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Brandon Watson SEGMENT II PORTFOLIO BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE SPRING 2013


Contents 4

RĂŠsumĂŠ

5

Introduction

7

2x2x2: Typology, Culture, and Site C1 Studio, Spring 2012

27

Ideogramming the City C1 Studio, Fall 2012

45

King Richard III Visitor Centre C2 Studio, Spring 2013

65

Design by Data Workshop, Spring 2013

70

Sketch Problem #3 Fall 2012

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Practice Component


BRANDON WATSON Education

Boston Architectural College | Sept. 2009 - Present Candidate for Bachelor of Architecture Concurrent Evening Classes New Hampshire Technical Institute | Completed June 2009 Associate in Science in Architectural Engineering Technology

Design Experience

Elkus Manfredi Architects | April 2013 - Present Project Management Assistant F.H. Chase Inc. | March 2012 - April 2013 Architectural Engineer - BIM Coordinator - REVIT Modeler - Project Manager Assistant - Construction Administration - Estimating - Material Takeoff - Scheduling Structures Unlimited Inc. | Oct. 2007 - March 2012 Design Drafter - Produced Architectural Plans, Elevations, Sections & Details for Pre-Engineered Aluminum Skylights and Free-Span Structures

United States Army Reserves | March 2006 - March 2012 MOS (Military Occupational Specialty): Carpentry and Masonry Specialist Grade: E-4, Rank: Specialist

Design Skills Awards

Software: AutoCAD Architecture, REVIT, Rhinoceros 4.0, SketchUP, Adobe Creative Suite CS5, CADRA, Bentley’s ProSteel, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Project Freehand Sketching/Drafting, Model Making, Rendering

Steffian Bradley Architects Scholarship | Spring 2012 Eagle Scout, Boy Scouts of America | Feb. 6, 2002


INTRODUCTION As I have progressed through my studies here at Boston Architectural College my perspective of architecture and design, in general, has been irrevocably altered. For better or for worse, I no longer view my surroundings in the same manner as I had in the past. It is my belief that the power of Architecture lies within this ability to alter a landscape and change the way that people perceive and engage with their environment. The projects contained within this portfolio represent a wide range of building types that vary from mixed-use housing and retail to cultural centers. These projects span different continents and different cultures. With the advances in technology, society is increasingly becoming more global and so too is the profession of Architecture. I was fortunate enough to have studios that embraced this global vision and provided me with the opportunity to explore architectural interventions specific to each region. The first of my C-level studios dealt with two mixed-use development projects, one residential in nature and the other hotel oriented. The mixed-use, residential project is located in Malden, MA and the Hotel in Tulancingo, Mexico. The second studio is an intermodal and cultural center that provides a bus terminal, performance space, and an enclosed area for Boston’s Haymarket vendors. The third studio sought to provide a visitor center and mausoleum for the recently resurrected remains of King Richard III in Leicester, UK. I approached each studio differently and made certain design decisions unique to each. As a result each project was developed both programmatically and aesthetically different than the previous. It is evident that each project contains certain character and is different yet the underlying trait shared among all is the enhancement of the surrounding context with the desire to change the perspective of the urban landscape.

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CD101: 2X2X2 Typology, Culture, and Site Spring 2012 Duration: Part 1 - 8 Weeks Part 2 - 8 Weeks

Instructors: Kevin Benham Bertha Pantoja

Course Brief: “This vertical, advanced, interdisciplinary studio will focus on using the principles of regional planning, site planning, housing, and landscape ecology to develop two master plans of differing densities and context that emphasize housing while preserving tourism and culture sites and simultaneously ameliorating ecological conditions. The studio will take place on two different locations: Malden Center, Massachusetts and the haciendas and Greater Tulancingo, Hidalgo, Mexico. Both sites share compromised ecological systems and have the potential to become important centers of mixed use housing. In both cases, it is important to understand the natural systems, urban context and their relationship to transportation in order to find opportunities for housing development and preservation.”

Design Response: My design response for the Malden, MA site was fairly straightforward and arose from a desire to remediate a site that had been tarnished from years of industrial occupation. This region along the Malden River is heavily zoned as Industrial and accompanied by raised subway tracks, effectively creating a “divide” between two residential communities. I felt there was an opportunity to develop this site as common ground between the two separated communities a create a bridge across the divide. In addition this development hoped to set a precedent for the rest of the properties situated along the Malden River. By providing retail and housing there is the potential for a community of young working professionals that would find this site as an attractive location to live. The site would have retail and dining in the same complex as housing. As an added bonus, public transportation is only a short distance away making the commute into Boston fairly easy. This project could act as a starting point for the urban revitalization of Malden, MA. My design response for Tulancingo, Hidalgo, Mexico took a slightly different approach than that of Malden. The goal here was to provide a solution that would bolster tourism in Tulancingo and bring people to the city. There are historic Haciendas located only a short distance outside the city limits. If one were to provide comfortable lodging within the heart of the city along with an easy route to the Haciendas, this could quickly become a tourist destination. The site I chose for the hotel is adjacent to one of the city’s most prominent landmarks, the Catedral de Tulancingo. This offers many amenities such as a beautiful public space, Jardin de la Floresta, and a pedestrian shopping street just one block away. In order to respect the local vernacular, I reserved a portion of the site to act as an outdoor public plaza and kept the building itself as a low-rise, so as not to compete with the Cathedral for the spotlight.

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PART 1: MALDEN, MA

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SITE

The Malden River is roughly 2.3 miles long and is 675 feet across at it’s widest point.The river was once brackish and tidal, bordered on both sides by salt marshes, is currently dammed and, in it’s current condition it is considered ecologically compromised. The poor water quality is a common result of neglect and with more than a century of Industrial Development along the river’s banks. The Malden River is an integral component of my design approach, as the site is located directly adjacent to it. As is__ evident in this image the existing conditions clearly show an “Industrial Divide” which separates two larger regions of residential neighborhoods. The hope is that by providing a mixed-use development at this location it will help to re-connect the two communites and establish a destination for people to shop and dine while enjoying the water amenity. Improvements along the river will inevitably increase public awareness and ulitmately properties along Malden River will become much more desirable.

MALDEN CENTER T-STOP

NORTH STRAND BIKE TRAIL

RESIDENTIAL ZONE

SITE MALDEN RIVER

MALDEN REGIONAL ZONING MAP RESIDENTIAL ZONE

INDUSTRIAL “DIVIDE” 9


ABUTTING PROPERTYTWO STORY OUTPATIENT MEDICAL FACILITY

SITE

CEMETARY Currently a one-story warehouse building occupies the site with surface parking. There is limited access to Malden River and minimal pedestrain amenities within a five minute walking distance. 

KEY MAP

A. The current edge condition between the Site and Malden River is almost non-existant.

C. The majority of the residential housing within a five minute walking distance of the site is comprised of these “triple decker” apartments.

B. Apartment complex across from the site, converted from a factory building.

D. Distant view towards Boston, MA Potential view from apartments.

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E. View of Malden River


Pedestrian Circulation Diagram 1

Pedestrian Circulation Diagram 2

POTENTIAL PEDESTRIAN PATHWAYS It would be advantageous to provide access across Malden River via the site in an effort to provide the “bridging” of residential zones through the Industrial Divide. The image above identifies the avenue which I chose to establish for the river crossing.z

Views toward Boston Skyline

Potential Bldg. Footprint LEGEND RETAIL FRONTAGE BUILDING AREA PUBLIC SPACE WATERFRONT ACCESS SITE ACTIVATION STRATEGY 11


iteration 1 In this early concept I chose to separate residential and retail spaces by their location on site and also by massing type. Initially I thought it might be nice to have one-story retail that responds to pedestrian access corridors sited in between buildings. I also chose to push the residential apartments towards the Northern portion of the site. Separating residential from commercial.

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Abstraction of River Edge

iteration 2 I chose to consolidate the program and simplify the design thereby making it more cohesive. This way it would read as one design rather than a mixture of several. I also manipulated the form to respond to an abstracted version of the river bank which also helped to provide views toward the Boston Skyline.

Orienting Facades Towards Boston, MA 13


The above images represent the point I reached at the conclusion of eight weeks. It is obvious that certain design decisions were not fully realized and especially the building’s fenestration leaves something to be desired. In assembling this portfolio I have attempted to push this design further in an effort to bring it to the next level of understanding. I have simplified the overall scheme while maintaining some of the earlier concepts such as public access to Malden River and the orientation of windows to provide views towards Boston..

LEGEND RESIDENTIAL APARTMENT UNITS STUDIO, 1BR, 2BR SMALL RETAIL / CAFE / RESTAURANT

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OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACE

APARTMENT UNITS

ROOF TOP GARDEN

MAIN ENTRANCE

LEGEND RESIDENTIAL APARTMENT UNITS STUDIO, 1BR, 2BR

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SMALL RETAIL / CAFE / RESTAURANT


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PART 2: TULANCINGO, MEXICO

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Hacienda San Juan Pueblilla

El Espejel

Apan Santiago Chimalpa

San Francisco Ocotepec

Santiago Tetlapayac

San Antonio de Tocha

SAN JUAN PUEBLILLA

SAN MIGUEL REGLA

Here are a few examples of the Historic Haciendas located a short distance outside the city limits of Tulancingo. These Haciendas, constructed from local stone, erected by wealthy landowners, served as small communities. These Haciendas operated independently and were self reliant. This was essential because at this point in history the only means of travel between towns and cities was by horseback.

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SANTA MARIA REGLA


DOWNTOWN TULANCINGO, HIDALGO, MEXICO

A CERRO DEL TEZONTLE

E BIBLIOTECA PUBLICA

B ZOOLOGICO MUNICIPAL

F MERCADO MUNICIPAL

C JARDIN DE LA FLORESTA

G CATEDRAL METROPOLITANA

D BIBLIOTECA PUBLICA

H TEMPLO DE NUESTRA DE LOS ANGELES 20


SITE SELECTION

CATEDRAL DE TULANCINGO SITE LOCATION JARDIN DE LA FLORESTA

C JARDIN DE LA FLORESTA

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JARDIN DE LA FLORESTA CATEDRAL DE TULANCINGO

A B

A) VIEW TOWARDS CATHEDRAL

The reason I chose this site was because I wanted my hotel to be centrally located within the city. It would be important for guests to have direct access to the local retail and restaurants. The site adjacent to the Cathedral seemed an ideal spot because it offers multiple amenities within walking distance. It also feels connected to the historic center of Tulancingo making it a fitting place for a hotel aiming to attract tourists searching for antiquity.

B) BUILDINGS ACROSS STREET

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ITERATION 1

The climate of Mexico is very different than that of Malden, MA. I felt it necessary to provide an outdoor public plaza in the form of a courtyard because unlike Malden there are no natural landforms such as a River for users to enjoy. The courtyard was designed to be the public realm for my hotel. The extension of the Jardin de la Floresta and a place for the residents and visitors alike to comingle.

ITERATION 2 Development of the Courtyard and Massing Strategy

COURTYARD PARTI DIAGRAM

INTERIOR FACADE WRAP

PRIMARY ACCESS ROUTE

SUN PATH DIAGRAM 23


As was the case with Part 1 of this studio, these images represent the conclusion of eight weeks of investigation and design. I felt confident in the relationship of the buildings and public plaza however the massing strategy didn’t feel appropriate. The selection of materials also did not feel appropriate for the surrounding context. The facade treatment was also problematic in the sense that the fenestration felt too rigid and reminiscent of a mill factory. The images on the following pages represent my revisions to this project. I chose to reduce the overall impact of this hotel on the site. There are not as many stories nor as many material changes. I also provided greenspace in the center of the courtyard for people to sit and enjoy some shade. There are two green roofs intended to serve as terraces for hotel guests. The idea being a sort of private outdoor space overlooking the public plaza. I kept the overall massing scheme the same and accentuated the first floor retail with regard to the street presence.

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HOTEL COURTYARD PUBLIC SPACE ROOF TOP GARDEN

SITE PLAN

In the previous massing studies of this hotel the proportions were un-realistic. At this stage I have adjusted the two buildings to have double-loaded corridors with hotel rooms situated on either side. The dimensions are more consistent and representative of a double-loaded corridor. This coordination of dimensions allowed me to free up more space and give that space back to the public plaza. In this iteration I feel as if the proportion of outdoor space to indoor space is more appropriate now than it was previously.

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CD101: Ideogramming The City Fall 2012 Duration: 16 Weeks

Instructor: Skender Luarasi

Course Brief: “The objective of this studio is to re-discover the site through the use of ideogramming, that is, by registering, manipulating and transforming graphically the plenitude of information that the site offers. These ideographic processes will be inspired through a series of words/terms from Metapolis Dictionary of Contemporary Architecture. Each student will choose a set of five words that represent five different ideas, mentalities, actions, operations or transformations, and use these words to structure a generative design process that will later inform the design of architectural proposal. The site is an in-between condition, and it is situated between the Big Dig/Boston Artery and the old Oyster House in the North-South direction and Faneuil Hall and Haymarket Station in the EastWest direction. The architectural proposal will consist of an Intermodal and Cultural Center. The proposal will integrate existing programs and events of the site and offer new ones. It will consist of a bus station, a cultural and Information Center and furnish the existing Haymarket event with an enclosable space. The whole architectural proposal will act as an urban infrastructure that will mediate among complex and often disparate urban flows, processes and events.”

Design Response: I would like to preface my design response with a brief explanation of my experiences in this studio. This was by far the most challenging C-Studio that I have particpated in. It was a requirement of the studio to use Rhino, so that we could explore our designs with the freedom made available in a Rhino environment that isn’t as easily achievable using similar software. Another caveat of this studio was the experimentation with the computer programming application known as Grasshopper. Prior to taking this studio, I had never qused either either of these programs. In the first portion of the studio we were instructed to explore the ways in which our chosen words, from The Metapolis Dictionary of Architecture, could be expressed and deployed within the site. We were to super-impose our discoveries / observations in a tactical manner on the site in such a way that our design would embrace not only the result of our discoveries but at the end be an IDEOGRAM of our initial word selection from The Metapolis Dictionary of Architecture. These selected words were the guidelines that we were instructed to follow. In my proposal I chose to separate the way in which my two chosen words were to perform. The first word, Moire, a pattern overlayed upon itself, was abstracted to create a portion of the building’s exterior facade. The second word, Braid, a looping spatial condition, dealt with the relationship of program and the spaces within the building. The adjacencies of programmatic spaces were intended to be braided together resulting in relationships that were anything but conventional.

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An IDEOGRAM is defined as a written character that symbolizes the idea of a thing without indicating a sound which is used to say it. “...ideogramming.... between the parametrics of form and the metrics of environment.” -- Skender Luarasi

The site for this studio is located in the interstitial zone between the Government Center / Faneuil Hall area of Boston, MA and the adjacent North End neighborhood. Despite the efforts of the infrastructural improvements such as the introduction of the Rose-Kennedy Greenway, the zone between the North End and Government Center still remains a divide in the landscape predominantly occupied by vehicular travel. In my exploration process, I hoped to remediate the existing “divide” and provide a solution adressing this interstitial zone. The inspiration for my architectural solution originated in the following vocabulary words found the Metapolis Dictionay of Contemporary Architecture. The goal was to interpret the conditions of the existing site and approach the problem with the intent of deploying an abstracted representation of these vocabulary terms (as defined below) and produce an architectural form which inherently symbolic of these words.

BRAID “The notion of the braid translates to the elastic and undisciplined - at the same time as disconcerting characteristic of dynamic systems, capable of favouring topological actions of “folding, unfolding and foldback.” Braids are spatial loops; transgressive trajectories; nodes and crosses; virtual bonds and links of movements, but also superposed messages;attractors of activity tending to provoke strange situations of intrigue.” - The Metapolis Dictionary of Advanced Architecture.

MOIRE “The term moire (which means ‘rippled surface’ or ‘glossy surface’) indicates a texture produced by the overprinting of grids (or webs). The paradigmatic effect of moire is based upon the idea of superposition: the combination of pseudo-regular elements produces complex and uncertain effects that demonstrate apparently irregular behaviour.” - The Metapolis Dictionary of Advanced Architecture.

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SITE LOCATION Boston, MA

ROSE-KENNEDY GREENWAY SITE

ROSE-KENNEDY GREENWAY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SITE HAYMARKET “EVENT” NEW ENGLAND HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL

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EXISTING SITE CONDITIONS

A. Aerial View of Haymarket “Event�. When vendors and shoppers alike come together here. There is a chaotic livelihood that injects character in to the site. the architectural solution should engage and enhance that livelihood.

C. The North End Park, part of the RoseKennedy Greenway plays an important role in my site because it is excellent green space that attracts people often times in the hundreds.

B. Another view of the North End Park, Because this park is a big attraction, I developed the plan of my design to allow people to filter from the park through my building.

D. I envisioned providing a space large enough on the ground level to allow some vendors to set up inside. This will allow more vendors to participate and create a blurred programmatic relationship between my building and the event. 31


SITE ANALYSIS

This diagram is a representation of the existing pedestrian traffic flows surrounding the site. I have also indicated the relationship of the site to the Subway which is conveniently located right near the site. Faneuil Hall is also close by. The placement of an Intermodal and Cultural Center on this site makes sense from the standpoint that this part of Boston is arguably the most popular destination for visitors and residents alike.

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CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT

In this initial study I chose to represent the structure as an undulating surface that inhabits the site. The intent was to create a dynamic surface which could act as a container for program and activity within. The problem with this design is that it does not engage the site enough other than providing an interesting and engaging visual object.

Undulating Surface

Access Across Site

Perforated Skin

Here I chose to push the development of the surface further than the previous iteration. What I found intriguing was the spatial conditions created within by the folds of the surface. The idea was to engage people and pull them inside the structure.

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DEVELOPMENT OF BUILDING FORM

The images on the left show different iterations of the development of the building form. The goal was to try and create spatial conditions that embodied the characteristics of the word BRAID. The idea is to fold and loop building program both in plan and section. The irregular shape of the building will create different spatial conditions as a result of the folding and looping along its length at different intervals. These moments are the generators and boundaries of programmed space. Typically, elements such as walls and doorways are what divide and separate programmed spaces. In my design, the folding and extrusion of wall surface define the threshold which begin to suggest the change between one space and another.

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These sections hope to express the the nature of spaces defined by curvilinear elements. Imagine architectural program re-interpreted as metaphorical tubes being extruded or squeezed into a container filling all the voids and crevasses. The result of this would cause that architectural program to take the shape of whatever element it is being squeezed into. This idea is radically different than the stacking of program and the stacking of floor plates common in conventional building construction.

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Lines to Create Diagonals

Divide Surface into Subsurfaces

Generate Facade “Element”

Extract Points from Subsurfaces

Radius of Facade Pipe

The above Grasshopper definition script is my interpretation of a tutorial generously provided by Andrew Heumann for ARCH4605 ,Adaptive Component Systems, Cornell University. Due to the time constraints and learning curve associated with scripting. I chose to replicate examples I found in research and apply them in my design process. I felt that for academic purposes this was acceptable.

One of the tools we were encouraged to exploit in this studio was Grasshopper. Grasshopper is a visual programming language that was developed to help designers create objects in RHINO quickly that would otherwise take an incredible amount of inefficient time to produce. The idea of Grasshopper is to have a certain objective in mind, such as the conversion of a surface into a certain facade treatment and execute that objective in a timely fashion. The above images represent the conversion of my exterior facade into a “Moire” type element that wraps the Southern portion of my building.

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N 0

25'

SCALE: 1/16" = 1'-0"

LEVEL 2 PLAN

GROUND PLAN

37

50'


SITE PLAN

PERFORMANCE SPACE

“MEZZANINE” LEVEL IN DOUBLE-HEIGHT SPACE

DINING FACILITY

LEVEL 2 PLAN

ENCLOSED HAYMARKET SPACE BUS DROP-OFF

TICKET OFFICE / LOUNGE

GROUND PLAN

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CIRCULATION DIAGRAM 1 Ground Level to Level 2

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM 2 Level 2 to Level 3

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM 3

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I found this studio to be both extremely frustrating yet ultimately rewarding. I struggled in the beginning trying to comprehend the design problem while simultaneously learning RHINO. With that being said, I believe that this project is the most exciting and stimulating out of all of my studio projects. The Amorphis character of this design has the ability to be molded, manipulated, and reconfigured endless amounts of times. What interests me the most about this project is the spatial relationship of the internal architectural program. I would like to explore and develop these spaces further and test whether or not they are functional. At this current state, this design is still lacking in certain key elements to include structural support and vertical circulation such as elevators.

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CD102: King Richard III Visitor Centre Spring 2013 Duration: 16 Weeks

Instructor: Peter Martin Eric Pfeufer

Course Brief: “In response to the discovery of the remains of King Richard III under a car park in the centre of Leicester, UK, it is proposed that a visitor centre and mausoleum be designed. This complex will be created to provide an appropriate burial place for the royal remains and an education centre / museum that provides an objective account of the much-maligned monarch’s life and brief reign. The main objective of this studio is for students to master plan and design a medium sized, mixeduse building and adjacent public space. It will be an opportunity to engage in the ‘craft’ of making architecture and landscape architecture.” Key Components: Mausoleum- 150sqm Gift Shop/Reception Area- 60sqm Café /Gallery/Kitchen - 400sqm Auditorium/Simple Theatre- 280 people / 500sqm Exhibition Space- 500sqm Education Center / Seminar Rooms- 4 x 100sqm Offices- 200sqm

Design Response: My architectural proposal for this studio hoped to remediate a site that is situated on the edge of a desolate region, a scar caused by the insertion of a 1960’s “Ring Road”, that divides the medieval center of Leicester, UK with the rest of the city. Early in my research it became apparent that the City of Leicester contains a wide array of historical landmarks and architectural precedents that span from the Roman Empire to modern day. Due to the expansive historical time line that can be seen in Leicester, I felt my design solution did not need to fall in to any specific category already represented there. This decision gave me the flexibility to operate freely and I was not limited to a specific vernacular common to the region. While it may be pragmatic to propose a brick building with a pitched roof constructed of wood, I felt it was equally important and relevant to introduce a building that would be both different and respectful of the surrounding context yet worthy of showcasing the royal remains of King Richard III.

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F

C B

E D G H A

J

I

A

De Monfort University

E Leicester Market

I

Victoria Park

B

Ancient Roman Ruins

F

J

Nelson Mandela Park

C

High Cross Shopping Mall

G Town Hall Square

D

St. Martin Cathedral

H Train Station

Haymarket Centre

During the 1960’s, Leicester, UK, like most modern cities was subjected to the invasive installment of a “Ring Road”. This Ring Road forms a circle around the old Medieval Centre of Leicester and provides motorists with a means to circumvent the city and re-connect with the major motorways. Unfortunately, the installment of this major infrastructure left a scar in the quaint urban medieval landscape. One of the goals of my design proposal is to reconnect or bridge the urban divide between the downtown Centre and the surrounding city.

41 0k

m

SITE

km 150

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SITE LOCATION Leicester, UK

HIGH

S LA

ET

STRE

CIR

O

ICH

.N ST

OCK

PEAC

3-STORY PARKING GARAGE

LN

ST. MARTIN CATHEDRAL

RING ROAD SITE

SITE ACCESS DIAGRAM 47


EXISTING CONDITIONS

PANORAMIC VIEW OF SITE FROM PARKING GARAGE In my design proposal I have decided to remove the surface road and replace it with public plaza space with the potential for future development.

VIEW DOWN HIGH STREET High Street is a pedestrian only street that is lined with retail and cafe space on either side. The site is located at the end of High Street which will help to bring people in to the site.

TYPICAL VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE With a few exceptions, most of the buildings surrounding the site are three to four stories above grade. Red Brick is the predominant building material as is evident in these pictures and pitched roofs constructed of wood and clad in shingles is common.

HISTORIC WYGSTONS HOUSE The Wygstons House, a historic museum, abuts the site property line. In my design proposal I pulled back my building footprint and allowed the plaza to directly connect / relate to the Wygstons House property.

EXISTING STREET CONDITION This a picture showing the approach from the Roman Ruins to the West of the site. In the background St. Martin’s Cathedral is visible. This is an important landmark in Leiciester’s skyline.

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SITE ANALYSIS

SUN PATH DIAGRAM I chose to orient my building so that the outdoor public plaza will receive the majority of daylight.

WIND ROSE DIAGRAM The majority of the wind comes from the Southwest. In my proposal the Western facade of the building will block some of the wind from the outdoor plaza.

In this diagram I have indicated the major circulation routes surrounding the site. I have removed the surface road in this diagram but the submerged highway tunnel remains.

BUILDING FOOTPRINT LOCATIONS

FFIC RA ET ICL VEH

AXIAL CONSIDERATIONS These are the major access points for the site.

BLDG. LOCATION?

I felt that it would be far more beneficial for the City of Leicester to occupy the entire site in an attempt to begin the process of re-connecting the central core of Leicester with the surrounding community divided by the Ring Road

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From the beginning,The KRIII Visitor Centre had specific programmatic requirements that specified the size and function of spaces. In the first stages of this design process I chose to focus on these requirements and use them as a guide to begin making design decisions. Rather than choose a specific design precdent that I found appealing, I began to arrange volumetric masses that represented the different program types. Once the appropriate size of the spaces were realized I could then begin to arrange them in different relationships that could begin to develop a narrative of the building’s architecture.

AUDITORIUM / THEATRE EDUCATION / SEMINAR EXHIBITION SPACE MAUSOLEUM

The massing studies above helped to establish a certain scale that felt appropriate on the site. However, they failed to address one of the most important programmatic elements that is crucial in any type of civic architectural proposal, the outdoor public space. I decided to simplify the design by dividing the elements into two parts; the Mausoleum and everything else. This decision allowed me to create a central courtyard space that could potentially be developed into a public space that forms the core of the design.

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CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT

The earlier decision to separate the mausoleum from the rest of the program provided an opportunity to create a public plaza that complimented the building. Because the site sits at the edge of the urban fabric there is a tendency for one to feel overwhelmed by the transition from a compressed street scale to the wide open expanse. Therefore I chose to situate the plaza closer to the urban center and I arranged the building around it as if the building is protecting or sheltering the Mausoleum space.

Auditorium Education Space Exhibition / Cafe / Gift Shop Mausoleum

In addition to sheltering the Masoleum I also manipulated the height of the building in such a way that it slopes up and away from the urban center. I needed the three levels to accommodate the amount of program but I did not want this building to be disproportionately large compared to the surrounding context.

Mausoleum

Auditorium

Lo bb y EE T

R

Exhibition / Cafe / Gift Shop

HIGHCR

REET OSS ST

H

ST IGH

LEVEL 2 PLAN

T

HIGHCR

REET OSS ST

R EE H ST HIG

GROUND PLAN 51

Education Space


CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT

These images represent the point I reached at the midterm review. I had a basic building form and a good direction for proceeding forward. It was at this point that I began to explore different materials that I would like to experiment with. I felt that the material selection and the building form would accomplish my desire to make this building identifiable in the surrounding context.The majority of the surrounding buildings employ brick and some masonry. There are a variety of roof materials to include wood shingles and metal roofing. I felt a nice juxtaposition to the surrounding brick would be a composite metal panel with coloring similar to sand or limestone--a softer, smoother texture. For the first floor I wished to use glass storefront that will allow people to see what is happening on the street and vice versa. The Mausoleum also was to be glass but a crystal shade of blue that would lend a sort of precious quality to the sacred space.

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GROUND LEVEL

MASOLEUM LEVEL (BELOW GRADE)

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

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THIRD LEVEL

SECOND LEVEL

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WEST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

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METAL COMPOSITE PANEL

GLAZING

STORE FRONT SYSTEM

For the exterior façade I chose to use a formed metal panel with a module of 1220 mm x 1220 mm, (roughly 4’-0” x 4’-0”). This standard module was the driver for the size and arrangement of the building’s fenestration. Initially I thought it might be interesting to have a façade that gave the impression of a deteriorating structure with miscellaneous components missing. This however was not a realistic goal and instead I chose to use a standard module that is easily fabricated and readily available and used the constraints of the system to define the exterior treatment.

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I chose to use a Two-Way Flat Slab configuration of sitecast concrete for the structural system of the KRIII Visitor Centre. In this structural system the concrete slabs are supported at each column with a drop panel or column cap. I chose this structural system because it is fairly common throughout the United Kingdom and I also felt that it may be more economical than a structural steel system. I did encounter one area where I chose to deviate from the sitecast concrete. As is evident in the section above I chose to use open-web bar joists to support the roof above because I needed to span the entire distance over the Theatre with the least amount of columns possible.

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EXTERIOR VIEW - LIGHTING SCHEME

= L01 - LED Cove Light = L02 - LED Wall Washer = L03 - LED Spot Light

A

MECH. ROOM

L02

L02

L02

L02

L02

L02

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L02

L02

L02

L02

L02

L02

L02

L02

L02 L02

L02

L01

L03

L02 L03

MAUSOLEUM L01

L01

L01

L01

L01

L01

L01

L01

L01

L01

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L01

L01

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L01

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L01

L01 L02 L01 L01

L02 L01 L01 L03 L01

L02 L01 L02

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L02

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L02 L02 L02

L02 L02 L02 L02

SCALE = 1:200

60

L02

L01

L01 L02

MAUSOLEUM REFLECTED CEILING PLAN

L02

L01 L01

L02

L03

L01

L01

L02

1

L02

L01 L01

L02

N

L02

L01

L01 L02

A


INTERIOR VIEW OF MAUSOLEUM WITH SKYLIGHT ABOVE

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APPROACH FROM HIGH STREET

COURTYARD VIEW

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VIEW FROM PARKING GARAGE

AERIAL VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST

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CD105D: Design Space 3.0 Spring 2013 Duration: 16 Weeks

Instructors: Juhong Park Yuna Kim

Course Brief: “This design workshop utilizes data mining methods to identify spatial and behavioral patterns of two BAC buildings: 320 Newbury Street and 951 Boylston Street. In this workshop, students will learn the theories and methods for database-driven design to propose dedicated studio classrooms and acquire digital design techniques to build storage (cabinets and shelves) systems. The final outcome of this workshop is to participate in a design project that pushes conceptual ideas into a realized project.” Workshop Goals: Identify dedicated studio space in the BAC main buildings. Design a dedicated studio space Introduction to the computer programming language, Python, and the benefits of using scripting to visualize design ideas in the software package, RHINO.

Design Response: It is no secret that Boston Architectural College is lacking in the dedicated studio space category when compared with other architecture schools around the country. Due to the hybrid academic/practice nature of the BAC the majority of the student population are commuters. It is standard practice for students to work at home and present their progress weekly in the classroom environment. The goal for this studio was to propose a dedicated studio space to serve a segment of the student population, providing an amenity that is currently non-existent. The challenge of this studio was figuring out a solution that is not only feasible but works with the non-traditional, transient nature of the school. The importance of data and implications of that data played an important role in my design process. It was stressed that the future of Architecture and design will not lay in the aesthetic appeal of a project but the design decisions made upon analysis of data. It is becoming more frequent that clients demand a building design that performs efficiently and doesn’t affect the “bottom line”. Adopting this mentality of design by data, I began my explorations understanding the existing BAC conditions while pondering future implications. It soon became apparent that due to the highly fluid yet orchestrated schedule that is BAC demanded an unusual solution. Admittedly it is possible to dedicate studio space in certain time periods when a particular class is not in session but to me, this felt like a half-hearted solution. I instead chose to re-allocated a portion of the 320 Newbury St. Building and dedicate that region as a multi-use space. The idea is to provide an easily identifiable zone within the building that provides students with space to work in between classes and also lockable storage. If, due to schedule conflicts, a classroom needs to occupy this space then so be it. Hence the multi-purposed, fluid nature of the dedicated studio space inspired by the BAC’s own transient style.

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694 Students submitted their Practice Registration Form, representing seven different Degree Programs For diagrammatic purposes I used this number of 694 to demonstrate that even with a small allocation of square footage spread over 694 students yield a gross number that simply is not feasible for the BAC to “dedicate� for individual studio space. As a result of this analysis, I changed the way in which I approached the problem and revised my solution accordingly. Rather than give space for individual students to have a desk and storage, instead I felt it was prudent to provide a communal area to work that is available to whomever wishes to use it. Additonally, I felt that there was more value in providing “lockable� storage space for students who wish to store items at school in an effort to reduce the amount of materials required to be transported to and from school.

Subtotal

205 200 247 247 465 485 430 465 485 545 485 235 215

M400 M401 M402 M403 M404 M405 M406 M407 M409 M414 M415 M503 M504 M508 M509 M511 M512 M513 M514 M515 M516

400 346 346 401 528 404 358 397 615 411 377 619 546 372 374

Subtotal

5'-6"

955

Subtotal

sq. ĹŒÍ˜

4'-6"

8081 DESK

B-2 B-3

26,290

LAPTOP / GENERAL USE

DRAFTING / MODELING

951 Boylston Street Room No.

Sq. Ft. Subtotal 11,040 9,800 1,080 1,200 640 400 2,130

694

Total

234 408 563 382

Ideal Sq. Ft. / Student 40 40 30 30 40 40 30

Sq. Ft.

DESK

5(

6'-6"

507 506 505 504 503 502 501

275 295 355 265 315 315 285 315 545 535 2135 885 450 455 455 470

Degree BARCH MARCH BID MID BLA MLA BDS

Sq. Ft.

STORAGE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 12 13 202 Casc. Hall 307 303 302 301 401 403 404 405 407 408 409 508

No. of Students 276 245 36 40 16 10 71

100 DÄ‚Ć?Ć?Ä‚Ä?ŚƾĆ?ĞƊĆ? Ave. Room No.

7'-6"

Sq. Ft.

STORAGE

320 Newbury Street Room No.

5(

3817 3561 1465 0

8843

0

1 2

1 2

12844 ARCHITECTURE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

INTERIOR DESIGN DESIGN STUDIES

Total Sq. Ft. 29,768 BAC would need 26,290 sq. ft. to provide students with roughly 30-40 sq. ft. of dedicated studio space.

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950 sf 5th FLOOR

1497 sf

4th FLOOR

DF

1509 sf

Total = 3956 sf

CENTRAL CORE SELECTED FOR STUDIO SPACE 3rd FLOOR

By transforming the central core of the 320 Newbury Street Building from existing classroom space to semi-dedicated studio space a solution emerges that addresses both the needs of school and the needs of the students. Currently, BAC students do not have many spaces to congregate and collaborate within. By creating a core zone within the 320 building the outcome hopes to produce a common ground for everyone to take advantage of.

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SHAPE GRAMMAR A generative process to define how a shape or module is transformed following a specific set of rules or logic. .

As a guide to begin to understand the storage system I chose to establish a module size which was based upon typical dimensions needed to store such items as site models, building models, presentations boards, and office supplies. This “module� became a standard unit of fabrication that could be easily understood and replicated. From an architectural standpoint, any module that can be replicated and aggregated to form a system conveniently becomes an entity that which can be programmed. The images above represent my exploration of Shape Grammar, geometric shapes that are subject to certain rules and logic which control the way they are transformed and aggregated. The idea was to establish a module, replicate it and begin to generate space and form from that module.

50 UNITS TOTAL 6'-0" 3'-0" 2'-0"

SQ.

FRONT

SIDE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

UNITS

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ZONE 1 ZONE 2

ZONE 2

ZONE 3

1. Lounge Study 2. Group Study 3. Independent Study 69


SK303: Sketch Problem #3 Fall 2012 Duration: 12-Hour Design Charrette

Team Members: Brandon Watson Andrew Godek Antoinette Marcoux Mandy Li Yurong Liu-Korovkine

TASK Each team was tasked with providing a solution for the renovation of an existing building located in Chicago, IL. We were given specific programmatic requirements that needed to be satisfied in order to achieve a successful design solution. The challenging aspect of this project was figuring out a way to fit all the program within a limited defined space and also make the spaces ADA accessible. Program: Bookstore CafĂŠ Small Kitchen / Food Prep. Area Art Gallery 1 Bedroom Apartment 2 Bedroom Apartment Public Restrooms Storage Space Vertical Circulation (I.E. Stairs, Elevator)

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This is the floorplan that was provided to us at the start of the design charrette. Due to the fact that this space is a single unit in a larger structure we were instructed to ignore the facades and focus our attention solely upon the interior fit-out.

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PUBLIC TOILET COMMON

105 SF

90 SF

COMMON ELEVATOR

124 SF

87 SF ELEVATOR

ELEVATOR

GALLERY

87 SF

84 SF

1774 SF

STAIR 56 SF

STAIR 73 SF

STORAGE

STAIR

STAIR

STAIR

92 SF

109 SF

109 SF

109 SF

COMMON

SKYLIGHT

161 SF

COUNTER 215 SF

2 BED RM UNIT 810 SF BOOK STORE/ CAFE 1139 SF

STAIR 168 SF

STAIR

STAIR

156 SF

168 SF

1 BED RM UNIT 622 SF COMMON 163 SF

STAIR

RAMP

STEP

BASEMENT LEVEL

STREET LEVEL

APARTMENT LEVEL

LEGEND BOOKSTORE / CAFE COMMON AREAS GALLERY SPACE DESIGN STRATEGY

1 BR APARTMENT

The strategy we chose to employ is straight forward. We felt that it was important to place the cafe and bookstore at street level with the intent of attracting clientele. Expanding upon this desire to attract customers we designed the bookshelf to be a curvilinear element meant to draw people further into the space. The bookshelf is meant to serve two purposes 1) Functional Book Display and 2) Inviting Sculptural Element.

2 BR APARTMENT

We chose to place a stair at the center of the building to serve as an Architectural Feature that provides access to the Art Gallery below. There are additional stairs in this design proposal however they are reserved for the residents of the apartments on Level 2. The third major element we incorporated into our design is a large skylight that allows daylight to penetrate deep within the structure via the multi-story atrium. The void created by this atrium also divides the two apartments. We intentionally provided windows in the apartments lining the perimeter of this atrium so that the residents could open the curtains in their living room and be able to see into the adjacent apartment as well as observe the activity below.

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KITCHEN / FOOD PREP.


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BAC Segment II Portfolio  
BAC Segment II Portfolio  
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