CalContractor - 2022 Specialty Construction

Page 1

Issue 10 - 2022

MAGAZINE Skanska Stacy and Witbeck A Joint Venture Completes Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project – Largest Bridge Project in History of Los Angeles


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CONTENTS

2022 Specialty Construction

06 14 22

PUBLISHER: Kerry Hoover khoover@calcontractor.com

SKANSKA STACY AND WITBECK A Joint Venture Completes Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project – Largest Bridge Project in History of Los Angeles

EDITOR: Brian Hoover Senior Editor

GRAPHIC DESIGNER: Aldo Myftari FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION: Please call: (909) 772-3121

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Implements Unique, Unprecedented Approach to Moving 150-Ton Building 15 at Pier 70 in San Francisco

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Skanska Stacy and Witbeck A Joint Venture Completes Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project – Largest Bridge Project in History of Los Angeles By Brian Hoover, Senior Editor / Photos provided by Skanska Stacy and Witbeck

Above: View of the completed Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project in downtown Los Angeles.

T

he iconic 6th Street Bridge in Los Angeles has served as a background for numerous movies, music videos and other productions since its erection in 1932. The visuals and angles provided by the viaduct are just a few reasons why so many movies like Terminator 2, To Live and Die in L.A., The Mask, Drive and Point Blank were shot at this amazing location. On January 27, 2016, the 6th Street Bridge was officially shut down and scheduled for demolition. Designed by architect Merrill Butler, the old 6th Street Bridge was the longest bridge in Los Angeles at 6

3,500 feet in length. The 6th Street Viaduct Replacement Project now represents the largest bridge development in the history of Los Angeles. The bridge crosses the Los Angeles River and will serve as a connector to the Downtown Arts District and historic Boyle Heights community. The $588 million Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project was funded by the Federal Highway Transportation Administration, the California Department of Transportation, and the City of Los Angeles. Skanska Stacy and Witbeck, a Joint Venture was the contractor chosen to build the new

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6th Street Bridge in downtown Los Angeles. The City of Los Angeles Bureau of Engineering held an international design competition to develop a new design for the new 6th Street Bridge. Community members were then invited to help select the winning design. In 2012, an HNTB-led team, with collaboration from Los Angeles architect Michael Maltzan Associates and Danish bridge architect, Dissing+Weitling was chosen to design the new structure. The new design would be known as the “Ribbon of Light” for its multiple concrete arches beautifully lit from below. C A LCO N T R AC TO R .CO M


THE DEMOLITION Geraldo (Jerry) Iniguez is a VP of Operations for Skanska USA and the Project Executive on the Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project for the Skanska Stacy and Witbeck, A Joint Venture. “The original 6th Street Bridge is one of America's most famous and iconic structures. Unfortunately, the bridge was deemed seismically deficient and irreparable, so the decision was made to demo the old structure in favor of a new design,” says Iniguez. “Our subcontractor, Silverado Contractors, Inc., began demolition of the existing 6th Street Bridge in 2016. Once demolition and some of the mitigation/detours were complete, we started the new bridge construction which was completed this past July.” Skanska Stacy and Witbeck, was also chosen to demolish several buildings around the old 6th Street Bridge and relocate utilities to make room for the new bridge structure and the new city park below. THE FOUNDATION Iniguez explains that once the demolition was complete, it was time to begin the foundation work. The CDIH foundations were installed by Condon Johnson Associates, Inc. using both cast and drill methods. “We started with the CIDH Foundation work while also protecting and relocating existing utilities. Our crews then began installing the bearings on top of the lower columns casted on top of CIDH piles, followed by the Y-arms and then on to the falsework to begin building the remaining portions of the bridge,” CALCON TRAC TOR.CO M

Top: Skanska Stacy and Witbeck team placing concrete bridge deck on east end of viaduct project. Above left & right: Crews performing concrete placement on one of the arch ribs.

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Right: View of a completed arch rib with cables installed and tensioned.

Below: Aerial view of the completed Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project.

says Iniguez. “This was the point where we could essentially start building the superstructure, which is the road surface that is now in place. Once this was finished, we moved on to constructing the arches.” THE ARCHES According to Iniguez, there were a total of 10 pairs of arches with a 9-degree outward cant, and the arches range 30 feet to 60 feet in height. “One of the more interesting features regarding the arches is that they are ten feet in width from inside to outside. When you look at the structure, you will see that the

arches do not terminate at the deck and that they continue down into the Y-arm,” says Iniguez. “The outside 3-feet of the arch is architectural, while the inside 7-feet is the structural component. Each arch required around 260 cubic yards of concrete (34 truck loads) and 12 to 14 hours to pour.” THE CABLES With the arches now complete and the falsework removed, the cable installation could begin. Although the 2 ¾-inch diameter cables are pleasing to look at, they also function as support for the bridge structure. A total of 15,000

feet of steel cables were utilized as support for the bridge deck. Each arch required up to 24 cables to connect the arch ribs and the edge girder that support the viaduct. “It is more common to see cables used on a steel structure, whereas the 6th Street Bridge was constructed with concrete. Cables have a strict tolerance on how much tension is required,” says Iniguez. “The tension on one cable affects the others, so every cable had to be monitored with strain gauges as the tension was increased or decreased as needed. Combining the concrete element made the entire job and process much more complex.” { Continued on page 10 }


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Right: Triple pendulum friction bearings were installed for seismic base isolation which allows movement of 30 inches in any lateral direction.

{ Continued from page 8 }

THE BEARINGS The new viaduct has 23 columns, 11 bents and two abutments. The bridge columns and abutments use triple friction pendulum bearings for seismic base isolation, allowing movement of 30 inches in any lateral direction. These seismic isolation bearings are located at each column's base and designed to withstand even the strongest earthquakes. Iniguez says that the

Cables are 2 3/4” in diameter

Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project was a one-of-a-kind structure with several unique elements. “On a typical bridge design, you have hinges and built-in stages that isolate some seismic activity,” says Iniguez. “The new 6th Street Bridge does not have joints but instead is seamless from one abutment to the another, which is unique. In addition, the original bridge had an abrupt angle in the middle, just past the river. The new 6th Street Bridge is one continuous radius structure that required some right-of-way

acquisitions of existing buildings.” The Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project included 22 stages of construction with a geometric control manual (GCM) that was strictly adhered to at every level. “To construct this bridge and meet all aspects of the intended design, we had to make certain that everything was in accordance with the GCM,” continues Iniguez. “There was minimal tolerances allowed, and we even had a scale model that we referred to throughout the entire sequence of the bridge system.”

Arches: 10 pairs of arches with a 9-degree outward cant, 10’ width and range in heights from 30’ to 60’ tall

The new viaduct has 23 columns & 2 abutments

The viaduct spans 18 railroad tracks, operated by 5 different railroad agencies 10

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Left: Crew members put the final touches on the project by installing barrier mounted street lighting.

Skanska Stacy and Witbeck have previously worked on many successful joint venture projects. Robert Thorpe is the Deputy Project Manager on the Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project and has been with Stacy and Witbeck for ten years. Thorpe has worked full-time on the new 6th Street Bridge since 2014. “Jerry and I worked hand in hand on this joint venture project. Our crew members also worked together seamlessly as one cohesive team. We play to one another's strengths. Skanska is well-known

for their excellence in building large bridges, and Stacy and Witbeck is known for their ability to offer alternative delivery methods and work with third parties,” says Thorpe. “This was a CMGC (Construction Manager/General Contractor) delivery project where we begin construction and continue to work with the owners, agencies and other stakeholders throughout the design process. There is a definite benefit of moving forward even when the design process is not quite complete. That is the beauty of the alternative delivery concept.”

110,000 tons of concrete, 8,250 tons of steel to build new viaduct

The viaduct is 100’ wide; an increase of 40’ CALCON TRAC TOR.CO M

Viaduct columns & abutments use triple friction pendulum bearings for seismic base isolation, allowing movement of 30 inches in any lateral direction

Thorpe explains that working with the five railroad agencies is a good example of navigating the intricacies that go with such a high-profile project. “The bridge goes over 18 railroad tracks and we had to continually coordinate with the various agencies like Metro, Metrolink, UPRR, BNSF and Amtrak. We were also regularly dealing with Caltrans as the bridge spans the 101 Freeway, the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, and the Los Angeles County Flood Control District for anything that affects the L.A. River. Then there is the

Length of viaduct is 3,500’ from Mateo Street to just east of the 101

Viaduct piles extend an average of 150’ underground, equivalent to a 15-story building S PEC I A LT Y CO N S T RUC T I O N / 2 0 2 2

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Right: Aerial view of northeast pedestrian ramp connecting to 6th Street Bridge from ground level.

Los Angeles Department of Transportation for the roadways and bike paths and the Bureau of Street Lighting, among many other public and private agencies. The coordination effort was just huge,” says Thorpe. “I think another challenge and unique aspect of this project that people can appreciate is the sheer scale and geometry of the overall bridge structure. This is not a standard Caltrans bridge by any means. Many geometric elements are different and unique. For instance, the arches all cant out to nine degrees off vertical. This is also true with the edge of the deck formwork and railings. Under the structure, floor beams support the deck; each one is skewed and has an elliptical soffit.” According to Thorpe, approximately 56,000 cubic yards of concrete and 8,250 tons of steel were utilized on the 6th Street Bridge project. “We went through several different means of controlling the temperature of the mass concrete. First, we utilized tubes that cycled cold water, but our structure contained so much rebar that once the prestressing ducts and additional rebar were introduced, we couldn't use that method any longer. Next, we used 12

ice, which can get expensive when scheduling issues arose, and the ice melted waiting for the concrete,” says Thorpe. “So, we ended up using a third method where we injected each ready-mix concrete truck with liquid nitrogen when it arrived onsite. The nitrogen cooled the concrete, and we achieved optimal thermal control of the numerous pours.” All of the castin-place concrete and formwork was self-performed by Skanska Stacy and Witbeck. Key specialty subcontractors and disadvantaged businesses worked for the joint venture on the project as well. LA Steel Services for the reinforced rebar, VT Electric for the lighting and Lucas Builders for the railing. Skanska Stacy and Witbeck worked six and even seven-day workweeks to keep the schedule and get the 6th Street Bridge open as soon as possible. “At peak, our subs and craft were running between 200 and 300 team members each day,” says Thorpe. “Beyond the demolition, foundation, arches, cables, bearings and deck, we also constructed sidewalks on each side of the viaduct at 8-to-14-foot widths. Additionally, our crews built 10-foot-wide Class IV protected bike lanes that run

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along each side of the viaduct and five sets of stairs connecting the viaduct to the ground underneath.” The east ramp of the bridge was built as a 3.5 level helical (helix) structure that is connected to paths to both the north and south sides of the viaduct. Located near the center of the bridge, the 790-foot, 12-foot wide and 45-foot tall helix allows cyclists and pedestrians to enter and exit the viaduct. The arches are lit with color-changing LED lights which will light up from the bottom and upward for different events and celebrations. Now that the 6th Street Bridge is complete and open to the public, the construction of the 6th Street Park, Arts and River Connectivity Improvement Project (PARC) will begin. Starting in 2023, the Bureau of Engineering will construct a new $40 million, 12-acre park underneath the 6th Street Bridge that will provide access to the Los Angeles River, including an arts plaza, sports fields, recreational programming, and much more. For more information on the 6th Street Bridge, please visit www.sixthstreetviaduct.org Cc

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Silverado Contractors Implements Unique, Unprecedented Approach to Moving 150-Ton Building 15 at Pier 70 in San Francisco By Brian Hoover, Senior Editor / Photos provided by Sam Burbank

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Below: Building 15 in its final configuration, which will be an iconic feature of the Pier 70 development and pay homage to the historic significance of this structure.

C A LCO N T R AC TO R .CO M


P

ier 70 in San Francisco was formerly the home and headquarters for Union Iron Works and Bethlehem Steel. It has been used for shipbuilding since the Gold Rush and had as many as 18,000 workers supporting the war effort during World War II. It has also served as a ship repair operations yard from the SpanishAmerican War in 1898 through today. Pier 70 played an essential role in our nation's maritime history, supporting several war efforts by building the first steel ships. Pier 70 is the oldest civilian shipyard in the United States and sits upon more than 65 bay front acres. After decades of being primarily vacant, Pier 70 is now being revitalized with space for arts and retail/maker space in the future. New construction will include the rehabilitation of 19 existing buildings and the construction of 16 new structures. The redevelopment will eventually create an entirely new neighborhood in San Francisco and provide a new waterfront park. Buildings 12 and 15 at Pier 70 were dedicated explicitly to shipbuilding and repair. Building 12 was scheduled for renovation to become the centerpiece of the new mixed-use redevelopment project. To prepare the 60,000-square-foot, CALCON TRAC TOR.CO M

2,300-ton steel-framed structure to house a new market hall, production and office space, it was necessary to lift it 12 feet for excavation and seismic upgrade. To complete construction, it was also required to temporarily move Building 15, which was located directly adjacent to Building 12. Developer Brookfield Properties chose Plant Construction Company as the general contractor to help restore Building 12 and Building 15 on the overall 28-acre Pier 70 project. Plant Construction Company put the Building 15 temporary relocation contract out for bid to several select contractors. Each contractor was asked to devise an innovative way to safely and soundly temporarily move the steel-beam structure. Several plans were offered, including completely dismantling and reassembling the steel structure piece by piece or cutting it completely in half and picking and moving it with a crane. After careful consideration, Silverado Contractors, with corporate headquarters in Oakland, was chosen for their less invasive and quite innovative plan. Troy Wright was the project manager for Silverado, who oversaw the entire Building 15 project. “I reached out

Above: Building 15 was transported and stowed at a location allowing the project development to progress for three years.

to Mammoet, a company known and revered worldwide for its ability to safely and efficiently lift and transport heavy objects and structures. We had worked with Mammoet in 2007 on the Bay Bridge roll-in project. The process we were looking at was similar to how we demoed the Bay Bridge over that Labor Day weekend,” says Wright. “Our process involved simple technology that would preserve and protect the structure throughout the process. We were able to mitigate the risks implementing these methods that, while simple on the surface, were quite complex to administer in real time.” Silverado decided to officially bring in Mammoet as a subcontractor on the Building 15 project and the innovative Silverado/Mammoet solution was put into action. Wright explains that his crews began by disassembling the 49.75-foot-tall steel building, removing the sheet metal siding and hiring another subcontractor to perform some abatement. “Once the demo and abatement

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15


were complete, we began the process of raising the 153-ton steel frame structure from its foundation that it rested on since WWII. After vertically jacking Building 15 from its foundation, we brought in several sets of dollies to act as a big trailer to move the building 180 feet from its original location,” says Wright. “These dollies bore the entire weight of the 300,000-pound structure, and we utilized two Link-Belt 350 excavators operated by two of our best operators to pull the structure away. It was imperative that our operators move in perfect sync with one another, traveling slowly and controlled to ensure that all 22 dollies and 16 steel building columns moved evenly.” Now that Building 15 was safely moved 180 feet away, the developer could begin their work of raising Building 12, performing the seismic upgrade and generally preparing to receive Building 15 in its final configuration. The roadway next to Building 12 also had to be raised 10 feet to allow for the new foundation that would support Building 15 in its new iconic, architectural and communal role. The move back, however, would require different methodologies 16

and tools. “Once Building 12 was raised, it was time for our team to prepare Building 15 for the horizontal transfer to its final resting position,” says Wright. The Silverado/ Mammoet team jacked the structure to the height of the new foundation and then slid the entire distance back to Building 12 on steel rails. “Before we could vertically jack the structure, Building 15 was moved 3 feet to align it with the new foundations adjacent to Building 12. Then several jacks raised the building in unison while timber crane mats were installed,” continues Wright. “Resetting the jacks and setting the building down were precarious situations and moments. Everyone was watching and we were on the edge of our seats doing everything we could to ensure it all went smoothly.” Wright says that once the mats reached a certain height, man lifts and scissor lifts were required to continue the timber mat stacking process to 12.5 feet. “We acquired more than 600 crane mats from all over the state of California. I remember thinking while the crane mats were placed, 'please, no earthquake.' In my mind, deploying these crane mats presented the

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Above: Over 600 crane mats were installed to support the skid system and building during the horizontal transport.

single biggest risk. That is when we were all so happy to have Oscar Reyes and Mick Root at the wheel who were there to execute every movement with specific intention,” says Wright. “Each joint on each rail needed to be supported by crane mats. After reaching the optimum height, we began lowering the structure down to the steel rails where the jacks no longer bore the weight.” According to Wright, after Building 15 was lowered onto the steel rails, soap was added to lessen the friction during movement. Building 15 was lowered to the steel rails where the jacks would no longer bear the weight. The track was Teflon coated and our crew soaped up the rail. “The soap of choice was an orange-scented Ajax. Each of the four manual jacks were fired in perfect sync to move the structure 20-inches at a time to avoid any distortion of Building 15. There was no going back, only forward,” continues Wright. “As we inched toward the final destination { Continued on page 18 } C A LCO N T R AC TO R .CO M



Above: Utilizing a perimeter jacking frame, Building 15 is raised to its new elevation. Pre-installed skid rails are ready to guide the building to its final destination.

{ Continued from page 16 }

next to Building 12, the tension grew, and there were still so many things that could go wrong. There was a 4.5 earthquake in Santa Cruz around 15 feet from touchdown, but we were prepared, and everyone did their job to perfection as Building 15 landed precisely upon its new foundation.” The Building 15 relocation project began in September 2018 and was completed in July 2021. Silverado also performed some of the earthwork to bring everything up to grade in 2020. “For the average person, the Building 15 project would have represented a once in a career opportunity. This was our third such project, one of the unique things that makes Silverado such a quality partner. We offer general contractors so many different scopes of work 18

that save them time and money. I am so proud of everyone who contributed to the success of this unprecedented and successful project. We went in with our A-Team and they executed it all to perfection,” says Wright. “This was also a great example of what strong project partners can accomplish together. A complicated and critical project like this requires everyone to pull in the same direction, which was certainly present on this job. I want to thank and recognize Plant Construction Company, the general contractor on this project. They did an outstanding job and were great to work for and with. I also want to recognize Degenkolb Engineers, the project's construction engineer who provided a lot of welcome peer reviews. Lastly, I want to thank Mammoet for their continued expertise, knowledge and professionalism.” Silverado Contractors serves customers throughout the western United States. Most of their work is performed in California, with

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licenses in Oregon and Washington. Silverado has successfully completed hundreds of projects since its inception, including a long list of high-profile demolition jobs. These include Candlestick Park, the Warren Hall implosion, the iconic 6th Street Bridge in Los Angeles, San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge Yerba Buena Island Transition, BART Lake Merritt Administration Building, Carquinez Bridge Approach Ramps, San Francisco International Airport's Boarding Area “A,” the demolition of the 240' tall Bank of America Clock Tower Building, and multiple projects for the Port of Oakland. Silverado's experience and commitment to service ensure that their contracts will be completed with the highest level of professionalism, safely, on time, and within budget. For more information on Silverado Contractors, please visit www.silveradocontractors.com or call their Oakland headquarters at (510) 658-9960. Cc C A LCO N T R AC TO R .CO M


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Sully-Miller Contracting Co. In Early Stages of $121 Million Oak Hills I-15 Pavement Rehabilitation Project for Caltrans District 8 By Brian Hoover, Senior Editor / Photos provided by Sully-Miller Contracting Co.

Above: Sully-Miller crews placing concrete using a Gomeco paving machine at the Los Angeles International Airport. Left: Sully-Miller's new Gomeco GP3 paving machine to be used on the Caltrans I-15 pavement rehabilitation project.

S

ully-Miller Contracting Co. (Sully-Miller) began construction on the I-15 Pavement Rehabilitation Project in partnership with Caltrans District 8 in November 2021. Also referred to as the Oak Hill Project, Sully-Miller will replace the existing asphalt pavement with Jointed Plain Concrete Pavement (JPCP) on 59 lane miles in San Bernardino County. The project spans from Oak Hill Road in Hesperia to just south of Bear Valley Road in Victorville. Along with the paving, there will be other civil improvements to on and off ramps, drainage systems, signals, lighting, and other upgrades to the safety features. 22

This project staff is led by Iqbal Bahramzi (Project Manager), Arnulfo Aguirre (Project Superintendent) and Frank Stevenson (Pavement Manager). Sully-Miller is self-performing all the major improvements, and the project is being constructed in stages to minimize impacts to traffic flows. “Stage 1 involves grading the existing median and paving with Hot Mix Asphalt to temporarily divert traffic during construction of the northbound and southbound lanes,” says Ayaz Uddin, Operations Manager for Sully-Miller. “Stage 2 takes the northbound traffic and moves it to the median while Sully-Miller

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crews remove the existing pavement and pave the new lanes with concrete along with other drainage and traveling public safety improvements. Finally, Stage 3 does the same as Stage 2, but on the southbound side of the I-15 freeway.” The $121 million dollar paving project for Caltrans District 8 will be completed in the Fall of 2024. Preparing Median Section for Traffic In order to divert traffic on the I-15 freeway, it was first necessary to prepare the existing median, which was essentially a V-Ditch with a metal beam guardrail. “We C A LCO N T R AC TO R .CO M


Above & Right: Sully-Miller's on-site wet batch plant at the I-15 project.

performed close to 100,000 cubic yards of earthwork in the median to bring the grade up to the necessary temporary level. Our crews then placed and compacted around 9 inches of base material followed by 6-inches of hot mix asphalt,” says Uddin. “Although it is temporary, this asphalt section is substantial and structurally equipped to handle the millions of cars and trucks that will drive upon it for the next two years. More than 400,000 linear feet of temporary barrier will be used to manage the traffic during the temporary traffic diversions.” Single Lane Replacement Section According to Uddin, Sully-Miller is currently working on a constrained section of the I-15 freeway, where traffic could not be diverted into the median section. “Over the 9-mile stretch of freeway under construction, there is an area with a bridge that crosses railroad tracks,” says Uddin. “In this section, it is necessary for our crews to replace the existing asphalt pavement with concrete, one lane at a time. This portion of the project is around threequarters of a mile in length and is located between Ranchero Road and the SR-395 Connector.” CALCON TRAC TOR.CO M

Milling, Recycling and Exporting Existing Asphalt Pavement Section Before any paving can occur, the existing asphalt pavement must be partially removed and recycled. Sully-Miller is utilizing milling machines and pulverizes to remove 200,000 cubic yards of asphalt and treated or untreated base materials. Before project’s end, 520,000 cubic yards of roadway excavation will occur, including the removal of asphalt, dirt and subbase. This will include the recycling of on-site material to produce 140,000 cubic yards of Class II Base. “Portions of the existing asphalt pavement section is being milled off while the rest is being pulverized in-place and recycled as base material,” continues Uddin. “We are running multiple machines and grinding in varying depths from 12-to-24inches.” Placing the JPCP on Northbound and Southbound Lanes Uddin says once the temporary roadway median section and the single-lane replacement at the railroad crossing bridge near SR395 area are completed, they will begin the placement of the JPCP on the northbound lanes. “Before placing any concrete on the three

northbound lanes, we must first do some roadway excavation for the proposed pavement structural section. Sully-Miller crews will then begin placing 8-inches of aggregate subbase, followed by a 4-inch asphalt bond breaker and then a 15-inch thick JPCP section,” says Uddin. “The 15-inches of JPCP is necessary due to the heavy truck traffic that travels through this section of the I-15 freeway. It represents a major throughway connecting Southern California to neighboring states and supports an average of 4.7 million vehicles annually. We will move to the southbound section when the northbound lanes are complete and repeat the process.” Uddin explains that JPCP is unreinforced cast-in-place concrete pavement designed with dowelled transverse joints and tied longitudinal joints to control cracking as well as vertical and horizontal movement. “The minimum design life expectancy for JPCP is 40 years before repairs and replacement are usually necessary. The low maintenance requirement is also one of the principal advantages of concrete pavements,” continues Uddin. “A total of 167,000 cubic yards of JPCP will be placed across all six lanes before finishing in 2024.”

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Above: Sully-Miller's asphalt paving crews placing Hot Mix Asphalt in the center median to facilitate northbound I-15 traffic switch for the proposed concrete pavement.

Getting It Done with a Gomaco GP3 Slipform Paver Sully-Miller recently acquired a new Gomaco GP3 slipform paver from Terry Equipment out of Bloomington. The Gomaco GP3 is designed for paving up to 30 feet wide and can accommodate multiple width changes. Sully-Miller operates a four-track machine, but the unit is also available in twotrack configuration. Sully-Miller’s Gomaco GP3 slipform paver is also equipped with Automated Machine Guidance (AMG) for a more integrated and efficient construction process. Sully-Miller’s professionally trained paver operators use the AMG to perform paving operations with increased safety, efficiency, accuracy, and with less dependency on previous manual methods. The Gomaco GP3 is also equipped with the exclusive G+ control system with load-sensing hydraulics for maximum paving performance and optimum fuel efficiency. “Our new Gomaco GP3 slipform paver is an amazing machine, full of state-ofthe-art technology. We are paving up to 30 feet on this project, using AMG with peak production of around 2,000 cubic yards per day,” says Uddin. “This Gomaco paver makes all the difference on a massive production job like the I-15 pavement rehabilitation project.” 24

Finishing the Median, Shoulders and On-and-Off Ramps Once both sides of the 9-mile stretch of the I-15 freeway are paved with concrete, Sully-Miller will go back into the median to construct it to final specifications. “The median will remain, and the shoulders will be widened as part of the safety enhancements. Portions of the median will remain in place while other areas will be milled off and capped to final grade,” says Uddin. “The northbound and southbound sides of the freeway are not necessarily on the same plane, so additional grading will be necessary to cap off the median to final grade in some areas. Other improvements will include a concrete barrier to serve as the center divider. There will also be multiple on-and-off ramps that will be repaved with asphalt. A total of 280,000 tons of asphalt pavement will be used on this project for pavement and bond breaker applications. Weather and Traffic are the Primary Challenges Uddin points out that weather can always be challenging on this stretch of the I-15 freeway. “The south end of the I-15 on this project is located near the Cajon Summit, which sits at an elevation of 4,300 feet. During the winter months, it consistently remains below freezing, and in the summer, we see desert-

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like conditions with temperatures in excess of 110 degrees. Fall and Spring can also come with extreme wind conditions,” says Uddin. “Asphalt paving can only be performed at 50 degrees or greater, while concrete placement must be at 40 degrees and rising, both of which are difficult in winter months. During this time, our crews will perform earthwork, milling or other non-paving activities.” Truck traffic and long-distance interstate travelers make safety the number one concern and priority for Sully-Miller construction crews. “Working in and around an active freeway is always a challenge. The median work is mostly at night, but the northbound and southbound mainline replacement work will be done primarily in the daytime,” continues Uddin. “At peak, we will have 75 individuals working fulltime on the craft side and 8 to 10 project staff on the jobsite. That is a lot of people to look after and keep safe, day and night, with constant nearby traffic. This is an amazing project that everyone at Sully-Miller is proud to be a part of as we look to a successful conclusion in 2024.” For more information on Sully-Miller Contracting Co., please visit www.sully-miller.com or call their Brea headquarters at (714) 578-9600. Cc C A LCO N T R AC TO R .CO M


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Operators Representing California Cat Dealers for 2022 Global Operator Challenge Move From Local Competition to Western Regional Finals Caterpillar is on a quest to find the best operator in the world. Local operators competed in local challenges and the winners moved on to compete in the Western Regional Finals on October 20 in Clayton, North Carolina. The following operators advanced on to the Western Regional Finals: Steve Newman of Newman Equipment Rental, Inc. (Quinn Cat), Danny Younghusband of Star Equipment Rental, LLC (Hawthorne Cat), Jonathan Lewis of Extreme Backhoe Services (Peterson Machinery Co.), and Daniel Ludtke of Elite Dirtwerx (Holt of California). During each portion of the Global Operator Challenge, participants execute a variety of tasks, such as digging a trench, loading a precise amount of dirt, and hauling or maneuvering the equipment through a variety of obstacles. Scoring is based on the operator’s skills, efficiency, as well as his or her competence in using integrated technology to enhance the machine’s performance. Specifically, there were five challenges in the local California events. The Big Dig where the objective was to dig a trench to grade using 2D technology. Precision Tracktor where contestants load, dump and return to hit payload/ pass count. The Load & Go where they were tasked with maneuvering a dozer through a pre-set course. Mini Masters where they “played” the course and put the ball in the 28

hole and Stay On Track showcased contestants’ balance and material control skills. The winner with the best score from all of the events combined won the local challenge to move on to the regional event. None of the California operator contestants moved on to the Global Operator Challenge finals at CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2023 in Las Vegas from March 14 -18. However, two of the operators did win individual events at the Western Regional Finals. Daniel Ludtke of Elite Dirtwerx (Holt of California) won the wheel loader challenge and Steve Newman of Newman Equipment Rental, Inc. (Quinn Cat) won the backhoe challenge at the western regional event in North Carolina. Steve Newman of Newman Equipment Rental (Quinn Cat) reflects on his experience at the Cat Operator Challenge Western Regional Finals in North Carolina. “Coming out of the first round, I was holding down first place after the backhoe competition. We then moved on to the 'Locked and Loaded challenge' where we ran a 950 wheel loader. I was able to hold on to first place after the second round and on into the last round. I just needed to go smoothly and try not to make any mistakes so I could retain 1st place,” says Newman. "The final round was the excavator challenge where we needed to utilize the cat 2D grade technology. I had trouble getting

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the bucket off the machine, which cost me 45 seconds. Due to a few penalties and going up against some stiff competition, I came in second place overall by only 13 seconds. The contest was really a great opportunity for me as an operator to be able to show off my skills and as a business owner to be able to network with other great operators and representatives from Caterpillar, both on the manufacturer and dealer side. On behalf of all the California operators, I want to thank Caterpillar for hosting such a wonderful event. I also want to thank Quinn Cat, Coco McWade, and Jeff Liebl for the great opportunity to represent Quinn in the Global Operator Challenge. Hopefully in 3 years I will be able to do it again, just next time I plan on bringing home the firstplace trophy.” Cc C A LCO N T R AC TO R .CO M


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