Page 1

Cache Magazine Wilderness watercolors Artist Ernie Verdine paints daily, completing 100 pieces this year alone

The Herald Journal

AUGUST 24-30, 2012


contents

August 24-30, 2012

MUSIC 3 Nashville Tribute Band to perform LDS concert

4 Trout and Berry Days

includes multiple concerts

4 Singer/songwriter Sarah Sample coming to Logan

ART 5 Caffe Ibis to host

Jack Sears art collection

MOVIES 7 Joseph Gordon-Levitt goes full-speed in ‘Premium Rush’

THEATER

PAGE 8

11 ‘Les Miserables’ to

take stage in September

YOUR STUFF 10 Smithfield photos taken by summer citizen

11 Heather Malmberg

writes about her Klingons

crossword 13 Take a stab at this week’s puzzle

CALENDAR 14 See what’s happening this week

Winter watercolor scene by Ernie Verdine. On the cover: A fall scene painted by Verdine.

FROM THE EDITOR

I

am amazed with people who can stick to something every single day, whether it be going to the gym, reading, practicing an instrument, singing, meditating or painting. Some people can just pick a goal and do it. About five months ago, I decided to take one photo every day. I’d read about other people doing this for blogs, and one of my friends did it for a month. I decided to take on this project for a year because I love pictures, capturing memories and long to be better at artistic things. I knew my photos would be basic snapshots, but they would tell

stories about people I like to be with, places I like to go and the pretty things I see. While I’d like to say I’ve completed this goal perfectly, I’m not even close. In fact, this last month has been pretty much a doozy in that aspect of my life. Remembering to take one photo a day is harder than you think, especially on the days you stay home and pictures of various rooms have already been shot. Also, you can only take so many pictures of yourself. Of course there are several days when it’s easy, too, like when you’re walking around the streets of Chicago like I did a few weeks ago, or you get to see your nephew on a horse for the first time, or you’re at a party with a bunch of friends. I’m not giving up taking photos —yet

— because I just don’t want to. It’s good for me to have goals, even the simple picture-taking goals. Perhaps a little aspiration like this will someday translate into me exercising every day, or writing a book. This week’s main feature is about Ernie Verdine, an artist who paints every day. He says he just can’t go without it. Some days this means waking up in the wee hours of the morning. Even on the frustrating days, when he starts over on a project or repaints, he’s determined to keep art an active part of his life. This year alone, he’s finished 100 paintings. How many people can say they’ve done that? That’s determination I tell ya, and I hope to get more of it. — Manette Newbold


Nashville Tribute Band coming to USU Multi-platinum winning singer/songwriter/producer Jason Deere and the Nashville Tribute Band will perform a concert at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 27, in USU’s Kent Concert Hall. This summer, the Nashville Tribute Band has been on a western states tour performing in Oregon, Idaho, Arizona and Utah. Opening the show will be rising pop/country star Katherine Nelson, sharing selections from her justreleased CD “Born Brave.” The album was produced by Deere and recorded in Nashville with such legendary musicians as Larry Stewart (Restless Heart), Ilya Toshinsky (Keith Urban, Carrie Underwood) Nir Z (John Mayer, String), Rob McNelly (Lady Antebellum) Nashville Tribute Band and multi-Grammy awardwinning mix engineer Silvio WHAT: Nashville Tribute Richetto. Joining Nelson and Deere will be the popuBand concert with lar country trio Due West. Katherine Nelson and Due Deere, who co-wrote the West hit single “Love’s Lookin’ WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Good on You” for the blockMonday, Aug. 27 buster country group Lady WHERE: Kent Concert Antebellum, with Mark Hall Lopez of Due West, said he Tickets: $6 to $9. They always enjoys performing in Logan. can be purchased at www. “I love the college campus nashvilletributeband.com. atmosphere in Logan. Monday is the first day of classes at USU, so there should be a and “The Trek: A Nashville lot of excitement and antici- Tribute to the Pioneers.” Deere has written songs pation at the concert. We’re for some of Nashville’s biggoing to get the school year gest stars – Little Big Town, off to a rocking start.” Leann Rimes, Jessica SimpThe band will perform son, Be Be Winans, Natalie songs from a trio of CDs Grant, The Wreckers, James including their 2011 release Wesley and Stealing Angels “The Work: A Tribute to the — and is just as comfortable Missionaries,” as well as penning tunes about the two previous best-selling heritage and tradition of his albums: “Joseph: A Nashfaith. ville Tribute to the Prophet”

“I think all artists are their own worst critic. That’s the way it is with me. ... I think everybody has art ability. Art is art. It’s the interpretation of the eye.” – Ernie Verdine, page 8

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption

Pet: Wrangler From: Cache Humane Society Why he’s so lovable: Wran-

Due West The Nashville Tribute Band is a collection of artists and musicians who come together under Deere’s musical direction. Many of them have solo careers or play with well-known groups. The Nashville Trib-

ute Band has performed hundreds of concerts in the U.S., Canada, Australia and China. Tickets for the show are $6 to $9 and can be purchased online at www.nashvilletributeband.com.

gler is a very handsome pointer. He is an unclaimed stray so he is now up for adoption. Those who want a young, very active, smart and devoted dog who is eager to learn should look no further. Wrangler will need continued obedience training to be a great member of the family. He is an active breed and will need an active owner who can keep him in tip-top shape with exercise.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, August 24, 2012

ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


Page 4 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, August 24, 2012

all mixed up Multiple weekend concerts will rock Paradise Musicians to perform as part of annual Trout and Berry Days celebration Paradise City and the Brad, and their 10 Paradise Ranch Roping children. Her music is 4H Club are pleased rooted deeply in the to announce the Trout Western landscape her and Berry Day’s conlife is immersed in. cert featuring Western Mary Kaye tours entertainer Mary Kaye extensively and this at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. year alone will perform 24, at the Paradise Park, in 11 Western states. In 8970 S. Hwy 165. January, she released her Mary Kaye is a mullatest CD, “No Wilder tiple award-winning Place,” which is currententertainer. She is the ly No. 1 on the Western current Western Female music charts and has Performer of the Year received very favorable with the Academy of reviews in the Western Western Music. In 2010, Horseman, American she was named Female Cowboy and The WestVocalist of the Year ern Way magazines. by the Western Music For more information, Association. She was visit marykayeknaphus. also one of most popular com. performers at the annual Tickets are $10 per Cache Valley Cowboy person in advance or Rendezvous held in $12 at the gate, and $20 March. per family in advance Born in Texas and or $25 per family at the raised in Mississippi, gate. They are available she now resides on a at www.4hranchroping. 100-year-old pioneer com or from 4H club homestead in a small members. For additional Western town in central information, call 435Utah with her husband, 512-5087.

On Saturday, Aug. 25, Cache Valley’s south end will be rocking with the Country-Rock Fest for Hope. Held in conjunction with Trout and Berry Days in Paradise, this live music festival will feature local talent as well as a guest bands from Ogden and Oregon. This free event is being held to raise awareness for the Cache Valley for Hope Cancer Foundation, a progressive charitable organization that helps local families struggling with cancer. In addition to the regular activities of the Trout and Berry Days celebration, the live music will start at 11 a.m. and end with a family dance from 7:30 to 11 p.m.. 11 a.m. — Shawn and Mindy Potter 12 p.m. — The Polluters 1 p.m. — Break/Auction 2 p.m. — Kountry Knights 3 p.m. — The Polluters 4 p.m. — Chandler and Darci O’Brien 5 p.m. — Kalei Hogan 6 to 7:30 p.m. — Trout Dinner 7:30 to 11 p.m. — Sagwitch Basin Boys and Kountry Knights Those who like to dance, listen or sing along are welcome to the event. Everyone is also invited to stop by the Cache Valley for Hope booth and find out how they can help their neighbors and friends who might be struggling with the high costs of cancer. Photo courtesy Lori Faith Merritt

Songwriter Sarah Sample coming in concert The Bridger Folk Music Society presents a concert with singer/songwriter Sarah Sample at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, at Crumb Brothers Bakery, 291 S. 300 West in Logan. Tickets are $13 and are available at www.bridgerfolk.org, or by calling 435-757-3468, or take your chances at the door. Seating is limited, and this show traditionally sells out, so advance purchase is recommended. The concert is sponsored by Import Auto and Utah Public Radio. Sample has performed all over the four corners and then

WHAT: Sarah Sample When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25 WHERE: Crumb Brothers Bakery, 291 S. 300 West in Logan COST: $13

some in Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Wyoming and Texas. Sample’s album “Never Close Enough” is to her as “Flaming Red” is to Patty Griffin: a marked departure from a promising, acoustic debut but never too far away from her soulful

folk roots. Sarah’s passionate, soul-stirring voice is up front. On “Never Close Enough,” with some new musical colors and a great new family of songs, Sample achieved her dream to stay true to the muse while staying faithful to her roots. “Someday, Someday” is Sample’s latest release. And after two albums, an EP, and lots of touring into her career, Sample is quickly shedding any traces of up-and-comer with its arrival. For more information, go to www.bridgerfolk.org or www. sarahsample.com


From Sept. 7 to 17, select works from the private family collection of Jack Sears will be exhibited at Caffe Ibis Gallery Deli, 52 Federal Ave., in Logan. This collection will be featured as a part of the Logan Downtown Gallery Walk on Friday, Sept. 7, with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Don’t miss out on the rare opportunity to view this special family collection of one of the most prominent Utah artists. Sears was born in Salt Lake City in 1875. He studied art in San Francisco at the University of Deseret, and in New York as a part of the Art Students League. He worked as a cartoonist for New York syndicate newspapers before working at Times News as a political cartoonist and illustrator for several other newspapers including the Deseret News and the Salt Lake Tribune. After going back to study art

in New York from 1904-1918, he returned to Utah where he became instructor of art at the University of Utah for 24 years. During his teaching career, Sears founded the commercial art department at the University of Utah.

coming up ‘West Side Story’

Four Seasons Theatre Company presents Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim’s musical adaptation of “Romeo and Juliet,” “West Side Story.” Performances are Aug. 30 and 31, Sept. 1, 3, and 6 to 8 at 7:30 p.m. on the Sky View High School stage. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door and are available at fourseasonstheatre.org or by calling 435-563-6273. This tale of rivalry and forbidden love has been a favorite of audiences since 1957. The Tony Award-winning score includes the songs “I Feel Pretty,” “Tonight,” “Maria,” “America” and many more. Don’t miss the timeless music and dancing that has made “West Side Story” one of the most beloved musicals of all time.

PoochPalooza

Dog lovers of Cache Valley are invited to attend an Animal Fair and PoochPalooza presented by the Cache Humane Society and Zoomdog Agility and Sports Club. This free event will be held at the Cache County Fair-

grounds from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8. The Animal Fair and PoochPalooza is geared toward building up the Cache canine community and encourages people to spend more time with family, including the dog, and get together with other local dog owners. The day’s activities will include agility trials, presentations, booths, canine contests and fun games for kids. Everybody is invited — especially the family dog.

Food fight

A food fight fundraiser for Zac Lockhart will take place from 4 to 11 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8, at the Little Bear Bottoms Resort and Corn Maze in Wellsville. The food fight itself will take place at 5:30. There will be multiple inflatables by Checketts Amusements, Hershey’s syrup slip ‘n’ slides and four 200-foot water slip ‘n’ slides. When it gets dark, two movies will be screened on two separate screens. Proceeds will help with hospital bills for Lockhart, who recently had a cancerous tumor.

Sears worked in various media, constantly sketching life around him. Apart from creating numerous drawings and paintings, he also wrote and illustrated the books “The Diary of a Cat” in 1934 and “Cat Drawings” in 1943.

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Page 5 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, August 24, 2012

Caffe Ibis to display Jack S. Sears exhibit


Page 6 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, August 24, 2012

movies This remake of the 1976 girl-group tale is like a box of July Fourth sparklers. It sizzles briefly whenever people open their mouths to sing, but in between, when people open their mouths to talk, the characters mostly are like burned-out sparklers — stiff, inert, disposable metal sticks. Not really the way we’d like to remember Whitney Houston or welcome a gifted singer such as Jordin Sparks to the big-screen. But the main attraction is the glitter and glamour, and in that it delivers, compensating somewhat for the bad melodrama and bad acting in a bad story of a Supremes-style sister act on the late 1960s Motown scene. In the title role, “American Idol” winner Sparks is eager and earnest, singing beautifully but acting in flat, breathless tones, infusing Sparkle with all the conviction of a drama club diva with her first lead in a school play. She’s upstaged by the other actors — among them Carmen Ejogo, Tiki Sumpter, Derek Luke and Mike Epps

★★ ‘Sparkle’ Director // Salim Akil Starring // Jordin Sparks, Carmen Ejogo and Whitney Houston Rated // PG-13 for mature thematic content involving domestic abuse and drug material, and for some violence, language and smoking — none all that good but at least able to mug their way through the lurid story. Houston’s death in February turned director Salim Akil’s movie into a memorial of sorts, but as the sisters’ stern mom, she speed-mumbles through her dialogue, while the one solo number she sings is blah, a sad reminder of another glorious voice gone gruff with time and hard living. 116 minutes. — Review by The Associated Press

Presents their annual

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Saturday August 25th 10:00am - 2:00pm

521 North Main Street, Ste A, Logan 435-753-6070

TriStar Pictures

This image shows Jordin Sparks in a scene from “Sparkle.”


The Reel Place Aaron Peck

The world of bike messengers in New York City is a dangerous one. We’re informed at the beginning of “Premium Rush” that there are about 1,500 of these thrill seekers spread throughout the city. They dart from one part of the city to another, delivering packages faster than any mail service could. The way they do this is by swerving in and out of chockablock traffic in the middle of Manhattan at break-neck speeds. This isn’t a job for the weary. Wilee (Joseph GordonLevitt) is one of these maniac messengers. He informs us that he rides a fixed-gear bike with no brakes. He routinely speeds down the street, weaving in and out of traffic as fast as he possibly can (most of the time going faster than the cars). Not only does he have to dodge cars and aggressive cab drivers, but we soon learn everything is a hazard. Yet, Wilee loves this line of work, and boy, does it look like work. He pedals, and pedals, and pedals without stopping. I got tired just watching him crank those ped-

Columbia Pictures

This film image shows Joseph Gordon-Levitt in a scene from “Premium Rush.”

als around as fast as he could. The stunt work in this movie is amazingly nimble and fun to watch. It will also give you pause. You may wonder, like I did a few times, “How in the world did they film this without killing Joseph Gordon-Levitt?”

Action!

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★★★ ‘Premium Rush’ Director // David Koepp Starring // Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Michael Shannon and Dania Ramirez Rated // PG-13 for some violence, intense action sequences and language

deliver a package for a young Asian woman. He doesn’t know what’s inside, he just knows he has a certain amount of time to get from point A to point B. Everything is going smoothly until he runs into a suspiciouslooking man played by Michael Shannon. The man happens to be a dirty cop, but Wilee doesn’t know that. All he knows is that this man wants the envelope and he’s not going to give it up. Then the man tries to run Wilee down with his car in the street. Given to any other actor, I’m afraid the

character Shannon plays would’ve been a one-note, forgettable performance. However, anyone familiar with Shannon’s work knows that he’s never given a one-note performance in his life. Even though his character Detective Monday is the routine dirty cop character that you’ve seen in a thousand action movies, Shannon offers a nuanced performance that creates something, literally, from nothing. The stunts are exciting, but Shannon almost steals the movie away from those scenes. He’s that good. He’s one of

the best American actors working today. The real drawback to the movie is that it feels like we need a full explanation of what’s in the envelope so it provides backstory through needless flashbacks that only serve to undercut the aggressive action. Director David Koepp could’ve decided to go the Hitchcockian route and provided a story about a regular man, thrust into an extraordinary situation, and never really offering a reason why. The movie would’ve been that much more interesting had we not known the background behind the envelope and instead watched Wilee and Detective Monday battle it out until the end. The flashbacks really grind the pulse-pounding bike action to a halt. It’s understandable why they’re there, because Koepp feels that we need an explanation to why it’s all happening, but we don’t. The stunts, action, and Shannon’s acting are captivating enough. Koepp should’ve just played to his strengths for the duration. Feedback can be sent to aaronpeck46@gmail. com.

Page 7 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, August 24, 2012

‘Premium Rush’ full of high-speed tricks


Wilderness watercolors

W

ith the mantra of wanting to enjoy retirement, Ernie Verdine has done just that. Enjoying life has translated into painting or sketching on a daily basis for the 67-yearold Logan resident. If he goes several days without picking up a brush, Verdine feels he is in a slump. “I know artists that will go several weeks without painting,” Verdine said. “If I went that long, I would really start worrying. This year I’ve probably done 100 paintings already.” He is quick to point out his painting are “not large.” Still, the 16x20 works of art take time. Plus, he admits to tearing up some pieces if he is not happy and will redo a scene three or four times before feeling good about it. “I take stuff to different galleries and different shows, and I don’t want to present something I’m not happy with,” Verdine said. “I want to put my best work out there.” The median Verdine works in is watercolors, which can be unforgiving. “It’s one of those of medians that is difficult to control sometimes,” Verdine said. “You end up with good stuff and not so good stuff. You get little surprises; the flow of the paint on the paper kind of adds to watercolor. It blends. Some of it is contrived, some of it’s matter of technique.” Verdine takes a moment to show and explain what he is talking about in his studio located in the upstairs of his house. He has plenty of examples of his work as more than 40 paintings are hung on the walls of the guest bedroom that is his studio for now. He is thinking of turning his garage into a studio. The Missouri native said he has always drawn and remembers doing line drawings as young as the third grade. He painted with oils in high school and transitioned to acrylics because his wife is allergic to oils. Thirty years ago he started working with watercolors. He said most of his art is self taught. Liquid graphite is another median he uses.

Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal

Local artist Ernie Verdine works on a watercolor painting in his studio Tuesday.

Verdine also continues to use acrylics and even mixes it with watercolors sometimes. He has also worked in pastels and continues to do pencil drawings. Most of his work has a wilderness look. He said he is inspired by nature, old buildings and old man-made structures. Pine and spruce trees are in many of his paintings. “I like the Cache Valley area and the canyons,” Verdine said. “I’ve been asked what my work should be called. I was like, ‘how about Wilderness Watercolors.’” He also likes painting winter scenes. “In the winter, you can kind of see the bones of nature, see the trees and limbs,” Verdine said. “I really like winter and fall scenes.” Since retiring from the Air Force 12 years ago and moving to Utah to be closer to some of his five children, Verdine has been able to focus a lot more time on his art.

“I wanted to enjoy my life, enjoy my retirement,” Verdine said. “My wife does the same thing. She’s an accomplished rug hooker and hooks these fabulous rugs. We have kind of divided our house up. She has her areas, I have my area. We just do what we enjoy doing.” Verdine primarily does landscapes from northern Utah, southern Idaho and the mountains in the Uintahs. He goes out and takes photos at various times of the year for reference. Then he does preliminary sketches in what he calls his pencil journals for watercolors. He also paints from memory and what he called his interpretation of what he sees. When it comes to painting, Verdine likes to mainly use earth tones. They include various grays, yellows, amber and some greens. He does “float color” like blue and red sparingly. Then there is the paper. For Verdine, he likes the heaviest weight.

“I beat the paper to death sometimes,” Verdine said. “I throw dirt on it, gravel on it and have been known to throw salt on it. ... I do a lot of scrubbing and polishing.” Those techniques are used to get texture. He uses the heavy paper in order to be a little rough with it. And he doesn’t like to tack or tape the paper down. A piece can take him several days to complete, depending on how motivated he is. The painting he was working on Tuesday morning was something he was redoing from something he had painted Monday. “How long it takes me all depends on how wrapped up I am in it,” Verdine said. “Sometimes I will be painting in the early morning hours and before I know it the sun is coming up.” Over time Verdine has developed his own style and technique. As he has concentrated on painting more, the quality of his work has improved. When he reaches, what he calls a plateau, Verdine tries a new process or technique. It’s an ever-evolving art. “It’s a matter of refinements,” Verdine said. “A painter can sense progression. ... I think all artists are their own worst critic. That’s the way it is with me. “... I think everybody has art ability. Art is art. It’s the interpretation of the eye.” Then there is the issue of selling his work. If something is really good, he has a hard time parting ways with it. If it turns out at the other end of the spectrum — not up to his standards — Verdine won’t sell it either. Having gone to art fairs and been a part of art guilds in the past, Verdine currently has 24 paintings in galleries. He plans on getting more of his work in galleries in the future. His work can be seen locally at the Logan Fine Art Gallery (60 W. 100 North), at his house or on his blog at www.eaverdinefineart.blogspot.com.

By Shawn Harrison


Wilderness watercolors

W

ith the mantra of wanting to enjoy retirement, Ernie Verdine has done just that. Enjoying life has translated into painting or sketching on a daily basis for the 67-yearold Logan resident. If he goes several days without picking up a brush, Verdine feels he is in a slump. “I know artists that will go several weeks without painting,” Verdine said. “If I went that long, I would really start worrying. This year I’ve probably done 100 paintings already.” He is quick to point out his painting are “not large.” Still, the 16x20 works of art take time. Plus, he admits to tearing up some pieces if he is not happy and will redo a scene three or four times before feeling good about it. “I take stuff to different galleries and different shows, and I don’t want to present something I’m not happy with,” Verdine said. “I want to put my best work out there.” The median Verdine works in is watercolors, which can be unforgiving. “It’s one of those of medians that is difficult to control sometimes,” Verdine said. “You end up with good stuff and not so good stuff. You get little surprises; the flow of the paint on the paper kind of adds to watercolor. It blends. Some of it is contrived, some of it’s matter of technique.” Verdine takes a moment to show and explain what he is talking about in his studio located in the upstairs of his house. He has plenty of examples of his work as more than 40 paintings are hung on the walls of the guest bedroom that is his studio for now. He is thinking of turning his garage into a studio. The Missouri native said he has always drawn and remembers doing line drawings as young as the third grade. He painted with oils in high school and transitioned to acrylics because his wife is allergic to oils. Thirty years ago he started working with watercolors. He said most of his art is self taught. Liquid graphite is another median he uses.

Jennifer Meyers/Herald Journal

Local artist Ernie Verdine works on a watercolor painting in his studio Tuesday.

Verdine also continues to use acrylics and even mixes it with watercolors sometimes. He has also worked in pastels and continues to do pencil drawings. Most of his work has a wilderness look. He said he is inspired by nature, old buildings and old man-made structures. Pine and spruce trees are in many of his paintings. “I like the Cache Valley area and the canyons,” Verdine said. “I’ve been asked what my work should be called. I was like, ‘how about Wilderness Watercolors.’” He also likes painting winter scenes. “In the winter, you can kind of see the bones of nature, see the trees and limbs,” Verdine said. “I really like winter and fall scenes.” Since retiring from the Air Force 12 years ago and moving to Utah to be closer to some of his five children, Verdine has been able to focus a lot more time on his art.

“I wanted to enjoy my life, enjoy my retirement,” Verdine said. “My wife does the same thing. She’s an accomplished rug hooker and hooks these fabulous rugs. We have kind of divided our house up. She has her areas, I have my area. We just do what we enjoy doing.” Verdine primarily does landscapes from northern Utah, southern Idaho and the mountains in the Uintahs. He goes out and takes photos at various times of the year for reference. Then he does preliminary sketches in what he calls his pencil journals for watercolors. He also paints from memory and what he called his interpretation of what he sees. When it comes to painting, Verdine likes to mainly use earth tones. They include various grays, yellows, amber and some greens. He does “float color” like blue and red sparingly. Then there is the paper. For Verdine, he likes the heaviest weight.

“I beat the paper to death sometimes,” Verdine said. “I throw dirt on it, gravel on it and have been known to throw salt on it. ... I do a lot of scrubbing and polishing.” Those techniques are used to get texture. He uses the heavy paper in order to be a little rough with it. And he doesn’t like to tack or tape the paper down. A piece can take him several days to complete, depending on how motivated he is. The painting he was working on Tuesday morning was something he was redoing from something he had painted Monday. “How long it takes me all depends on how wrapped up I am in it,” Verdine said. “Sometimes I will be painting in the early morning hours and before I know it the sun is coming up.” Over time Verdine has developed his own style and technique. As he has concentrated on painting more, the quality of his work has improved. When he reaches, what he calls a plateau, Verdine tries a new process or technique. It’s an ever-evolving art. “It’s a matter of refinements,” Verdine said. “A painter can sense progression. ... I think all artists are their own worst critic. That’s the way it is with me. “... I think everybody has art ability. Art is art. It’s the interpretation of the eye.” Then there is the issue of selling his work. If something is really good, he has a hard time parting ways with it. If it turns out at the other end of the spectrum — not up to his standards — Verdine won’t sell it either. Having gone to art fairs and been a part of art guilds in the past, Verdine currently has 24 paintings in galleries. He plans on getting more of his work in galleries in the future. His work can be seen locally at the Logan Fine Art Gallery (60 W. 100 North), at his house or on his blog at www.eaverdinefineart.blogspot.com.

By Shawn Harrison


Page 10 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, August 24, 2012

Photos by you

Both of these photos were taken by summer citizen Donna Morell at a farm near Lee’s Marketplace in Smithfield. Morell is a summer citizen from Sun City, Ariz., and resides in Smithfield five months of the year.

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Classic play ‘Les Miserables’ to be performed by students Top of Utah Entertainment will present the student edition of “Les Miserables” at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 6 to 8, and 10 to 15 at the Elton Eccles Theatre in Logan. A matinee performance will take place at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8. The show will be performed by a cast of 130 students younger than 19. Director Gwendolyn Dattage said, “It has been amazing to watch this show change the lives of students in the cast. Every cast member has put 100 percent into this show and I couldn’t be happier with how the production is turning out.” Dattage also said she’s never seen a more excited cast. “These kids came together and have become one big family. It’s a joy to watch them all support each other and work as a team.” The story of “Les Miserables” recounts the struggle against adversity in 19th century France. Imprisoned for stealing a loaf of bread, petty thief Jean Valjean (Corbin Lee and Peter LaBarge) is released from his 19-year term and not only becomes an honest man, but the mayor of a prosperous town and a loving adoptive father — violating his parole in the process. The relentless Inspector Javert (Brady Stuart and Scott Glattli) makes a decent life for Valjean impossible while continuously pursuing him. Only years later, after Valjean proves his mettle during a bloody student uprising and saves the life of a young man hopelessly in love

with Valjean’s adopted daughter, does the exconvict finally feel fully redeemed. The play was originally adapted from Victor Hugo’s timeless novel. Auditions for “Les Miserables” were held in May and the students have been practicing throughout the summer. Dattage said it took a month to nail down all the parts with auditions taking place in several high schools from Box Elder and Bear River, throughout the valley and up to Preston and West Side High School. Tickets are $17 to $19 and can be purchased at

the theater box office at 43 S. Main St., by calling

435-752-0026 or online at www.cachearts.org.

Towne Singers Openings A few good men needed: Basses & Tenors! To make a good mixed chorus even better! Come and sing with The Towne Singers, Logan’s oldest mixed chorus in its 48th year. Rehearsals 7:30 Wednesday nights at the Dansante, 59 S 100 W, Logan, beginning September 5th. Two major concerts yearly, Christmas (Tablernacle) and Spring (Dansante).

Contact Gary Poore, 435-713-4726 or check us out at rehearsal

Your Stuff “Fabric Softener”

By Heather Malmberg When my skirt clings to my legs full of static, fresh from the laundry like Ben Franklin’s hair after the storm I can rub the skirt with a dryer sheet or spray it with aerosol hairspray or, as a last resort, I can use Cling-Off, the powerful de-clinger. None of these methods work on my Klingons. Michael, my Klingon, thinks I’m the hippest thing since bell-bottoms which would be fabulous if he weren’t slightly crazy. Devin, my Klingon, thinks I’m the hottest thing since sunburn which would be lovely if he weren’t a pathetic mama’s boy. Jeff, my Klingon, thinks I’m the grooviest thing since disco which would be pleasant if he weren’t an utter narcissist. Landon, my Klingon, thinks I’m the sweetest thing since Cool Whip which would be nice if he didn’t lack a backbone. Jonathon, my Klingon, things I’m the smartest thing since the computer which would be great if he weren’t so stupid. Now, I could have been honest and told each Klingon exactly why he didn’t have a Weight Watchers chance in a bakery but I’m not that cruel. Instead, I told Jonathon I needed to focus on school, and never on him I told Landon I had an incurable disease I told Jeff I was a lesbian I told Devin I was moving to Guam and I told Michael I’d had a religious conversion. Having shaken my skirt free of the current batch of Klingons, I openly embrace the new recruits. Send your poems and stories to mnewbold@hjnews.com.

435-753-2500


Page 12 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, August 24, 2012

Books Former poet laureate Hass offers lyrical essays By Laura Impellizzeri Associated Press

The generous and gentle Robert Hass has titled his retrospective collection of essays and talks with a reference to a theme that always sets his work apart: the act of attention. Visible from the first essay, written 27 years ago, through the last are the lush layers of Hass’ rare combination of brilliance, erudition and selfawareness. He is unusually present, able to ponder “what light can do,” and he notes with just enough modesty that this can

sometimes overtake him in the form of “digression inside the digression.” But he offers his thoughts with surpassing clarity and circumspection. His passion for the subjects he surveys, dissects and gleefully honors is more tender than fiery — whether he is celebrating the complexity of Anton Chekhov’s short stories, giving Allen Ginsberg’s poem “Howl” the full cultural context it merits, or exploring the overlooked back story of a protest at the University of California at Berkeley. A reader never feels ill-equipped, as so often

r legacy entertainment presents

happens with literary criticism. Instead, we’re all welcomed to the party Hass throws in honor of great creativity. Hass often builds this openness

on personal anecdotes, setting a critique of the Wallace Stevens poem “The Emperor of IceCream” among his recollections of an impromptu drive with seven fellow students to Carmel, Calif., for example. Recounting how he and his friends read and reread the work enables Hass to mention the evolution of his own thinking and include differing views of the poem. Hass, a UC Berkeley professor who served as U.S. poet laureate from 1995 to 1997 and has received major awards for his poetry and a previous essay collection, writes

with the confidence of deep familiarity instead of a sense of superiority; nearly every piece teaches us something, though he rarely instructs. He is clearly frustrated with the simplistic news coverage of — and community response to — the fight over cutting down part of a planted grove of trees at UC Berkeley to make way for the football stadium’s renovation. So, asked to deliver a research lecture, which appears as “An Oak

Grove,” the book’s final entry, Hass reveals the many lessons about the area’s rich botanical and cultural history and even the Arts and Crafts movement that the conflict could have provided. If the collection includes perhaps too many essays and talks, or a reader finds one or another a bit too long, it’s easy to skip ahead. Savoring just one of these life-giving morsels is memorable, even transcendent.

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Page 13 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, August 24, 2012

CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Slangy negatives 5. ___ artery 10. Theories 14. Texted 19. Carbamide 20. ___ column 21. Economical 22. Sheik’s bevy 23. Dry 25. Rings used in mountaineering 27. Terror’s superpower 29. Red flag 30. PC “brain” 31. It’s the law 32. Very cool 33. To boot 36. Kind of trip 39. Spot for swingers? 45. Loud Australian bird 47. Actress Claire 49. Razz 50. Halo and Sunfire’s superpower 54. Pro ender 55. Apothecary weights 56. Quitter’s word 57. Mouse manipulator 58. Lightheaded people? 60. Fraternity letters 62. Flowering food plants 64. “It’s a Very Merry Muppet ___ Movie” 69. Comparison connector 70. Love devotee 73. Glorified gofer 74. Child of fortune? 76. Red Asian weaverbirds 79. Brownish 81. Unus the Untouchable, Argent and Violet Parr’s superpower 84. ___ sore 85. No-cal drink

86. Honors 87. Old torch part 89. Ham, to Noah 90. Word with tree or lace 91. Blue ___, Ohio 94. Where the buoys are 96. Rug rat 98. Mea ___ 100. Black Death, the Shade and Wraith’s superpower 109. Advise, in a way 110. Customs 111. Mellon ___ 112. Cheese in a ball 113. Podded plants 114. Mesh of veins 115. Razor sharpener 116. Start from scratch 117. Coward and namesakes 118. Tennyson work Down 1. Flake 2. Pupil surrounder 3. Did a garden chore 4. Debaucher 5. Figure in Maori mythology 6. Ice cream thickener 7. Drop down? 8. U.N. agency 9. Egg cream ingredient 10. Varieties 11. Rumble ___ 12. Santa ___ 13. Weightlifting maneuver 14. Shred 15. Punjabi princess 16. Nabisco treat 17. Gull relative 18. Dash lengths 24. Pick, with “for” 26. Colorless gas 28. Wild plum 33. Course for 37-Down 34. Put

35. ___ box 37. Some high-schoolers, for short 38. Campus sight 40. Centers of activity 41. Pathologic process 42. Father of Balder 43. Congeal 44. Outfielder Griffey, Jr. 45. Shifters 46. “___is never finished, only abandoned,” da Vinci 47. Small fastener 48. Bygone bird 50. Scottish Gaelic 51. Sine qua non 52. Cemetery sights 53. Scoffs 54. Apprentice 59. Maui veranda 61. Measure the concentration of a liquid, in science 63. Trios 64. Capacity unit for measuring fish 65. Descriptive for modern gadgets 66. Japanese soup 67. Former British protectorate 68. On Easy Street 70. Supplement 71. Purplish red 72. Partner of “done with” 74. Icy coating 75. Coastal raptor 77. Cage for hawks 78. “___, Babylon” (Frank novel) 80. Beehive State native 81. TV monitor? 82. San Joaquin Valley city 83. Guanabara Bay city 88. Move unsteadily 90. Three sheets to

the wind 91. Synchronized 92. Erratic 93. Grimm character 95. “A little more than kin, and less than kind,” e.g. 97. Whopper topper 98. Engine part 99. Female organs 100. ___ sandwich 101. Swear 102. City near Lake Tahoe 103. Break a small piece off from 104. Carangid fish 105. Exec’s note 106. ___ oxygen 107. Russian river 108. ___ is more 109. Bombast

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted Deadlines inbyThe email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the Cache Magazine calendar items are due Wednesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free

first half of Cache Magazine can be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


Page 14 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, August 24, 2012

calendar Friday

4453. Free.

The USU Common Literature Convocation will take place at Smart Bites free weekly 9:30 a.m. Aug. 25 at Kent Conworkshops will take place at 11 cert Hall. David Baron, author of a.m. every Friday through Aug. “The Beasts in the Garden,” will 24 at the Cache County Senior Center, 240 N. 100 East in Logan. speak. The hour-long workshops will be Paradise Trout and Berry packed with valuable nutrition Days events will take place all information, easy recipe demday Saturday, Aug. 25, at the onstrations, samples and simple Paradise Town Square. The exercise ideas. schedule is as follows: 5K run at 7 a.m.; breakfast from 7 to 10 Eagles Lodge (a private club a.m.; flag ceremony at 8 a.m.; 3 for members) will host a luau on 3 volleyball from 9 to 11 a.m.; at 7 p.m. Aug. 24. There will be booths from 10 a.m. to dark; finger foods, a raffle, limbo conparade at 10:30 a.m.; pie eattest and live music. Cost is $3 for ing contest at 11:30 a.m.; trout members and $5 for guests of scramble at noon; community members. Eagles is located on auction at 1:30 p.m.; mud volleythe corner of 900 North and 200 ball at 4 p.m.; trout dinner from 6 West. For more information, call to 9 p.m. 435-752-8776. Tim Pearce will perform alternative rock/reggae music from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24, at Caffe Ibis. Free. Singer/songwriter Cherish Tuttle will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 24. at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza, 99 E. 1200 South. Everyone welcome.

SATURDAY Register by Saturday, Aug. 25, for a 12-week series about the Constitution and the role of government to take place Wednesday nights from Sept. 5 to Nov. 28. Individual, couple and family pricing is available. Please visit http://www.eventsnearhere. com/find-events/ID/Weston/ addetail/2583/ or call 435-7641750 for complete details. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is hosting the annual Century Ride Fundraiser on Saturday, Aug. 25. For more information, call 713-0288 or visit cachevalleycentury.com. Mom’s Night Out is Aug. 25 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Stork Landing, 99 W. Center St. in Logan. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call 435-792-

Day of Culture and Brotherhood will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 25 at the Logan Tabernacle. The event will focus on promoting better understanding of different cultures in the valley. There will be free live entertainment, a food/crafts sale and more. The Hispanic Health Coalition will also sponsor a 1-mile walk, free health screenings, information booths, music and entertainment, prize drawings and more. All are invited to a one-day, all-day meditation retreat beginning at 8 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, at the Unitarian Universalist house, 595 E. 900 North. No experience necessary. The day ends with a performance of sacred chanting by Salt Lake City musician Leraine. Suggested donation $25. Kaiti Jensen will perform at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, at Pier 49 San Francisco Style Sourdough Pizza. Everyone welcome. AARP will hold a free Car-Fit program from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25. This program assists mature drivers by showing them how to adjust seats, belts, steering wheels and other items so they can be safer and

more comfortable while driving. It only takes 15 minutes and can help drivers feel more secure in their driving habits. Call Susie at 435-753-2866 for location and reservations.

SUNDAY Scotty Haze will perform folk/ blues/rock music from noon to 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 26, at Caffe Ibis. Free.

MONDAY Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is hosting a movie night from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 27. Cost is $3. For more information, call 713-0288. The Logan Aquatic Center will adjust hours Monday, Aug. 27, now that kids are back in school. Hours will be 3 to 8 p.m. Monday, 3 to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 7 p.m. Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. The pool will be open from noon to 7 p.m. Labor Day Monday. The pool will close for the season Tuesday, Sept. 4. The schedule for the Hyrum Senior Center is as follows: Monday: Fit Over 60 at 10 a.m.; Tuesday, chair yoga at 10:30 a.m., card games, Pinochle and Bunko at 12:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Mike Hatch will play the piano; Thursday, chair yoga at 10:30 a.m.; Friday, Bingo at 12:30 p.m. The center is open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. There are quilts to work on every day. Lunch is at noon every day except Thursday. Please call 245-3570 to reserve a place. The center is located at 675 E. Main St. in Hyrum.

TUESDAY Learn how to treat ailments without a trip the doctor’s office at a free essential oils class from 10 to 11 a.m. or 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, at Citrus and Sage, 130 N. 100 East in Logan. For more information, contact Deonne Johnson at 435-227-

5343 or deonne@livingdoterra. com. The Food Sen$e girls will teach a free class on using garden veggies in various meals at a free cooking and community class at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, at Macey’s Little Theater. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is having a pre-trip meeting for the Bloomington Lake destination trip Tuesday, Aug. 28, at 5:30 p.m. Pre-trips are mandatory for anyone who is attending a destination trip. To request more information, call 713-0288. Chimney Choir will perform indie/acoustic music with Hoodoo and RacecaR RacecaR at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, at Why Sound. Cost is $5.

WEDNESDAY Trina Thomas will teach a free cooking and community class on using garden vegetables with any dinner plan at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 19, at Macey’s Little Theater. A support group for people with mental illness is held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) office in the basement of Bear River Mental Health, 90 E. 200 North, Logan. For more information, call 435787-4165. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures is having volunteer orientation from 6 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 29. For more information, call 713-0288. Utah State University Extension is offering a research-based course, “How to Avoid Falling for a Jerk (or Jerkette).” Whether you are single, dating, engaged, or single again, this class offers information about how to pick a partner and develop a relationship in a healthy way. This program is free. The last class will be held from 6 to 8:15 p.m. Aug. 29 at the Child &

Family Support Center, 380 W. 1400 North, in Logan. Dinner is provided each evening. Call 435232-6022, or email k.anderson@ usu.edu to register. Registration is also available on eventbrite. com.

THURSDAY

Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will visit Logan Canyon for cycling and horseback riding from Thursday, Aug. 30, through Saturday, Sept. 1. To find out more information about destination trips, call 435-713-0288 or visit www.cgadventures.org. Origami Ghosts will perform indie/acoustic music with Iver Anchor at 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30, at Why Sound. Cost is $5.

A free women’s hockey night will take place from 8:45 to 9:45 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30, at the Eccles Ice Center. All women and girls ages 6 and older are welcome. No experience needed. Equipment and instruction will be provided. For further information, email mandy.peterson@usu.edu or dtarb@comcast.net. The Farmer’s Market in Hyrum takes place from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Thursday at 675 N. Main St. The Cache School District and the Up to 3 Early Intervention Program will conduct a screening for children 0 to 5 years old who may be eligible for programs for preschoolers with developmental delays. Children who will not be 5 years old by Sept. 1, and who may demonstrate delays, are encouraged to attend this screening session. The Bear River Head Start program will also conduct a screening for the 2012-13 school year by appointment. These screenings will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 30 and 31 at Bear River Head Start, 852 S. 100 West in Logan. For more information, contact Kellie Garcia at 753-2100 ext. 1902, Kathleen Westover at 7530951 ext. 122 or Marla Nef at 797-2043.


.

empowering the community

Page 15 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, August 24, 2012

d

DO YOU THINK THE OSCARS ARE GROUCHY PUPPETS THAT LIVE IN TRASH CANS?


Page 16 - The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, August 24, 2012

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Cache Magazine  

August 24-30, 2012

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