to the person dropping them off. “It’s no questions asked,” Rogers said. “The officer never touches the medicine, they are just basically there to guard it, so no one else steals it. The people themselves put it in the container.” Blackorby said there are simply too many risks in having old medicine sitting around, and that his department collects and disposes of unneeded substances throughout the year. “If someone can’t make it for some reason, just contact us and we can come pick it up,” Blackorby said, noting illicit drugs can also be brought to the police department for disposal. “Any way we can get them off the street, we’ll do it.” After being collected, the drugs will be incinerated by the DEA.

‘Popeye’ Kallal 5k run Saturday By BoB CRossen Jersey County Journal Registration is still open for the seventh annual Spring Organ-Tissue Donation Awareness (SODA) run in Jerseyville held April 26 in remembrance of Mike “Popeye” Kallal. Mike Kallal was the victim of a car accident that took his life in the fall of 2004 when he was 44 years old. The family made the choice to donate his organs, and as a result two people internationally can now see due to the donation of his corneas. Those interested in registering for the race may do so up to the day of the run. There is also a walk for those who feel the run would be too difficult. Runners can register by visiting the JCH Wellness Center for a form or by emailing kallal@ sodarace.org. The cost to enter the race is $20 and all proceeds will go to Mid America Transplant Services.

Patty Kallal, Mike’s widow, said the organ donation became a source of pride for the family. The donation helped her and her children through the grief of losing Mike. “At first it helped a lot. We knew that the one good thing that came out of it was that Mike was able to be a donor. His eyes were the only thing that could be donated because of his injuries,” Kallal said. “Two people that had lost their sight can now see.” One year prior to Mike’s death, Mike ran his first 5K with one of his daughters through the Wellness Center. She said everybody in the family has participated in runs or walks, as well, and felt hosting one in Mike’s honor would be a good way to remember him and promote the importance of organ and tissue donation. Kallal said such donations affect nearly every person in some way, noting that there are even members

of the community in Jersey County who have been positively affected by organ and tissue donations. “It touches everybody. It doesn’t discriminate,” Kallal said. “It touches all our lives in many ways. … We’ve met a lot of amazing people throughout it, be it donors, families or recipients.” The family even traveled to the Rose Bowl Parade in 2012 as part of the Donate Life float. Kallal said they met a younger man who was almost brought to tears knowing his mother’s life was saved by an organ donor. Those who are unable to attend the event may support the cause by sending donation checks payable to S.O.D.A. to 607 Yvette Place, Jerseyville, IL 62052. For more information about the donation recipient, Mid America Transplant Services, visit mts-stl. org where there is additional literature regarding organ and tissue donation.

TIF projects, cleared the cost as a TIF expense. He invited Bauersachs to call Weber regarding the issue to get a firm understanding on why the money could be paid out of that fund. In response to an explanation of the payments made to PGAV, Alderworman Flo Rowling said the company is too expensive, citing the $175 expense for placing a phone call to Weber. She asked how many people call the organization, and who is authorized to do so. City Attorney Jim Schrempf said the council should follow a guideline used by his office in that he would not accept a call from a council member without the council agreeing to that call being made. “It’s my understanding that I should not respond to that unless there has been either a motion or a consensus of the council,” Schrempf said. “I think the same rule should probably apply to Mr. Weber.” Thompson said there are other issues regarding the purchase of the ferry landing on the Missouri side of the river with TIF funds. The mayor said Bauersachs ruined the flow of payments by telling the city’s business manager Carmen Simon she could not pay the bill with TIF money, despite their eligibility to be paid in such a manner. Bauersachs denied Thompson’s claim, saying he was passing along information he received from Treasurer Harmon. Schrempf said he saw no legal problems with the expense being paid through TIF funds. Capping off the discussion of finances, Mayor Thompson explained the city’s financial shape is at its best in

years. In the past five years, he said the city has paid off around $2.8 million in debt and spent nearly $1 million on infrastructure improvements. He said the city will be without debt by the end of his term. “It’s on schedule to be paid off, in my opinion, in three years. All of our debt,” Thompson said. “We have a substantial amount of money in a savings account CD. We are in good shape financially. Trust me. We’ll continue to keep the city this way because of this council.” In other business, the council: n Approved two resolutions allowing the city to engage in an electric aggregation agreement for its citizens. The referendum giving the city this authority passed in the April election in an 79 to 37 vote. n Approved a resolution supporting the expansion of the Central Port District. n Approved a contract with McNelly Contracting to replace and paint the facade on front of city hall for $6,200. n Approved a business license for The Birdhouse, a guest house located at 1 East Water St., owned by Kayla Knoll. n Approved to replace and install a new pump and check valve at Piasa #3 Lift Station for $17,045 to be paid out of TIF funds. The station is within the TIF boundary. n Approved replacing a pump and single phase start component kit for a lift station at the visitor’s center in the amount of $3,161. n Approved the purchase of roll-up doors for the visitor’s center at a cost of $2,225.

Grafton

(Continued from A1) Mayor Tom Thompson said the city does not have the full $550,000 grant sitting in one of its accounts. “We will not be using any of our city money. It comes down through the state,” Thompson said. “When it’s all said and done, all of it is paid out of that $550,000 grant.” In answering a line of additional questions from Bauersach, Gray Magee, AHFP partner, explained the state would be auditing all of the grant funds in early May. He said those auditors would be able to answer any additional questions and invited Bauersachs to request that full report when it was completed to answer any and all of his questions. “They’re going to do a complete audit on the whole thing,” Magee said. “To talk about this tonight is a waste of time because you’ll have all those records from that audit from the state, and you need to ask the state the questions because they’re the ones controlling the money.” Some expenses related to AHFP are reimbursed by the state to the city – infrastructure of water and sewer lines – and Bauersachs worried the reimbursements were not being delivered in a timely manner. The city has received only $5,700 in reimbursement costs and is still awaiting an additional $36,800. Thompson invited Bauersachs to call the state regarding the money sent to reimburse those costs, as state officials would have a more clear handle on the situation. Bauersachs’ submitted questions also requested a full report on the change orders with Sheppard, Morgan and Schwaab (SMS) Engineers for Loellke Plumbing’s work installing the sewer system to AHFP. Charles “Cas” Sheppard, president of SMS Engineers, attended Tuesday’s meeting. He said two change orders have been made regarding invoices to the city, but those change orders have not changed the overall budget for the project. “We maintained the project within that budget,” Sheppard said, “So my answer would be yes, we are [on budget].” Bauersachs also took issue with the expense of money for taxi and lodging in Washington, D.C. when Thompson visited the nation’s capital to meet with legislators regarding economic development on the riverfront. The expense was paid using the tax increment financing fund, which Bauersachs said is not the correct fund to be used for paying that cost. Mayor Thompson said Mike Weber, a representative for PGAV, the company responsible for handling the city’s

Robert Lyons/Jersey County Journal

PRODUCT

OF PRIDE; BARN QUILTS A GROWING TREND

Chris Casey, University of Illinois Unit 18 extension community and economic development educator, displays a hand-painted, two-foot by two-foot barn quilt thursday afternoon at Jerseyville Public Library. Around Casey are several barn quilts produced by Fieldon resident Donna schuckenbrock. Casey, a Calhoun County native, presented a well-attended seminar on the history of barn quilts and how their popularity has grown in recent years. Calhoun County, which has 82 barn quilts, is at the root of a trend that now spreads through many Illinois counties.

District 100 (Continued from A1) located in Jerseyville. By law, he said the district does not have to offer students that close to their respective school transportation, but removing those routes could have additional consequences. The transportation director said it is not clear how such a change would affect student attendance, noting he is thinking outside the box for ideas on how to reduce costs in the district’s transportation budget. He said the reductions in expenses will be necessary as some buses in the fleet need to be phased out. All vehicles are safe for transporting students, he said, but some have higher mileage than others and some have some exterior wear from rust. It would benefit the district to replace the older buses, he added. “Any bus that Jersey uses to transport students, they are safe,” Breden said. “There are just some that are in better shape than others.” District 100 transports approximately 1,100 students each day and the weekly combined mileage of all

buses in the district is the equivalent of driving around the world in miles. In other business, the board: n Accepted resignations of Joe Lawrence, auto mechanics educator, effective at the end of the 2015-16 school year and Beth Morgan, assistant girls soccer coach, effective at the end of the 2014 season. n Approved extra-curricular assignments of Joseph Johns, volunteer football coach, Jeff Vanost, volunteer football coach, and Dan Deist, volunteer girls soccer coach. n Approved employment of Patty Birdsell as a temporary bus driver. n Approved the dismissal of a bus driver, effective immediately. n Approved the employment of certified personnel including fourth year teachers Dawn Dwyer and Norman Fabry; third year teachers Scott Bechtold, Sara Beckman, Nathan Blasa, Holly Campbell, Zoe Chin, Emily DeSherlia, Heather Dohrn, Nikita Egelhoff, David Jacobs, Lisa Jacobs, Jamie Jones, Jessica Ray, Megan Taake and Scott Tonsor;

second year teachers John Cooper, Nicholas Crnokrak and Neely Kinkel; and first year teachers Chelsey Bohannon, Steven Flowers, Stephanie Harris and Debra Weiler. n Approved the duplicating paper bid in the amount of $12,000. n Approved a working cash abatement resolution to permanently abate $900,000 to the education fund from working cash. n Approved early childhood summer school fees for 2014. n Approved to host a Dell desktop computer and monitor sale at the technology building later this spring. n Approved student handbook updates adding e-cigarettes to its tobacco policy and adding social media to the harassment and bullying policies. n Approved moving regular board meeting dates to the third Thursday every month at 7 p.m., excluding the December meeting which will be held on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m.

Mumps confirmed in Jersey County Jersey County has an unvaccinated adult with a confirmed case of mumps. Confirmed cases have recently been reported in Greene County and Morgan County. The Illinois Department of Public Health and Jersey County Health Department are asking for public vigilance in helping to contain this outbreak. Mumps is an acute viral illness transmitted by respiratory droplets and saliva. It is a vaccine-preventable disease. Mumps can be spread easily to someone in close contact, such as having a conversation with someone standing three feet away. Up to half of people who get mumps have very mild or no signs or symptoms, and therefore do not know they were infected with mumps. Mumps typically have an incubation period of 16-18 days after exposure to the virus, but symptoms can appear anywhere from 12 to 25 days after contact with someone with the infection. The most common symptoms include fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, loss of appetite, and/or swollen and tender salivary glands under the ears on one or both sides. Children should receive the first dose of mumps containing vaccine, MMR, at 12 to 15 months of age and usually the second dose at 4 to 6 years of age. Jersey

County Health Department is recommending that parents of pre-school children consider getting their child the second MMR anytime from 13 months of age to under the age of 6 years old. It needs to be done at least 28 days since their last vaccination was given. This may help to increase protection. Also, this second vaccination will count as the requirement for kindergarten and would not need to be repeated. All adults born during or after 1957 should have received at least one dose of MMR. Adults at higher risk such as university students, health care personnel, international travelers, and persons with potential mumps outbreak exposure should have documentation of two doses of mumps vaccine or other proof of immunity to mumps. Suspect and confirmed cases of mumps should be reported to Jersey County Health Department within 24 hours. Susceptible contacts to cases are to be excluded from school, child care facilities, and the workplace from days 12 through 25 after exposure. For any additional information, or if you have had contact or exposure to anyone who has had mumps, phone 618-498-9565, ext. 301.

E-mail your news tips to jcjnews@campbellpublications.net

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NEWS

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

Local bee population down after harsh winter Three airlifted from By BoB Crossen Jersey County Journal A Brighton beekeeper has been turning down orders for his locally-made honey after learning between 10 and 15 percent of his hives’ population died during the winter. Gene Reilly, Brighton beekeeper and owner of Shamrock Honey Farm, said raising bees was a hobby of his after he retired. Though honey production has been a source of income, he expects to earn less this year. “This was the worst winter. I bought the farm in ‘79, and this is the worst winter I think we’ve had,” Reilly said. “Bees are not used to 30 degrees below wind chills. …I’m going to have to buy a lot of bees to replace what I lost.” The extended winter and nearly record-low temperatures in January and February led to the loss of bees on his farm. He said some beekeepers in the northern parts of the country like Wisconsin wrapped their colonies with insulating material to protect them from the conditions. Steve Chard, Illinois Department of Agriculture apiary inspection supervisor, said it is not yet clear how widespread the die-off of bees is in Illinois. Beekeepers are beginning to open their hives for the spring months to report their population figures. If the bee loss throughout the rest of the state is similar to that of Shamrock Honey Farm’s, the apiary inspection supervisor said consumers could potentially see some differences in the produce aisle at the grocery store. “It depends upon the extent of the loss,” Chard said. “If there’s not enough bees to pollenate, then you’re going to see some reduction in production of apples and strawberries and melons and pumpkins and things of that nature.” He said the die-off of the bees may not be in direct relation to the cold weather, but rather a slew of compounding factors. Last spring, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Environmental

Protection Agency released a study about declining bee populations due to disease. Chard said it is possible the die-off of bees this year was due to the pollenating insects suffering from diseases with the winter weather being a compounding factor in their deaths. “Initially it is hard to tell if the severe winter conditions actually killed the bees or if some of the colonies were weakened by disease in the past and the winter was the tipping point,” Chard said. And though 10 percent of the bee population at the Brighton honey farm is significant, Reilly said

“this was the worst winter. I bought the farm in ‘79, and this is the worst winter I think we’ve had. Bees are not used to 30 degrees below wind chills. …I’m going to have to buy a lot of bees to replace what I lost.”

Gene Reilly Brighton beekeeper bees are available for purchase. It costs around $100 for three pounds of bees with a queen, he said, though beekeepers may also buy colonized frames to get back to honey production quicker for a higher price. Even with their purchase, however, the bees have to colonize before they’ll venture out to the fields in search of pollen. “When you buy just three pounds of bees and queen, you probably won’t get honey out of it this year. They’ll have to fill their comb out,” Reilly said. “That takes a lot of time and a lot of honey.”

At one point in his 25-year honey farming career, the local beekeeper said he would agree to place his hives out to local farms to pollenate farms in the countryside. Since that time, however, he said pesticides have become increasingly popular and releasing his bees into the crops was detrimental to his bee population. “Several years ago, they weren’t supposed to spray,” Reilly said. “They did anyway, and I lost three or four strong hives. It’s not worthwhile. I won’t do that anymore.” But dangers to bees aren’t purely related to the pesticides used by farmers or the diseases that spread throughout a colony. Invasive bugs can eliminate a colony just as fast a disease. Reilly said hive beetles were his biggest concern last summer. He said the invasive pest was first noticed in Missouri five years ago, and since that time, the beetles have migrated north, invading his bee colonies in Brighton. “It just looks like a ladybug, but they’re hardshelled like a beetle,” Reilly said. “They lay eggs like crazy, and fill the cells up. I lost a lot of hives. I had to burn them up because they multiply so fast.” The damage from the hive beetles is primarily seen as a result of the beetle larvae feasting on the bee’s honey. Their feeding activities make the honey ferment and froth, developing a nasty odor, resulting in abandonment of the colony by the bees. To combat the hive beetles, he purchased a trap which uses corn oil to draw the insect into a container where they eventually drown. The extent of the cold winter on the state’s bee population is not completely known as the apiary division of the Illinois Department of Agriculture is still compiling population figures from beekeepers throughout the state. Those numbers could be available in early May, according to an apiary inspection supervisor with the Illinois Department of Agriculture.

Goldenrod on its way to St. Louis for restoration By BoB Crossen Calhoun News-Herald The historic Goldenrod Showboat will receive the repair attention it needs to re-enter the St. Louis riverfront, after an agreement was made between the company mooring the boat and a St. Louis association. The Historic Riverboat Preservation Association has entered into an agreement with Pool 24 Tug, a Kampsville mooring company, to purchase the boat. The Goldenrod had been put up for auction last fall with a court order, but Pool 24 was the only bidder for the more than 100-year-old vessel. Pool 24 paid nearly $70,000 for the boat. At the time Jake Medford, a Jerseyville resident who has volunteered time to help restore the boat since 2010, presented a petition requesting the boat not be sold for scrap, but rather restored to its former glory. Medford said the HRPA’s purchase of the boat is the first step in getting the vessel back into the water where it can be used as a museum and entertainment venue. “It would be turned back into a theater and/or music venue,” Meford said. “Also it is going to be what it is now, a National Historic Landmark. Some tours will be given to look around…It’s quite unique. The boat was purchased last week for $40,000 with the remaining $30,000 to be paid over the next six months. Medford said getting the boat to St. Louis will increase its visibility and allow for better fundraising opportunities. “We are accepting donations at this time and plenty of fundraisers are in the works,” Medford said in a message to Calhoun News-Herald. “We have a team of volunteers that are dedicated to this project. These great people are working non-stop to clean, secure and monitor the Goldenrod, while others are talking to local governments and city leaders to get fundraisers planned out and the fine details covered.” He said the boat will be inspected by the Coast Guard and a marine surveyor before towboats tug the

vessel to St. Louis where it will be moored during its restoration. After it is restored, he said the association plans to open it as a tourist destination with theater shows and historic tours. The Goldenrod Showboat was declared a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service in 1968 and is the last showboat to run on the Mississippi River. Only 2,540 properties have gained the National Historic Landmark distinction. The only other surviving showboat, the Majestic, is located in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Mississippi River’s historic showboat was built in 1909 – three years before the Titanic – in Parkersville, W.V. by the Pope Dock Company for W.R. Markle. The boat changed hands after Markle took ownership, sustaining damage in a number of accidents before it came into the custody of Captain Bill Menke. Menke brought the Goldenrod to St. Louis, where it gathered much of its fame. Originally moored in St. Louis in 1937, Menke marketed the vessel so successfully that tickets to theater shows – the boat can hold 1,400 people – were often sold out before the boat would dock for boarding theater-goers. The boat experienced more drama than just that in its theater, however, as it sank two times

before 1950 and was salvaged after each incident. On June 1,1962, a fire – the result of faulty wiring – tore through the boat, ruining the auditorium and integrity of the boat’s structure. St. Louis businessmen and theater enthusiasts began a restoration campaign to fix the boat. Led by Frank Pierson and Don Franz, the boat was restored at an estimated cost of $300,000 and was officially reopened in 1965. The boat was in service near St. Charles, Mo., until 1991 when it bottomed out in the Mississippi River, requiring another $300,000 for repair. John Swartz came into ownership of the boat after that and donated it to HRPA before it was moored at Pool 24 in Kampsville. It incurred nearly $70,000 in mooring fees in the past three to four years since it was located at the Calhoun County dock, and worries last fall were that it would be sold for scrap. Medford said he is happy to have an amiable resolution to the boat’s history and is excited for its restoration. “It is relieving,” Medford said. “It’s truly relieving and exciting to see.” For more information about the Goldenrod Showboat, visit goldenrod-showboat.com. For regular updates like the Goldenrod Showboat on Facebook.

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late night rollover staff report Jersey County Journal Three Madison County teens were airlifted from the scene of a single-vehicle rollover accident Saturday, April 12. The crash was called into the Jersey County Sheriff’s Department at 2:33 a.m., and was said to be in the vicinity of the Route 16 and Route 100 junction. However, the vehicle was located approximately a half-mile from Eldred Road along Route 16,

according to the crash report. The report states the vehicle was traveling eastbound on Route 16 when it left the roadway and rolled over. All three occupants of the vehicle were ejected. Nineteen-yearold Zane Aud of Wood River was driving the 1997 Chevrolet truck. His passengers included Bradley Peters, 19, of Bethalto, and Andrew M. Webb, 18, of South Roxana. Aud was cited for improper lane usage.

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

Our VIEWS

The Jersey County Journal is published weekly by Campbell Publishing Company, Inc., Bruce Campbell, president. Phone (618) 498-1234 E-mail: circulation@ campbellpublications.net

Kids need care even as they approach adulthood

Publisher and Editor: Julie Boren

The Issue: Prom, graduation right around the corner Our View: Keep these moments of celebration from turning disastrous

publisher@campbellpublications.net

Regional Editor: Robert Lyons

I

jcjnews@campbellpublications.net

t may seem as teenagers prepare for prom and high school graduation their childhood is all but over. But parental guidance is just as important at this juncture as it is the first time a child crosses the street.

Even as it seems teenagers nearing the end of their high school career have learned a great deal about life, those negative influences aren’t going away. Parents still have a responsibility to steer their teenagers away from substances that could hinder their progress into a productive adulthood. But, parents are not alone in this effort. Community leaders and organizations have developed two events to help aid residents in keeping the streets and young minds free of harmful intoxicants. The first is a drug take back event this weekend, where over-the-counter and prescription drugs can be dropped off with no questions asked to be disposed of safely. This service can help assure parents and grandparents are not unknowingly giving children easy access to drugs. Illicit drugs can be taken to the Jerseyville Police Department with the same assurances of anonymity and proper disposal. The second event will take place next Thursday, May 1 at Jersey Community High School. Several individuals who are very knowledgable on the subject will form a discussion panel to talk about several aspects of underage drinking, including its relationship to other drug usage. Many parents, according to Jersey County Against Drugs chairperson Jen Rogers, assume there is no problem with allowing their child to celebrate things such as prom and graduation with alcohol at home. There will even be a portion of the discussion focused on educating adults of the legal and other risks involved with supplying alcohol to minors. There should certainly be senses of pride and accomplishment for the students who are arriving at the point in their lives where they are becoming independent . But there are still so many things that could blow the ship off course. Drugs and alcohol are two obvious factors that could have detrimental longterm effects.

This Week's

ONLINE POLL

Assistant Regional Editor Sue Heitzig sheitzig@campbellpublications.net

General Manager and Advertising Director: Nichole Liehr nliehr@campbellpublications.net

Sports Editor: Sam Elliott selliott@campbellpublications.net

Reporters: Bob Crossen bcrossen@campbellpublications.net

Back the PAC P

art of the great history of Jersey has been the continuous work of the Panther Athletic Club (PAC). Long before most schools had any type of booster clubs, our community came together to form the PAC. It has had a long and proud history in our community. For those of us who grew up in Jersey, we remember the famed “Back the PAC” slogan that could be found all over the community. Many of us had and still have the “Back the PAC” windbreakers. There were “Back the PAC” window stickers on cars, on trucks, in business windows, they were everywhere and they carried the slogan. The sole purpose of the PAC was and is to provide funds to help our youth in their sporting activities at JCHS. Many of us have been touched by something the PAC has done – many times under the radar where nobody even knew. Just in the last few years the PAC has been instrumental in building new dugouts at the American Legion softball field, where our Lady Panthers play. The PAC purchased wall mats for our wrestling room for the safety of our wrestlers. Just this past year, the PAC purchased new windscreens for our tennis courts for the boys

Q:

A) Spending time with family. B) Easter dinner. C) The chocolate bunny.

Results of last week's poll When did you file your taxes? 17% 33% 50% 0%

A) April 15. B) As soon as I received my W-2. C) I wasn’t in a hurry, but before April 15. D) What taxes? This poll is not scientific and reflects the opinion of those who chose to respond

Your VIEWS Says Jersey has appalling response to needs of no-kill shelter TO THE EDITOR: What is wrong with the people of Jerseyville? A few weeks ago, I heard a radio broadcast announcing the possible impending closure of Riverbend Humane Society (a nokill) shelter located on Chrystal Lake Road in Jerseyville. A void in adequate funds. After going for supplies and calculating how much I could give in cash, I drove out there, contemplating potential crowded parking. I expected to see numerous vehicles and donations. Not to worry! The only other person that arrived that day was a lady from MIssouri with a pickup truck of supplies. But not one local resident!Appalling response, Jersey! Is your region really that absent of compassion? C’mon people…providing for the continuous discarded animals is ongoing. Of course, they need support.The survival of this deserving facility relies on donations to stay afloat.

The few people who provide care for these animals strive to give each identity and dignity. Struggling with expense of maintaining, the needed new pens (at $500 a pop) are just a dream now. The director of the facility, Bill Stuart, spent many years working with respected animal advocate Helen Gibson, (somewhat of a pioneer in our area), who left the legacy of Five A’s in Alton. I’’m sure the multitude of businesses in your town could each afford to send even $20 a month. What about Sunday school classes and youth groups in your locale? It would be wonderful for them to come up with creative ways of funding events, with the proceeds going to Riverbend Shelter. They could experience the fulfillment of giving, as well as do some creative thinking. My appeal is not limited to groups, but individuals, as well. What a difference it could make, if each household in your town would spend the price of a stamp and envelope with a dollar enclosed each month! It’s a negative reflection on the community to remain oblivious to the need of supporting your local shelter. Jersey, change your image. Remember, “All creatures great and small…the Lord God made them all.” MARIE SHERFY Godfrey, Ill.

and girls tennis programs, as well as any community members using the courts. They currently are assisting in the “Support the Court” program for the JCHS and IMS gyms. These programs are on top of the normal yearly projects they fund. Each year the PAC donates the money for the field maintenance at our football, baseball and soccer stadiums. They also raise and donate the money for our training room supplies and weight room supplies. All this directly affects the athletes in our programs. In addition, the PAC purchases the numerals for our first-time athletes as well as many of the varsity “J”, pins, and other awards. Without the PAC, none of this could be done. As we all know, JCUSD #100, as many other southern Illinois District, is facing difficult financial times. The BOE has had to make some really difficult decisions in terms of the financial stability of the district. With this have come some deep cuts across the board. Like all the other programs, athletics has also sustained deep cuts. Because of these cuts, it has become even more imperative that the PAC not only survives but thrives. If Jersey is to sustain these

Carmen Ensinger censinger@campbellpublications.net

programs, the Guest PAC is going to have to be Column even more BY SCOTT involved. The TONSOR PAC and more i m p o r t a n t l y, our youth needs you. Please take time to fill out a membership form, join the PAC and become a working part of it. The PAC is in dire need of membership, workers, and support of every kind. These financial difficult times are NOT going to be solved without the efforts of our community. If you have a son or daughter who is now part or will be part of any athletic program at JCHS, supporting the PAC is support for that program. If you are a former athlete, remember the sacrifice that others gave for you. It is always easier to sit back and rely on someone else to do these things. However, now is NOT that time. Now it the time for all of us to rise up, join in, and “Back the PAC.” Membership forms can be found on the JCHS website. www.jersey100. org – select JCHS and click on student/parents. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––– n Scott Tonsor is the activities

director for JCUSD 100.

A little bit of ‘soul’ music

Share your answer at jerseycountyjournal.com What was the best part of your Easter?

EDITORIAL

I

remember a lot of revivals, both at my church and at others, but the one that stands out so well in my memory was the revival at the Washville Baptist Church where my cousins’ grandfather, Victor Vollintine, was invited to the front and sang with the band! Grandpa Vollintine was failing in health and in body, but he still loved to sing. I remember that it was fall. It was cold enough outside to warrant a jacket, and I, the picture bug, was taking pictures, because the Vollintine family was having their annual family reunion at the Washville Baptist Church in the church’s newly renovated fellowship hall. Everyone was there: aunts, uncles, cousins, siblings, and, most important of all, grandchildren. The hall was filled with grandchildren. Some were very young, just babies, others older, most were college age, but all were loved just the same by their grandparents, Helen and Victor Vollintine. Christmas was just around the corner, and it was also Vick’s birthday. We called Grandpa Vollintine Vick in place of Victor. I just called him Grandpa. Grandpa had brought along his harmonica. He loved to play his harmonica and sing. He was on a walker at the time, but that didn’t deter him one bit from playing with the grandkids and enjoying the reunion. The church had hired a band for the first night of revival and the band came downstairs and ate with us in the fellowship hall because we

had so much food! I think Aunt Carol or Aunt Vicky talked with some of the band members and quietly told them just how much Grandpa loved to sing and how much he wanted to have his own band to sing in, but never could. Like I said, it was his birthday. The band never said anything much about Grandpa’s love of singing and gospel music, and I think we quietly let it go. We played with the kids, visited, and cleaned up after the fun and headed upstairs to the revival meeting. The band started to play, and I could tell that Grandpa was enjoying it. He was clapping his hands and even singing along, though I couldn’t hear him all the way in the back of the church over the loud music. Then, the band called him on stage, and his face broke into a huge grin. Aunt Carol and Aunt Sharon helped him to the stage and the band handed him his own microphone! They told us how it was his birthday and that he loved to sing and that he loved gospel so much, but never got a chance to sing with any of the bands. The band let Grandpa choose the song and they started to play. Grandpa started to sing. It was one of those moments where Grandpa’s eyes lit right up and he kept pace with the band. He had a wonderful time singing! It wore him out to be up there for the whole song, but I could tell he loved every minute of it. When Grandpa came down off that stage, he was beaming ear to ear.

The band’s kindGuest ness really made Column his day—maybe BY his whole year! It was the best HEIDI MOORE birthday present anyone has ever given to him. Grandpa talked about that song he sang for weeks afterwards. It was the highlight of the Vollintine reunion. No one ever forgot just how much fun Grandpa had at his home church singing with that revival band. A little kindness goes a long way, and we could certainly use more of it in this dreary world of ours. Grandpa continued to fail in health following Christmas, and by the New Year had to be admitted to a nursing home in Litchfield. He lost so much that year; the ability to drive, his home, his apartment, and his memory, but he never lost his love for his family or his love of great music. That always stayed with him. Through everything, up until the end, he always enjoyed relaxing with family and friends in the nursing home dining room listening to a great gospel band. Grandpa loved Bluegrass, but now he’s enjoying the heavenly music, and, I’m sure, enjoying singing in the band! We miss him very, very much. But, we’re also happy that he can now sing again. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––– n Heidi Moore is a resident of

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Postmaster: Send address changes to: Jersey County Journal, P.O. Box 407, Jerseyville, IL 62052. The Jersey County Journal is published for the whole of Jersey County. Any worthwhile program that will benefit the county will be backed by the Jersey County Journal. Jersey County Journal will always be the number one information source about the people, events, and issues of Jersey County, Illinois. We serve the Jersey County community and lead in the efforts to make it a better place to live and work. Letters to Editor policy: The Jersey County Journal welcomes letters to the editor. They must be signed, include your address and a daytime phone number. Letters without an individual’s signature will not be published. The Jersey County Journal will accept only letters to the editor that are written in good taste. Libelous remarks will not be published. The editor reserves the right to make the decision of acceptance. Letters may be edited for clarity, brevity and fairness. Opinions expressed in columns are those of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views of this newspaper.

“Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.” ~ Thomas Jefferson, 1787

2013

Jerseyville and a guest columnist for the Jersey County Journal.

How to reach us:

JOURNAL SEEKING GUEST COLUMNISTS If anyone is interested in submitting a guest column, please contact the Journal. There are many topics out there and we have found that our readers have a lot of thoughtful things to say, on a broad range of topics. Columns, like letters, should add to the public discourse in a helpful way. Guest columns are submitted by a rotating roster of columnists or are simply sent in unsolicited and, if appropriate, are published. These columns do not reflect the views of the newspaper, only the writer. Length is no more than 800 words. Deadlines are Tuesday at 10 a.m. Topics are the choice of the columnist although we encourage our contributors to avoid obviously inflammatory issues (religion, abortion, etc.). Though we are a local paper, contributors are free to write about national or international issues (the pledge, the war, Social Security, health care, etc.). The Journal reserves the right to hold, edit or withdraw a column. These guest columns are an opportunity for our contributors to share an idea, an opinion or information; it is not an opportunity to sell a product or a service. We are looking for informed opinion and lively debate. Our only requirements are that your column have relevance to our community and our readership and be responsibly written (no personal attacks or self promotion, for example).

By Phone: 618-498-1234 By Fax: 630-206-0320 By Mail: 832 S. State St. P.O. Box 407 Jerseyville, IL 62052 By E-mail: jcjnews@campbell publications.net

Words to live by: “You cannot shake hands with a clenched fist.”

Indira Gandhi


Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

A5

Jerseyville, Illinois

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois


SPECIAL

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

A7

Jerseyville, Illinois

GRAFTON

Piasa Winery and Pub Mushroom Festival Sunday By BoB CRoSSEN Jersey County Journal The Piasa Winery and Pub in Grafton will host its 11th Mushroom Festival in 12 years after last year’s event was flooded out. Kathryn Jones, general manager of Piasa Winery and Pub, said people are craving the festival after nearly two years since the last event. Though flooding posed problems last year, Jones said rain is a tradition for the event. She said the weather will not hold back the festival. “The folks have already prepared their dishes by that day, so the only reason we would [cancel] is because of flooding or something like that,” Jones said. “We’ve had a lot more phone calls

and questions about it this year. … I think it will be an even bigger crowd than normal.” The Mushroom Festival is host to a competition for 10 chefs who will each bring their own personalized dish to the festival. Attendees will get a chance to sample each mushroom-themed food and vote for the best one. Two years ago, a mushroom cupcake took first place. Made with a candy cap mushroom from California, the small sweets left a maple syrup smell hanging in the air. Jones said she is not sure what is in store for the festival this year as the chefs are tightlipped about their creations. “Most of them won’t tell us. They want it to be a secret because they don’t want anybody to try and duplicate

it,” Jones said. “The chefs that have participated in the past are pretty big on keeping it a secret.” Jones said the Piasa Winery and

“They love to come to our festival. … I think it’s really the only bigger festival like this in the area.”

Kathryn Jones

General Manager of Piasa Winery and Pub Pub has a core community of people that visit on a regular basis for drinks and dinner with their friends, noting the

Mushroom Festival promotes the same kind of atmosphere. People travel from more than an hour away for the event, she said. “We always have newer people coming through, but we always have a large regular base and they’re from all over the place,” Jones said. “They love to come to our festival. … I think it’s really the only bigger festival like this in the area.” The Mushroom Festival will be held at the pub Sunday, April 27 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. with live music. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased on-site when they go on sale at 12 p.m. Up to 500 tickets will be sold. For more information about the Piasa Winery and Pub visit piasawinery.com and like its Facebook page.

What's Happening in GRAFTON

Elvis in Concert at Pere Marquette

Friday, May 2, 7p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Things are about to get “All Shook Up” at Pere Marquette Lodge, when Terry Phillips takes the stage with his salute to the King of Rock and Roll. Terry is a St. Louis-based, award winning Elvis Tribute Artist who specializes in portrayals of all Elvis eras…50's, 60s, & 70's! From the 1950s hits “Heartbreak Hotel,” “Don’t Be Cruel” and “Hound Dog,” to his later smashes “Devil in Disguise” and “Suspicious Minds,” the music of the legend lives on in this special concert experience. Reserve tickets by calling 618-786-2331.

Comedy Show at Grafton Winery

Saturday, May 3, 6 p.m. Have a laugh while enjoying dinner at the Grafton Winery. Advance reservations required. No cancellations. For more information, call (618) 786-3001.

Beverly Farm’s Diamonds and Denim at the Loading Dock

Saturday, May 10, 5:30 p.m. It’s time to shine your diamonds and dust off your denim because we’re heading to the Boatworks at The Loading Dock in support of Beverly Farm Foundation. The Glendale Riders will perform, with members of 93.7 The Bull on hand. So put on your dancing shoes and get ready for a night of celebration! Diamonds & Denim (formerly Chicken & Beer Dance), is a community-wide event held for the benefit Beverly Farm’s equestrian therapy program for people who live with intellectual/developmental disabilities on campus and throughout the area. For more information, visit beverlyfarm.org.

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Grafton Girl Scout Troop 532 collected cans for their food drive on March 29. Troop members pictured with the donations are front, left to right, Arlynn Weber, Katie Schultz, Ariana Davis, Alexis Draper, Katlyn Springer. Back, left to right, Kendal Davis, Avery Kemper, Abby Womack, Eliva Flowers, Reecie Kennett, Alaina Herman, Nina Grant. The donations were given to the Grafton Food Pantry.

The Meeting of the Rivers Foundation (MTRF), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and their many partners are throwing a party for our great rivers! The first annual Great Rivers Festival will be at the National Great Rivers Museum in Alton and the Riverlands Migratory Bird Sanctuary in West Alton, Mo., from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Saturday May 17. A party so big, it spans the Mississippi River!

At the National Great Rivers Museum you can look forward to live music, local food and drink vendors, local art vendors, and much more! There will be live bird shows from the World Bird Sanctuary and an appearance by Serengeti Steve: The Reptile Experience. Other shows include a taxidermy demonstration and lessons on how to catch and prepare Asian carp! At the Riverlands Migratory Bird Sanctuary, canoes, kayaks,

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INFORMED Read

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

and stand up paddleboards will be available for the public to try in the calm backwaters of Ellis Bay. Paddling is open to all ages and skill levels but must be 11 years or older to paddle solo. Visitors will be able to talk to members of the St. Louis Canoe and Kayak Club plus many other paddling enthusiasts about water safety and paddling our great rivers. The paddling portion of the festival will be $5 per person and equipment will be supplied.

For a complete list of show times and events, visit www.mtrf. org. The National Great Rivers Museum is located off River Heritage Parkway (IL Hwy 143) at #2 Lock & Dam Way, East Alton, adjacent to Melvin Price Locks & Dam. The museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and has free admission. For more information, call 618-462-6979 or go online to www.mtrf.org. You can also find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/GreatRivers.

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Mushroom Festival Chefs Aerie’s Riverview Winery • Grafton, IL Katey’s Cakes • Jerseyville, IL Crazy Beaver Pizza Lodge • Grafton, IL Mulligan’s West • Jerseyville IL Community Cafe at theYMCA • Alton, IL

Mississippi Half Step • Grafton, IL Franco’s Holiday Inn • Alton, IL Big Kahuna Bar and Grill • Grafton, IL Cultured Table Bistro • Elsah, IL Piasa Winery & Pub • Grafton, IL The 518 • Jerseyville, IL

Grafton Riverside Flea Market Next to Loading Dock Many New Dealers • All dealers have new & varied collectibles 400 Front Street • 618-786-8210

April 26 - 27 • 9am - 5pm Market Dates: Apr 26-27, May 24-25, Jun 28-29, Jul 26-27, Aug 23-24, Sep 27-28, Oct 25-26

Advertise on next month's GRAFTON PAGE Call Jack or Julie at: (618) 498-1234 C

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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

NEWS

Jerseyville, Illinois

‘The Wizard of Oz’ playing Jersey County HCE celebrating 83rd anniversary in St. Louis May 13 – 18 The Fabulous Fox Theatre is delighted to announce that the first North American tour of the new stage adaptation of “The Wizard of Oz” will play May 13-18 in St. Louis. Performances of “The Wizard of Oz” at the Fabulous Fox Theatre run May 13-18. Show times are Tuesday through Friday at 7:30 p/m., Saturday at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets are available online at MetroTix.com, by calling 314534-1111 or in person at the Fox Theatre Box Office. Ticket prices start at $25. Prices are subject to change; please refer to FabulousFox.com for current pricing. Starring Danielle Wade as Dorothy, who was chosen by the Canadian public through CBC TV’s reality show “Over The Rainbow,” the tour of “The Wizard of Oz” is an enchanting adaptation of the all-time classic. Developed from the ever popular MGM screenplay, this new production contains all the beloved songs from the Oscar®-winning movie score, all the favorite characters and iconic moments, plus a few surprises along the way, includ-

STADIUM

Midnight showing Thursday night!

THEATRE

Jerseyville http://thestadiumtheatre.com

now aLL DIgItaL anD 3D!!! nEwLY REMoDELED!!! MATINEES DAILY - 2 Spacious Theaters MOVIE PASSES MAKE GREAT GIFTS!

ing new songs by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber. Click your heels together and join Scarecrow, Tin Man, Lion, Dorothy and her little dog Toto, as they journey through the magical land of Oz to meet the Wizard and obtain their hearts’ desires. Watch out for the Wicked Witch of the West and her winged monkeys as you rediscover the real story of Oz in this fantastic musical treat for all the family.

The 83rd Annual Meeting of the Jersey County Association for Home and Community Education (formerly Home Bureau) will be held Wednesday, May 14 at Peace United Church of Christ on Glenda Avenue in Jerseyville. The group, which was organized on May 14, 1931 in the Jersey County courtroom with almost 500 county ladies in attendance, has been a mainstay in Jersey County since that time and still is very active in the community with over 100 present day members. Registration for the meeting

Our County. Our Health. Our Future. Thursday, May 1, 2014 at 7 PM Jersey Community High School Cafeteria A panel discussion on underage drinking; prescription and over-the-counter drug use; the effect of underage drinking on school performance; the increased risk of depression and other mental health problems; and Illinois laws regarding underage alcohol use and adult provision of alcohol to minors.

Drama/Sport Kevin Costner

“DRAFT DAY” Rated PG-13 (109 min.) Shown in 2D digital only

CINEMA 2

Drama/Action Russell Crowe, Jennifer Connelly

“NOAH” Rated PG (138 min.) Shown in 2D digital only

“THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2” Starting Thursday 5/1/14! SHOWTIMES Friday - 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 Saturday - 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 Sunday - 2:00, 4:30, 7:00 Mon. thru Thus. - 4:30, 7:00 ADMISSION PRICES Adults - $6.00 Children (12 and under) - $5.00 Matinees (All ages) - $5.00 3-D Movies Additional - $2.00

Program Moderator Lori Hopkins, JCUSD #100 Superintendent Panelists: ∞Ben Goetten, Jersey County State’s Attorney ∞Scott Woelfel, Jerseyville Police Department, School Resource Officer, DARE ∞Randy Newberry, Pharmacist, Prescription Shop ∞Janette Heath, Director of Jerseyville Services, WellSpring Resources ∞Jennifer Rogers, JCAD Chairperson and Parent This program is sponsored by the Jersey County

In keeping with that theme, the speaker at this year’s luncheon will be Terry Frank, who is the Executive Sous Chef at Lewis & Clark Community College. The luncheon is being served by the ladies of Peace United Church of Christ. The cost of the luncheon

is $12 per person and must be paid in advance. Deadline for luncheon reservations is Wednesday, April 30. To make a reservation, please call Elizabeth A. Schwab, Secretary at 618-639-4192 or contact any HCE board member.

DISTRICT 100 FOUNDATION

10TH ANNUAL DINNER AUCTION SATURDAY, APRIL 26

WESTERN ATTIRE ENCOURAGED

Knights of Columbus Hall, Jerseyville, IL PRIME RIB & CHICKEN DINNER JOIN THE $35 PER PLATE A FUN FOR SE U DOORS OPEN AT 5:30 FOR SILENT AUCTION Dinner at 6:30 • Live Auction 7:30

A Town Hall Meeting on Prevention of Underage Drinking

Now Showing 4/25/14 through 5/1/14 CINEMA 1

begins at 9:30 a.m. and the meeting will begin at 10 a.m. The theme for this year’s event is “Been Cookin’ for 90 Years,” which was the theme for the state organization, IAHCE which recently celebrated its 90th anniversary.

GREAT CA

Auction Items: Seed Corn, $1500 Monsanto Gift Certificate, Original Artwork, Party Bus, Tech Items: Kindle Fire, iPad-mini, etc. Lots of Gift Certificates, Panther attire, household items, little kid events, Football sidelines, cheerleaders, etc. The District 100 Foundation is a nonprofit organization that supports local education opportunities. They provide scholarships for JCHS seniors, mini-grants for teachers and grants for District 100 schools

Please call JCHS for ticket (618) 498-5521

WOMEN’S SELF-DEFENSE Where:

Jerseyville Susnig Center (Senior Center)

When:

Tuesdays and Thursdays in May 8-9 PM

Who:

Women 16 and Up (under 18 requires parental consent)

Cost:

$50 Per Person

REGISTER Phone:

(618) 465-5904 or (618) 946-0359

Course Contents Safety Awareness Practical Defense

TINY TOTS KARATE Tuesdays and Thursdays in May 5:00 - 6:00 PM Jerseyville Susnig Center (Senior Center)

Children 4-6 years old will develop Discipline * Respect * Self-control Concentration * Coordination

Delivered by:

Universal Soo Bahk Do Praxium

Against Drugs Coalition. For more information contact Jennifer Rogers at 618-498-3500, jrogers@jch.org or

This class will be packed with motivational activities guaranteed to captivate the interest of any child!

To Register CALL (618) 465-5904 or (618) 946-0359

Lynn Welling at Jersey County Health Department, 618-498-9565, ext. 334, jchdhealth@gtec.com.

JERSEYVILLE, IL

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FRIENDS & NEIGHBORS

Engagements

Burns ~ Hartley engagement Mr. and Mrs. Scott Burns of Jerseyville and Mr. and Mrs. Bert Hartley, also of Jerseyville, are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their children, Heather Burns and Zach Hartley. The couple are both 2010 graduates of Jersey Community High School. Heather is a senior at Blackburn College and will be graduating in May 2014 with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. Zach is currently serving as a corpsman in the U.S. Navy. The couple will be wed in May 2014.

Birthday

Anna’s 5th birthday Anna Marie Phillips will be turning 5 years old April 26. She will be honored with a “Frozen” Themed party Saturday and will be celebrating with family and friends. She is the daughter of John and Lindsy Phillips of Jerseyville and has a little brother, Aiden, who is 1. Grandparents are Greg and Lind Burton of Jerseyville, Jane Davies of Alton and Barb Phillips of Elsah. Great-grandparents are Buzz Davis and Ethel Burton, both of Jerseyville.

Births

Jackson Gene Petty Doug and Ashley (Terpening) Petty of Kirksville, Mo., welcome a son, Jackson Gene Petty, 6 lb. 13 oz., 1:39 p.m. April 1, 2014, Northeast Regional Medical Center, Kirksville. Elder sibling is Laine, 2. Grandparents are Ken and Barb Terpening of Jerseyville and Janet Petty of Corydon, Iowa. Greatgrandparents are Warner and Mary Semetis of Englewood, Fla., Jim and Carole Terpening of Carrollton and Brenda Lindsey of De Soto. Cecilia Marie Peters Matthew and Michelle Peters of Jerseyville welcome a daughter, Cecilia Marie Peters, 6 lb. 10 oz., 8:20 p.m. April 6, 2014, Alton Memorial Hospital. Elder sibling is Huckleberry, 3. Grandparents are Gary and Janice Peters of Dow and Michael B. McNamee Sr. of Alton. Kylee Rae Ontis Kevin Ontis and Kara Gill of Nutwood welcome a daughter, Kylee Rae Ontis, 8 lb. 9 oz., 8:52 p.m. April 7, 2014, Alton Memorial Hospital. Elder sibling is Hailee, 4. Grandparents are Ray and Nancy Ontis of Nutwood and John and Shannon Gill of Carrollton. Greatgrandparents are Penny Shafer of Carrollton, Nelda Masiero of Cottage Hills, Richard Talley of Jerseyville and Lawrence “JR” Ontis of Nutwood.

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

B1

Jerseyville, Illinois

Illinois schools win No Child Left Behind waiver After pushing for more than two years, Governor Pat Quinn and the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has announced that Illinois has won approval from the United States Department of Education for its request for flexibility from parts of the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law to improve the quality of education for Illinois’ schoolchildren. The approved waiver gives Illinois needed flexibility to continue its progress in implementing a comprehensive strategy to improve education in Illinois by closing achievement gaps, supporting our most challenged districts and preparing all students for college, career and beyond. “Today’s approval is a big step forward that will allow Illinois to do what’s best for our kids and improve the quality of education throughout our state,” Governor Quinn said. “In 2011, we enacted landmark educa-

tion reform that made our schools stronger and more accountable. Now, with this federal approval, we will continue to improve the quality of education in Illinois and better prepare our students to be successful in college, career and beyond.” Illinois has moved forward already with many elements of the waiver, including the adoption of college and career ready learning standards in English, language arts and mathematics in the summer of 2010. In 2011, Governor Quinn signed landmark education reforms that strengthened accountability in our schools and training for teachers, administrators and school board members. The historic measure set clear standards for teacher evaluations and prioritized performance above tenure. These reforms represent unprecedented statewide agreement on issues that continue to be unresolved across the nation.

“The best economic tool a state can have is a world-class education system, and that’s why we have been fighting to get this done since day one,” ISBE Chairman Gery Chico said. “Schools across Illinois are already putting in place many elements of our plan for student success and this approval will allow us to fully implement our comprehensive plan to make Illinois’ education system the best in the nation.” The approved waiver also calls for a new state and district accountability system. Illinois will implement a multiple measure system that look at an entire school and district, not simply a test score. In addition, the Illinois accountability system calls for a renewed focus on closing achievement gaps, turning around the lowest-performing schools, building capacity for school improvement and enhanced transparency.

“We still believe that a top priority must be for Congress to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, but short of that, a waiver does allow us to move forward and work with local districts to do what’s best for students,” State Superintendent of Education Christopher A. Koch said. “Despite the delay in our waiver approval, Illinois educators have moved forward with elements of our plan and the commitment to college and career preparedness for all students, including the implementation of new, internationally benchmarked learning standards and 21st century assessments of student learning.” The federal education law has been due for Congressional reauthorization since 2007. In the absence of reauthorization, President Obama announced in September 2011 that the administration would grant waivers from NCLB to qualified states.

WIC celebrates 40 years of strengthening Illinois families The Illinois Department of Human Services (IDHS) is celebrating the 40th Anniversary of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC), the nation’s public health nutrition program. WIC provides families with the knowledge and skills necessary to make healthful choices, which they can carry with them for a lifetime. “I applaud the WIC program in

their efforts to promote healthy lifestyles and for making a true difference every day in the lives of women, infants and children in Illinois,” said IDHS Secretary Michelle R.B. Saddler. WIC aims to improve the health of low-income women, infants and children by providing supplemental nutritious foods, nutrition education and counseling, breastfeeding promotion and support, health screenings and referrals to eligible

families. Nearly 40 percent of all babies born in Illinois are WIC participants and research shows that WIC has been successful in the reduction of fetal deaths, infant mortality, low birth weight rates, iron deficiency anemia in children and increased immunization rates. In addition, in Illinois, women who participate in the Breastfeeding Peer Counselor program offered by WIC tend to have high-

March unemployment hits five year low 8.4 percent lowest since January 2009 The March unemployment rate fell to 8.4 percent, the lowest level since January 2009, according to data released last week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Illinois Department of Employment Security. The rate fell despite more people entering the labor force to look for work. As expected, however, the unseasonably cold and snowy weather in March dampened initial estimates for new hiring. Combined with continued job loss at the government level, the state recorded -3,200 fewer jobs than in February but +29,400 more than one year ago. The unemployment rate and job creation numbers can move independently of each other because they come from different surveys. “Today’s drop in the unemployment rate highlights significant progress in our state,” IDES Director Jay Rowell said. “Our monthly numbers will continue to show uneven but measurable progress. Consumer confidence and its

related spending remains a key driver of our economic growth, especially in construction and manufacturing.” Numbers from the independent Conference Board’s Help Wanted OnLine Survey show Illinois employers in March advertised for more than 195,000 jobs and 85 percent sought full-time employment. The Board is a global business membership and research association. The numbers measure new, first-time online jobs and jobs reposted from the previous month on internet job boards, corporate boards and smaller, niche websites. Illinois employers added +257,000 private sector jobs since January 2010 when job growth returned following nearly two years of consecutive monthly declines. Leading sectors are Professional and Business Services (+119,900, +15.3 percent); Education and Health Services (+56,600, +6.9 percent); and Leisure and Hospitality (+40,200, +7.8 per-

cent). Government (-26,500, -3.1 percent) continues to lead job loss. In March 2014, the number of unemployed individuals fell -17,100 (-3.0 percent) to 551,900. Total unemployed has fallen -201,600 (-26.8 percent) since January 2010 when the rate peaked at 11.4 percent. Since January 2010, when compared to the previous month, Illinois recorded job growth in 35 months and job loss in 15. The unemployment rate fell in 25 months, increased in nine and was unchanged in 16. The unemployment rate identifies those who are out of work and seeking employment. A person who exhausts benefits, or is ineligible, still will be reflected in the unemployment rate if they actively seek work. Historically, the national unemployment rate is lower than the state rate. The state rate has been lower than the national rate only six times since January 2000. This includes periods of economic expansion and contraction.

Thank you for reading the Jersey County Journal

er rates of breastfeeding initiation (81.2%) and one month duration rates (73%) than those who do not participate in the program (61.4% and 61.3%, respectively). Women who participate in WIC while pregnant also have lower Medicaid costs than those who do not participate. As a result of these outcomes, the health of women, infants and children has been improved, infant mortality has decreased and

Medicaid expenditures have been reduced. Since its beginnings, the WIC program has strived to meet the needs of its participants and has served as a long-standing and important community nutrition program which will continue to serve the needs of its population for years to come. To learn more about the WIC program or to see if you may qualify, please visit www.fns.usda.gov/ wic or at your local WIC office.

THANK YOU

The family of Cora Spencer would like to extend our sincere thanks to all who have shown kindness and support at this most difficult time. Never underestimate the simplest act of sympathy, none go unnoticed. To Larry Alexander and Rev. Sonny Renken for helping us through. Megan Fish and Shannan Church, you took on the larger and hardest tasks for us. Please know how much you are loved and appreciated. Whalen-Hill Post 648 Grafton and the sisterhood of the Ladies Auxiliary, your kindness and generosity will never be forgotten. To John and Penny Morgan and John and Dawn Glover families for opening your hearts and homes to our family, we are eternally grateful. Blessed be to all who gave memorials, they are much needed and appreciated.

Coty, Maddelynn, Abigail, Susie, Tuck, Emily, Brittney, Patrick, and family.

Your hometown news source

Jersey county journal Call today to place your classified ad! (618) 498-1234

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B2

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois


OUR TOWN

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

B3

Jerseyville, Illinois

Journal NOTES What’S HAPPENING

with the drug disposal box at all times. For more Hey, JCHS seniors (and their remain information contact the JPD at 498-2131. parents) Ministry performing at Dow The Jersey County Journal is compiling its annu- Southern Baptist Church al keepsake graduation sections featuring Jersey Community High School seniors. Forms have been made available to students at the high school and we’d like to remind everyone to turn their forms and photos in to the high school office no later than Friday, April 25. Forms are also available at jerseycountyjournal. com under the services tab. If forms and photos are not received by the end of that day, they will not be included in these special sections. Call the Journal at 498-1234 with questions.

Drug Take Back April 26 Walgreens, the Jerseyville Police Department and the Jersey County Against Drugs Coalition offering the Jersey County area an opportunity to dispose of old and unused medications. A disposal box will be on the Walgreens parking lot Saturday, April 26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Unused and expired prescription and over-the-counter medications can be disposed of at that time. Medications can be in their original containers or removed from the container and directly disposed of into the disposal box. All solid dosage pharmaceutical products and liquids in consumer containers will be accepted. Liquids such as cough syrup should remain in their original container and be tightly sealed. Intravenous solutions and injectable medications will not be accepted. No injection needles or syringes will be accepted. Illicit substances such as marijuana or heroin cannot be disposed of in the drop box. All materials collected will be incinerated. This program is anonymous and all efforts will be made to protect the anonymity of individuals disposing of medication. No questions or requests for identification will be made. Law enforcement will not handle the medications at any time but will

CrossFX, a creative arts ministry team from Crossroads Community Church in Brighton consisting of middle school and high school youth, will be performing at 6 p.m. at Dow Southern Baptist Church Sunday, April 27. Black-light puppetry and God rods are a few of the tools used in the ministry. The mission of CrossFX is to reach people for Christ through a unique and creative program. This year’s program is entitled “Words” and it asks the audience to consciously look at words used on a daily basis and the impact of such words have towards others.

Thursday, April 24: Jersey County Health Department cholesterol and blood sugar testing by appointment. Call 498-9565, ext. 301. Friday, April 25: Rabies and Heartworm Clinic at Brighton Firehouse from 5:30 to 7 p.m. All vaccinations and heartworm prevention available. Sponsored by Jersey Calhoun Veterinary Hospital. Saturday, April 26: Free resume workshop at Brighton

Memorial Library District from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Rebecca Klenke, local resident and owner of Human Resources Development and Professional Coaching, will be on hand to review your existing resume’ or give pointers to help spruce up what you already have. Call the library at (618) 372-8450 for more information. Sunday, April 27: Riverbender. com Community Center second annual Wine Tasting Fundraiser

from 4 to 6 p.m. at Riverbender. com Community Center, 200 W. 3rd Street in downtown Alton. Event features appetizers, craft beer tasting provided by Ridgebrook Brewery and music by local musicians. Wednesday, April 30: Busch Stadium Day for JCHS vs. Sciota West Prairie High immediately following Cardinal game. For more information call Deanna at 4985521, ext. 226.

Calling all Moms and Sons: Jerseyville Parks and Recreation Department (JPRD) is once again offering a magical night for moms and sons this spring and spots are filling up fast! The Mom and Son Fiesta will be on Friday, May 2 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Susnig Center in Jerseyville. This night will be filled of memories that include dinner, dessert, music, dancing and activities. The event is for boys 3 to 12 years old and their moms, stepmoms, grandmas or guardians. Dress casual or get decked out for this special event. A photo of each couple will be taken and ready for pick-up the following Wednesday at the Susnig Center. Feel free to bring your camera for snap shots of the evening. This night is all inclusive for $15 per person. For those moms with multiple sons between the ages of 3 to 12, all are welcome for the per person fee. The event is open to both residents and non-residents. Space is limited and registration must be completed by Friday, April 25 at 3 p.m. For more information or to learn how to register, please visit jerseyville-il.us/ParkRec/forms. htm, call JPRD at 498-2222.

Calhoun Nursing and Rehab offers options for therapy By Carmen ensinger Jersey County Journal They say with age comes wisdom – but what they don’t tell you is that aches and pains go right along with it. As we get older, we slow down somewhat – what might have been routine when we were 20 now seems a chore at 60; after all, those joints have 40 more years of wear and tear on them than at age 20. Thanks to medical technology, just about everything these days can be replaced but perhaps the most common replacements are the hip and knee replacements. Oh, if it only were as easy as going into the hospital, getting a titanium knee or hip, going home and getting on with life. But it’s not that way – both require intensive therapy and sometimes this leads to a stay in a nursing home, where many facilities have such therapy programs. Calhoun Nursing and Rehab, however, is able to offer these services on both an inpatient and outpatient basis. As part of the Accelerated Care Plus (ACP) program they are able to offer a wide variety of occupational therapy, speech therapy and physical therapy program at the Hardin facility. “ACP’s specialized treatment

programs are used by thousands of recognized skilled nursing facilities along with outpatient clinics and home health care agencies throughout the U.S. to improve patient care, quality of life and independence,” Director of Rehabilitation Kari Burton said. “These programs are implemented by the rehab provider’s therapy staff in conjunction with ACP’s professional clinicians and the patient’s doctor.” Described as safe, non-invasive and medication free, ACP’s programs have been developed around the medical complexities of the geriatric population and have been used successfully for several years. Calhoun Nursing and Rehab has been participating in the program for eight years. Burton estimates that around 60 percent of the facilities 60 residents receive some kind of therapy from the ACP program. “They address a wide range of issues with therapy,” Burton said. “Everything from pain, edema, neuromuscular issues, stroke recovery, arthritis, COPD, carpal tunnel syndrome along with hip and knee replacements.” The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons estimates more than half a million hip and knee replacements are performed each year.

“Sometimes, even after having the joint replaced, some patients still experience pain, swelling, muscle weakness and stiffness,” Burton said. “These problems can prevent them from resuming their normal activities and doing what they enjoy doing most.” The ACP program uses three advanced techniques which seem to help people resume a more active lifestyle. These include infrared therapy, therapeutic ultrasound along with therapeutic exercise and electrical stimulation. Research has shown that high frequency ultrasound waves along with red and ultra can help reduce pain and swelling to joints and muscles. A combination of slow and gentle stretching along with simple strengthening exercises in combination with mild electrical pulses can help improve range of motion in one’s joints and increase muscle strength. What sets Calhoun apart from other local facilities is its ability to offer therapy on an outpatient basis. “Anyone, whether or not they need to be in a nursing home environment or just physical therapy, can come here – we just have to check to see if our company is able to take their insurance,” Burton said. “All they need is

a slip from their doctor saying they need physical therapy or any other form of therapy offered. Right now we even have a teenager coming here for therapy from a sporting accident.” Therapy is helping more and more patients be able to go back home. “We have 10 to 15 patients in our building who are trying to get back home,” Burton said. “They need the extra care until they are able to get back on their feet, but therapy will allow them to return home.”

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Call for a free, no-obligation appointment Jerseyville 888.436.2273 Jacksonville 217.245.9192


B4

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

OBITUARIES/NEWS

Quilt show May 10

Patsy Watson

Michael Marshall

Cora Spencer

Patsy Ann (Baecht) Watson, 82, of Dow died at 11:10 a.m. Wednesday, April 16, 2014 at the Jerseyville Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. She was born on Sept. 1, 1931 in Grafton, one of four children born to the late Edward Joseph and Mary Catherine (Williamsmeyer) Baecht. While in grade school in Grafton, Patsy met Charles E. Watson Jr., and the two married on Oct. 1, 1949 in Grafton. The two were blessed with six children, raising them in a warm, loving home, and shared 62 years together before his death on April 26, 2011. Patsy got the most joy in life from spending time with her family. She always put her family first and devoted most of her life to her beloved husband, children, and grandchildren. She was a wonderful mother and a friend to her children and had a special gift for making them feel loved and important. In addition to spending family time, she also enjoyed cooking, sewing and taking family vacations. Patsy was known for her witty sense of humor and always loved a good laugh. Most of all, Patsy enjoyed family gatherings at home, surrounded by those she loved. These gatherings were filled with love and laughter and will forever remain as wonderful memories for those that loved her. Surviving are three daughters and sons-in-law, Wendy and John Maupin of Grand Rivers, Ky., Terri and Brady Young of Jerseyville, and Diane and Denny Crank of Dow; two sons, Kevin Watson and Michael Watson, both of Dow; 10 grandchildren and their spouses, Christi and David Ferch of Minnesota, Amy Duncan, Nathan Maupin and Katie and David Walker, all of Kentucky, Jamie Young of Champaign, Matthew and Rebecca Young of Brighton, Kari Young of San Francisco, Calif., Jordan Watson and Paige Watson, both of Bethalto, and Mallorie Peebles of Dow; 10 great-grandchildren; and two sisters and brothers-in-law , Mary and George Kahl and Karen and James Weishaupt, all of Jerseyville. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her beloved daughter, Kimberly Ann Watson on Oct 15, 1978; and a brother and sisterin-law, Edward Joseph and Enid Louise Baecht. Visitation was from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, April 18 at Crawford Funeral Home in Jerseyville. Funeral services were conducted at 10 a.m. Saturday at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Grafton. Father William Hembrow officiated. She was laid to rest alongside her beloved husband and daughter at Oak Grove Cemetery in Jerseyville.

Michael Ray Marshall, 48, of Jerseyville died at 7:08 a.m. Monday, April 21, 2014 at his home. He was born June 24, 1965, in Jerseyville. He married Anne Frances Randolph Nov. 17, 1990, at St. Johns Catholic Church in Carrollton. He had been a farmer and a mechanic at Alton Steel. Survivors include his wife, Anne Frances Marshall of Jerseyville; children, Blake Marshall of Jerseyville and Kristen Marshall of Jerseyville; is mother, Doris Ann (Frost) Marshall of Medora; a sister, Michelle Honchell of Grafton and companion Doug Johns; and brothers, Mark and Sherrie Marshall of Jerseyville and Myron Marshall of Medora. He was preceded in death by his father, Wilbert Kenneth Marshall and his grandparents. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday, April 24, at Alexander and Gubser Funeral Home in Jerseyville, where funeral services will be conducted at 10 a.m. Friday. The Rev. Brent Meyer will officiate. Burial will take place in St. Francis Xavier Cemetery in Jerseyville. Memorials may be given to Melanoma research or St. Frances/Holy Ghost Schools.

Cora E. Spencer, 38, of Jerseyville died at 5:09 p.m. Saturday, April 12, 2014 at her home. She was born July 16, 1975, in Jerseyville. She married Todd D. Spencer March 10, 1995, in Jerseyville. He died April 28, 2011. A homemaker, she enjoyed riding motorcycles and loved to cook for her family and friends. Survivors include a son, Coty Spencer of Jerseyville; daughters, Maddelynn Spencer of Jerseyville and Abigail Spencer of Jerseyville; her mother, Susan Schulte of Grafton; a sister, Emily Schulte of O’Fallon, Mo.; and a niece, Brittney Schulte of O’Fallon, Mo. She was preceded in death by her husband; father, Robert Pfeiffer; and maternal grandparents, Don and Dorothy Schulte. Visitation was from 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 16, at Alexander and Gubser Funeral Home in Jerseyville, where funeral services will be conducted at 10 a.m. Thursday. The Rev. Sonny Renken will officiate. Burial will take place in Oak Grove Cemetery in Jerseyville. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to the family in care of the funeral home.

Charlotte Freeman

Charlotte I. (Wallace) Freeman, 92, of Grafton died peacefully at 2:30 a.m. Easter Sunday, April 20, 2014 at Jerseyville Manor Nursing Home. She was born in Grafton on April 3, 1922, one of eight children born to the late Alva and Birdie Mae (Wilson) Wallace. Charlotte was a devoted and loyal member of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Grafton, and retired as a cook at Principia College in Elsah. She was a devoted and loving wife, Mom and Grandma and Great-Grandma and will be deeply missed. She married LaVern “Bus” Freeman on March 14, 1944, at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Grafton, and they shared 58 years together before his death on Aug. 24, 2002. Surviving are her four children and their spouses, Pat and Sheryl Freeman of Grafton, Dennis and Karen Freeman of Fieldon, Judy and Darrel Owen of Coppell, Texas and Dan and Jana Freeman of Grapevine, Texas; eight grandchildren; and 10 greatgrandchildren. In addition to her parents and husband, she was preceded in death by two brothers, Wilbur Wallace and Donald Wallace; and five sisters, Geraldine Bittner, Virginia Bailey, Corinne Forbes, Cosette Seal and Lucille Franz. Visitation was from 4 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 22 at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Grafton. A Mass of Christian Burial was conducted at 10 a.m. Wednesday at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Grafton with Father William Hembrow officiating. Burial took place in Scenic Hill Cemetery in Grafton. Memorials may be given to the St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Grafton. Crawford Funeral Home in Jerseyville is in charge of arrangements.

Margaret Montgomery Margaret Mary Montgomery, 74, of Jerseyville died at 4:26 p.m. Monday, April 21, 2014 at Calhoun Nursing and Rehab. She was born Oct. 14, 1939, in Michael, daughter of the late Joseph L. and Viola (Howard) Koenig. She married Dean Allen Montgomery, Sr. Feb. 14, 1959, in Jerseyville. She had been a bookkeeper and homemaker. She was a member of Women of the Moose. Survivors include her husband, Dean Allen Montgomery, Sr. of Jerseyville; daughters, Pam and Greg Steinacher of Jerseyville and Ann Montgomery and companion Joan Chobanian of Taylorville; grandchildren, Keith (Natalie) Steinacher of Dow and Ryan (Jill) Steinacher of Godfrey; great-grandchildren, Alex and Sean Steinacher; a sister, Theresa Schaaf of Jerseyville; and a brother, Harold and Joann Koenig of Greenfield. She was preceded in death by her parents and a son, Dean Allen Montgomery, Jr. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, April 25 at Alexander and Gubser Funeral Home in Jerseyville, where funeral services will be conducted a 10 a.m. Saturday. Father William Hembrow will officiate. Burial will take place in GrimesNeely Cemetery. Memorials may be given to the Parkinson Foundation.

Submitted photo

Kathryn Schimpf and Carol Layton, members of the Prairie Union Quilt Guild, are pictured with one of their quilts.

Churn dash, flying geese, shooting star and Dresden plate… if these phrases conjure up visions of quilts, mark your calendar for Saturday, May 10. That’s when the Prairie Union Quilt Guild will host a quilt show from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Jersey County

Historical Society. Dozens of quilts will be displayed throughout the Cheney Mansion and historic Union Forest Church which are located on the grounds of the Historical Society at 601 N. State Street in Jerseyville.

Refreshments will be served on the front porch and portico throughout the hours of the quilt show. Tickets are $5 per person and include refreshments and may be purchased the day of the show at the Cheney Mansion.

Southwestern holding Fine Arts Night The Southwestern Middle School and High School art classes are having an Open House Art Show Monday, May 14 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. in the Middle School Commons and around the Middle School. The high school art work will be displayed in the MPR room in the high

school. The Southwestern Middle and High School Band are having a spring concert at 7 p.m. in the high school gym. The middle and high school library is having a Book Fair from 5 to 7:30 p.m. in the library.

Fosha receives NWTF scholarship Aaron Fosha of Jerseyville recently received a scholarship for $500 through the Midwest Gobblers chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation in Jerseyville. NWTF scholarships are set up to benefit youth with a commitment to conservation and preserving the hunting tradition, and recipients may pursue any type of degree they wish. The scholarship program is part of the NWTF’s Five-Star program, making $500,000 available each year to graduating seniors throughout the U.S. by awarding more than 800 scholarships annually. To date, the NWTF has awarded more than $3.6 million through the scholarship program. Applicants for the scholarship must be licensed hunters to be eligible. They are judged on their scholastic achievements, leadership abilities, community involvement and demonstrated commitment to conservation. The winners of the local chapter scholarship are then eligible for the $1,000 state award and finally, state winners are eligible for the NWTF’s $10,000 national scholarship. “The NWTF is proud to provide

Something for everyone...

scholarships for students who have proven their dedication to conservation and acted as leaders in their schools and communities,” said Midwest Gobblers president, John Wagner. Aaron is sure to serve the NWTF and their generation as an excellent spokesperson for our sport in the academic field they pursue.” The NWTF is a national nonprofit conservation organization that was founded in 1973 and has worked with wildlife agencies to restore wild turkey populations from 1.3 million wild turkeys to nearly 7 million today. Now, NWTF’s volunteers raise funds and work daily to improve critical wildlife habitat, increase access to public hunting land and introduce new people to the outdoors and hunting. Together, the NWTF’s partners, sponsors and grassroots members have raised and spent more than $372 million preserving our hunting heritage and conserving 17 million acres of wildlife habitat. For more information, contact Wagner at 618-729-3831, call 1-800-THE-NWTF for visit nwtf. org.

Submitted photo

John Wagner, left, president of Midwest Gobblers, presents Aaron Fosha with a $500 scholarship.

Submitted photo

MAUNDY THURSDAY SERVICE FEATURES ‘THE OTHER TWELVE: THE WOMEN OF THE CROSS’ A Maundy Thursday dramatic presentation of “The Other Twelve: The Women of the Cross” was presented at the Jerseyville United Methodist Church Thursday, April 17. The true meaning of the night came through as each woman told her story of how Jesus had changed her life forever. Directed by Jenn Bell with set design by Peggy Reynolds, the cast included: front, Beth King, Cindi Barrett, Melissa Medford, Tabitha Schulte; middle row, Cathy Helfer, Paula Lewis, Delsie Eads and Amy Lowis; back row, Sara Hudson, Lori Moore, Mary Eisler and DeeDee Longley.

JERSEY

COUNTY JOURNAL


Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

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Going on a hunt

Robert Lyons/Jersey County Journal

Penelope Mireles-Cook, 1, inspects a blue egg she pulled from a large container of Easter eggs Friday morning at Willow Rose. Robert Lyons/Jersey County Journal

Chloe Nurdin, 3, shows off her prizes from Friday morning's Easter egg hunt while being held by mother Kasey McDaniels at Willow Rose Rehab & Health Care.

Robert Lyons/Jersey County Journal

Alexis Draper, 6, finds a golden ticket in one of her Easter eggs Friday morning at Willow Rose. The ticket allowed Draper to receive a prize.

Robert Lyons/Jersey County Journal Robert Lyons/Jersey County Journal

Tristan Dziurowitz, 6, visits with the Easter Bunny Friday morning after an Easter egg hunt at Willow Rose Rehab and Healthcare in Jerseyville.

Willow Rose Activities Director Carolyn Short gathers prizes for Easter egg hunt participants Friday morning. Tickets were inside many of the 5,000 eggs, which corresponded with various bonus prizes.

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Robert Lyons/Jersey County Journal

Riley Ball, 5, scoops up Easter eggs Friday morning at Willow Rose Rehab & Health Care in Jerseyville. Willow Rose's annual Easter event featured a bounce house, visits with the Easter Bunny and more than 6,000 eggs.


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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

NEWS

Jerseyville, Illinois

Submitted photo

EARNS

Submitted photo

WILLOW ROSE

ANNOUNCES PRIZE WINNERS

Willow Rose Rehab and Health Care hosted the 2014 community Easter egg hunt on Good Friday with a wonderful sunny morning! Fun was had by all! Left to right, Dolly Liles, Haillie Steele, Ellie Laird, Serenity Cathcart, the Easter Bunny, and Ellen Stiritz. Willow Rose residents enjoyed watching all the kids at the egg hunt. Haillie, Ellie, and Serenity found the special prize eggs and received the prize baskets.

RANK OF

EAGLE SCOUT

Mark Wendell, right, son of Dave and Diane Wendell, recently earned the rank of Eagle Scout. For his Eagle Scout project, Mark, with the help of his troop members, repaired, cleaned, and restored a small rural cemetery in Jersey County with headstones dating over 100 years old. Troop members who helped with the project are, left to right, Alan Wendell, Gabriel Dizon, Michael Dizon, Ryan Croxford, Kevin Weiner, Tyler Derstine and Luke Hill. Beth McGlasson of the Jersey County Historical Society informed Mark on the history of and laws governing these old cemeteries and noted that Jersey County has more than 100 cemeteries similar to this one. Mark is a member of Troop 93 sponsored by Holy Ghost Catholic Church. He will be honored with a Court of Honor Saturday, April 26.

Cancer survivors, caregivers invited to dinner, Lap of Hope to kick off ACS Relay For Life

Submitted photo

JSB

MAKES DONATION TO

RIVERBEND HUMANE SOCIETY

With hearing the recent news on the possible closure of the Riverbend Humane Society, Jersey State Bank employees and customers joined together. A $550 check, dog and cat food, and some treats were presented to Robin Robins with the Riverbend Humane Society. Left to right, Bonnie Ward, Rick Solum, Mark Schaefer, Kathy Landess, Robin Robinson accepting a check from Joni Soer, Tiffaney Ellifritz, Jenny King, Kelsey Gibson. Kelly Plummer and Kelli Keller are in the back row.

A cancer survivor is defined by the American Cancer Society as anyone who is living with cancer, from the date of diagnosis. If you have ever heard the words “You have cancer,” we invite your to participate as a survivor at the survivor dinner on June 6 at 5 p.m. Please join Relay for Life at Jersey Community High School, 801 N. State St, Jerseyville, at no cost to the survivor and their caregiver. As a cancer survivor, you’re an inspiration to many. Your courage gives hope to those on the cancer journey and empowers us all to fight back for a cure. That’s why there’s a special place for you at the American Cancer Society Relay For Life. Please RSVP by May 23 to Molly Cannon, (618) 946-1063 or rfljerseysurvivor@gmail.com. Then on June 6 at 7 p.m., the Relay For Life of Jersey County will kick off with a special Survivors Lap, a moving experience honoring those who have defeated cancer. Survivors will join together to walk the opening lap, unified in victory and hope, while the rest of the event’s participants surround the track to cheer them on. This empowering celebration is just a small piece of the special experience of Relay

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For Life. Relay For Life is a unique grassroots fundraising event in which individuals and teams of participants in over 6,100 communities nationwide walk around a track overnight to celebrate the lives of those who have faced cancer, remember loved one lost, and commit to fight back against the disease. The money raised through Relay For Life supports the efforts of the American Cancer Society to create a world with less cancer and more birthdays. Relay For Life events are held at an athletic track, park, or fairground, with the goal of keeping at least one team member on the track or pathway at all times. Teams do most of their fundraising prior to the event, but some teams also hold creative fundraisers at their camp sites at the event. Relay For Life brings together friends, families, businesses, hospitals, schools, and faith-based groups to finish the fight against cancer. If you are a cancer survivor or caregiver and would like to take part in the Relay For Life of Jersey County, call your American Cancer Society at 1-217-523-4534 or visit www.relayforlife.org/triil


Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

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WHAT'S HAPPENING AROUND


Wednesday, aPril 23, 2014

CLASSIFIEDS The People’s Marketplace

Reaching 75,000 Readers Each Week! CALHOUN NEWS-HERALD P.O. Box 367, Hardin, IL 62047

PIKE PRESS

E-Mail: cnhnews@campbellpublications.net Monday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tuesday 9 a.m. - 11 a.m. Friday 1 - 4 p..m.

P.O. Box 70, Pittsfield, IL 62363 Ph: 217-285-2345 Fax: 630-206-0320 E-Mail: ppnews@campbellpublications.net Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

GREENE PRAIRIE PRESS

Scott County Times

Ph: 618-576-2345 Fax: 630-206-0320

P.O. Box 265, Carrollton, IL 62016 Ph: 217-942-9100 Fax: 630-206-0320 E-Mail: gppress@campbellpublications.net

P.O. Box 138, Winchester, IL 62694 Ph: 217-742-3313 • Fax: 630-206-0320 E-Mail: sctnews@campbellpublications.net

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

THE WEEKLY MESSENGER

Monday, Tuesday & Friday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

832 South State, Jerseyville, IL. 62052 Ph: 618-498-1234 • Fax: 630-206-0320 E-mail:

jcjnews@campbellpublications.net

Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Monday 8:30 a.m. - Noon Friday 8:30 - 11:30 a.m.

Ph: 217-734-2345 • Fax: 630-206-0320 E-Mail: wmnews@campbellpublications.net

*Certain classifications of ads appearing in The People’s Marketplace also appear on all Campbell Publications websites at no additional charge.

100 AUTOmOTIvE FOR SALE: Toyota Prius, 55,000 miles. 45 mpg. Silver color, good condition, thorough maintenance records. Serviced 11 April. Asking $10,000. Jerseyville. Phone: 618-49807018. 4.30

200 BUSINESS SOUTH SIDE SHOP 987 W. Washington St. Next to Neal Tire. Used furniture, beds, appliances, antiques, vintage, home decor, tools, and lawn mowers. Something for almost everyone. Open 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 7 days a week. New items arriving daily. We buy, sell & trade. 4.23 RIck'S LAwN EqUIPmENT Parts and services for all brands. Tillers, lawn mowers, chain saws, blowers and seedeaters. We sell the best and service the rest. Gravely, Stihl, Husqvarna, Zero turn mowers on sale! Pick-up and delivery. Hwy 54, west of the Illinois bridge. 573-754-5055. 6.25 THE TRADING POST 501 E. Prairie St., Jerseyville, IL. Open Monday - Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Over 7,000 sq. ft. of clean furniture, appliances, sporting goods and tools. Plus 2000 smalls @ $2.00 or less! We buy full or partial estates/households of GOOD, CLEAN furniture and appliances. Why buy new when "slightly used" will do? For more information, call: 618-639-4569. TFN cOLmAN'S cOUNTRy cAmPERS 2013's on sale. Big discounts. Sales, service, parts, propane. #2 Fun St. Hartford, IL 62048. 618254-1180. www.colmanscampers.com. TFN 2012 mOBILE HOmE STImULUS PAckAGE: up to $25,000 for your trade in. Discounts for land owners. Financing available. Prequalify by phone 314-5627459. tf SELLBEST, 110 W. Quincy St., Griggsville: Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Quality Used Furniture & AppliancesWashers, Dryers, Freezers, Fridges, Microwave, Electric Stoves, Twin, Full, Queen Beds, New Mattress Sets, Bedroom Furniture, Tables & Chairs, Upholstered Furniture, Tools, T.V.s, Stereos. Everything for the home and you! Call 217-2422252.TF

300 FARm mARkET

400D FOR RENT Pike county 1 AND 2 BR apartments available. No smoking. No pets. Security deposit required. 217-285-4502 TF OFFIcE SPAcE Prime location. Ample parking. West Washington St., Pittsfield. Call 217-285-2848 or 217-2855925. 5.28 NEwLy REmODELED office space on the square in Pittsfield. For more information, call 217-473-8811. TF FOR RENT: 2 BDR bungalow, newly remodeled, Pleasant Hill. References required. Send inquiries to: General delivery\Rental. Pleasant Hill, IL 62366. TF

GOOD SELEcTION mATTRESS sets starting at $199 for twin size. End tables starting at $119. Swivel rockers starting at $299. Sofas and reclining sofas. Miller furniture, 115 West Washington St., Pittsfield. Phone 1-217-2856212. 5.7 GOODyEAR T125/70D15 95M Temp. spare for 1998 Buick. Never used. $20. 217285-4975. TF

1500 yARD SALES

DRIvERS wANTED to make daily runs to Quincy. Must have a CDL and good driving record. Apply in person at Hofmeister Welding, Inc. 402 N. Wall St. Griggsville, IL 62340. No phone calls. 4.23

NO TRESPASSING no hunting on property owned by Martha Knight (also known as Marty Aderton), Lincoln Valley Road, Hardin. 11.11.14

NEED ExTRA cash? Sell your used items in The People's Marketplace Classifieds. One phone call puts your ad in six newspapers....a total circulation of almost 22,000 readers! Plus your ad will be put online for FREE

EASTSIDE HEALTH & rehab. Pittsfield, IL. RNs, LPNs and CNAs. All shift available. Come in and apply. 4.23 cHURcH PIANIST Sunday morning in SVC in Jerseyville, prelude/hymns/ postlude and accompany vocal soloist. Classical training preferred. By audition. 618-374-2858. 5.7

mAINTENANcE POSITION The Center for American Archaeology in Kampsville, IL is seeking skilled applicants for full-time employment. Must be experienced in carpentry, plumbing, grounds, small engines, old buildings, and light cleaning. $28,000/ yr compensation and benefits. Six months probationary period. Send resumes with two references to CAA P.O. Box 366, Kampsville, IL 62053. Inquiries: caa@ caa-archeology.org or 618653-4316. 4.23 NPDL IN GRIGGSvILLE is accepting bids for mowing. Written bids will be accepted until 4/25. 119 S. Corey or P.O. Box 419, Griggsville, IL, 62340. 4.23 TANDUm AND TRAILER truck drivers wanted. Call 217-242-0838. 4.30 wORk wANTED Pike County odd jobs, cleanup, lawn care, carpentry, painting, dry wall, gutters, stump removal. 217-491-5872. TF

LOOkING FOR pasture ground to rent. Will use cattle, together with rotational grazing techniques to build the soil. 217-370-2743. 4.23

400A FOR RENT calhoun county APARTmENT FOR rent. Call Matt 618-576-2766 or 618576-2449. TFCNH cOmmERcIAL BUILDING for rent. Hardin, IL. Call (618)498-1234 and ask for Business Department. TF FOR RENT: Renovated winter 2014!! New cabinets, flooring, fresh paint & more; one bedroom apts. in Hardin; water/sewer/trash included; no dogs, no smoking; $350/ mo, deposit required; call 618-576-2662. 4.30 FOR RENT: 3 bedroom, 2 bath house. Full basement in the country outside of Kampsville, IL. No pets. Call 217-370-7310. 5.7

400D FOR RENT Pike county 2 BR HOUSE for rent No smoking No pets. Security deposit required. 217-2854502. TF

PRIvATE PROPERTy No hunting or trespassing on any property owned by Gary Rothe, Teri Rothe Kirbach and Debra Rothe in Jerseyville, Illinois in Jersey County. Violaters will be prosecuted. 12.19.14

900D NO TRESPASSING Pike county NO TRESPASSING on any and all land owned by Double Creek Farms, Inc. TF

my LAND located in Section 18 SW of Pearl is private property. Hunting, fishing, trapping, trespassing, for any purpose, without the written, signed permission of the owner, is strictly forbidden. Violators will be prosecuted. Timothy Brinkman. 3.19.15

1100A REAL ESTATE calhoun county mULTI-UNIT RENTAL property. Great income producing property. Priced to sell! Call Chris at the Bank of Calhoun. 618-576-2211. TF

1100D REAL ESTATE Pike county LARGE, NEw beautiful home near Summer Hill for sale with 19 1/2, acres, a finished basement, pond, inground pool, attached and detached garage with living quarters in the back of it, pull barn and much, much more. Please call 217-473-8811 for more information. tf

DON'T PAy high heating bills eliminate them with an outdoor wood furnace from Central Boiler Call Today. 217236-3022. TF

wANTED: LIcENSED BEAUTIcIAN to work 1 day a week, approximately 3 hours. Apply in person at West Pine Retirement Village, 508 W. Pine St., Jerseyville. 4.30

BED qUEEN Pillowtop mattress set. New in the plastic. $175. Can deliver. (618)7722710. 5.7.14

615 HUNTING

1100E REAL ESTATE Scott county

TImE cLOckS, Acroprint 125 $100 and Acroprint 150 $125. Call Jane at 618-4981234. TFN

LOcAL HUNTER looking to lease hunting ground. Short term/long term. 217-829-4008. 2.27.15

FOR SALE 8 ft disc, like new generator, wagon, hog cart. 217-734-1811. TF

900c NO TRESPASSING Jersey county

HOUSE FOR SALE: 4 Excellent starter home for a single person or a couple in a small rural community with excellent neighbors. 918 square feet cozy home is situated on a large lot. If interested, please call 1-217242-7262. tf

FOR SALE: garden tiller. Call 731-691-6831. 5.7

FOR SALE: Perfection cook stove, apt. size, gas, 20 inches wide, white with LP orifices, $75. Contact Rose at 217-734-2875. 4.23 REcLINERS REcLINERS recliners, including the extra large body rest lift recliner made by best chair, the best in the industry. The back lays flat for resting or seat lifts up to standing position. Also power lift recliners in small and medium size. Also good selection rocker recliners and space saver recliners. All sizes and colors. Heat and massage recliners, come in and try them out. Miller furniture. 115 W. Washington St., Pittsfield. Monday through Friday, 9-11 a.m., 12:30 to 5 p.m. Sat. 9-11 a.m. . 4.23

600 HELP wANTED DRIvERS: LOcAL Springfield, MO ocmpany. Earn up to .38+ w/ incentive pay. Looking for professional drivers to haul regional freight. Offering good benefits. Sign on bonus and home every 7-10 days. 866-374-8487 www.drivetransland.com. 4.23 DRIvERS: Dedicated. Regional. Home weekly/biweekly guaranteed. Start up to $.44 cpm. Great benefits + bonuses. 90% no touch freight. 70% drop & hook. 877-704-3773. 4.23

Saturday May 3, 2014 • 10:00 AM Auction Location: 610 North Jackson Pittsfield, IL

• 1 1⁄2 story Bungalow Home • ~1100 s.f. 2 Bedrooms • Hardwood floors! • Vinyl Siding, 3 Porches! • GFA Furnace & Hot Water • Large ~ 80’x 160’ Lot • ~15x22’ Detached Garage • Great Location!

B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County • 1200 Services* • 1300 Wanted* • 1310 Web Sites* • 1400 Work Wanted • 1500 Yard Sales A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County

615 HUNTING

wANTED Helper for a DORS client in Pittsfield. Must be reliable, non-smoker and have your own transportation. 217-491-0383. 4.23

500 FOR SALE

• 610 Hobby Shop/Handicrafts* • 620 Kids For Hire • 700 Lost/Found • 710 Meeting Reminders • 800 Miscellaneous* • 900 No Trespassing A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County • 1000 Pets* • 1100 Real Estate* A: Calhoun County

600 HELP wANTED

HOUSE FOR RENT f3 BR, 1.5 BA located in Southern Pike County. Pikeland School. $525/mo, security deposit, no smoking, no pets. (217)8832820. 4.30

LOOkING FOR a home to rent in Winchester? Call Lyle with Jones Real Estate at (217)-652-2522 for more details. 4.30

ous or does not infringe on the privacy of any individual or entity. All advertisements are accepted and published by the newspaper upon the representation that the agency and/or advertiser will indemnify and hold harmless the newspaper from any loss or expense, including the cost of defense and any settlement and/or judgment resulting from claims based upon the contents of any advertisement, including claims or suits for defamation, libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism or copyright infringement. All advertisements created by the newspaper are not considered a “work made for hire” and the newspaper retains the copyright to all advertisements created by the newspaper for the advertiser. The advertisement may not be reproduced without the written permission of the newspaper. EquAL HOuSING OPPORTuNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination, in the sale, rental or financing of housing. In addition, the Illinois Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination based on age, ancestry, marital status, or unfavorable discharge. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which violates the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call the Chicago area Fair Housing Alliance toll free at 1-800-659-OPEN.

CLASSIFICATIONS • 100 Automotive * • 200 Business* • 210 Church Services • 220 Collectibles* • 300 Farm Market* • 400 For Rent* A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County F: Miscellaneous • 500 For Sale* • 600 Help Wanted*

PART-TImE nights and weekends. Must be good with people. Must be able to life 40 lbs. Please send resume to: Job Applicants, P.O. Box 70LS, Pittsfield, IL 62363 4.30

FOR RENT storage building Winchester. all 618-4981234. Ask for Jane. TF

ESTATE AUCTION

GENERAL INFORMATION DEADLINES: Classified ads, Monday 3:30 p.m. (For placement and for cancellation.) CLASSIFIED RATES: First insertion, 25¢ per word, minimum $6. Consecutive repeat insertion, 15¢ per word, minimum $5. Prepayment is required. Any change in original ad will be considered start of a new ad. Blind Ad, $4 service charge, plus postage if replies are to be mailed. Yard Sales, $6 up to 20 words. No Trespassing notice, one year, up to 20 words, $60. ADVERTISING POLICY The following are policies of: Calhoun News-Herald, Greene Prairie Press, Jersey County Journal, Pike Press, Scott County Times and The Weekly Messenger: We are not responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of display and classified advertising. One free insertion will be allowed for a classified ad with a significant mistake. Please let us know immediately. The newspaper reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement submitted for publication. Yard Sale and Work Wanted ads are payable in advance. Proper identification is required of persons placing ads. A F.O.I.D. card will be asked for when selling a firearm. No exceptions will be allowed. Newspaper reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including the right to do so after the ad has been accepted for publication but before publication occurs. The advertiserʼs sole remedy for such refusal shall be the refund of the funds paid to purchase the ad. Advertisements are accepted by the newspaper upon the representation that the agency and/or advertiser is authorized to publish the contents and subject matter of the advertisement and that it is not libel-

HOmE IN cOUNTRy for sale or rent. 3 BR, 2 BA, completely remodeled. No pets. Deposit and references required. 918-223-7780. Located in New Canton. 4.23

400E FOR RENT Scott county

The PeoPle’s MarkeTPlace classifieds

DEER HUNTERS: Rent Pittsfield country home away from home. 3 BR, sleeps 6+, fully furnished, move-in ready. 573-549-2530. Cell: 636-3586994. TF LOcAL HUNTER looking to lease a farm in Pike County or Northern Calhoun County 217491-0181. TF PRImE PIkE & Macoupin County deer hunting property for lease. 217-370-9408. 4.30 DEER HUNTING Northern Pike County, IL. Over 150 acres (might split up 60%-40%) timber, CRP, ponds and creeks. Walk in hunting. No outfitters. Lease and insurance required. $50 per acre minimum. Archery and shotgunfull season. By landowner. 217336-2191. 4.30 SEEkING LAND ~200 acres to lease for bow/gun season in Pike or surrounding counties. Personal lease for hunting only, not an outfitter. 601-466-4436. 5.7

900A NO TRESPASSING calhoun county ABSOLUTELy NO TRESPASSING on the property of Lloyd and Debbie DeSherlia in Batchtown. Violators will be prosecuted. 8.7.14 NO TRESPASSING on Marty Aderton property in Hardin. 7.14.14 NO TRESPASSING On Jack and Mary Jeaen Aderton properety in Hardin. 5.1.14

LOOkING FOR a new home site? Check out Valley Tree Estates in Winchester. Large lots with city utilities in quiet and peaceful subdivision. Call Lyle at (217)-652-2522 for more details. 4.30

1200 SERvIcES PIANO LESSONS available at A Heart of Music studio, now enrolling for July! Contact Becky: rsbfitzmaurice@gmail.com or visit rsbfitzmaurice.musicteachershelper.com. 4.23 I HAvE a pickup truck. Spring cleaning has changes. I will haul to the dumpsters for a reasonable donation. Also available for odd jobs and mowing. Call Ron 217-2484278. 4.23 SmITH LAwN SERvIcE 20 yrs experience. Fully insured. Free estimates. 217-370-5416. 5.7

1400 wORk wANTED wORk wANTED Odd jobs, cleanup, lawn care, carpentry, painting, dry wall, gutters, stump removal. 217491-5872. 4.23

1500D yARD SALES Pike county AUcTION April 25, 2014. 5 p.m. Colliver winery, #2 Rooster Way, Barry, IL. Selling: Cane chairs, rocker, wardrobe, large lot wooden boxes, orange crates, antique toys, coffee grinder, lighted beer signs, garage full of long handled tools and hand tools. Partial estate of Berniece Ogle Doyle, consignments from Barry Baptist Church and others. Lister Auction Servie, not responsible for accidents. More information and pictures at AuctionZip #36719. 4.23 mEGA yARD SALE Sat., Apr. 26. Summer Hill Park. Clothes, vintage rustic items, crafts, microwave, music, sewing machine, misc. items. 8 a.m. - ? 4.23 PITTSFIELD: 1118 SUNSET Drive, Monday-Friday 7 a.m. 7 p.m. 4/28-5/2. Girls and boys, infants to size 8, toys, teenadult clothing, carseats, households, books/CDs, too much to mention! Freesmeyer 4.23

Check website or call for terms, info or to view home prior to auction! Also selling Antiques and Collectibles • Antique Furniture • Appliances & Misc. Attorney- Eddie Carpenter 305 W. State St, Jacksonville, IL 217-245-7015

LOUISE JONES ESTATE James Jones - Executor Curless Auction – Brian Curless Auctioneer 217-242-1665 IL Lic. #440000013 www.curlessauction.com

AUCTION

GUNS - TOOLS - PRIMITIVES – 50, 60 & 70s TOYS - ANTIQUES - ARROW HEADS - HOUSEHOLD & COLLECTABLES

RNs LPNs

The Best Kept Secret in Nursing! Correctional nursing is a unique specialty which can provide a rewarding career in a specialized field that encompasses ambulatory care, health education, urgent care and infirmary care. Corizon, provider of health services for the Missouri Department of Corrections, has excellent opportunities at the Northeast Correctional Center in Bowling Green, MO. Corizon offers competitive rates, excellent benefits and the opportunity to try something new in this growing specialty field. PRN positions available.

also

Please Call: Roschell Davis or Tammy Anderson 573-324-6520 roschell.davis@ corizonhealth.com www.corizonhealth.com EOE/AAP/DTR

SALE 311 E. JEFFERSON Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 9-3. Furniture, chairs, tables, windows, doors, DIY projects, fabric, paint, vintage smalls. 4.23

Public Consignment Auction FARM MACHINERY ~ ANTIQUE EQUIPMENT ~ LAWN & GARDEN VEHICLES ~ MISC. EQUIPMENT

SAT., MAY, 3rd • 2014 @ 10 A.M. AUCTION HELD: At the Scott County 4-H Grounds, 401 North Walnut St. Winchester, Il. Under the clear span Building. KENNY COLLISON, Winchester, IL. Will sell: GUNS: Ruger model 357 Blackhawk 6 shot pistol w/wood grip – Mossberg 500A 12 ga. Pump - Winchester 22 cal. model 67 bolt action rifle – Daisy BB gun – ARROWHEADS, Found in Scott Co. Approx. 160 various arrowheads, misc. bits, & some pottery pcs. – arrowhead books – arrowhead frames – Kachina dolls – COLLECTABLES Winchester clock – framed prints – 1946 auction sale bill – 1915 threshing photos – small glass display (from Bluffs Phillips 66) – old bottles & jugs – apple peeler – Prairie land & Rees recall buttons – telegraph board – smoking stand – occasional table – Winnie the Pooh watch - Man O War print in frame – adv. Pcs. LIBBY DAVIS, Winchester, IL. Will sell: ANTIQUES Kitchen cabinet w/flour sifter – 48” round oak table w/ball & claw ft. – 6 press back oak chairs – dresser – iron head board for bed – 18” grind stone – ladder back chair – kerosene lamps – oak high back dbl bed frame – large Coronado radio, needs work – approx 12 Platt & Monk 1934 children’s books, (see web site for list) - Mikasa china – old clocks –match books from around world – HOUSEHOLD 32” JVC TV – Pro form treadmill – glassware – metal lawn chair – fishing poles – socket sets & hand tools - fertilizer spreader – 3 lanterns – lawn chairs – child’s sled – picture frames – lots Mardi Gras beads – office chair. FRED LEINER, Winchester, IL. Will sell: (Note) most the items were boxed at time of listing, several items to sell not listed. Some items from the Grout house on Main st. 50, 60 & 70s toys – Tonka fire truck – Tru Scale combine – erector set – army men – bike directional signal – baseball & football cards – misc. games – Fisher Price Circus Wagon - 60 & 70s electronic gadgets – small TV – telescope - WW 2 TO 1990 ham radio equipment – reel to reel player – HOUSEHOLD 6’ folding table – folding chairs – fans – security file safe – magnifying lights - upright vacuum – micro wave – steam cleaner – classical CDs & DVDs – 2 DVD players – lamps – books - small elec. appliances – towels & linens – china & glassware TOOLS New Dewalt saws all - circular saw – Husqvarna chain saw – hedge trimmer – leaf blower – ANTIQUES 6 wicker chairs – 2 wicker plant stands – flat top trunks – framed paintings – occasional table w/drawers – Zenith radio/record player, other items to sell not listed. For listing & photos see auctionzip.com Auctioneer I.D. # 16215 TERMS OF PERSONAL PROPERTY; CASH. Buyer number issued and personal check accepted upon presentation of positive photo identification. All Federal gun laws apply, bring current F.O.I.D

AUCTIONEERS

DARRELL MOORE, WINCHESTER, IL (217)-473-5486 ROGER STRANG, VIRGINIA, IL. (217)-370-2530 DICK SAMPLES, JACKSONVILLE, IL. (217)-245-5010

SAT., APRIL 26 • 9:30 A.M. LOCATION: 1 1/2 miles south of Greenfield, Illinois, Joyce Angus Farms. Watch For Markers TRACTORS: Long 360 Tractor; JD 4010 DSL Tractor; 1970 JD 4020 Tractor w/ 148 Loader; IHC Super C; Fork Lift; Skid Loader; JD 4430 Tractor Quad Range; JD 4430 Tractor; 1066 Int. Tractor (restored); AC D 11/Blade; COMBINES: JD 920 Platform; TRUCKS: 1967 Lone Star Truck; 1985 Ford 7000 Dump Truck; Lacrosse HD 24 Ton Trailer; 1999 GMC Jimmy; EQUIPMENT: JD 7000 6 Row Planter; 20’ Bush Hog Vertical Till Silage Chopper; JD Mower Conditioner; Gravity Wagons; JD Power Seeder; Skid Loader; Hay Rake, Drill; Cattle Feeders; 2- 6 Ton Fert. Spreaders; JD 630 29’ Disk; JD 960 S Tine Field Cult.; JD 535 Round Baler/Wrap; 2 Anhydrous Tanks/ Running Gears; JD Gator; Bush Hog Disk Mower; Case Loader; Fork Lift; Bush Hog 15’ Flex Shredder; 8x61 Swing-a-way Auger; Danhauser Post Digger; MF Round Baler 4x6; 400 BU Center Drop/Tri Axel Trailer; 2 BTM Plow; Fast Hitch Blade 6’; Fast Hitch Carry All; Barge Wagon; Saddle Tanks; 2 - Gehl Silage Wagons; JD 3800 Silage Chopper/Two Row Head; 8’ Front Blade for Tractor; Sunflower 29’ 8.5 Spacing Disk; DMI 4300 13 Knife Anhydrous Applicator; Several Shredders; Kewanee Flat-Fold 8 Row Cultivator; NH 55 Hay Rake; NH 855 Round Baler; Landpride 72 Finishing Mower; 11 Knife No-Till Anhydrous Bar; DB 590 Gain Cart; Gehl 312 Manure Spreader; 5032 TMX Mixer; MISCELLANEOUS: Hedge Posts, New Cattle Gates; Used Cattle Gates; Water Pipe; Used Metal; Pipe Fittings; Snowmobile; Several Augers; Concrete Blocks; Steel Posts; Camping Supplies; Gas Grill; Saddles; LAWN & GARDEN: Several Riding Mowers; Fence Mowers; Snapper Snow Blower; Yardman 20” Push Mower; Shop Tools; Garden Tools; JD 110 Setup to look like 4200.

MANY OTHER ITEMS BEING CONSIGNED, THIS SALE BILL WAS PRINTED 30 DAYS PRIOR TO THE SALE; ONE CLOSE-OUT PENDING!!! FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL AUCTIONEERS: Jerry Joyce Larry Derricks Mark Pennell L.N. #440.000186 L.N. #440.000206 L.N. #440.000552 (217)368-2300 (217)243-4095 (217)243-1455 (217)248-4073 (217)370-7007 I.D. NEEDED TO OBTAIN NUMBER - NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS. ALL STATEMENTS MADE DAY OF SALE TAKE PRECEDENCE OVER PRINTED MATTER.

FOR RENT STORAGE BUILDING WINCHESTER

CALL 618-498-1234 Ask for Jane

TIME CLOCKS FOR SALE Models

Acroprint 125 - $100 Acroprint 150 - $125

CALL (217) 285-2345 TO ADVERTISE WITH US!

caMPbell PublicaTions

CALL JANE 618-498-1234

Great Auctions Start Here!

ILLINOIS CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK ADVERTISING SERVICES

HEALTH

Need to place your ad throughout Illinois? Call Illinois Press Advertising Service 217-241-1700 or visit www.illinoispress.org

BOATS THE BOAT DOCK We Buy & Consign Used Boats! 217-793-7300 theboatdock.com

CAMPERS/RVS Colman’s RV - We Buy And Consign Used RV’s And Campers 217-787-8653 www.colmansrv.com

CAREER/EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE BECOME AN AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECH. FAA APPROVED TRAINING. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL AIM 800-481-8312.

WEIGHTLOSS / WELLNESS COURSE, develops discipline, evidence based, daily accountability, online with coaching support, 20 weeks $539, 100% guaranteed results, corporate and group discounts, LLUniversity.com, 1-800-859-1776. IF YOU USED THE BLOOD THINNER PRADAXA and suffered internal bleeding, hemorrhaging, required hospitalization or a loved one died while taking Pradaxa between October 2010 and the present. You may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles H. Johnson 1-800-535-5727

HELP WANTED DRIVERS Central and Eastern Illinois Experienced CDL A Drivers Wanted! $1500 SIGN ON, $60K-$70K Annually! Dedicated Customer, Home Weekly and Excellent Benefits. Call 888-409-6033 online www.DRIVEJTC.com

Daily Express needs Contractors for Stepdeck & Lowboy hauls! FREE TRAILERS! “New” Daily Expedited Fleet! Also Heavy Haul and Specialized Division available. www.dailyrecruiting.com or 800-669-6414 Hiring One Ton and 3/4 Ton Pickup trucks to deliver RV’s. 10¢/mile Sign-On Bonus, 4 Terminals & 8 Backhaul Locations. Call 866-764-1601 or www.foremosttransport.com Tanker & Flatbed Company Drivers/Independent Contractors! Immediate Placement Available Best Opportunities in the Trucking Business CALL TODAY 800-277-0212 or www.driveforprime.com Drivers - CDL-A SOLO & TEAM DRIVERS NEEDED! Top Pay for Hazmat. OTR & Regional Runs. CDL Grads Welcome. 700+ Trucks & Growing! 888-928-6011 www.Drive4Total.com

Owner Operators CDL-A Up to $200,000 a year. Out 2 weeks. Home as many days as needed. Lease Purchase Available. Sign On Bonus. 855803-2846

HOMES FOR SALE Tennessee Log Home Sale! New, ready to finish log cabin on 5+ acres with FREE Boat Slip on 160,000 acre Kentucky Lake. Only $89,900. Excellent financing. Call now 877-888-0267, x97

REAL ESTATE / HOMES FOR SALE Low/No Down Programs FHA/VA/USDA Paula Wykoff NMLS#137830 Premier Home Mtg NMLS#162291 919 S 8th Springfield, IL 62703 217-522-5191 apply online https://pwykoff.premierhome mortgage.com Illinois Residential Mortgage Licensee EHL

Central ICANS - Run Date Week of 4/20/2014


Campbell publiCations

the people’s marketplaCe Classifieds

Wednesday, april 23, 2014

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PIKE COUNTY, PITTSFIELD, ILLINOIS OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC Plaintiff,

Asphalt Paving • Patching • Concrete Sealing • Striping • Crack Repair • Oil & Chip • Roads • Parking Lots • Driveways

Said property is legally described as follows: Commonly known as 14 Bear Court, Pittsfield, IL 62363 Permanent Index No.: 54-184-01; 54184-02; 54-183-13A

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CALHOUN, COUNTY HARDIN, ILLINOIS Bank of America, N.A.; Plaintiff,

Improvements:

VS.

Residential Structure UNKNOWN Units UNKNOWN Bedrooms UNKNOWN Garage UNKNOWN Bathrooms UNKNOWN Other UNKNOWN

Tony Heigl; Jennifer Heigl; Deer Trail (Care Free Community Living) Home Owners Association; Deer Trail Home Owner`s Association NFP; Pulaski Bank; Defendants.

vs. 13 CH 23 MARCUS A. CROWDER A/K/A MARCUS CROWDER; JAYME L. CROWDER A/K/A JAYME CROWDER; Defendants. NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment entered in the above entitled matter on January 17, 2014; Paul Petty, Sheriff, 204 E. Adams Street, Pittsfield, IL 62363, will on May 16, 2014 at 9:00 AM, at Pike County Courthouse, 100 E. Washingon Street, Pittsfield, IL 62363, sell to the highest bidder for cash (ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours, the following described premises situated in Pike County, Illinois. Said sale shall be subject to general taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and any prior liens or 1st Mortgages. The subject property is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title or recourse to Plaintiff. Upon the sale being held and the purchaser tendering said bid in cash or certified funds, a receipt of Sale will be issued and/or a Certificate of Sale as required, which will entitle the purchaser to a deed upon confirmation of said sale by the Court.

ESTATE CONSIGNMENT AUCTION

The property will NOT be open for inspection prior to the sale. The judgment amount was $136,818.66. Prospective purchasers are admonished to check the court file and title records to verify this information. For Bid Amount contact: Sale Clerk Fisher and Shapiro, LLC 2121 Waukegan Road, Suite 301 Bannockburn, IL 60015 (847)291-1717 THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT IF YOUR PERSONAL LIABILITY FOR THIS DEBT HAS BEEN EXTINGUISHED BY A DISCHARGE IN BANKRUPTCY OR BY AN ORDER GRANTING IN REM RELIEF FROM STAY, THIS NOTICE IS PROVIDED SOLELY TO FORECLOSE THE MORTGAGE REMAINING ON YOUR PROPERTY AND IS NOT AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT THE DISCHARGED PERSONAL OBLIGATION. I597741 4.16., 4.23, 4.30

Saturday, April 26 • 9 AM Auction Location: 1 mile north of Pittsfield, IL along US Hwy 54 at the former JDL facility, Bldg 2

Antiques & collectibles: (10+ wagons w/hundreds of great collectible antiques) • 10¢ Coke Machine • 75+ Guns • Coins & Currency • Appliances ● • Antique & Modern Furniture • 3-Mowers, Tiller, Tools • Much More! ● • ‘08 Sable 25K mi, ‘86 Grd Marquis 43K mi, ‘74 F-100 Pick-up 2-rings most of the day. Abbreviated listing. Additions and photos on Website! A large auction of great guns, coins, antiques & more, come spend the day! FORREST BAUGHMAN, HELEN LAWSON ESTATES & OTHERS

Curless Auction – Brian Curless Auctioneer 217-242-1665 IL Lic. #440000013 www.curlessauction.com IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PIKE COUNTYPITTSFIELD, ILLINOIS FREEDOM MORTGAGE TION PLAINTIFF

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CALHOUN, COUNTY HARDIN, ILLINOIS US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, VS. 11 CH 00002 RICHARD LEE GRISSOM, JR. A/K/A RICHARD GRISSOM, JR.; CASSANDRA M. GRISSOM; VILLAGE OF KAMPSVILLE; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; Defendant. 400 OAK STREET KAMPSVILLE, IL 62053 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on February 21, 2014, CALHOUN COUNTY SHERIFF in CALHOUN County, Illinois, will on May 29, 2014, in CALHOUN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, HARDIN, IL 62047, at 10:00AM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of CALHOUN, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 07-06-02-303-702 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 400 OAK STREET KAMPSVILLE, IL 62053 Description of Improvements: VINYL SIDING ONE STORY WITH A ONE CAR DETACHED GARAGE. THE COLOR OF THE HOUSE ISWHITE. I AM UNABLE TO VERIFY THAT THE UTILI-

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY-JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. 13 CH 24 NANCY E. GREEN; Defendant. Address: 504 Snedeker Street Jerseyville, Illinois 62052 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 31, 2013, I, Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois, will on May 15, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 AM at the Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl, Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey, State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: COMMON ADDRESS: 504 Snedeker Street, Jerseyville, Illinois 62052 P.I.N.: 04-925-005-00 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT $83,931.57

WAS:

Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds; the balance, by certified funds, is due within twenty four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to

TIES ARE ON OR OFF. NO FENCE The Judgment amount was $72,108.34. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1102376 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I601235 4.16, 4.23, 4.30

Plaintiff and in “as is” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representations as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. Pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amounts of any surplus bid will be held by the sheriff until a party obtains a Court Order for its distribution, or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus, it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, 230 W. Monroe St., Chicago, IL 60606, telephone 312-541-9710. Please refer to file number IL 13 6912. Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois I592611 4.16, 4.23, 4.30

VS

CORPORA-

13 CH 30

BRUCE H JONES A/K/A BRUCE JONES; URSULA J JONES A/K/A URSULA JONES; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; DEFENDANTS 3 ORCHARD DRIVE BARRY, IL 62312 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on January 17, 2014, PIKE COUNTY SHERIFF in PIKE County, Illinois, will on June 6, 2014, in the first floor lobby OF THE PIKE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, Pittsfield, IL, at 9:00AM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of PIKE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 46-101-13 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3 ORCHARD DRIVE BARRY, IL 62312 Description of Improvements: ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH A TWO CAR ATTACHED GARAGE The Judgment amount was $183,697.45. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; bal-

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT GREENE COUNTY, CARROLLTON, ILLINOIS First Bank d/b/a First Bank Mortgage PLAINTIFF Vs.

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 1/10/2014, the Sheriff of Greene County, Illinois will on 6/4/14 at the hour of 9:30AM at Greene County Courthouse, 519 North Main Street Carrollton, IL 62984, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Greene and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate:

COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 321 E. North Street Roodhouse, IL 62082 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that pursuant to a judgment heretofore entered by the said court occurred in the above entitled cause, William Heffington, Sheriff of Calhoun, Illinois, will on May 5, 2014, at the hour of 11:00 AM at Calhoun County Courthouse, Main and County Roads, (in good weather held in Courtyard), Hardin, IL 62047, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate in the said judgment mentioned, situated in the County of Calhoun, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PIKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS PEOPLES BANK & TRUST CO., Plaintiff, vs. Case No. 2013-CH-32 STACEY WARD, MICHELLE WARD, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendants.

For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only -

Permanent Real Estate Index Numbers: 47-014-11, 47-002-11, 47-013-06

Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1314386 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I603175 4.23.14, 4.30, 5.7

If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/ expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises.

PIN 08-22-18-203-003 Improved with Residential

NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE

ance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW.

13 CH 00020

Steven Scott Durham, Co Executor; et. al. DEFENDANTS

12 CH 6

The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-13-17700. I603787 4.23.14, 4.30, 5.7

NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to an Order of Default Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above cause on January 17, 2014, the Sheriff of Pike County, Illinois will at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, June 6, 2014, at the Pike County Courthouse, 100 East Washington, Pittsfield, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: The North One-half of the Northwest Quarter of Section 12; The Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 2; A Part of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 11 described as follows, to-wit: Beginning at the Northeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of said Section 11, thence West 48 rods, thence South 33 1/3 rods, thence East 48 rods and thence North 33 1/3 rods to the place of beginning; All situated in Township 4 South, Range 7 West of the Fourth Principal Meridian, in the County of Pike and State of Illinois.

Commonly known as: Rural Route, Kinderhook, Illinois The judgment amount was $461,643.56 Sale terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real

NOTICE OF SALE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF PIKEPITTSFIELD, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs.

13-CH-22

JOSH P. HARRISON, Defendant. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 901 LAWRENCE ST. BARRY, IL 62312 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of the above Court entered on February 7, 2014 in the above-entitled cause, the following described real estate, to wit: Permanent Index Number: 46-08303 Commonly known as: 901 Lawrence St., Barry, IL 62312 will be offered for sale and sold at public vendue on June 6, 2014, at 9:00 a.m., at the Pike County Courthouse, Pittsfield, Illinois.

such judgment to wit: C/K/A: 304 Deer Trail, Golden Eagle, IL 62036 PIN:

07-17-06-100-001-304

The person to contact regarding information regarding this property is: Sales Dept., The Wirbicki Law Group, 33 W. Monroe St., Suite 1140, Chicago, IL 60603. Any questions regarding this sale should refer to file number W121705. The terms of the sale are Cash. 10% at time of sale, with the balance due within 24 hours. The property is improved by: PUD. The Property is not open for inspection prior to sale. The real estate, together with all buildings and improvements thereon, and tenements, hereditament and appurtenances thereunto belonging shall be sold under such terms.

The Wirbicki Law Group LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 33 W. Monroe St., Suite 1140 Chicago, IL 60603 Phone: 312-360-9455 Fax: 312-572-7823 W12-1705 pleadings.il@wirbickilaw.com 4.9.14, 4.16, 4.23

estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Kerri A. Doll (Registration No. 6217319), GIFFIN, WINNING, COHEN & BODEWES, P.C., Attorneys at Law, One West Old State Capitol Plaza, Myers Building, Suite 600, Springfield, Illinois 62701, (217) 525-1571. NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Kerri A. Doll (Registration No. 6217319) KerriD@giffinwinning.com Giffin, Winning, Cohen, & Bodewes, P.C. 1 West Old State Capitol Plaza Suite 600 Springfield, Illinois 62701 (217) 525-1571 4.16.14, 4.23, 4.30

inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. For information contact Plaintiff’s Attorney: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, 111 E. Main St., Decatur, Illinois 62523 (217) 422-1719. The purchaser of a condominium unit at a judicial foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, who takes possession of a condominium unit pursuant to a court order or a purchaser who acquires title from a mortgagee shall have the duty to pay the proportionate share, if any, of the common expenses for the unit which would have become due in the absence of any assessment acceleration during the 6 months immediately preceding institution of an action to enforce the collection of assessments, and which remain unpaid by the owner during whose possession the assessments accrued. If the outstanding assessments are paid at any time during any action to enforce the collection of assessments, the purchaser shall have no obligation to pay any assessments which accrued before he or she acquired title. If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5 (g)(l).

The judgment amount is $62,326.83. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. Sale terms: The bid amount, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, shall be paid in certified funds immediately by the highest and best bidder at the conclusion of the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to the Plaintiff. The Sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for

If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701 ( c ) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW Note: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act you are advised that the Law Firm of Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. James A. Coale Attorney for Heavner, Scott, Beyers, & Mihlar, LLC 4.23.14, 4.30, 5.7


C6

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

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SPORTS

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

C7

Jerseyville, Illinois

Jersey jumpers sustain success

HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL/SOFTBALL ROUNDUP

Lady Panthers reach 10 wins

Mike Weaver/Jersey County Journal

Jersey Community High School freshman Bethany Muenstermann is swarmed by her teammates as the Lady Panthers beat Civic Memorial 7-6 in eight innings Friday at the Don Snyders Sports Complex. Jersey — which finished 9-19 last season — has already reached a double-digit win total this season with a 10-6 overall record. michaelrweaver.com

Softball

— Jersey 7 > > 4/21Mascoutah 8 8 inn. — Southwestern 2 > > 4/19Triad 15 5 inn. — Jersey 8 > > 4/19Marquette 6 — Jersey 9 > > 4/19Marquette 4 — Southwestern 2 > > 4/18Dupo 8

— Southwestern 3 > > 4/18O'Fallon 10 — Southwestern 1 > > 4/18Edwardsville 15 5 inn. — Civic Memorial 6 > > 4/18Jersey 7 8 inn. — Jersey 7 > > 4/18Roxana 1 — EA-WR 1 > > 4/17Jersey 11 6 inn. — Waterloo 5 > > 4/16Jersey 1

Baseball

— Mascoutah 6 > > 4/21Jersey 5 8 inn. — Southwestern 2 > > 4/21Metro-E. Lutheran 8 — Southwestern 1 > > 4/19Greenville 2 — Southwestern 10 > > 4/19Freeburg 5 — Jersey 18 > > 4/18Calhoun 2

— Jersey 1 > > 4/18Civic Memorial 3 — Southwestern 5 > > 4/18Roxana 3 9 inn. — Pittsfield 0 > > 4/17Jersey 10 6 inn. — EA-WR 0 > > 4/17Southwestern 16 5 inn. — Jersey 1 > > 4/16Waterloo 2 — Litchfield 4 > > 4/16Southwestern 3 8 inn.

Sam Elliott/Jersey County Journal

Jersey Community High School junior Sydney Jones leaps into the sand pit during the long jump competition at the annual Lady Panther Invitational Thursday at the Don Snyders Sports Complex. Jones won the event by clearing 17 feet, 0.5 inches, while senior teammate Mary Claire Davis was first in the high jump with a winning height of 5 feet, 2 inches. Jones and Davis were second and third, respectively, in the triple jump, the event in which Jones placed 10th at last season's Class 2A state championships. selliott@campbellpublications.net

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JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

SPORTS MVC showing Panthers its strength C8

Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Jerseyville, Illinois

Sam Elliott/Jersey County Journal

Jersey Community High School junior Brendan Kennedy slides safely into third base during the Panthers' non-conference outing against Pittsfield Thursday at the Don Snyders Sports Complex. Kennedy's second-inning triple drove home the game's first two runs as the Panthers went on to beat Pittsfield 10-0 in six innings. Jersey has since ran its overall record this season to 13-5, but the Panthers are winless through their first three games within the Mississippi Valley Conference. None of the defeats have come by more than two runs and Monday's 6-5 loss against Mascoutah was decided in eight innings. selliott@campbellpublications.net

The Panthers' high-scoring offense and a deep well of pitching have helped them come close to already surpassing last season's win total, but the Mississippi Valley Conference has remained a tough test for the Jersey Community High School baseball team. Ten wins in their past 13 contests have the Panthers sporting a 13-5 overall record this season — just one shy of last year's 14 victories — but a trio of tight games have

ended with Jersey just missing out on an MVC win. The Panthers lead all league teams with an average of 8.9 runs scored per game this season, but they were limited to one each in their first two MVC games and have combined for seven through their first three conference outings. Two of Jersey's league games were won by one run — including a 6-5 decision claimed by Mascoutah in eight innings Monday at the Don Snyders Sports Complex —

and the other was a two-run win. Waterloo won the teams' MVC opener 2-1 Wednesday, April 16, in Waterloo and Civic Memorial claimed a 3-1 victory Friday in Bethalto. Between conference games, the Panthers blanked Pittsfield 10-0 in six innings Thursday at the Don Snyders Sports Complex. Will Mortland pitched a three-hit shutout, Hunter Bryant went 3-for-4 and Brendan Kennedy totaled three runs batted in.

Jersey beat Calhoun 18-2 to cap a traveling doubleheader Friday in Hardin. Jacob Varble hit a home run and doubled as part of a 3-for-4 game with five RBIs and four runs scored, Kyle Obertino went 3-for-5 and four other Panthers — Lane Powers, Jordan Witt, Shane Long and Kennedy — added multi-hit games while Alec Buettel pitched four innings with five hits, no runs, seven strikeouts and two walks to earn the win from the mound.

Sam Elliott/Jersey County Journal

Will Mortland pitches against Pittsfield Thursday at the Don Snyders Sports Complex. The Jersey Community High School junior is 3-1 this season with a 3.44 earned-run average after throwing a three-hit shutout against Pittsfield during the Panthers' 10-0 win.

JCHS finishes second Jersey wins five-straight at Lady Panther Invite

Mike Weaver/Jersey County Journal

Lady Panthers senior Macy Thurston winds up a pitch against Civic Memorial Friday at the Jerseyville American Legion Post 492 softball field. Thurston pitched four innings — allowing five hits and two earned runs with as many strikeouts and one walk — as the Jersey Community High School softball team erased a 6-2 deficit midway through the sixth inning and won a 7-6 decision in eight innings. Freshman Bethany Muenstermann, batting a team-best .482 this season, went 3-for-5 with three runs batted in to lead the Lady Panthers' offense. Jersey extended its winning streak to a season-high five games by sweeping a doubleheader with Marquette Saturday in Alton. Macy and freshman little sister Mackenzie Thurston each hit home runs to lead the Lady Panthers to a 9-4 win in the opening game and four starters — Ellie Tonsor, Jessica Bradfisch, Muenstermann and Caitlyn Connel — each had multi-hit games as they won the finale 8-6. Jersey is 10-6 overall this season and 1-2 within the Mississippi Valley Conference after Mascoutah edged out a 7-6 decision in eight innings Monday in Mascoutah. michaelrweaver.com Sam Elliott/Jersey County Journal

(Above) Jersey Community High School's Caroline Crawford approaches the finish line during a relay race at the annual Lady Panther Invitational Thursday at the Don Snyders Sports Complex. Jersey tallied 107 points to place second at the six-team meet behind only Chatham Glenwood's 162 points. (Left) Anne Snyders takes off out of her blocks to begin a race Thursday at the Don Snyders Sports Complex. The Lady Panthers finished first in the 4x200and 4x400-meter relays, Kiara Chapman won the 400 meters, Mary Claire Davis won the high jump and Sydney Jones won the long jump. selliott@campbellpublications.net

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COURT/PUBLIC NOTICE

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Jersey County police and traffic

The following police reports were filed between April 14 and April 17. These reports are public information and are obtained from the Jersey County Circuit Clerk’s office. All individuals listed have been arrested and charged, or cited in the case of traffic violations. All are innocent until proven guilty. The following individuals were charged with misdemeanors: Pillman, Justin L., dob 10-18-90, domestic battery/bodily harm. Stamper, Amanda M., dob 3-1990, domestic battery/bodily harm and disorderly conduct. Nejmanowski, Justin P., dob 6-19-81, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of cannabis/2.5-10 grams. Johns, Floyd E., dob 12-5-56, disorderly conduct. Cherry, Eldridge G., dob 11-1292, obstructing identification. Hendricks, Michael T., dob 5-290, domestic battery/bodily harm. Sadler, Amber L., dob 9-4-93, purchase/possess liquor/minor. Bond, Corey J., dob 11-21-93, possession of drug paraphernalia and retail theft/display merchandise. Enochs, Patrick M., dob 2-6-92, criminal trespass to state land and disorderly conduct. Holmes, Michael J., dob 6-1094, theft control intent and criminal trespass to land. Littleton, Jason L., dob 4-11-81, theft control intent and criminal trespass to land. Cummings, Shane M., dob 1-1293, theft control intent and criminal trespass to land. Ryan, Randi N., dob 11-16-86, retail theft/display merchandise. The following individuals were charged with ordinance violations: Enochs, Patrick M., dob 2-6-92, public intoxication. Branan, Judith W., dob 2-3-74,

unlicensed/inoperable vehicle. The following individuals were issued traffic citations: Smith, Susan L., dob 2-24-56, fail to obey yield sign. Violette, Craig J., dob 10-16-71, driving 21-25 mph above the limit. King, Cory T., dob 11-14-97, driving 15-20 mph above the limit. Head, Jason C., dob 10-24-70, driving 15-20 mph above the limit. Collins, Jennifer L., dob 10-285, operating an uninsured vehicle. Metz, Justin A., dob 7-2-88, operating an uninsured vehicle and driving 15-20 mph above the limit. Johnson, Ruth A., dob 1-21-54, driving 21-25 mph above the limit. Hunter, Kendra M., dob 7-2-93, fail to reduce speed. Thurston, Maria L., dob 9-1893, fail to reduce speed. Aud, Zane R. M., dob 12-12-94, improper traffic lane usage. Sadler, Amber L., dob 9-4-93, operating an uninsured vehicle. Cherry, Eldridge G., dob 11-1292, driving on suspended license. Whitten, Kayla M., dob 6-21-94, operating an uninsured vehicle. Layton, Rachel L., dob 12-1988, driving on suspended license and operating an uninsured vehicle. Miller, Danielle R., dob 2-1-79, operating an uninsured vehicle. Streeb, Michael S., dob 12-1949, transportation of alcohol/passenger. Lashbrook, Brian R., dob 4-991, squealing/screeching tires and operating an uninsured vehicle.

Divorces

The following couples were granted a divorce in Jersey County Circuit Court between April 14 and April 17: Mary Goshorn and Ronald L. Goshorn Timothy L. Lyons and Michelle Lyons

Man suing three bars, patron STAFF REPORT Jersey County Journal A Jersey County man is suing three bars and an individual after suffering a fractured leg during an altercation at one establishment. According to court documents filed in Jersey County Circuit Court, which tell just one side of the story, Adam Summers, the plaintiff, was working as a bouncer at Jem Bar on May 3, 2013 and attempted to “peacefully remove” an intoxicated and disorderly David Hyink from the bar. While trying to remove Hyink from the premises, Summers tripped, Hyink came into contact with Summers and Hyink used excessive force under the circumstances, the court IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTYJERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. 13 CH 24 NANCY E. GREEN; Defendant. Address: 504 Snedeker Street Jerseyville, Illinois 62052 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on October 31, 2013, I, Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois, will on May 15, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 AM at the Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl, Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey, State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: THE WEST FORTY-SIX AND ONEHALF (46 1/2) FEET OF LOT FIVE (5), IN BLOCK FIVE (5) OF STRYKER’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF JERSEYVILLE, SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF JERSEY AND STATE OF ILLINOIS, WITH PRIVILEGE OF AND SUBJECT TO EASEMENTS, RESERVATIONS, RIGHT OF WAY GRANTS, EXCEPTIONS, COVENANTS, AGREEMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS OF RECORD. SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF JERSEY AND STATE OF ILLINOIS. COMMON ADDRESS: 504 Snedeker Street, Jerseyville, Illinois 62052 P.I.N.: 04-925-005-00 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT $83,931.57

documents allege. The complaint states because of his injuries, Summers continues to incur medical expenses, is unable to pursue normal activities and is losing wages. Summers is suing Hyink for damages in excess of $50,000. Under the Illinois Dramshop Act, Summers is also seeking damages from Jem Bar, Mulligan’s West and The Levee in Carrollton, as court documents allege Hyink had become intoxicated while consuming alcohol at all three establishments. Hyink was charged May 6, 2013 with misdemeanor battery; however, the case was not prosecuted. Summers is represented by attorney Michael P. Glisson of Alton. funds; the balance, by certified funds, is due within twenty four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “as is” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representations as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. Pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amounts of any surplus bid will be held by the sheriff until a party obtains a Court Order for its distribution, or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus, it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice.

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY

NOTICE

IN RE THE MATTER OF: RYLEE ELIZABETH MAE BOZARTH TO. RYLEE ELIZABETH MAE CRANE

Public Notice is hereby given that on April 10, 2014, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of Jersey County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post-office addresses of all the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as The Bird House, located at 1 East Water Street Grafton, IL. Dated this 10th day of April, 2014

NOTICE OF FILING OF PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME Notice is given you, the public that on or after June 12, 2014 at 9:00 o’clock, a.m., a Petition for Change of Name will be filed in this Court asking the Court to change the name of Rylee Elizabeth Mae Bozarth to Rylee Elizabeth Mae Crane, pursuant to the statute in such case made and provided.

Steve Pohlman COUNTY CLERK

STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY - IN PROBATE IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF PATRICIA SNIDER, CASE NO. 14-P-14

Dated: April 24, 2014. Rylee Elizabeth Mae Bozarth Brandi L. Crane, Mother and Natural guardian

DECEASED.

Robert L. Watson Attorney at Law 201 North Main St., Box 488 Brighton, IL 62012 618-372-8441 STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY - IN PROBATE IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF IRENE L. JEPP CASE NO. 14-P-17 DECEASED. CLAIM NOTICE Take notice of the death of Irene L. Jepp, of Brighton, Jersey County, Illinois. On April 15, 2014, the court issued Letters of Office to Executrix Cheryl L. McKee, whose address is 7605 Humbert Road, Godfrey, Illinois 62035; and whose attorney is John W. Hoefert, Jr., 3017 Godfrey Road, PO Box 5215, Godfrey, Illinois 62035. Claims against the estate may be filed in the Office of the Circuit Court, Probate Division, County Courthouse, Jerseyville, Illinois, or with the representative above named, or both, on or before November 10, 2014, and any claim not so filed is barred. Also, copies of claims must be filed or delivered to the representative and to the attorney within ten (10) days after filing with the Court.

CLAIM NOTICE Notice is given to claimants of the death of PATRICIA SNIDER, deceased of the City of Jerseyville, County of Jersey, State of Illinois, Letter of Office were issued on 4-3-14 to DALE SNIDER, as Administrator, whose address is 1227 Cemetery Rd., Jerseyville, Illinois 62052, and whose attorney is THOMAS O. FALB of Williamson, Webster, Falb & Glisson, 603 Henry Street, City of Alton, County of Madison, State of Illinois, 62002. Claims against the estate may be filed in the office of the Clerk of the Seventh Judicial Circuit, Probate Division, Jersey County Courthouse, Jerseyville, Illinois 62052, and with the administrator on or before 6 months from the first date of publication, which occured on April 23, 2014, or if by mailing or delivery of a Notice from the representative is required by Section 5/18-3 of Chapter 755 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes, the date stated in that Notice. Any claim not filed on or before that date is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered by the claimant to the representatives and to the attorney within ten (10) days after it has been filed (755 ILCS 5/18-3, 755 ILCS 5/1811, 755 ILCS 5/18-2).

COMMENCING ON PEARL STREET, IN THE CITY OF JERSEYVILLE, COUNTY OF JERSEY AND STATE OF ILLINOIS, AT A POINT 44 FEET EAST OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 6, BLOCK 13 OF THE ORIGINAL TOWN (NOW CITY) OF JERSEYVILLE; RUNNING THENCE NORTHERLY PARALLEL WITH JEFFERSON STREET 100 FEET; THENCE EASTERLY PARALLEL WITH PEARL STREET 22 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY PARALLEL WITH JEFFERSON STREET 100 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY LINE OF PEARL STREET; THENCE WESTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHERLY LINE OF PEARL STREET 22 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, BEING PART OF LOTS 6 AND 7 IN SAID BLOCK 13; ALSO FORTY-FOUR (44) FEET OFF OF THE EAST END OF LOTS SIX (6) AND SEVEN (7), IN BLOCK THIRTEEN (13), AND TWENTY (20) FEET OFF OF THE SOUTH SIDE OF LOT EIGHT (8) IN BLOCK THIRTEEN (13), EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE WEST FORTY-FOUR AND ONEHALF (44 1/2) FEET OF THE SOUTH TWENTY (20) FEET OF LOT EIGHT (8) IN BLOCK THIRTEEN (13), ALL IN THE ORIGINAL TOWN, NOW CITY OF JERSEYVILLE, JERSEY COUNTY, ILLINOIS. WHEREAS, said real estate is surplus real estate and E.D. Investments, which owns the real estate adjoining said real estate, which is used as a theatre, and WHEREAS, if it cannot increase the size and expand from two to four screens, it may have to close, and

IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW.

WHEREAS, E.D. Investments agrees to pay the appraised price and

WHEREAS, said real estate has been appraised by a qualified appraiser to have a value of $13,000.00, which is a strip of land 66x120/ 7920 sq. feet.

NOW THEREFORE, be it resolved by the City Council of Jerseyville, Illinois as follows: That the City of Jerseyville sell the real estate described above for $13,000.00 to E.D. Investments, Inc. and that the Mayor and City Clerk be authorized to execute a contract and whatever additional documents necessary to transfer title to said real estate for the total sale price of $13,000.00. Passed and approved this 18 day of March, 2014 by the City Council of Jerseyville, Illinois. This resolution shall become effective upon passage and publication as provided by law. TH

Richard Perdun Mayor of the City of Jerseyville, Illinois ATTEST: Catherine L. Ward City Clerk Jerseyville, Illinois

4.16, 4.23, 4.30

RECORD OF VOTE:

Your

n Hometow e! c r u o S s w e N

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Call today to place your classified ad!

618-498-1234

To: RONALD F. HUDSON Take notice that a petition was filed in the Circuit Court of Jersey County, Illinois, for the adoption of a child named Sydney Jean Hudson. Now, therefore, unless you Ronald F. Hudson, and all whom it may concern, file your answer to the Petition in the action or otherwise file your appearance therein, in the said Circuit Court of Jersey County, Room A, Jersey County Courthouse, 201 W. Pearl St., in the City of Jerseyville, Illinois, on or before the 20th day of May, 2014, at 8:30 a.m., a default may be entered against you at any time after that day and a judgment entered in accordance with the prayer of said Petition. Dated: April 3, 2014, Jerseyville, Illinois Charles Huebener Jersey County Circuit Clerk Todd W. Parish Attorney for Petitioners Strang & Parish, Ltd. 108 N. Lafayette St. Jerseyville, IL 62052 Ph. (618) 498-6821 4.9.14, 4.16, 4.23

Commercial Building for rent Hardin, IL

Call (618) 498-1234 and ask for Business Department

STORAGE SPACE FOR RENT Hardin, IL

Call (618) 498-1234 and ask for Business Department

PLEASANT HILL VILLAGE in Girard is accepting applications for

C.N.A.’s for all shifts.

Position includes competitive pay, shift differentials, incentive pay, benefits, and a friendly dedicated staff to welcome you aboard. Interested parties may apply in person at 1010 West North St. in Girard or online at www.pleasanthillvillage.org.

www.jerseycountyjournal.com

WHEREAS, the City of Jerseyville, Illinois believes it to be very important to the City that said theatre continue to exist in the community, and

Sale terms: 10% down by certified

CALL JANE 618-498-1234

a female child.

4.23.14, 4.30, 5.7

WHEREAS, the City of Jerseyville, Illinois, holds free simple title to the following described real estate which is unimproved and

Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois I592611

No. 14-AD-5

Williamson, Webster, Falb, & Glisson Thomas O. Falb #00768804 603 Henry Street Alton, IL 62002 (618) 462-1077

RESOLUTION NO. 2014 03 18

WAS:

Models

Acroprint 125 - $100 Acroprint 150 - $125

By: Thomas O. Falb - #00768804

If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4).

For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, 230 W. Monroe St., Chicago, IL 60606, telephone 312-541-9710. Please refer to file number IL 13 6912.

In the matter of the Petition for the adoption of SYDNEY JEAN HUDSON,

TIME CLOCKS FOR SALE

DALE SNIDER, Independent Administrator of the Estate of PATRICIA SNIDER, Deceased.

By: John Hoefert

4.23.14, 4.30, 5.7

ADOPTION NOTICE STATE OF ILLINOIS COuNTy OF JErSEy CIrCuIT COurT OF JErSEy COuNTy

Dated this 15 day of April, 2014

Cheryl L. McKee, Executrix of the Estate of Irene L. Jepp, Deceased

John W. Hoefert, Jr. Reg. No.: 03127194 3017 Godfrey Road P.O. Box 5215 Godfrey, IL 62035 Telephone: (618) 467-2500 Fax: (618) 467-2525

D1

Jerseyville, Illinois

Aye

Nay

Absent

RUSSELL

_X___

____

____

HARTMANN

_X___

____

____

KETCHUM

_X__

____

____

MACIAS

_X__

____

____

PERDUN

_X__

____

____

Employment Opportunity Join our growing team at a community focused bank. Our mission is to provide customers unsurpassed service, and to provide an outstanding environment for our employees to succeed personally and professionally. Applications for PART-TIME are now available at our Hull, Pittsfield, Winchester, White Hall and Jerseyville locations: Contact us: hr@farmersstate.com 108 East Adams, Pittsfield IL 63363 217-285-5585

An Equal Opportunity Employer

HELP WANTED Business Manager

Campbell Publications is seeking a Business Manager to work in our Jerseyville office part-time Monday through Friday. The successful candidate: • Will be computer proficient. • Will have experience in business accounting and proficiency with QuickBooks and other business-related software. • Will enjoy working with the public and handling inquiries. • Will be organized, meet deadlines and perform with strict attention to detail. • Will possess good grammar skills; keyboarding skills required. This position offers the opportunity to excel in a fast-paced and creative work environment. Competitive salary, pleasant office and friendly co-workers. To apply, come to the Jersey County Journal office in Jerseyville to fill out an application. Resumes are encouraged but not required.

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL 832 S. State St. • Jerseyville, IL

HELP WANTED Graphic Designer

Jersey County Journal is seeking a full-time Graphic Designer to work in the production of print advertisements and newspaper pages. Job includes duties maintaining newspaper websites. BASIC QUALIFICATIONS • Computer training, typing proficiency, excellent grammar and Internet skills required. • Availability to work flexible hours. • Ability to meet deadlines. PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS • Design experience. • Experience with Mac computers and networks. • The ideal candidate will be proficient in InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop. WE OFFER: • Pleasant office and friendly co-workers. • State-of-the-art programs. • Opportunity to excel in a fast-paced and creative work environment. • Competitive salary and benefits package.

To apply, contact Julie Nash, production supervisor, Jersey County Journal. Resumés are appreciated but not required. 3.19.14

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL 832 S. State St. • Jerseyville, IL


D2

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

REAL ESTATE

Jerseyville, Illinois

TRI-COUNTY REAL ESTATE TOUR HOUSE CENTER PLUS CARROLLTON OFFICE

JERSEYVILLE OFFICE

730 S. State St. Suite A, Jerseyville, IL 62052 618-498-2321 c21hcp@gtec.com

Scan This Code With Your Smartphone To Go To Our Website

500 N. Main St., Carrollton, IL 62016 217-942-5182

JERSEYVILLEC21.COM Roberta Wallace Managing Broker 618-535-5820

Karen Bertman

Charlene Morgan Broker 618-535-0071

Broker 618-535-6044

1003 Spruce St. Jerseyville

210 Curtis St. Jerseyville

$49,000 Bob Jones 618-498-2321

Kim Frazer

Molly Farmer

Connie Hayes

Broker 618-535-2262

Sue Beach

Broker 217-851-1663

Broker 618-535-6784

Broker/Owner 618-498-2321

Broker 618-535-4628

Broker

618-946-1999

NEW LISTING!

Bob Jones

Brad Stockstill

Nikki Guymon

Broker 618-946-4618

105 Pleasant St. Jerseyville

122 Roberts St. Jerseyville

$55,000 Roberta Wallace 618-535-5820

$98,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$78,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

PERFECT STARTER HOME

OPEN LIVING/DINING, 2 CAR GARAGE

CLEAN 2 BR, 1 CAR GARAGE

2+ BEDROOMS, 1.5 BATHS, 1 CAR GARAGE

103 Roberts St. Jerseyville

520 3rd St. Carrollton

310 E Prairie St. Jerseyville

1003 Westlake Dr. Jerseyville

$95,000 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$143,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

FENCED 2 BR 75X132 LOT

RETIREMENT, GOLF, SWIM, DINE

1108 Westlake Dr. Jerseyville

24 Oakwood Pl. Jerseyville

$192,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$168,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$57,000 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$61,500 Molly Farmer 217-851-1663

UPDATED, FENCED, GREAT STARTER

UPDATED, HOME WARRANTY

283 E Lewis St. Palmyra

503 S Sixth St. Carrollton

$92,700 Molly Farmer 217-851-1663

$116,500 Kim Frazer 618-535-2262

WALK IN CLOSETS, APPLIANCE STAY

INVESTMENT, 2 APARTMENTS

RRI Box 120 White Hall

309 Pleasant St. Jerseyville

404 Kenwood Jerseyville $84,500 Affordable place to start. Spacious 3 bedrooms, 1 full bath, 2.5 lots, 1,340 sq ft., 25x32 detached 2 car garage. Newer furnace and central air. Covered front patio. Good location. Don’t Miss out Charlene Morgan 618-535-0071

JUST REDUCED 4 Rose Ct. Jerseyville $184,900 Fabulous Home in “Move In” Condition. This home features 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, granite countertops in Kitchen & all baths. Master bath has been completely redone with tiled shower and ceramic tile floor. All baths have ceramic tile floors. New carpeting throughout home. 3 car attached garage, fenced in back yard and upscale landscaping. Connie Hayes 618-535-6784

1336 Magnolia Jerseyville

307 Captains Ct. Grafton

VACATION SPOT YEAR ROUND

NEWER KITCHEN & BATH, WOOD FLOORS

1113 Reddish Dr. Jerseyville

401 E Fairgrounds Ave. Jerseyville 5 ACRES

$118,500 Molly Farmer 217-851-1663

$129,900 Roberta Wallace 618-535-5820

$139,000 Roberta Wallace 618-535-5820

$247,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$165,000 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$187,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

SUN ROOM, HOME WARRANTY

5 BEDROOMS, INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

VILLA WITH GARAGE & BASEMENT

VACATION OVERLOOKING RIVER & HARBOR

30X48 GARAGE

3,000 SQ FT IN CITY LIMITS

129 Rosewood Dr. Jerseyville

401 Timber Ridge Dr. #12 Grafton

1122 Sumner St. Jerseyville

604 Osage St. Jerseyville

Call One Of Our Brokers TODAY!

20403 State Hwy 109 Jerseyville 1.27 ACRES

$139,000 Kim Frazer 618-535-2262

$187,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

$65,000 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

FENCED YARD, FULL BASEMENT

VACATION, VIEW, CLOSE TO HOME

UPDATED STARTER OR RENTAL

$75,000 Roberta Wallace 618-535-5820

$218,500 Karen Bertman 618-535-6044

CLOSE TO BUSINESS DISTRICT

2 SCREENED IN PORCHES, 2 FIREPLACES

Selling Your ProPertY BY Sign or gavel • Selling Your ProPertY BY Sign or gavel •

HOUSE CENTER PLUS 730 S. State St. Suite A, Jerseyville, IL 62052 618-498-2321 c21hcp@gtec.com

CARROLLTON OFFICE 500 N. Main St., Carrollton, IL 62016 217-942-5182

Scan This Code With Your Smartphone To Go To Our Website

AGENT SUE BEACH IS HOLDING

Sue Beach Broker

618-946-4618 sbeacg@yahoo.com

OPEN HOUSES!

SATURDAY MAY 3

RD

3 to 6

PULLED PORK - CHIPS - DRINKS

713 CROSS AVE., JERSEYVILLE

3300 CLEARVIEW, GODFREY

Move in ready!!! 3 bedroom, 3 bath located on large corner lot. Fenced in back area with shed. #70435 $129,900 Agent: Craig Baker 806-2666

RICE P W E N

Low maintenance brick ranch featuring large bedrooms, original hardwood floors, main floor laundry and attached garage. Lots of updates throughout including kitchen (’11), roof (’10) and water heater (’10). Very nice home, call today for more information. #70775 $95,000 Agent: Whitney McIver 531-2256

!

WALK THE PROPERTY WITH THE SELLER!

18456 Reddish Ford Rd., Jerseyville $300,000 #4210321 This special property must be seen to be appreciated. This is a complete farmstead featuring a 2 story 1890 farm house which has been updated, but which retains its charm. Included is a 900 sq ft restored cedar lodge, which features a kitchen, large gas fireplace & lofted master bedroom. The farmstead includes outbuildings, a circa 1912 horse barn, a new pole barn, 3 grain bins & silage pit. Tillable land, pasture & trees surround the house and buildings. The farm house & lodge can be used for family living, for guests as a B & B or as a hunter bunkhouse. DIRECTIONS: St. Hwy 16 West 5 miles from Jerseyville to Central to Lax Cemetery to Bethany Church to Reddish Ford. Houses on Right.

29.3 ACRES

SUNDAY MAY 4TH 11:30 to 1 HOTDOGS - CHIPS - DRINKS 108 Mill St., Elsah $120,000 #4303060 Two bedrooms, two baths. This adorable Elsah gem has many special touches from the copper backsplash to French doors entering the master bedroom and a sky light in the dining area. The entire house has wood floors, and the living room has a fireplace. A stone patio runs the entire length of the house, and the detached bonus room has a large screened porch,and cedar closet, and both rooms have ceiling fans. Property also includes a shed/stable, which could be made into a garage. Roofs, windows, floors, electrical wiring, kitchen cabinets and many other elements in the house are new. Whether a full-time residence or a weekend get-away, this property must be seen to be appreciated. DIRECTIONS: From River Road to Mill St. / From Jerseyville to Elsah Rd. it becomes Mill St.

SUNDAY MAY 4TH 2 to 4

15360 OTTERVILLE RD., GRAFTON

Look no further if considering country living or hunting retreat. Versatile 58 acres m/l, appx 28 acres wooded, 42x60 pole barn. Property partially fenced with gate. 30 minutes from Clark bridge. Call today!! #70915 $549,000 Agent: Sonja Shaw 535-1899

141 E. FAIRGROUNDS AVE., JERSEYILLE

Almost 3,000 sq ft of living space is housed in this open floor plan. Home features 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, main level laundry, full basement with living room with built in bar and wet bar and so much more. Call today for more information. #70535 $199,900 Agent: Mindy Woelfel 946-0434

109 BRADFORD PL., JERSEYVILLE

Great home in established West Point Subdivision. Home features granite counter tops, cherry cabinets, 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, huge family room in lower level, plus optional office or bedroom. NOT a drive by, call for an appointment #70705 $225,000 Agent: Sonja Shaw 535-1899 Agent: Whitney McIver 531-2256

23 COVE DR., BRIGHTON

Get on Briarwood Lake!! Nice sized bi-level family home with 3 bedrooms, 2 ½ bath and 2 car garage, plus 2 tiered decks to pool and fenced backyard and only steps from 111 ft. of waterfront. Wood burning stone fireplace in family room. Lots to offer. Home warranty provided. #70475 $139,900 Agent: Michael Paslay 530-7355

710 W. WILBUR ST., BUNKER HILL

Small town living on almost a ½ acre lot. Remodeled 3 bedroom, 2 bath ranch style home with a carport plus a detached 27x22 garage. Great home with a lot to offer. Home warranty included. Great Price!! #70235 $104,900 Agent: Michael Paslay 530-7355

801 E. FAIRGROUNDS AVE., JERSEYVILLE Log cabin living – this 3 bedroom, 1 bath home offers actual yellow pine logs and solid 2” pin flooring throughout. Wood burning stove only 2 yrs old. All appliances including washer/dryer. A 20x32 detached garage w/electric and water, insulated and with concrete floors. #70605 $79,900 Agent: Mindy Woelfel 946-0434

707 N. State St., Jerseyville

$179,500 #4304433 This gracious home has many special features, including a built-in window seat, a gas fireplace and ceiling fans throughout. In addition, the owners have made extensive improvements in all areas of the house. There are 4 bedrooms upstairs. One of them contains a washer and dryer, which are conveying with the house. Another bedroom is shelf lined and could serve as a library/study. The backyard is fenced in. There are many wood floors throughout the house. The attic has been finished and features 2 skylights, 2 ceiling fans and built in storage cabinets running both sides of the length of the attic. This home is one of Jerseyville’s gems. DIRECTIONS: North on State Street to 707. 2,158 SQUARE FEET

Paslay, Realtors Jerseyville 618-498-4844

Bethalto 618-377-3377

Toll Free 1-800-377-3350

Visit www.paslay.com to view all of our properties. C

M

K

Y

NOW OFFERING COMPLETE AUCTION SERVICES!

Specializing In Estate Sales, Land Auctions, Farm Equipment, etc. Let Us Sell Your Property By Sign Or Gavel! CHECK THIS LISTING ON 406 W. Carpenter, Jerseyville Convenience store and auto service shop complete with drive up window. Also get pet grooming shop all under one roof. Business could be purchased separate. Possible Owner Financing. Call Angie $349,500

YOUTUBE!

16 West Convenience Store, Jerseyville, IL 62052

ED!

C REDU

Freedom Lane, Jerseyville 906 High, Jerseyville Luxurious Senior Living - new construction. 2 or 3 bedroom 3 Bed, 1 Bath. This is clean move-in ready home on a available, 2 car attached garage. Reasonable association fees corner lot. Lots of fresh paint and new kitchen flooring. include lawn care and grounds maintenance, snow removal. Call Roger Starting at $167,000 Call Roger $69,500

204 West Carpenter, Jerseyville Investment Property, great location, short walk to downtown, 3 single bedroom units, lots of parking. Great income producer. Call Angie. $78,000

701 June St., Jerseyville Local family owned business. Len’s Towing & Detailing. Turn-key deal, everything to carry on day to day operations. Call Stacey $295,000

ING!

PEND

607 Stryker, Jerseyville 3 bed, 2 bath on a big lot. Perfect for that growing family. Call Angie $130,000

309 Andrew, Jerseyville 3 bedroom, 3 bath home on corner lot with 2 car attached garage. Priced for quick sell. Call Angie $84,900

Call Roger For A Free Quote To Sell Your Property by Public Auction

MODERN REALTY & AUCTION SERVICE, LLC

RESIDENTIAL • FARM • COMMERCIAL 110 S. State St., Jerseyville 62052 • Office: 618-639-6399 Fax: 618-639-6398

www.modern-realty.net

ROGER SCHEFFEL

ANGIE GOFORTH

STACEY WOCK

618-535-5017

618-535-5356

618-535-0235

Managing Broker/Auctioneer Lic. #441002069

landman160@gmail.com

Broker/Agent

tdbajg@hotmail.com

Broker/Agent

sswock@gmail.com

Selling Your ProPertY BY Sign or gavel • Selling Your ProPertY BY Sign or gavel •

Selling your property by Sign or gavel • Selling your property by Sign or gavel • Selling your property by Sign or gavel

JERSEYVILLEC21.COM

Selling your property by Sign or gavel • Selling your property by Sign or gavel • Selling your property by Sign or gavel

JERSEYVILLE OFFICE


REAL ESTATE

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

D3

Jerseyville, Illinois

TRI-COUNTY REAL ESTATE TOUR FEATURED LISTING OF THE WEEK

113 E. Main St., • Grafton, IL Wendi Mielke Managing Broker, Owner GRI, SFR, SRES, e-Pro - 618-535-2930 Kynan Mielke Broker - 618-535-0873 Devin Brown Broker - 618-581-6658

NG! NEW LISTI

(618) 786-2036

NEW LISTING! BLUFF PROPERTY 5 mins from Grafton $89,900

Immaculate 3 Bedroom Home Totally Updated With Newer Gas Heat, Central Air, Water Heater, Dishwasher & Floor Coverings - Stove & Refrigerator Stay In EatIn Kitchen - Attached Garage - Fenced Back Yard With Utility Shed - THIS IS A MUST SEE! #4304993 Call Listing Agent PAM ROADY - 618-498-6846

LOCAL

24+ Acres located off Rowling Ridge Grafton

HOMES OF AMERICA REALTY, INC.

Submitted photo

Three Bedrooms, two full baths, living room w/ vaulted ceilings.Full walk out basement with a rough in for third bath. 2 Car garage. Shown by appointment Friday, Saturday or Sunday Call Wendi Mielke.

201 S. State Street, Jerseyville, IL 62052 618-498-6846 www.homesofamericarealty.com

SCOUTS HOLD FOOD DRIVE

Daisy through Senior Girl Scouts from the Brighton and Jerseyville area collected 523 items for the Brighton food pantry. The girls included Mylie Ramirez , Morgann Ramirez, Mallory Clevenger, Kenzie Inman , Lainie Behernds Alyssa Casten, Madelaine Ramirez, Abby VanDoren, Ellie Walsh, Lucy Fritz, Lexi Allen, Galaxie Vale, Kimberly Beherends, Mackenzie Beherends, Madelynn Clevenger, Tori Ennis.

w w w. t h e i l p r o s . c o m

GENERAL INFORMATION

KINGDOM REAL ESTATE, INC. Hardin

Jean Hagen, Managing Broker - 232-1110 Jeff Oldham, Ph.D, Broker - 576-2531

832 South State St., P.O. Box 407, Jerseyville, IL 62052 Ph: 618-498-1234 Fax: 1-630-206-0320 Submit your news: jcjnews@campbellpublications.net Advertising information: jkallal@campbellpublications.net

Submitted photo

CELEBRATING COMMUNITY BANKING WEEK

the right to reject any photo that will not reproduce clearly. PhOtOS And rePrIntS: 5x7-$9.00; 8x10-$10.00. Copies: 81/2 x 11: 20¢ per copy; 8 1/2 x 14 to 11 x 17: 25¢ per copy. AdvertISIng rAte: $11.66 per column inch. example: 1 column by 3 inches would be 3 col. inches x $11.66 = $34.98 For more information about display rates, quantity discounts and insert rates, contact the Jersey County Journal advertising department at 618-498-1234. cArdS OF thAnKS, MeMOrIALS: $7.95 minimum; 25¢ per word after 65 words, prepaid. tO MAIL A SIngLe ISSue: $4

3 bdrm 1 bath home on 1.5 rural acres. West of Hardin. Great views. 4 bdrm, 2 bath 2 story home on 3 lots located in Hardin. The property includes a detached large two car garage and a large boat shed. The property is close to a major town boat launch. The home has excellent views of the Illinois river. 100 ft lot with river frontage and boat ramp. Hamburg Large 1 bdrm cabin with river frontage. Michael. 1.8 acre lot. with road frontage. Ideal area ready to build on. Batchtown Small quaint cabin overlooking the Ill River sitting on 5 secluded Hardin town lots. 5.7 acres and adjoining 3.6 acres may be available. 141 acre farm consisting of tillable land, gentle sloping pasture land, woodland and ponds. Included is a newly renovated 2 story farm home with separate apartment with bsmt. This secluded farm is an ideal weekend getaway. North Calhoun 6 acres of open land and woods. Nice building spot. S Hamburg 2 bdrm home that’s ready to move into. Full Basement. Views of Miss River. Hamburg 1 acre M/L river lot with frontage on the Ill River 15 acres woodland with easy access from major county rd. Golden Eagle.

“We Make Good Things Happen.”

618-576-2531

www.il-real-estate.com

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2004 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXT. CAB 4X4 #774958AA - 4X4, Z71, FULL POWER

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2006 DODGE CHARGERT R/T

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2014 JEEP PATRIOT

2008 DODGE AVENGER R/T

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2011 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT

#11063A - 4CYL, FULL POWER, ALUM. WHEELS

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2010 DODGE JOURNEY SXT

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2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU

2007 FORD RANGER

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2013 DODGE AVENGER

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#74621A - TOURING, CHRYSLER CERTIFIED

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#11236A - ALUM WHEELS, FULL POWER

$10,995

2010 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY

#11172 - BACK UP CAMERA, FULL PWR. LOW MILES

2009 FORD FUSION SEL

#11346 - DVD, SUNROOF, LEATHER, NICE VAN

$244/ month

$239/ month

2012 CHRYSLER 200 LX

#75073A - SE, QUAD SEATS, NICE VAN, FULL POWER

2011 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

$239/ month

2007 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY WALTER P. CHRYSLER EDITION

2006 FORD FREESTAR VAN

$269/ month

$219/ month

$337/ month

$199/ month

2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA

#11232 - V6, SUNROOF, BUCKET SEATS

$16,995

$349/ month

2012 RAM 3500 4X4 DIESEL LARAMIE LONGHORN

2013 DODGE DART 4DR

4 cyl.,Full Power, #11295

$15,995 RAM 217-243-3371 217-243-3333 800-851-6039

#11367 - LOADED, LOADED, LOADED

$50,995

2014 JEEP COMPASS

#11361 - 4X4, 4 CYL., FULL POWER

$21,995

Gary Jarvis Chad Tullis Monte Keltner Tom Breen Mark Keller Jim Powers

Jim Long

Bret Todd

*All Prices are Plus Tax, Title, License and Doc Fee **Payments based on Tax, Title, License and Doc Fee Down, 4.9 % for 48 months 2004 Models; 4.9 % for 60 months 2006-2008 Models; 4.9% for 72 Months 2009-2013 Models With Approved Credit.

Jacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram • Jacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram • Jacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram • C

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Jacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram • Jacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram • Jacksonville

Jacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram • Jacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram • Jacksonville

Jersey State Bank employees celebrated Community Banking Week with a baseball theme. Employees handed out popcorn and peanuts and participated in a can drive for the Salvation Army to “Strike Out” Hunger. Employees left to right, Sherry Cooper, Kelli Keller, Rose Wock, Steve Goetten, Richard Lott (Salvation Army), Becca Strang, Kelsey Gibson, Ashley Haun and Kelly Plummer. The items collected will be contributed to the local food pantry.

OFFIce hOurS: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday. AdvertISIng POLIcy: We are not responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of display and classified advertising. Please let us know immediately upon publication of any errors. Responsibility is limited to the cost the space error occupies in the ad. All transactions under $50 must be paid in advance. Proper identification of the person placing the ad is required. The Jersey County Journal reserves the right to reject or edit any advertisement submitted for publication. deAdLIneS: Society-weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, engagements, Noon Monday; Classified ads, 3p.m. Monday; Display advertising, 5p.m. Monday. We reserve


D4

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

Jerseyville, Illinois

M NEY MATTERS

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Ideas to grow your business Getting a startup off the ground is a considerable and rewarding achievement. But once a business has achieved a certain level of success, business owners often find themselves wondering what to do next. Growing a business may not prove as challenging as turning it from a startup into a successful enterprise, but business owners often agonize over the best way to grow their businesses. The following are a few ideas to grow your business so you can build on your initial success. n Open a new location. Physical expansion is often the first idea that comes into business owners' minds when they are thinking about how to grow their businesses. But physical expansion is not always the best way to grow a business. Before deciding to open a second location, consider consumer trends to determine if your company has staying power, and economic trends to determine if the economy is healthy enough to support both your initial location and any additional locations you plan to open. Another thing to consider before opening a new location is your management style. If that style is very hands-on, then who will manage your new location, or your existing one if you plan to oversee things at the new store? Physical expansion can be good for business, but it's often most successful when business owners have a solid management team already in place, which allows owners to spend time at both locations. n Diversify your offerings. The Small Business Administration notes that diversifying is a strong growth strategy, providing multiple streams of income that can help business owners survive the slower months when sales tend to dip. Startups often credit loyal customer bases when citing their reasons for surviving their first few years, and such customer bases already trust your brand. Expanding that brand to include complementary products or ser-

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Successful business owners can grow their businesses in a variety of ways.

vices is a logical next step to grow your business and build on the credibility you worked so hard to achieve with your customer base. n Form an alliance with other businesses. Rather than diversifying their product offerings, some business owners have found it's easier and more profitable to form an alliance with other businesses who already sell complementary products. Such an alliance can be good for both businesses, as

each can expand its customer base without the kind of effort it takes to open a new location or the cost of producing new products. Other businesses already have lists of prospective customers who may need your products, and vice versa. Alliances can be the most effective and quickest ways to grow a business, not to mention the least expensive and time-consuming.

Money-saving tips for single moms Life as a single mother is not easy. In addition to the challenge of raising a child without another parent in the household, single mothers face many of the same challenges faced by married parents, only they must do so on just one income. Stress is a reality for many single parents, and much of that stress can be traced to the financial burdens of single parenthood. Single parents often find themselves looking for ways to save money, and the following are a handful of ways to do just that. n Resist the urge to overextend your budget. Many expenses, such as groceries and housing, are necessities. But single parents know there is also tremendous pressure to spend money on things that have nothing to do with need. For example, come the holiday season, single parents may feel pressured to buy youngsters everything on their holiday wish list. The same approach can be taken when making big-ticket purchases. If a new car will bust the budget, then shop for a preowned model, ideally one that is dealer certified and still covered under its original warranty. n Explain your financial situation to your kids. Keeping kids in the dark about your finances may lead to trouble or create undue stress. For instance, if kids are not aware that money is tight, then they may struggle to understand why they can't have the latest must-have sneakers or fill up the grocery cart on trips to the

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store. But single mothers who explain the idea of a budget and define that budget for their kids will likely find their kids are willing to cooperate and make good partners with regard to staying within the budget. n Trim entertainment costs. Another way for single mothers to save money is to trim the amount of money they spend each month on entertainment. Cable television

has become increasingly expensive in recent years, but single mothers have alternatives that can be considerably less expensive. In lieu of paying for cable television, single mothers can subscribe to a streaming service, such as Netflix or Hulu Plus, that charges a fraction of what cable companies charge but still offers a substantial amount of current content.

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