Chelsea 2030

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CHELSEA 2030



CAD O GAN | CHELSE A 2030

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CONTENTS A sustainable future

4

Foreword

6

Context & Approach

8

Environmental sustainability

10

Carbon

11

Water

14

Waste

16

Air quality

18

Green infrastructure

20

Wellbeing and culture

22

Community cohesion

24

Employment and skills

26

Health and wellbeing

28

Giving back

30

Securing our future

32

GRI Index

34

Endnotes

36


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A Sustainable Future Chelsea – a ‘village of palaces’ 1 with a rich and iconic cultural history.Today, it is one of London’s most vibrant neighbourhoods and wealthiest boroughs, with the health of residents performing above average on the majority of public health indicators2 and rich in cultural attractions, beautiful architecture and open green spaces.

W

hile an extremely desirable location, the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea (RBKC) faces both local and global challenges: from inequality, with a quarter of working residents earning less than the London Living Wage and 37% of children living in poverty3, to problematic air quality and the changing nature of retail leading to a ‘death of the high street’ faced by all urban areas. Chelsea 2030 takes a step towards addressing these issues and others. Cadogan has been part of this community for over three centuries and, as an owner, manager and developer of 93 acres, has played an active role in shaping this remarkable neighbourhood. This long-term commitment comes with responsibility to ensure a positive contribution

towards a sustainable environment, protecting the area’s unique heritage and supporting a thriving community. With 12 ambitious targets supported by a multitude of initiatives, this strategy builds on existing work to target air quality, emissions, waste, water, green infrastructure and the wellbeing of the community. These ambitious projects would be impossible without the partnership of many local stakeholders, combining forces to achieve and deliver significant change. This GRI-compliant4 report intends to highlight an understanding of the challenges ahead, plans for addressing them and progress so far, as well as the transparency with which Cadogan intend to approach them. This strategy is a commitment to being part of a more sustainable future for Chelsea and providing a foundation for change together over the coming decade.


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Foreword I

am delighted to be launching our commitment to a more sustainable future. It has never been more obvious that we must work together to build the city - and the life we want for ourselves and our children. We have been part of the Chelsea community for over three centuries and this long-term commitment comes with significant responsibility. As an owner, manager and developer of over 90 acres we take pride in the active role we play in shaping this remarkable neighbourhood. Following an extensive local consultation, ‘Chelsea 2030’ responds to our community’s environmental and social concerns. From urgent global issues including climate change and waste, to more specific challenges such as fragmented society and air quality, Chelsea 2030 reflects how we can address these together, a transparent roadmap with clear targets to accelerate positive change.

Leveraging our significant heritage to deliver the change needed for an even more vibrant future is an inspiring challenge. We look forward to working together and sharing our progress to ensure a better quality of life for everyone, now and for generations to come.

Chief Executive, Cadogan


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Context & Approach Chelsea 2030 is the result of three years of research and development, stakeholder engagement and data analysis, to ensure that the business puts sustainability at the heart of its approach.

O

ver 2,000 local residents, workers and visitors to Chelsea responded to community surveys, sharing their thoughts on how to build a better future for Chelsea. This survey was built upon with roundtables, workshops and in-person interviews with a selection of experts living and working within Chelsea who actively integrate sustainability into their lives. Their insights have helped to shape this strategy. It is also important that Chelsea 2030 reflects both the local and the global context. Therefore, it aligns with RBKC’s Climate Change Strategy5, and supports ten

C H E L S E A 2030 A N D S H A P I N G P O L I C I E S

of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs). The central net zero emissions target aligns with the Paris Agreement6. A range of transparent, measurable and auditable targets will allow Cadogan to report progress annually.

Cadogan has a major financial, social and environmental stake in Chelsea and clearly cares deeply about these issues over generations. I am greatly impressed by their carefully considered long-term plan for this historic part of London. Focusing on science-based goals and the needs of the community is key to achieving a healthier, inclusive and more sustainable city. SIMON BIRKET T

Local resident and Founder and Director of Clean Air in London


CAD O GAN | CHELSE A 2030

AIM

TA RG E T

2 0 3 0 D E TA I L

WA S T E

1 . WA S T E R E D U C T I O N

Send zero commercial operational and nonhazardous construction waste to landfill

R E L E VA N T S D G

9

Reuse or recycle over 90% of commercial operational and construction waste

A I R Q UA L I T Y

2 . S U P P L I E R C O N S O L I D AT I O N

At least 40% of commercial customers join off-site consolidation scheme

3. Z ERO-EMISSION SUPPLIERS

80% of suppliers to deliver by zero-emission transport

4. ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING INFR A STRUCTURE

All service bays and residential parking lots to have EV charging by 2025, and all new developments with parking after 2021 to include EV charging

WAT E R

5 . WAT E R U S E R E D U C T I O N

Reduce absolute mains water consumption by 50%

CARBON EMISSIONS

6 . N E T- Z E R O EMISSIONS

Net zero emissions across Cadogan’s scope of influence

GREEN I N F R A S T RU C T U R E

7. I M P R O V E D G R E E N INFR A STRUCTURE

Improve quality and quantity of green infrastructure, including 25% increase in Urban Greening Factor

WELLBEING & C U LT U R E

8 . H E A LT H & W E L L B E I N G

Make a measurable improvement to our communities’ health & wellbeing

9. E M P LOY M E N T & S K I L L S

Increase local employment and support skills development

10. COMMUNIT Y COHESION

Enhance community cohesion between local stakeholders

1 1 . T W I N N I N G P R OJ E C T

Deliver one twinning project a year

12. GIVING PRO GR AMME

Facilitate increase in charitable giving

CHARITY

N /A


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SECTION 1

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILIT Y C limate change is becoming a more important factor in investment decisions, central to long-term policy planning and has become significantly more prominent for both individuals and businesses. Chelsea 2030 sets out ambitions to reduce environmental impacts through waste management, improving air quality, water use reduction, improving green infrastructure and achieving net zero emissions. Conscious of the limits of influence, Cadogan’s environmental targets sit within the Estate’s geographical boundary, including the impacts of occupiers and its operations, construction and supply chain.


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Carbon 2 0 3 0 TA R G E T

Net zero emissions

Managing carbon emissions is critical to mitigating climate change, and a commitment to net zero emissions7 by 2030 lies at the heart of the Chelsea 2030 strategy. Cadogan’s 2019 baseline carbon footprint was 106,213 tCO2e8, with 61% from carbon embodied in its construction and development activities and 22% from occupier operations. Therefore, the greatest reduction in emissions will result from efficient and low-carbon retrofit and refurbishment, retaining materials where possible, and preserving building heritage whilst also enabling and promoting efficient operations. New design standards and sustainable customer fit-out guides will facilitate and promote the re-use of materials and carbon efficiency. Different approaches will be required to increase renewable energy generation and improve the performance of the supply chain. With 96% of the Estate’s carbon footprint being the result of indirect emissions (Scope 3 – see table on page 12), bringing

partners together and facilitating collaboration will be the only way to achieve this change. The Net Zero Pathway sets out clearly how the business will significantly reduce emissions and offset the remainder. Offsetting will be transparent and verifiable, preferring approaches with co-benefits to local communities and investment in green infrastructure. Offsetting through Cadogan’s value chain will also be explored, working with partners to improve performance and reduce emissions across the industry. The Estate’s emissions fell by 11% in 2020, largely due to reduced commercial customer emissions during COVID lockdowns and a 9% lower UK electricity grid emissions factor. A small increase in landlord gas consumption was driven by a higher demand for hot water and cleaning, and the proportion of landlord renewable energy procurement dropped slightly in 2020 due to a small increase in the number of void units on the Estate with inherited supply agreements.

R E T RO F I T T I N G H E R I TAG E B U I L D I N G S Retrofitting historic buildings to be more environmentally sustainable is significantly more challenging than designing in sustainability from scratch. To explore what could be done, Cadogan trialled the EnerPHit standard9 on a refurbishment of a mews house, while retaining its charm, heritage character and luxury feel. Sitting within the Hans Town conservation area, 126 Pavilion Road is a nineteenth century stable house, which makes it one of the oldest houses in the UK to now meet Passivhaus standards – and one of the few period Passivhaus buildings. The refurbishment was so successful that it is one of only 1 percent of domestic refurbishments to be certified as BREAAM10 ‘Outstanding’. The refurbishment focused on efficient fittings, innovative material procurement and enhanced thermal insulation and airtightness. The end result was a property that the residents love, with improved thermal comfort, enhanced site ecology and biodiversity, as well as a reduction in energy consumption of up to 85%. The building has set a new precedent in environmental performance, meeting the demand for a more energy efficiency property in a desirable location. The lessons from the project are being applied to all future residential refurbishments and developments.


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ST R E A M L I N E D E N E RGY A N D C A R B O N R E P O RT I N G 2019

2020

CHANGE

Landlord procured electricity (kWh)

9,912,962

8,231,986

-17%

Of which is renewable (%)

91%

87%

-4%

Onsite renewable generation (kWh)

18,144

18,144

0%

Landlord procured gas (kWh)

7,272,343

7,562,623

4%

Total landlord energy11 (kWh)

17,224,652

15,824,952

-8%

Building energy intensity (kWh/m2)

198

191

-9%

Building carbon intensity (tCO2e/m2)

0.046

0.039

-14%

C A R B O N FO OT P R I N T Emissions (tCO2e) by source SCOPE 1

Landlord refrigerant gas

SCOPE 2

Landlord electricity

SCOPE 3

Developments

Water (landlord)

Other purchased goods & services

Capital goods

Fuel and energy related activity

Waste

Business travel

Employee commuting

Tenant operations

Investments

T O TA L

106,213

Total emissions per £m operating profit before capital items 1003

2019

2020

2019

Landlord gas

G H G E M I SS I O N S INTENSIT Y

971

CHANGE

-3%

2020

CHANGE

1,347

1,398

4%

79

148

88%

2,534

1,919

-24%

64,888

62,573

72

86

11,484

11,219

934

19

477

406

62

145

1

0

55

50

22,953

15,437

1,328

808

94,208

-4% 20% -2% -98% -15% 132% -100% -8% -33% -39%

-11%


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Water 2 0 3 0 TA R G E T

50% reduction in mains water consumption

Whilst the Estate is not a high water consumer, and London is not currently suffering from significant water stress, it is recognised that water remains a precious natural resource that will be threatened by climate change. With increased droughts and flash flooding already occurring12, and the large energy demand of water management, addressing water use and conservation is becoming increasingly urgent. The Estate has committed to reducing mains water consumption by 50% by 2030. With customer operations accounting for 98% of water use, engagement and influence will be the focus in bringing about change. Cadogan is implementing a series of measures to help customers, visitors and residents reduce their water consumption. These include using water more efficiently in buildings, from efficient plumbing fixtures to sustainable urban drainage systems. Since 2017 all new planting across the Estate has been of drought-tolerant species, reducing irrigation demand and increasing climate resilience. In particular, a new type of grass turf will be trialled in 2021, which needs 30% less water than conventional grass, and is much more resilient. The Estate is also exploring the impact of natural ponds to help manage excess surface water (see ‘green infrastructure’ section for further detail). Water consumption dropped by 9% in 2020 principally due to COVID lockdowns and careful management, despite increased cleaning regimes affecting landlord demand.


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WAT E R CO N SU M P T I O N By operations in m3

2019 T O TA L

3,945,091

-9%

Construction & fit-out

1,717 0.04%

Direct Operations

66,441

3,876,932 98.3%

3,592,942

T O TA L

Construction & fit-out

9%

21%

1.7%

Tenant operations

2020

CHANGE

1,877

0.1%

Direct Operations

80,183

2.2%

-9%

Tenant operations

3,510,882 97.7%


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Waste 2 0 3 0 TA R G E T

Zero non-hazardous waste to landfill and 90% recycling

Operations across the Estate use a significant quantity of resources, from materials used in developments to the waste generated by occupiers and visitors. Chelsea 2030 aims to promote the circular economy, reducing single use and facilitating recycling and reuse of materials. This was identified as a high priority issue by the community; over half of the people who responded identified more recycling bins and clearer signage as desirable. From engaging with contractors to reduce construction waste, to reusing discarded coffee grounds from local cafes as fertiliser, Cadogan is looking to work with partners across Chelsea to help promote the circular economy. With 20% of the Estate’s waste due to the operations of its commercial customers, engaging and influencing these retail and hospitality operators on effective waste management and recycling is key. Opportunities to reduce single-use plastics will assist in lowering waste as will increased recycling. Initiatives being explored include working with the Duke of York Square Fine Food Market to improve reuse and recyclability of packaging, supporting businesses on Pavilion Road to become the UK’s first single-use plastic free high street and installing public drinking fountains in the neighbourhood.


CAD O GAN | CHELSE A 2030

The reuse of materials is being considered in multiple contexts, from improved flexibility in refurbishment designs to ensure Chelsea’s buildings are more adaptable to future needs without large-scale waste generation, to reusing and upcycling material into garments. Last year’s 24% reduction in operational waste is due to the COVID lockdowns and the majority of stores and offices being closed for significant periods through the year. However, the continuation of construction activity through lockdown is evident in the large increase in construction waste, with excavations significantly increasing the volume of waste recycled in 2020.

WA ST E M A N AG E M E N T

in tonnes

Reused

Energy from waste

Recycled

Landfill

Operational waste 2019

Figure break

Construction & fit-out waste

2020

2019

2020

65 231

281 742

The clothes we wear don’t disappear, people have to live on top of them, or around them. C A RO L I N E G R AT I O N

Founder of The Fashion School on King’s Road

108,144

5,907

1,180

894

704

535

1,883

1,429 -24%

765

2 6,932

T O TA L CHANGE

109,206

1475%

Reused

Recycled

Energy from waste

2019

0.02%

75%

22%

3%

8,815

2020

0.73%

98.12%

1.05%

0.10%

110,821

38575%

1545%

-39%

-61%

1157%

CHANGE

Landfill

Total

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Air quality 2 0 3 0 TA R G E T

Supplier consolidation, zero-emissions transport and EV charging infrastructure

The air quality of the Borough is in the worst 10% nationally13, with particular issues on Brompton Road and Sloane Street. The reduction of air pollution leads to significant health benefits, including reducing the burden of disease from stroke, heart disease, lung cancer, and both chronic and acute respiratory diseases, including asthma14. In support of RBKC and Transport for London’s decarbonisation strategies, Chelsea 2030 seeks to contribute to tackling air quality through three main targets: encouraging the reduction of vehicles on the road, encouraging more vehicles to be zeroemission, and supporting this with relevant infrastructure. Working with operators and suppliers across Chelsea is key to achieving these goals. In 2017 the Sloane Street waste


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reduction scheme was launched, after carefully selecting two preferred waste providers. The reduction in waste providers resulted in a 23% decrease in vehicle movements, improving the air quality while reducing the cost to businesses by 25%. Through partnership with local stakeholders, this scheme is planned for roll-out across the Estate over the next 10 years. Continuing the focus on supply chains includes supporting last-mile consolidated delivery services, enabling nontime-critical deliveries to the Estate to be made by zeroemission vehicles such as the e-cargo bike service launched in spring 2020. Together with investment alongside RBKC in pedestrianisation and further provision of cycling facilities, this has made a significant difference to the local air quality on Pavilion Road.

e C A RG O B I K E T R I A L As part of its commitment to lowering emissions and boost support for local businesses at a challenging time, 2020 saw the launch of Cadogan’s zeroemission e-cargo bike service. The e-cargo bike was first trialled in spring 2020 on Pavilion Road, which acts as a ‘village heart’ for local residents and visitors, home to independent, artisan traders including a butcher, baker, wine merchant, greengrocer, cheesemonger and fishmonger. During national lockdowns, it became a local community hub and lifeline for residents and businesses alike. A complimentary e-cargo bike service was launched by Cadogan, offering free delivery to those within a three mile radius. During this first trial, it travelled 320 miles and saved 60kg CO2 compared to alternative

car travel. it also had a great benefit on air quality, saving 115.2g of NOx, 5.8g of PM2.5 and 10.6g of PM10.


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Green infrastructure 2 0 3 0 TA R G E T

25% increase in Estate Urban Greening Factor

Chelsea has a rich horticultural heritage, known historically for extensive market gardens and later home to the world’s most famous annual gardening event – its name is inextricably associated with verdant planting. Green spaces and access to nature provides a range of environmental and social benefits, including improving air quality, carbon absorption, flood regulation, pollination support, as well as recreation and significant mental health benefits15. From those who provided their views in the consultation, over 50% of local residents and 65% of Chelsea workers expressed their support for increasing accessible green space, helping to make it an even more sustainable and stimulating place to be.

Adapting to these things now is about getting the green infrastructure right, such as storm water drains and permeable pavements. These are the things that can be done to adapt to climate change, and something Cadogan has demonstrated they understand and are responding to accordingly. SIMON BIRKET T

Founder of Clean Air London and local resident


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Chelsea 2030 aims to contribute to the quality and quantity of green infrastructure, measured through the established measurement framework referred to as the Urban Greening Factor16. This will also bring about a net gain in biodiversity, supporting local pollinators with access corridors and broadening the diversity of plant species across Chelsea. In particular, planting Cotoneaster (a shrub which can absorb 20% more pollutants from the air than any other shrub studied17) in Cadogan Place Gardens adjacent to Sloane Street will have a direct improvement on air quality in this area. A comprehensive Green Infrastructure Strategy lies behind this target, with initiatives ranging from installing living walls and greening public realm, to increasing the proportion of fruit and nut trees on the Estate to support pollinators and birds. By creating new log piles, small ponds with aquatic plants and filling in tree pits with drought-resistant shrubs, small actions come together to improve the quality of green infrastructure across Chelsea. On Pavilion Road, an Edible Trail of planters with fruit, vegetables and herbs which correspond to adjacent retailers (for example, chives outside of the cheesemonger), aims to engage the public and inspire visitors to grow their own produce. The Edible Trail will be refreshed and revitalised annually, bringing new species to the micro-gardening operation. Sloane Street will soon benefit from an exciting multi-million pound public realm scheme which includes resurfacing, widening part of the pavement and ‘greening’ the street. This will see the introduction of over one hundred new trees and elegant, ornamental planting to help absorb airborne pollutants, provide a buffer between pedestrians and traffic and create a more welcoming environment.


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SECTION 2

WELLBEING AND CULTURE F

or centuries, Chelsea has been a haven for artists, musicians and designers – from Rossetti to the Rolling Stones and Vivienne Westwood. Whistler and Turner settled here to paint the picturesque riverside, while authors who called it home have included Oscar Wilde, AA Milne and Bram Stoker. In the first half of the twentieth century, it had the greatest concentration of professional artists across the capital.18


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Today, Cadogan’s support for the arts ranges from events such as the spectacular floral arts festival Chelsea in Bloom and Kensington and Chelsea Art Week, to the ongoing support of world-class institutions of contemporary theatre, art and music. Providing a spectacular backdrop to artistic endeavour in Chelsea is the area’s architectural heritage. Celebrating and preserving the character of the built environment is key to successful development. Traditional construction methods are used wherever possible, highlighting architectural details from traditional iron railings to heritage shopfronts on King’s Road. Celebrating the artistic and architectural heritage of Chelsea comes together beautifully at Rossetti Studios, with many other initiatives to encourage Chelsea’s artistic community under consideration.

RO SS E T T I ST U D I O S

The complexities around…listed buildings and conservation areas are what makes these buildings so special and so worth restoration and preservation…You have to honour the building’s heritage, the techniques and designs of the time it was built. E R I N D AV I D S O N

Architect of Rossetti Studios refurbishment

Rossetti Studios are rare surviving artist’s studios in the heart of Chelsea. Their famous namesake, the preRaphaelite artist Gabriel Rossetti, was based a stone’s throw away from the site as were other titans of the arts world, including JMW Turner and James McNeil Whistler – at the beginning of the 19th century Chelsea was the artistic quarter of London. The studios were recently purchased by Cadogan and rescued with a £4million renovation and restoration; re-establishing their original function, enhancing their character and history and refurbishing them to a modernday standard. Built in 1894 in Queen Anne style, embodying the aesthetic ideals of ‘sweetness and light’ they have been beautifully renovated and are filled with original features. They have even retained their access portal or ‘canvas slit’, which can be used to remove large canvasses from 1st floor studios to street level without the need to navigate staircases and normal sized doors. The complex of 8 studios will shortly be fully occupied by practicing artists to contribute further towards Chelsea’s rich artistic pedigree.


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Community cohesion 2 0 3 0 TA R G E T

Enhance community cohesion between local stakeholders

RBKC is one of the most diverse communities in the country19, with incredible opportunities and significant challenges. The borough is usually associated with affluence, yet a quarter of RBKC’s working residents earn less than London Living Wage18. Chelsea 2030 commits to working within the community, to enhance local cohesion through bringing people together. This includes measuring progress from publicly available datasets which cover seven policy areas indicating community cohesiveness and health: regeneration, youth, education, housing, employment, hate crime, and race and faith discrimination20. Cadogan hosts over 60 inclusive, complimentary events for the community each year. This includes the annual Summer Fete to ‘Chelsea in Bloom’, London’s largest free flower festival, outdoor yoga and running classes at Duke of York Square and a Fine Food market each weekend. Most recently,


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We have a task to present the serious, elite work like the Friezes and the Masterpieces, which…can sometimes feel inaccessible. We combine them with the art projects that are at the heart of our community in Chelsea that often don’t have the resources to be presented in the same way, and yet are just as relevant. V E S TA L I A C H I LT O N

Founder of Kensington and Chelsea Art Week

an annual ‘Chelsea Community Awards’ have been created, celebrating the many people and businesses who enrich the local community, from ‘Community Hero’ to ‘Cultural Champion’, nominated by public vote and recognised with a glittering event at the Saatchi Gallery. A diverse and inclusive Estate creates vibrancy and enjoyment for all. Key to this is the wide range of different uses – from spaces dedicated to community use, to educational and charitable organisations pop-up activations and installations. One such community use is The Fashion School, located just off King’s Road. It reflects the heritage at the heart of British fashion and celebrates inclusive, innovative design through offering sewing and design classes for everyone from the age of six, encouraging a healthy attitude towards fashion. In addition, Cadogan commits £1.3million annually to subsidise affordable, key worker and community housing - and is looking to extend this provision by 10% by 2025. A review of physical and digital accessibility across the Estate in 2021 will provide a framework for greater inclusion in the future. Recognising the exacerbation of inequality caused by COVID, in particular through unemployment, financial hardship and isolation, Cadogan is directly funding an additional case worker in St Giles Trust’s SOS Project, a scheme which helps people overcome adversity, tackling street and gang violence. This has provided extensive personal support to 12 vulnerable people in the first 6 months alone and will continue to deliver tangible change to people’s lives across the borough.

C A D O GA N H A L L Cadogan Hall was transformed from a disused place of worship into a world class music venue, celebrating the artistic and musical heritage of Chelsea. Cadogan wanted to bring the building back to life in a manner befitting its character and civic presence, extensively and thoroughly converting the space to provide new lighting and sound systems, with state-of-the-art acoustic technology. The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra has been resident since it reopened in 2004. The Hall’s 950 seats make it first choice for both the UK’s top orchestras and international touring orchestras. It is also the chosen venue for the world-famous BBC Proms Chamber Music Series and offers a vibrant selection of contemporary, jazz, folk and world music events as well as talks, debates and conferences. Working with local groups, charities, education and religious bodies it provides space for and support to local cultural attractions and programmes of community events. Community use of the venue is subsidised by Cadogan and the Hall is a place for bringing people together and practicing creativity and inclusion.

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Employment and Skills 2 0 3 0 TA R G E T

Maximise local employment and skills

In 2019, unemployment in RBKC was 5.7% (although this increased to 12% for minority ethnic communities and 20% for people with disabilities)21. Since then, the pandemic has led to even more job losses and economic hardship. Cadogan currently supports nearly 15,000 jobs in RBKC directly, which is 10% of the borough’s workforce. Chelsea 2030 aims to contribute to local employment and increase the skillset of disadvantaged parts of the community. Working in partnership in the borough is key to delivering tangible employment outcomes; recruiting an Employment Opportunities Coordinator in partnership with RBKC focuses on helping local unemployed people into work in local businesses. Cadogan is exploring establishing an apprenticeship programme, and working closely with the Kensington and Chelsea Foundation, supporting their work on skills development and education.

We are very excited to be embarking on a partnership with Cadogan to open up employment and skills opportunities for residents of the Borough. We are hoping that this joint initiative will provide much needed access to employment opportunities for residents, while supporting employers with their talent needs and providing links with local communities. C O U N C I L L O R FAU L K S

RBKC Lead Member for Skills and Enterprise


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One of the things that came out of a listening project we did around Grenfell was that there is a huge need for employment and there are a lot of jobs in the borough and a huge gap in skills. We now have a fledging project where we offer up access to courses and skills to upscale employment in the borough… We’ve been able to get people from local businesses to do the coaching and mock interview sessions. V I C T O R I A S T E WA R D T O D D

Director of Kensington and Chelsea Foundation

Supporting the diversification of the property sector is also important, providing opportunities for students from less advantaged and non-traditional backgrounds to experience the sector. Cadogan has supported Reading Real Estate Foundation’s Pathways to Property programme since 2017, providing work experience to young people who would not otherwise have had the opportunity.


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Health and wellbeing 2 0 3 0 TA R G E T

Make a measurable improvement to health & wellbeing

RBKC generally performs above average on public health indicators, with the exception of people killed and seriously injured on roads, adult diabetes diagnosis and childhood obesity. Furthermore, it has the highest rate of one-person households in the country22. Isolation and loneliness can be corrosive, damaging physical health as well as mental health. With particular focus on the issues affecting RBKC, Chelsea 2030 initiatives include supporting public health by maximising active travel across the area, promoting sociallypositive23 retail, and partnering with organisations across the borough who deliver meaningful grassroots impact on local health and wellbeing. For example, donating space for community group use and bringing people together with close proximity to nature to aid mental health and tackle loneliness. Raising awareness and education is key to addressing issues such as diabetes diagnosis, when 6 in 10 people have no symptoms prior to being diagnosed24. Cadogan is currently exploring how they can support social prescribing, sharing resources with community groups to enable them to take a holistic approach to public health and wellbeing.


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Giving back 2 0 3 0 TA R G E T

Increase direct and indirect donations to charity, and deliver twinning programme

Understanding that people do better together is central to the Chelsea 2030 strategy. Cadogan is the Principal Supporter of the Kensington & Chelsea Foundation, because their mission to identify and support projects which improve the lives of the disadvantaged and vulnerable in Chelsea is important to maintaining healthy communities of the future. Chelsea 2030 sets out two goals with regards to charitable giving. Firstly, to increase direct and indirect charitable giving by residential and commercial customers, visitors and partners. In 2019, Cadogan’s total direct and indirect social contribution was over £205,800, to 1151 beneficiaries. This increased by 144% in 2020 largely through COVID campaigns, giving £502,500 to 184 organisations and supporting 6,168 individuals. Secondly, launching an innovative Twinning Programme whereby a successful project delivered through Chelsea 2030 will be replicated elsewhere in the borough each year. This programme is intended to share learnings and best practice, creating new community connections and maximising environmental and social benefit.


CAD O GAN | CHELSE A 2030

KENSINGTON & CHEL SE A FOUNDATION Cadogan is Principal Supporter of the Kensington & Chelsea Foundation. This enables hundreds of local grassroots organisations to benefit, ensuring that support directly reaches those who need it most. In covering the Foundation’s running costs, assurance can be given that every further penny raised goes directly to local causes and we actively encourage our customer network, from residents to retailers and restaurants, to join us in supporting the Foundation.

• Helping to bridge the ‘digital divide’, with remote learning a particular challenge for children unable to access the safe learning environment provided by school during the pandemic. Cadogan was joined by other local groups and businesses to directly fund over 100 laptops for youth organisations across the borough, reaching over 400 children identified as at particular risk.

Funding for additional recent projects has also included: • Enabling the Foundation, in partnership with Age UK, to provide weekly care packages for over 1,000 vulnerable and isolated people • Further support, including staff fundraising activities, for the ‘Christmas in a box’ campaign to provide over 8,000 local families, homeless people or those at risk of isolation with support, gifts and food over the festive period

T H E C A D O GA N C H A R I T Y The Cadogan Charity is managed separately from business operations. Over the last 5 years it has donated over £12million to both local and national charities, including London’s Air Ambulance service, The Children’s Trust, Wellbeing of Women, Prince’s Trust and Alzheimer’s UK as well as many of the institutions of the borough.

In addition, the Cadogan family support and Chair the London Playing Fields Foundation, which transforms lives through sport and physical activity by protecting and promoting London’s playing fields; running social inclusion projects and directly managing several grounds across the capital.

B U S I N E SS CO M M U N I T Y F U N D Throughout 2020, Cadogan helped to contribute to Chelsea’s longer-term recovery from the pandemic through the creation of a ‘Business Community Fund’, which has so far delivered over £20 million in support. Core initiatives have included emergency rent support and relief measures for shops, restaurants, leisure operators and cultural attractions. On reopening, over 500 ‘al fresco’ seats were provided with the support of RBKC, to create a safe and appealing environment, along with substantial measures to protect the local community and ensure social distancing – including clear signage, sanitisation stations and ‘picnic bubbles’ on Duke of York Square’s green. Backing for the medical profession was provided in several different ways. Donations to Chelsea & Westminster

Hospital’s COVID-19 Rapid Response Fund supported COVID-19 research and new treatment trials, provided patients with technology so that they could communicate with loved ones, and initiated a memory box project to help the bereaved cope with loss. The funds have also contributed to an NHS staff wellbeing programme to help frontline workers. Sponsored accommodation and funding ensured the provision of 1,500 medical gowns-per- day to local hospitals, with over 32,000 gowns delivered during the peak of the crisis. It also continued its work in providing car parking and hotel accommodation for frontline workers, as well as subsidised key worker accommodation.

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SECURING

Our Future C

helsea is constantly evolving, from its initial prominence as a tranquil location for summer palaces and market gardens to the artistic and bohemian heritage very much alive today in one of London’s best loved neighbourhoods. Chelsea 2030 is another step in this evolution, strengthening Cadogan’s objectives to bring sustainability to the fore and contribute further to improving local quality of life. The vision and targets set out here will require collaboration and innovation. Engagement is critical to success – working with the diverse and exciting communities that make modern Chelsea such a vibrant place. Chelsea 2030 is only the first step for the next 300 years of stewardship.


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The vision and targets set out here will require collaboration and innovation. Engagement is critical to success – working with the diverse and exciting communities that make modern Chelsea such a vibrant place.


CAD O GAN | CHELSE A 2030

34

GRI Index GRI

METRIC

L O C AT I O N

PAG E

O RG A N I S AT I O N A L P RO F I L E 102-1

Name of Organisation

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

64

102-2

Activities, brands, products & services

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

62

102-3

Location of headquarters

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

60

102-4

Location of operations

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

4

102-5

Ownership & legal form

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

74

102-6

Markets served

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

4

102-7

Scale of the organisation

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

62

102-10

Significant changes to organisation & supply chain

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

16-17

Statement from senior decision-maker

Chelsea 2030 Report

7

Values, principles, standards and behaviour norms

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

5

Composition of highest governance body (Board)

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

60

S T R AT E G Y 102-14

ETHICS & INTEGRIT Y 102-16

G OVERNANCE 102-22

S TA K E H O L D E R E N G A G E M E N T 102-40

List of stakeholder groups

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

35-37

102-43

Approach to stakeholder engagement

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

35-37

102-44

Key topics & concerns raised

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

35-37

R E P O RT I N G P R A C T I C E 102-45

Entities included in the consolidated financial statements

2020 Annual Report & Accounts

86

102-46

Defining report content and topic boundaries

Chelsea 2030 Report

3

102-47

List of material topics

Chelsea 2030 Report

3

102-50

Reporting period

Chelsea 2030 Report

8

102-52

Reporting cycle

Chelsea 2030 Report

8

102-53

Contact point for questions regarding the report

Chelsea 2030 Report

38

102-54

Claims of reporting in accordance with GRI

Chelsea 2030 Report

4

102-55

GRI content index

Chelsea 2030 Report

36-37

M AT E R I A L A S P E C T : E N E RG Y ( G R I 2 0 3 : 2 0 1 6 ) 103-1

Explanation of the material topic & boundary

Chelsea 2030 Report

10-11

103-2

Management approach and its components

Chelsea 2030 Report

11

103-3

Evaluation of the management approach

Chelsea 2030 Report

11

302-1

Energy consumption within organisation

Chelsea 2030 Report

12

302-3

Energy intensity

Chelsea 2030 Report

12

302-4

Reduction of energy consumption

Chelsea 2030 Report

12

M AT E R I A L A S P E C T : WAT E R ( G R I 3 0 3 : 2 0 1 8 ) 103-1

Explanation of the material topic & boundary

Chelsea 2030 Report

10, 14

103-2

Management approach and its components

Chelsea 2030 Report

14

103-3

Evaluation of the management approach

Chelsea 2030 Report

14

303-5

Total water consumption

Chelsea 2030 Report

15


CAD O GAN | CHELSE A 2030

35

GRI

METRIC

L O C AT I O N

PAG E

M AT E R I A L A S P E C T : B I O D I V E R S I T Y ( G R I 3 0 4 : 2 0 1 6 ) 103-1

Explanation of the material topic & boundary

Chelsea 2030 Report

10, 22-23

103-2

Management approach and its components

Chelsea 2030 Report

22-23

103-3

Evaluation of the management approach

Chelsea 2030 Report

22-23

304-2

Significant impacts of activities, products or services on biodiversity

Chelsea 2030 Report

22-23

M AT E R I A L A S P E C T : E M I S S I O N S ( G R I 3 0 5 : 2 0 1 6 ) 103-1

Explanation of the material topic & boundary

Chelsea 2030 Report

10-11

103-2

Management approach and its components

Chelsea 2030 Report

11

103-3

Evaluation of the management approach

Chelsea 2030 Report

11

305-1

Scope 1 emissions

Chelsea 2030 Report

12

305-2

Scope 2 emissions

Chelsea 2030 Report

12

305-3

Scope 3 emissions

Chelsea 2030 Report

12

305-4

GHG emissions intensity

Chelsea 2030 Report

12

305-5

Reduction of GHG emissions

Chelsea 2030 Report

12

305-6

Emissions of ozone-depleting substances

Chelsea 2030 Report

12

M AT E R I A L A S P E C T : WA S T E ( G R I 3 0 6 : 2 0 2 0 ) 103-1

Explanation of the material topic & boundary

Chelsea 2030 Report

10, 16-17

103-2

Management approach and its components

Chelsea 2030 Report

16-17

103-3

Evaluation of the management approach

Chelsea 2030 Report

16-17

306-1

Waste generation and significant waste-related impacts

Chelsea 2030 Report

16-17

306-2

Management of significant waste-related impacts

Chelsea 2030 Report

16-17

306-3

Waste generated (total weight of waste by disposal route)

Chelsea 2030 Report

17

306-4

Waste diverted from disposal

Chelsea 2030 Report

17

306-5

Waste diverted to disposal

Chelsea 2030 Report

17

M AT E R I A L A S P E C T : L O C A L C O M M U N I T I E S ( G R I 41 3 : 2 0 1 6 ) 103-1

Explanation of the material topic & boundary

Chelsea 2030 Report

24, 26-27

103-2

Management approach and its components

Chelsea 2030 Report

26-27

103-3

Evaluation of the management approach

Chelsea 2030 Report

26-27

413-1

Operations with local community engagement, impact assessments and development programs

Chelsea 2030 Report

Operations with significant actual and potential impacts on local communities

Chelsea 2030 Report

413-2

8, 26-33 8, 26-33


CAD O GAN | CHELSE A 2030

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Endnotes 1

Daniel Defoe (1724) A tour thro’ the whole island of Great Britain, and re-quoted in Victoria County Histories

2

Public Health England, 2019

3

K&C Foundation 2019-20 Impact Report

4

The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) is an independent international reporting framework, enabling clear and comparable communication of relevant issues

5

RBKC Climate Change Strategies and Action Plans, 2016-2021

6

Paris Agreement adopted at COP21 in Paris in December 2015

7

Net zero emissions means reducing emissions as much as possible, and then offsetting the remainder, so the net resultant is zero

8 tCO2e (tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent): the standard unit for measuring emissions 9

EnerPHit is the refurbishment version of the Passivhaus standard, an international certification for extremely efficient and low carbon development

10

BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method): an international framework and certification for sustainable buildings

11

Includes electricity, gas and fuels

12

Met Office, 2020

13

Consumer Data Research Centre, 2019

14

World Health Organisation, 2018

15

Natural England’s Emerging Green Infrastructure Standards (in draft)

16

Greater London Authority, Urban Greening Factor for London Research Report, 2017

17

Tijana Blanuša et al. (2020) Evaluating the Effectiveness of Urban Hedges as Air Pollution Barriers: Importance of Sampling Method, Species Characteristics and Site Location

18

Census (1921) as reported in Victoria County Histories

19

K&C Foundation Impact Report 2019-20

20

Methodology recommended in Community Cohesion Action Guide, Local Government Association

21

ONS, 2019

22

2011 Census

23

Socially-positive retail: retail operations which have a positive social impact (e.g. employing ex-offenders, donating unsold food to a foodbank, or selling products with high ethical standards).

24

Diabetes UK

Contact information Kate Neale, Sustainability Manager kate.neale@cadogan.co.uk 020 7730 4567 www.cadogan.co.uk



10 Duke of York Square London SW3 4LY T. 020 7730 4567 cadogan.co.uk