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CONTENTS

M

A

G

A

Z

I

N

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2020 Published by Rankin Publishing, Inc. www.buslinemag.com

E

Hit By COVID-19 Slowdown, Hale Transportation Is Fighting Back ...................8 Continues Service With Free Fares, Passenger Cooperation & Communication

Go COMO (Columbia, MO) .................................20 — Busline Buyers Guides —

Flooring.........................26 • Brakes & Tires .................29 Busline Vehicle Showcase:

Trolley Buses & Street Cars • Hometown Trolley 32 • Cable Car Classics 34

Get Out Of Your Own Way On Path To Success....................36 CUTA 2020 Virtual Conference Set For November 16-19....44 RAPID RESPONSE .........................Page 6 INDUSTRY NEWS........................Page 39

ON THE COVER: Hale Transportation President Stephen Hale, left, and General Manager Philip Bond Jr., stand next to one of the company's Van Hool motorcoaches. Hale Transportation is located in Clinton, NY. See page 8.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

NOVEMBER 2020 November 16-19 Canadian Urban Transit Association (CUTA) (Virtual Conference) Info: 416-365-9800 November 16-19 Community Transportation Association of America (CTAA) (Virtual Conference) Info: 800-891-0590 MARCH 2021 March 3-7 United Motorcoach Association (UMA) Motorcoach Expo Orlando, FL Info: 800-424-8262

March 14-17 APTA TRANSform Conference & Expo Anaheim, CA Info: 202-496-4800

JUNE 2021 June 13-17 Community Transportation Association of America (CTAA) Expo Richmond, VA Info: 800-891-0590 June 18-22 American Bus Association (ABA) Marketplace 2021 Baltimore, MD Info: 800-283-2877

June 19-21 Busworld North America Baltimore, MD Info: busworldnorthamerica.org

JULY 2021 July 17-21 National School Transportation Association Annual Meeting & Convention Milwaukee, WI Info: 703-684-3200 NOVEMBER 2021 November 5-9 National Association For Pupil Transportation (NAPT) Annual Conference & Trade Show Grand Rapids, MI Info: 518-452-3611

Busline Magazine is published 6 times a year by Rankin Publishing, Inc., 204 E. Main, P.O. Box 130, Arcola, IL 61910-0130. Publisher assumes no liability whatsoever for content of any advertisement or editorial material contained herein. Copyright 2020 Rankin Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form without written consent of Rankin Publishing, Inc. Subscription Rates in United States: 6 issues $25. Single Copy rate: $10 including postage/handling; Buyer’s Guide $15 including postage/handling. International rates: 6 issue annual Air Mail Subscription $60 U.S. dollars net

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BUSLINE

November/December 2020

EDITORIAL & CORPORATE OFFICES

Rankin Publishing Co., Inc.

Linda Rankin, Publisher 204 E. Main Street • P.O. Box 130 Arcola, IL 61910-0130, USA Email: rankinmag@consolidated.net Website: www.rankinpublishing.com (800) 598-8083 (U.S.) • (217) 268-4959 Fax: (217) 268-4815 Editorial: Harrell Kerkhoff, Editor Rick Mullen, Associate Editor Design: David Opdyke, Kris Bott Reception: Mary Jo Dunn

Advertising Contact Kevin Kennedy @ 813-502-6672 Email: kevloraz@gmail.com Or Linda Rankin @ 800-598-8083 Fax: 217-268-4815 Email: rankinmag@consolidated.net


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Company

Website

ABA/Busworld North America ABC Companies Altro

Page #

40

Hometown Coach

altro.com/transport

27

Kelderman Air Suspension Systems

abc-companies.com

7

ARBOCsv.com

19

Bitimec Wash-Bots

wash-bots.com

35

BLTLLC.com

15

Bitzer

bitzerus.com

16

BYD

byd.com

47

CHTC Bus Group

chtcbusgroup.com

11

BRC Group

brcgroup.ca

CBM NA

23

cbmcompany.com/en/

13

Clean Seal

cleanseal.com

22

Diamond Manufacturing

diamondmfg.com

41

Factory Direct Bus Sales

factorydirectbussales.com

48

Complete Coach Works Dixie Electric Ltd. Gerflor USA

Website

busworldnorthamerica.org

ARBOC Specialty Vehicles

Better Life Technology (G-Floor)

Company

completecoach.com

delstar-hd.com

gerflortransport.com

39

38 28

Page #

hometowncoach.com

3

J & J Chemical

jjchem.com

41

LiquidSpring LLC

liquidspring.com

14

kelderman.com

18

Marathon Brake Systems

MarathonBrake.com

Motrocoach Tire Sales

MotorCoachTireSales.com

Midwest Bus Corporation Reyco Granning Safety Step

21

midwestbus.com

37

reycogranning.com

10

30

safetystep.net

43

Safety Vision

safetyvision.com

12

Service Insurance

serviceins.com

42

SanUVAire Sutrak

SanUVAire.com

sutrakusa.com

Temsa

temsa.com

Transign

transignllc.com

Thermo King Vanner Power

42

24 2

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vanner.com

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November/December 2020

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Hale Transportation representatives shown, left to right, are Tim David, technician; Stephen Hale, president; Philip Bond Jr., general manager; and Patrick Kilmartin, shop foreman.

Hit By COVID-19 Slowdown,

I Page 8

Hale Transportation Is Fighting Back By Rick Mullen, Busline Magazine Associate Editor

n 2006, Stephen Hale realized his childhood dream of going into the transportation business when he founded Hale’s Bus Garage, in Clinton, NY. The company is now commonly known as Hale Transportation. “In 2008, Stephen Hale entered into an agreement with an Albany, NY-based motorcoach company that placed coaches at our current Clinton facility and began to run a retail program,” Hale Transportation General Manager Philip Bond Jr. said, during a recent interview with Busline Magazine. “Stephen provided dispatching services, office space and the cleaning of the coaches. That arrangement grew from two coaches to as many as 10, and lasted until 2014 when the Albany-based company decided it no longer wanted a second location. The company pulled its equipment and ended the agreement.” BUSLINE

November/December 2020

Stephen Hale


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As a result, Stephen Hale purchased a used motorcoach and of the parts and deal with the major suppliers. I oversee the parts inbegan booking trips. There was an interest in what is now Hale ventory as well,” Bond said. “I share those responsibilities with my Transportation as another motorcoach company went out of busihead mechanic. I also take care of the licensing of the coaches and ness and left a void in the area market, Bond explained. oversee the inspection program that New York state conducts twice “As of 2020, we now a year. I also dispatch and work with a few customers here and there, have more than 24 motorbooking trips and so on, but the other stuff keeps me busy.” coaches, plus shuttle and Located in upstate minibuses,” Bond said. New York, Clinton is “I think if everybody in the As president and about an hour’s drive, owner, Stephen Hale is via Interstate 90, east industry refused to go into the involved in every aspect of Syracuse, NY, and in ‘gutter’ on pricing, we all could the neighborhood of a of the business, but primarily focuses on office, two-hour trip west of make a little more money.” cleaning, on-call servthe state capital of Al— Philip Bond Jr., general manager ices and customer-rebany. In addition, the lated matters. He began company’s facility is in the transportation inabout five hours northwest of the New York City metro area. dustry in 1999 by clean“We recently completed a $2.5 million renovation, increasing ing school buses. He later the size of our facility from 5,000 to 25,000 square feet, and inbecame a bus driver, cludes an automatic wash bay, new driver offices and an expanded Philip Bond Jr. while working toward a parking lot,” Bond said. landscaping degree. Hale Transportation’s primary focus is group charter transportation. “Stephen is very hands-on. He’s involved mostly with the office The company also provides shuttle services for various groups. “Our biggest business segment is athletic and academic transend of the business,” Bond said. “He deals with customers and portation for area colleges. We have formed great relationships handles all the major contracts.” with those institutions. Our drivers and staff are always geared to As general manager, Bond’s responsibilities include overseeing meet their needs,” Bond said. “Contracts are important to us. Even the company’s garage operation. when we are sold out, if one of our customers call at the last “We currently have two technicians in the garage. I order most

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November/December 2020


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HT -SERIES 35


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minute and asks for a coach, we come through for them.” Bond said athletic transportation can get “tricky” at times. Weather and other factors can cause trips to be cancelled or rescheduled. Sometimes people simply forget to schedule a coach. Such issues may result in a customer calling Hale Transportation at the last minute, needing a coach. In the case that there are two trips that need to be covered at the same time — one of which is an athletic trip handled by the contract team — Hale Transportation will handle the athletic trip and reach out to one of its partners in the area to handle the other trip, Bond said. “Once a customer signs a contract, we take that seriously. The client is expecting us to be there and provide what we promised in the contract,” Bond said. “Let’s say there is a wedding on a particular day that is not handled by our contract team, and, at the same time, there is a contracted athletic trip scheduled. We will reach out to another coach company to cover the wedding. Meanwhile, we will handle the athletic trip. “That is what we usually do when we are sold out and someone calls and says, ‘Oh my gosh, we forgot to book this trip with you.’ We don’t want to leave it up to a competitor to handle a major contract.” Hale Transportation counts several colleges and universities as important customers, including SUNY (State University of New York) Polytechnic Institute, located in Marcy, NY, just north of

A major renovation project recently expanded the company's facility from 5,000 to 25,000 square feet.

Utica. The school also has a campus in Albany. “New York Polytechnic Institute is on the cutting edge of the microchip world, and is going to build a factory on campus,” Bond said. “The school has been a customer of ours since the beginning.” According to sunypoly.edu, the Institute founded and manages the Computer Chip Commercialization Center (Quad-C). Other college and university customers include SUNY Morrisville State College, Cazenovia College, Colgate University and Hamilton College. SUNY Morrisville State College is located about 30 minutes south of Clinton in Morrisville.

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“The college is phenomenal to deal with, and we’ve been with them from the beginning, as well,” Bond said. “Hamilton College, meanwhile, is located about five minutes from our facility. Cazenovia College is a small private school (located about 40 minutes southwest of Clinton) and Colgate University is about 20 minutes from us in Hamilton, NY. Recently, the Hamilton College contract has become available, and we are going to be working with the college when things get back to some sort of normal. “While Colgate University and Hamilton College are very major contracts that can keep our fleet pretty busy, we are always looking to expand our services.” Although the area’s colleges and universities have been a major portion of Hale Transportation’s business in recent years, other charter trip offerings are also popular. “We transport groups to Manhattan in New York City to shop, go to a show, or anything else group members would like to do,” Bond said. “They spend about nine hours there.” Other “hot” destinations for charters include Boston and Washington, D.C. In the springtime, university and college teams also charter trips to southern locations, including Myrtle Beach, SC, and Florida, where their baseball teams practice, Bond said. “We also transport senior groups. Most of the time those are local trips. We have a pretty good following with local school districts, as well, because of our safety profiles,” Bond said. Indeed, last year, Hale Transportation scored 96 percent on the New York State biannual safety inspection. “In New York state, scoring 96 percent is a significant achievement because the state’s standards are pretty rigid,” Bond said. “Many times schools want to see our safety profile in deciding to go with us or with a competitor that may be charging less.” Hale Transportation refuses to get into pricing wars with competitors, Bond said. Transportation companies that consistently lowball prices to gain business have traditionally been a thorn in the side of companies offering highquality services. Many transportation officials, Bond included, think companies that cut prices to rock bottom are a drag on the whole industry’s bottom line. “I think if everybody in the in-

dustry refused to go into the ‘gutter’ on pricing, we all could make a little more money,” Bond said. “We are just not going to go there, because we would have to cut expenses somewhere, whether it be drivers’ pay, or not maintaining our coaches to the high bar that we have set. It is foolishness to me to operate that way.” In its charter service fleet, Hale Transportation has purchased coaches from ABC Companies, including two new Van Hool CX45 motorcoaches, delivered in 2017. The company also just purchased a 2020 Van Hool CX45. “We have had a strong relationship with ABC Companies since the beginning,” Bond said. “ABC’s support has been very good all around, from parts to sales to technical support — the company is very responsive. “If we call ABC with a problem at 5 o’clock in the afternoon, we

November/December 2020

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will get a call back within an hour from the company’s leadership and a tech support person. They also have an on-the-road rep who will come to our facility. I have visited ABC’s phenomenal locations in New Jersey and Florida.” The main thrust of Hale Transportation’s charter business is serving the Northeast. Some key destinations for charter trips include Boston, Washington, D.C., and Montreal, QC, Bond said. “Occasionally, we go down to Florida and South Carolina, but, our main charter business is in the Northeast, especially since the university business has really grown,” Bond said. “However, if somebody calls and says, ‘I want to go to Wisconsin’ or ‘I want to go to Colorado,’ we will charter a trip to those locations. That doesn’t happen as much anymore since our focus is athletic and academic transportation.” Hale Transportation also offers shuttle service to Turning Stone Resort Casino, located about 15 miles northwest of Clinton. “We provide a shuttle that runs between Syracuse and Turning Stone, located in Vernon, NY,” Bond said. “At one point, we operated employee shuttles on the campus of the casino, which was

a 24/7 operation. We also run a shuttle for a company between Fonda, NY, and Utica.”

A

ccording to a report released by the American Bus Association (ABA) in late April, nearly the entire motorcoach industry had shut down in every corner of the country. “Most charter and tour comA Hale Transportation employee panies have closed their doors, is shown working on one of the commuter operations have company’s motorcoaches in the mostly stopped running, and renovated facility in Clinton, NY. scheduled service operations are operating at approximately 15 percent of capacity. The industry is seeing a fallout between 80-90 percent of cancelled trips and very few future bookings,” the ABA said. “Some of the worst losses have been seen in the charter business, which depends on tours, meetings and conferences, where bookings are almost nonexistent, even though this is usually the busiest time of year. In addition, for many charter companies the period of March through June is when they earn as much as 60 percent of their revenue for the year and that work has been completely elimi-

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November/December 2020

THE IMPACT OF COVID-19


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nated. Even more impacted are shuttle and other services like school field trips, marching bands, and sports teams. Those services are down by about 95 percent.” “Like many other companies, we have been hit hard by the pandemic,” Bond said. “Many weeks and weekends were sold out for the entire calendar year — they have all been cancelled. Unfortunately, we have had to furlough some employees. “Nonetheless, we are hanging in there. Fortunately, Stephen (Hale) set us up pretty well. We had some reserves and savings. We also applied for payroll protection programs, and we received some Hale Transportation’s renovated facility funds. We also took advantage of the includes an automatic wash bay and plenty FEMA (Federal Emergency Management of space for vehicle maintenance. Agency) Economic Injury Development Loan, which has been a stopgap for us. Our lenders have been very good to us, as “We decided to end our lease at our Oneonta location. We are hopwell, allowing extensions for a few months. Wherever we can, ing to return to the area in the future,” Bond said. “The lease was we are reaching out for work and doing different things.” coming up for renewal at the end of July. Since there wasn’t any One positive development is landing a contract for the state of business out of Oneonta, we decided it was time to shut it down. For New York to operate two wrapped motorcoaches that will tour the the time being, all of our coaches are running out of Clinton.” area for six weeks, acting as rolling billboards for the state. Hale Transportation has taken measures to help ensure the safety “The coaches will be touring some cities in our area,” Bond said. and health of its employees and riders. “That will bring in some revenue. We are just going back to basics.” “We urge that all of passengers wear masks. We have put hand One casualty of the pandemic was Hale Transportation’s location sanitizer stations near the entry doors of the coaches. We also have in Oneonta, NY.

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hand sanitizer wipes located throughout the buses,” Bond said. tocols and procedures Hale Transportation has put in place to help Hale Transportation encourages social distancing. keep them safe and healthy. “We have an Atlantic City run every weekend to a casino, which “You are always going to have somebody who says, ‘I’m not limits the passenger count to 30 people to try to enforce social diswearing a mask.’ However, for the most part, people are trying to tancing,” Bond said. “When make the best of the situation. They coaches return from trips, we go want to get sick,” Bond said. “Like many other companies, we have don’t through them with a disinfectant “Colleges and universities have spray gun. We also have microbial their own protocols. We share with been hit hard by the pandemic... them what we have done. Most of filters in all of the buses. So far, we We are just going back to basics.” the time they will come back and haven’t had any complaints or say that is ‘perfect.’ Some of them problems.” go a little above what we have done as far as allowing a certain Hale Transportation uses several sources to learn and keep number of riders on a bus. Everybody has been good to work with abreast of best practices in dealing with the pandemic. and there hasn’t been a lot of issues.” “We check the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) website,” Bond said. “We also look at what comIn discussing what the winter season might bring, Bond said petitors are posting on social media and their websites. And, that hopefully the colleges and universities will continue their there are people within the Bus Association of New York winter sports, and other seasonal programs, carrying over into State who can help. I’m pretty close to a lot the people in the spring. that organization. I ask them such questions as, ‘What are “Of course, we have had a lot of hopes dashed through this panyou guys doing? What do you think is working? How are you demic,” Bond said. “It began in March when we heard, as we getting through this? What about social distancing? Are you locked down, this would all last two weeks and soon we would be limited on capacity?’ up and running like normal. We are still waiting for those two “Many times they will have some good answers for us. We also weeks to end. talk with our bus manufacturers. They put out bulletins and pro“Then we were looking at the fall season. In September, we revide guidelines, etc. We compile the information we have gathally geared up and got ready to go, but that plan was shut down. ered, and then pull out what we think we are going to do to ensure So, there have been a lot of letdowns.” people are safe. We do what we can.” Bond expects the service to Manhattan will dry up during the With a few exceptions, passengers have cooperated with the prowinter season because many people are not wanting to travel

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there, especially since COVID-19 cases are spiking again in the New York City area. In addition, trips to Salem, MA, which typically is a popular destination in October, have been nixed due to the coronavirus. “I think there is some light at the end of the tunnel,” Bond said. “Once we get through the election and put the nightmare of 2020 behind us and move into 2021, I’m hoping things will get back to somewhat normal.”

H

HIGHLY TRAINED AND ROAD-TESTED DRIVERS

ale Transportation has about 65 full- and part-time employees, including drivers. In addition to Stephen Hale, Bond and drivers, there are two part-time compliance managers, a part-time receptionist, two full-time technicians, one full-time cleaner and two part-time cleaners. “Drivers are required to have experience before we hire them,” Bond said. “Once hired, we continually road test and evaluate them. We also have frequent meetings and in-service days when we go through all the mechanical and operating functions of the various vehicles in the fleet. We expect our drivers to become familiar with all the intricacies of those complex vehicles. “We conduct training with small groups of three or four drivers at a time. We also take them out twice a year for a road test. We depend on feedback from customers. We always ask passengers after they return from a trip, ‘How did the trip go? Is there anything that the driver could have done better? Is there something

we need to follow up on?’ It is important to get that feedback from riders,” Bond said. Just having driving experience isn’t enough. Drivers who are successful at Hale Transportation have the right personalities to engage passengers in the way the company demands. “We can teach driving skills, but we can’t teach personality. If driver candidates come to us and their people skills are not all there, we are going to pass,” Bond said. “A person could be the best driver in the world, but, if he/she doesn’t like people, it is just not going to work out for him/her here at Hale Transportation.” Not all successful drivers have the same personalities. Some drivers match up better with certain types of groups. “For example, some older drivers do better with senior groups,” Bond said. “Once we get a driver matched with a particular coach or team, we take pains to make sure that person remains in that position. “When potential customers reach out to us, I will speak with them on the phone to gain some understanding of the personality of the group in order to match them with a driver. That is important, because the driver makes the trip. A driver who is difficult to work with, not willing to go somewhere or do something the group needs to do can ruin a trip. “Drivers have a lot of responsibilities. I have been there. I understand what they are going through, and that is why I try to take care of them.” For drivers who make the cut, Hale Transportation emphasizes communication and teamwork.

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B

“A driver who is engaged and feels he/she is part of a team is KEYS TO SUCCESS usually much happier than someone who is treated like a number,” Bond said. “We try to foster a family-type atmosphere. We have ond discussed some of the underpinnings of Hale Transan open door policy that allows drivers to voice any concerns they portation’s success since it opened in 2006. Prudent and might have. wise business decisions helped launch the company on an “Most of our recruiting comes from drivers leaving other comupward trajectory. panies to come here. They then spread the word to their former “We were able to grow quickly because there was a vacuum in colleagues that Hale Transportation is a good place to work. Also, the market when another company pulled out,” Bond said. “You keeping a highly maintained fleet also have to be competitive with goes a long way in attracting qualpricing and find good equipment, ity drivers.” “We were able to grow quickly because which we have done. Stephen Upstate New York winters can be (Hale) is very adamant, as well, there was a vacuum in the market harsh and snowy. Operating a 45that every coach have Wi-Fi, and when another company pulled out. foot motorcoach in such conditions other key amenities, such as 110takes a great deal of skill. Hale volt outlets, etc.” You also have to be competitive with Transportation’s drivers are up to Looking ahead, Bond said Hale pricing and find good equipment, the task. Transportation will continue to “The winters can get interestfocus on building its reputation which we have done.” ing as we get quite a bit of for offering the stellar customer snow in this area,” Bond said. service that it has nurtured over “Sometimes our drivers are expected to navigate coaches the years. The same goes for continuing its efforts to put highly on rural country roads, which can be hilly, narrow and maintained coaches on the road. Having to close down some winding. They are expected to be able to drive through destinations because of COVID-19, seeking new business is wooded areas. also a priority. “Weddings have really taken off in various venues scatThere are also some uncertainties moving ahead to prepare for, tered throughout the region. Many of those sites are deep in again because of the impact of the pandemic. wooded areas. Drivers have to be extra careful navigating “With more colleges going virtual, is that going to change their 45-foot vehicles through the woods.” the industry as far as transportation goes? We need to be aware

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November/December 2020

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of that, and other possible changes,� Bond said. “I wish I could see the future and know what it is going to bring. Nonetheless, we are going to do our best to be prepared for whatever might come.�

D

A GOOD CAREER

espite the monumental upheaval in the motorcoach transportation market at this time caused by COVID-19, Bond thinks the industry is a good career choice. “A person, for example, can become a motorcoach driver and go anywhere in the U.S. and Canada,� Bond said. Indeed, Bond launched his career path as a bus driver more than 26 years ago, a job he held for 12 years. He left the transportation industry for a time, but, in 2009, came back, driving for an Albany-based company. “Shortly thereafter, I became general manager of that company,� Bond said. He remained at that company until 2014, when he was recruited by Stephen Hale to be general manager of Hale Transportation. “I like the challenge of working in this industry, because it is always changing,� Bond said. “I get really hands on with the coaches when they have electrical and other issues. My head mechanic and I work well together. We will troubleshoot a problem a bus is having. I love that kind of stuff, where I am out in the garage trying to figure out where a wire is broken. We’ve gotten really good at that stuff because our earlier coaches had

a lot of problems. It is cool to get involved and understand what technicians are going through.� Bond stays involved with all of the company’s employees, from the maintenance technicians to the cleaner who works nights. “I will come in at night and ask him what he needs — what will make his life better,� Bond said. “It is a good career. I am happy where I ended up and what I’m doing. I have always enjoyed working with people. When I was a driver, it was amazing all the places I saw and all of the people I met. As my role changed and I moved into the office, it was fulfilling to work with the technicians and solve problems.� Working for a company such as Hale Transportation, also gives employees a chance to give back to their communities in various ways. “Stephen, for example, is very community minded,� Bond said. “He donates bus transportation for funeral shuttles, local festivals, works with the schools to help with playoff transportation, among other activities. He is also a volunteer fireman.�

Contact: Hale Transportation, 37 Kirkland Ave., Clinton, NY 13323. Phone: 315-853-8670. Website: haletransportationgroup.com.



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Columbia, MO

Continues Service

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Dale Lynn, Go COMO Transportation Superintendent

• Free Fares • Passenger Cooperation & • Communication By Harrell Kerkhoff Busline Magazine Editor

“Public transportation is a needed resource. And when such a need is there, it has to be filled. That is what we work hard on every day.”

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Even in times of uncertainty, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, many people still need a ride. Case in point is the transportation service provided in Columbia, MO, by the city’s bus transit system, Go COMO, helping passengers of all ages and economic backgrounds safely get to where they need to go. “Public transportation is a needed resource. And when such a need is there, it has to be filled. That is what we work hard on every day,” Go COMO Transportation Superintendent Dale Lynn said. BUSLINE

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With a history that dates over 50 years, today Go COMO provides a variety of public transportation services in a city with an approximate population of 125,000 citizens, as well as a large student population fueled by the University of Missouri, located in Columbia, with an estimated enrollment of 30,000. During a “normal” year, providing public transportation to such a diverse ridership group would be a challenge. Of course, 2020 is no normal year. And like most public transportation systems, Go COMO representatives have been busy responding to ongoing challenges brought on by a global pandemic. Lynn detailed the major safety steps taken by Go COMO since March 2020, which is when COVID19 entered the Columbia area, located in the middle of the state. “The first thing we did was to go fare free. That allowed our passengers to board and disembark through the rear door of our fixed-route vehicles. The only exception would be if a person needed to use a ramp,” Lynn said. “By being fare free, passengers don’t have to congregate near the fare box. It also allows better social distancing possibilities. Also, fare free means there is less interaction between passengers and our drivers. “We plan to continue fare free operations through the end of our current budget cycle, which goes through September 2021.” In another effort to better protect drivers, Plexiglas barriers have been installed around the bus cockpit.

Located in downtown Columbia, MO, Wabash Station is Go COMO’s main transfer and connection facility.

“The Plexiglas provides separation for the driver in case a passenger asks a question or requires other help. We have also mandated that all employees and passengers wear masks while on our vehicles,” Lynn said. “And, in an effort to discourage people from sitting together, and to encourage social distancing, we have cordoned off every other vehicle seat.” Fortunately, there have not been many problems with passengers complying with the new regulations.

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prior to the pandemic, the “We have not had too system ran 2,907,108 revmany issues. If we do, we enue miles, while its just ask the passenger to fixed-route ridership count leave the bus. It helps that in 2019 was 1,055,726. we have an onboard “Obviously, due to the video system for each of ongoing pandemic, we our vehicles. If there is a don’t know when ridership problem the driver can’t will pick up. Like everyhandle, we will contact body else, we are hopeful the police.” the pandemic ends soon,” In an effort to further Lynn said. “Once more keep everyone as safe as normal times return, we possible from COVIDwill definitely be tracking 19, drivers clean each of ridership more closely and their vehicles between looking for new changes routes. The same applies to Go COMO’s paratranin demand.” As stated, one of Go sit vehicles. Go COMO Transportation Superintendent Dale Lynn COMO’s more popular servDespite the historic imis shown next to one of the transit system’s buses. ices is called Tiger Line, pact of COVID-19, Lynn named after the University of Missouri’s nickname. It provides shuttle said Go COMO’s bus operation has been able to continue, although runs for students during spring and fall semesters. some services have been scaled back. “We have had a contract with the university for nearly 15 years, “Service has never completely stopped. We have continued our providing shuttle service between the campus and three satellite regular six fixed-routes throughout this entire time. Ridership on parking lots. There are many students who are housed on campus at those routes is at approximately 60 percent compared to before the residence halls, where there is a lack of parking, thus the need for pandemic. For paratransit, it’s 50 percent,” he said. “A lot of our the satellite lots,” Lynn said. “We transport students to and from the fixed-route ridership dropped due to fewer students using our Unilots, starting at 5 a.m. and running until midnight — seven days a versity of Missouri shuttle.” week. We do not provide that service during the summer.” Go COMO’s current service region is 65 square miles. In 2019,

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University students pay a fee associated with semester tuition, allowing them to ride the shuttle service without additional fare. Although service for Tiger Line continues, it was disrupted in the spring due to COVID-19. “University officials decided to discontinue in-person classes when the pandemic struck our area in March. All classes went virtual prior to the university’s spring break, and continued virtual until the end of the spring semester. In response, we stopped our shuttle service for the remainder of that semester and resumed in August, when students returned to campus,” Lynn said. “There are certain regulations students must follow while using Tiger Line. That includes wearing masks and practicing social distancing.”

C

THE BEAUTY OF COLUMBIA, OTHERWISE KNOWN AS ‘COMO’

olumbia is often referred to as the “Athens of Missouri” due to the city’s architecture, most notably “The Columns,” which are located on the University of Missouri’s campus. A recognized landmark, six columns each stand 43 feet tall, and are the remains of a portico from Academic Hall, an original university building which was destroyed by fire in 1892. Many natives of Columbia fondly refer to their city as “CoMo,” and benefit from the city’s mid-state location. Situated next to Interstate 70, Columbia is approximately equal distance (125 miles) between the Missouri cities of St. Louis to the east, and Kansas City to the west. Columbia is also just 37 miles north of the state capital, Jefferson City. The history of Go COMO dates to 1966, when the city of Columbia began bus service with three vehicles. As the city grew, bus service was expanded to meet the needs of the growing citizenry. Although known by different names over the years, Go COMO currently provides fixed-route and complimentary paratransit services within city limits, as well as shuttle service for the University of Missouri. Additional routes are added during the university’s home football games. “As with any transit system,

there have been multiple changes in routes over the years. Much of that is trying to keep up with city development. Of course, when it comes of public transportation, funding is always an issue with any type of expansion,” Lynn said. “We I started at Go COMO in 1996, the system ran eight buses on four fixed-routes. Paratransit was also added, featuring two small vans with wheelchair lifts.” In 2012, the Columbia City Council asked that Go COMO review its ‘hub and spoke’ transportation model, and rather implement a ‘networked’ model. The latter was expected to expand services closer to city limits, providing more opportunities for residents. “Although the networked system was implemented in 2014, it did not meet expectations. We reverted to a hub and spoke model in June 2019,” he said. “Our primary ridership wanted one main transfer location (the downtown Wabash Station), which the hub

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and spoke model provides. It is here that passengers can purchase bus passes and transfer to other routes. “Our current hub and spoke method is similar to the one existing when I started here in 1996, although it has been expanded. Our buses now operate on a 45-minute loop. They go in and out of the Wabash Station location on the same path. That allows passengers to disembark at different stops on our routes as needed, and then catch anShown, left to right, are Go COMO Administrative Support Assistants Doris Moore, other bus at a different time.� Nikki Butler and Tamra Canton, as well as Lead Bus Driver Regina Tavarez. Go COMO has 24 buses and 16 vans in its fleet. At the current time, 16 buses and four paratransit vans tion) and APC (Automatic Passenger Counter) technology. Those are used per service day. The fleet now includes four zero-emis- systems were first installed at Go COMO in 2011. Additionally, sion, 30-foot battery-electric K7M BYD transit vehicles, which new technology is being used for electronic pre-trip inspections, allowing drivers to detect any vehicle defects prior to a trip. were put into service in September 2020. “I would say our AVL system has been the biggest and brightest “The four battery-electric buses have worked out very well for us. They are used in our standard service. Our mechanics are re- star, when it comes to new amenities at Go COMO. It allows a ceiving additional training to maintain those vehicles,� Lynn said. rider with a smartphone or tablet to better track where his/her bus “Our intent in Columbia is to move as many vehicles to ‘green’ as is at any given time. The rider no longer has to stand at a bus stop possible. The battery-electric vehicles are also expected to reduce 15 to 20 minutes, waiting for the bus to arrive,� Lynn said. “It’s maintenance costs, and several of our passengers have noted how been a very useful tool for our passengers, to the point that if, for some reason, a bus is not being properly tracked through AVL, we quiet those vehicles are during operation.� All fixed-route buses in Go COMO’s fleet now include AVL will soon hear about it from the riders.� Go COMO has also purchased recent software to improve para(Automatic Vehicle Location), AVA (Automatic Voice Annuncia-

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transit scheduling. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Go COMO was using nine vehicles per day and providing, on average, 300 to 325 daily rides for paratransit participants. However, that ridership has been reduced by half, Lynn said, as many paratransit passenger trips are being replaced with virtual communication, such as doctor visits. Currently, Go COMO is using four vehicles for its paratransit services. “We operate wide-body vans that can seat up to 14 ambulatory passengers, plus room for three people in wheelchairs, for those in need of paratransit,” Lynn said. “Due to Columbia’s tremendous medical facilities, we see people from all over the state, and beyond, who need medically-related paratransit services. Paratransit has been a very successful program for Go COMO. We currently have a database of close to 700 eligible riders. “Columbia is growing. Therefore, sometimes our paratransit vehicles have to leave the city limits in order to reach new areas of Columbia. County residents who do not live within the city, however, are not currently eligible to use the service, unless they live within 3/4 of a mile from one of our fixed-routes.” Every driver employed at Go COMO is trained to service fixed-routes, the University of Missouri shuttle system and paratransit. “That works out well for us. The flexibility of moving a driver to where we need him/her is very helpful,” Lynn said. “I would estimate it’s a 50/50 split as to what drivers prefer when it comes to fixed-route and paratransit. Years ago when I was a driver, I personally enjoyed driving paratransit as it took me off ‘the beaten path.” Also, most paratransit riders are very appreciative of the service we provide, and you can develop more one-on-one connections with paratransit clients.” A standard practice among all Go COMO representatives, however, is to provide quality customer service no matter the rider or route. “We make it a practice to listen to members of the community and respond with clear, compassionate and timely communication,” Lynn said. “We exist to provide the best possible service to our customers — the men, women, children and businesses who make up our community. “Although all members of our staff are essential, drivers are often the ‘face of the city.’ They are responsible for properly communicating with passengers. That includes providing a proper greeting and answering questions to the best of their abilities. Such service generates more ridership, as word of mouth spreads very fast.” He added that it’s important all of Go COMO employees are knowledgeable about the routes and transportation services provided by the transit system. If there is something they don’t know, they are encouraged to call Go COMO’s call center for answers.

WABASH STATION PAINTINGS DEPICT LOCAL HISTORY Wabash Station, Go COMO’s main facility, is also one of the most historic buildings in downtown Columbia. Originally opened in 1910, the facility was renovated in 2005. It includes a four-painting series that frames a clock just above the original ticket windows in the Wabash Station lobby. The oil-on-canvas paintings are collectively titled, “Time in Transit,” and were painted by David Spear, a local artist. Spear used “time” as the theme, documenting the past and present of Wabash Station. Live models were used for all of the figures, including Herbert Crum, a longtime employee of the local bus service who is depicted as a conductor; fellow artist Don Asbee, who created the Wabash 808 sculpture just outside of the station; and various family members. Spear painted himself as a ghostlike figure fading from the station lobby, to emphasize how quickly the present becomes the past. The paintings, and Asbee’s exterior sculpture, were commissioned as part of the city’s Percent For Art program.

G

THE SEARCH FOR GOOD DRIVERS CONTINUES

o COMO employs 38 full-time drivers, four supervisors, five administrative assistants and three full-time maintenance assistants. In addition, it has seven seasonal employees. Despite the fact that unemployment rates have increased nationally due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the search for good drivers continues at Go COMO. “Over the past two years, we have been operating with a shortage of drivers. It’s hard to compete with school bus companies and the trucking industry for drivers. A person with a CDL has many choices right now,” Lynn said. “Also, there are many people who may be interested in driving, but have trouble passing a background check. That reduces the candidate pool. November/December 2020

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AbiliTrax 26 Center St. Randolph, NY 14701 USA 716-484-7014 Website: www.abilitrax.com Products: AbiliTrax universal, flexible flooring systems, stationary and quick disconnect seating solutions (CAM Lock, CAM2, and StepNLock). Also available are state-of-the-art ShiftNStep dual access lift system and more. All products are FMVSS compliant and patents are pending. 18

Altro See Ad On Opposite Page 12648 Clark St. Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670 USA 800-382-0333 Email: transport@altrofloors.com Website: www.altro.com/transport Products: Altro is a manufacturer of slip-resistant floors and has been in the forefront of innovation for 100 years. Being the inventors of safety floors, Altro’s transport floors have been satisfying the diverse needs of the transportation industry for decades in both bus and rail applications. Customers can put passenger safety first with Altro’s combination of aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and quartz aggregate. All products are lightweight, easy to install and maintain, and have been developed specifically to meet the demands of moving vehicles. Altro floors are engineered for the latest international smoke, fire and toxicity regulations. Investing in an Altro product is an investment in a complete system—a full range of accessories, including adhesives, color coordinated weld rods and sealants, nosings, trims and moldings are available. Customers can also take advantage of Page 26

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Altro’s kit-cutting service to save time on installation and get their vehicles back into service quickly. Family owned and run since 1919, Altro is committed to providing customers with innovative products to serve their needs. 17

Baultar Concept, Inc. 110, J.-E. Lemieux St. Windsor, QC J1S 0A4 CANADA 819-845-7110 Website: www.baultar.com Products: Baultar Flooring Solutions provides composite flooring and other products for the transit industry. 20

Better Life Technology See Ad On Page 15 9736 Legler St. Lenexa, KS 66219 USA 913-890-4619 Website: www.bltllc.com Products: The 100 percent polyvinyl flooring is purposefully designed for easy installation and maintenance, and for long lasting beauty and protection. This transit flooring won’t scratch, crack, peel, tear, and prevents moisture damage, denting, puncturing, and ripping. G-Floor is exceptionally durable and will withstand heavy traffic over years of continuous use. Additional advantages: waterproof to prevent rust damage and wood rot; covers entire floor without seams; lightweight material is easier to handle, install and provides greater fuel efficiency; special textured surfaces provide improved traction; slip and stain resistant; thick, yet cushiony for passenger comfort; cleans with soap and water; and no rubber odor. 19


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Forbo Flooring Systems North America 8 Maplewood Dr., Humboldt Industrial Park Hazleton, PA 18202 USA 800-842-7839 E-Mail: info.na@forbo.com Website: www.forboflooringna.com Products: Flooring product portfolio for the bus and coach sector. Includes entrance systems, safety floors, vinyl floors and flocked flooring as well as adhesives, accessories and installation tools. 20 Gerflor USA See Ad On Page 28 595 Supreme Dr. Bensenville, IL 60106 USA 877-266-2042 Website: www.gerflortransport.com Products: Gerflor is recognized as a specialist in PVC transit flooring solutions. Tarabus is the Gerflor product range designed for bus and coach applications. High product quality and innovative designs make Tarabus a leader in this market. Developing close partnerships with bus and coach manufacturers for more than 50 years, Tarabus offers a complete flooring solution designed to meet customers’ requirements and expectations. 18 Milwaukee Composites, Inc. 6055 S. Pennsylvania Ave. Cudahy, WI 53110 USA 414-571-2788 E-Mail: sales@milwaukeecomposites.com Website: www.milwaukeecomposites.com Products: Since 1997, Milwaukee Composites has produced its patented lightweight floor for the transit industry. 20

ProFusion Industries, LLC 822 Kumho Dr. Fairlawn, OH 44333 USA 800-938-2858 Email: astrainfo@profusionindustries.com Website: www.astraflor.com Products: Profusion Industries, a leader in school bus flooring for more than 25 years, now offers Koro-Trans® Astra Flor®, a line of decorative, slip-resistant bus flooring products that are rigorous enough to meet the demands of transit and paratransit applications. Koro-Trans Astra Flor systems provide high performance through better construction and stronger materials. Astra Flor’s unique smooth surface is attractive, clean and secure, meeting industry standards in slip resistance. Manufactured in the USA without harsh aggregates that can tear mops while cleaning, Astra Flor is rugged and easier to maintain. Astra Flor is resistant to abrasion, moisture, fire, contaminants and UV rays. Koro-Trans® flooring has been installed in over 50,000 public and privately operated vehicles. An expanded range of colors and designs, including popular metal flake textures and wood grain patterns, offer a variety of options to create a great first impression. 19 Protectolite™ Composites Inc. 84 Railside Rd. Toronto, ON M3A 1A3 CANADA 416-444-4484 Website: www.protectolite.com Products: Protectolite™ has been serving the mass transit bus community for over 50 years. It supplies a wide variety of products, including transit seating and seat components, flooring, exterior and interior body panels, bezels and headlamp housings. 20

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November/December 2020

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Safeguard Technology Inc. 1460 Miller Pkwy. Streetsboro, OH 44241 800-989-1695 E-Mail: info@safeguard-technology.com Website: www.safeguard-technology.com Products: Anti-slip flooring products for transportation and other industries. 20

SpaceAge Synthetics, Ltd. 1402 39th St., NW Fargo, ND 58102 USA 701-277-5631 Website: www.spaceagesynthetics.com Products: Thermo-Lite Board®, a fiber-reinforced urethane product for applications subjected to static and dynamic loads. The company’s product lines offer a non-absorbent, lightweight, tough material, with lifetime performance, for the bus and other industries. 20 TransitFlor 1833 E. Market St. Akron, OH 44305 USA 800-321-2340 Email: info@transitflor.com

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Website: www.transitflor.com Products: TransitFlor® premium-grade rubber flooring, stair treads and entrance plates are designed for such vehicles as school, metro and touring buses. 18

TransitWorks 4199 Kinross Lakes Pkwy. Richfield, OH 44286 USA 855-337-9543 Website: www.transit-works.com Products: SmartFloor™ flexible flooring system. The modular technology allows for quick and easy movement of seats and wheelchair positions. 18

Wooster Products Inc. 1000 Spruce St. Wooster, OH 44691 USA 800-321-4936 Email: tim@wooster-products.com Website: www.wooster-products.com Products: USA manufacturer of anti-slip safety stair and walkway products. Wooster’s stair treads and nosings can be used for vehicle entry steps. Samples available for evaluation. 20

www.gerflortransport.com

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Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems LLC 901 Cleveland St. Elyria, OH 44035 USA 800-AIR-BRAKE, 440-329-9000 Email: info@bendix.com Website: www.bendix.com Products: Integrated solutions, including the Bendix® Wingman® family of advanced collision mitigation technologies and Bendix® ADB22X® air disc brakes, that help deliver maximum vehicle performance and safety. The company's products are design to drive fleet efficiency and lower overall operating costs. 19 Bremskerl North America, Inc. 1291 Humbracht Cir. Bartlett, IL 60103 USA 800-939-4047 Email: sales@bremskerl.com Website: www.bremskerl.com Products: German manufacturer of air disc brake pads for coach bus applications. Available for every bus make and model in North America. 20

Bridgestone Americas Tire Operations, LLC 200 4th Ave. S. Nashville, TN 37201 USA 615-937-1000 Website: www.bridgestoneamericas.com Products: Provides lease, sales and service of commercial and specially-designed mileage tires, retreads, wheels and tire service equipment. 20 CBM NA See Ad On Page 13 8477 Chemin Dalton Ville Mont Royal, QC H4T 1V5 CANADA 877-332-3163 Email: info.canada@cbmcompany.com,

info.usa@cbmcompany.com Website: www.cbmcompany.com Products: Spare parts for motorcoaches, buses and trams. 18

Continental Commercial Vehicle Tires - The Americas P.O. Box 3010 Fort Mill, SC 29716 USA 800-847-3349 Website: www.continentaltire.com Products: Tires for various markets including the bus and motorcoach industries. 20

Cooper Tire & Rubber Company 701 Lima Ave. Findlay, OH 45840 USA 419-423-1321 Website: www.coopertrucktires.com Company Officer: Gary Schroeder Products: An American company since 1914, Cooper commercial tires include three application-specific series: PRO Series, WORK Series, and SEVERE Series. The WORK Series of tires is engineered for regional applications, with lines that include attributes specifically tailored to the school bus industry. 20 DuraBrake Co. 2311 Calle Del Mundo Santa Clara, CA 95054 USA 408-748-0400 Email: sales@durabrake.com Website: www.durabrake.com Company Officers: Shaun Shroff, Vice President Sales; Caroline Siegel, Sales Products: Brake rotors, brake drums and brake pads. 20 The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. 200 Innovation Way

Akron, OH 44316-0001 USA 330-796-2121 Website: www.goodyear.com Products: Goodyear is one of the world’s largest tire companies. It employs approximately 62,000 people and manufactures its products from 46 facilities in 21 countries around the world. It has two Innovation Centers, located in Akron, OH, and Colmar-Berg, Luxembourg. 20 Haldex Brake Products Corp. 10930 N. Pomona Ave. Kansas City, MO 64153 USA 816-891-2470 Website: www.haldex.com Products: Haldex develops and manufactures brake systems for heavy trucks, trailers and buses. The product offering covers all primary components and subsystems included in complete air brake systems. The operations are conducted through two business units: Air Control and Foundation Brake. 20

Marathon Brake Systems See Ad On Page 21 125 Old Mill Rd. Cartersville, GA 30120 USA 800-223-5201 Website: www.marathonbrake.com Products: Marathon Brake Systems has been serving the North American heavy-duty marketplace for more than 25 years. In that time, the company has developed a complete line of friction materials to satisfy applications ranging from general over-the-road freight to the most severe duty hauling to intracity transit and school bus fleets. These aftermarket and OE approved linings are manufactured in the company’s ISO-certified facilities. From the beginning, the company’s goal is to provide a better brake lining while offering dependable

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service and delivery. Brake linings are manufactured using state-of-the-art materials, processes and equipment to ensure reliable products are delivered to customers. 17 Meritor, Inc. 2135 W. Maple Rd. Troy, MI 48084 USA 866-668-7221 Website: www.meritor.com Products: Meritor is a global supplier of drivetrain, mobility, braking and aftermarket solutions for commercial vehicle and industrial markets. Meritor supplies more than two million brake assemblies per year for trucks, trailers, buses and coaches. 20

704-547-7411 Email: mail@mgmbrakes.com Website: www.mgmbrakes.com Products: Since 1956, MGM Brakes, a division of Indian Head Industries, Inc., has been a global leader in the development of spring parking brake actuator technology and electronic brake monitoring systems. MGM Brakes actively supports the commercial vehicle industry in the truck, trailer, transit bus, school bus, military and vocational markets with drum and air disc brake actuators. In recent years, MGM Brakes has been committed in the development and introduction of patented electronic brake monitoring systems. 20

Website: www.michelintruck.com Products: Tires for various markets including the bus and motorcoach industries. 20

Motor Coach Tire Sales, LLC See Ad Below Left 1133 4th St. Columbus, GA 31901 USA 678-463-4110 Email: bill@motorcoachtiresales.com Website: www.motorcoachtiresales.com Company Officer: Bill Kaiser, President Products: Sales of Toyo and Yokohama tires to the motorcoach industry. 17

Power Brake LLC 6515 N 50th St. Tampa, FL 33610 USA MGM Brakes 813-623-1333 6200 Harris Technology Blvd. Website: www.powerbrake1.com Charlotte, NC 28269 USA Products: Power Brake LLC, located in Tampa, FL, has over 50 years of combined experience in the brake industry, and has been in business for over 12 years. It is a knowledgeable and trusted leader in brake system innovation. Company officials have discovered a new and innovative technology that extends brake component life and reduces operating costs. The new process, labeled Diamond Technology, will extend the life of brakes. The goal at Power Brake is to provide a money-saving fleet maintenance solution that increases the life expectancy of brakes, while providing MOTORCOACH TIRE SALES NOW OFFERING SEVEN TIRE OPTIONS! superior performance and safety enhancements for vehicles. Power Brake offers a 100,000 mile warranty on trucks Toyo M144: Utilized by over hundreds of eets in the Motorcoach Industry, the Toyo M144 offers 19/32 of tread and an enhanced single load rating of 9370lbs. and buses, and a 36,000 mile warranty on fire engines against failure due to Toyo M920 Drive: Featuring 29/32nd of tread and a 20 Ply load rating, the Toyo M920 Drive offers outstanding traction in snow and ice. Also favored by Operators for the extended wear the tires deliver, reports of tire mileage exceeding wear, distortion, or cracking. 19 Michelin North America, Inc. P.O. Box 19001 Greenville, SC 29602 USA 888-622-2306

200,000 miles are not unusual. Tire averages exceeding 200,000 miles may reduce cost for these tires to under .002 cents per tire mile. Yokohama 104ZR: Quickly becoming one of the most popular tires in the Industry, the Yokohama 104ZR features 21/32nd of tread, a reputation for high mileage, and a high casing resale value. Shipping restrictions may apply.

Pirelli Pent C: Based in Milan Italy, Pirelli is one of the most recognizable tire brands in the world and is featured as the OE tire of choice in many of the worlds nest automobiles. Featuring an enhanced single load rating of 9370llbs, Pirelli has quickly gained a reputation in the industry as an extremely quite and smooth riding tire. New supplier information: Hankook, founded in 1941, is the world’s 7th largest tire company. Their coach tire offering is the AL22, with 18/32 of tread. It will be priced in the low $400’s range. GITI is the worlds 11th largest tire company. Based in Singapore, GITI sells in 130 countries and has 8 manufacturing centers worldwide. Their coach tire offering is the GSR225, with an enhanced single load rating of 9370 lbs and a coach tire industry leading 22/32nds of tread. It will be priced in the low $300’s. Magna, based in Holland, also sells in 130 countries. Recently available in the North American market, they are one of Europe’s largest tire manufacturers. Their coach tire offering is the MHSR with 19/32nds of tread. They will be priced at $299. Also available for school buses in the low $200 price range Prices do not include FET or applicable sales tax.

ALL TIRES OFFERED ARE 20 PLY WITH A MINIMUM OF 75MPH SPEED RATING

Contact Motorcoach Tire Sales for more information at 678-463-4110 or e-mail bill@motorcoachtiresales.com

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Telma Retarder, Inc. 1245 Humbracht Cir., Ste. B Bartlett, IL 60103 USA 800-797-7714 Email: customerservice@telmausa.com Website: www.telmausa.com Products: Telma provides frictionless braking systems based on the physical principle of electromagnetic induction. Telma’s expertise in the field of induction braking systems has been built from over 60 years in the market. 20 Webb Wheel Products, Inc. 2310 Industrial Dr. SW Cullman, AL 35055 USA 800-633-3256 Website: www.webbwheel.com Products: Webb Wheel Products produces wheel-end equipment. This includes brake drums, hubs, rotors and spoke wheels. 20


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ABC Companies Partners With Lightning eMotors, Launching Electric Repowered Motorcoach

ABC Companies will soon offer a motorcoach-diesel-to-electric-repower program for North American operators. Together with Lightning eMotors, formerly known as Lightning Systems, the partners have created a five-step process for identifying, assessing and converting a wide range of “donor” diesel coach models that fit the criteria for fasttrack battery electric conversion. The repower kits are engineered by Lightning eMotors and will be installed by ABC technicians. The program will launch under ABC Companies SVT (Specialty Vehicles and Technologies) division, underscoring the company’s focus on lowering EV market cost of entry barriers for coach operators. “ABC Companies has a very long history of repower and refurbishment expertise, making conversions to battery electric power a logical next step,” said Roman Cornell, president and chief commercial officer of ABC Companies. “By sourcing leading suppliers and manufacturers, we will provide a portfolio of offerings and price points that will enable our customers to accelerate their introduction of zero-emission vehicles into their fleets. Although the pandemic has impacted the motorcoach market, we are working to get traditional vehicles back on the road, while investing now with innovative new solutions which will address customers’ needs for environmentallyfriendly vehicles as the industry begins to recover. “Zero-emission coaches can offer a lowercost investment, while producing immediate benefits to the environment. With the variety of incentives for all-electric transportation, many customers are investing now before funding is depleted or no longer available.” Cornell cited reduced total cost of ownership and monetizing older assets as tangible benefits when specifically looking to add EV Repower to fleets. The new partnership between ABC Companies and Lightning eMotors was formed after a global search for a master service provider with the scope, scale, experience and expertise to develop EV Repower kits for a variety of customers and vehicle applications. Lightning eMotors is a leading developer of zero-emission electric powertrains for a wide variety of commercial vehicles and is certified by CARB and multiple OEM chassis certification programs. In addition to providing a full range of motorcoach zero emission vehicle (ZEV) Repower options, ABC will also be an authorized referral

agent for repowering many shuttle vans and cutaway applications such as the Lightning Ford Transit passenger van, E-450 and F-550 chassis. “The ability to assist in electric repowered solutions for our customers using these popular vehicles made Lightning eMotors a great fit for ABC Companies,” Cornell said. “Many of our customers utilize these smaller vehicles for var-

ious short distance routes, such as airport runs and hotel shuttles, as well as last-mile services for smaller groups. These vehicles can provide a lower cost of entry as fleets identify vehicles to be repowered, and we need to be ready to meet those needs.” The first repowered motorcoach, a 2012 Van Hool T2145, will be going into operation in the San Francisco area this month, while other motorcoach models are being readied. “When Roman and I took this zero emissions motorcoach for a drive for the first time together, both of us couldn’t stop smiling—the smoothness, the quietness, the power—we both could see that this changes the motorcoach business forever. We are now accelerating additional rollouts of new repower options for a multitude of new motorcoach platforms,” said Tim Reeser, CEO of Lightning eMotors. “ABC’s expertise in the motorcoach market and deep knowledge of their large customer base’s needs and requirements combined with Lightning’s proven technical proficiency, provides a powerful, fast, cost-effective zero-emission option specifically engineered to support each operator’s sustainability goals.” In addition to delivering the first repowered motorcoach application and launching the Lightning eMotors EV Repower kit option, ABC will also debut its first fully battery-electric OEMproduced Van Hool motorcoach later in 2020, the Van Hool CX45E. Featured at the 2020 UMA Expo and designed specifically for battery electric power, this new coach from Van Hool will change the way the industry views zeroemissions motorcoach travel.

“We must continually reassess our offering based on customer needs,” Cornell said. “Aligning with the right partners to bring scalable and flexible solutions to our customers is what drives our business strategies. Whether our customer needs an EV passenger van or a double-deck motorcoach, ABC is ready to help any sized fleet operator shape a solution around their resources and requirements for the longterm. We are also adding repowered Ford Transit passenger vans to our electric-powered ABC demo fleet, allowing customers to experience the many benefits of EV travel, while helping to educate our industry on the viability of these vehicles in their fleets,” Cornell added. “Even against the backdrop of our industry’s unprecedented challenges, technology moves forward. Because the success of ABC has always been tied to our customers’ success, we cannot allow our industry to fall behind this technology curve and lose out on the funding and other support many industries are already receiving. Motorcoach travel has always contributed to lowering carbon emissions, and the movement to electric power presents the opportunity for our industry to receive the accolades and increased ridership it truly deserves.” ABC Companies is a leading provider to the transportation industry with product and service offerings that cover a full spectrum of operational needs including new and pre-owned full-size highway coach equipment along with transit and specialty vehicles.  ABC supports customers with an after sale service network for service and repairs, collision services, extensive OEM and quality aftermarket parts needs for transit, motorcoach and heavy-duty equipment from 10 locations throughout the U.S. and Canada. Private and municipal financing and leasing options are available through the company’s financial services group. Lightning eMotors provides complete electrification solutions for commercial fleets – from Class 3 cargo and passenger vans to Class 6 work trucks, Class 7 city buses, and Class 8 motor coaches. The Lightning team designs, engineers, customizes and manufactures electric vehicles to support the wide array of fleet customer needs, with a full suite of telematics, analytics and charging solutions. Contact ABC Companies at 800-222-2875 or visit the company website at www.abc-companies.com.

Contact Lightning eMotors at 800-223-0740 or visit lightningemotors.com.

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Hometown Trolley By Double K, Inc.

Hometown Trolley By Double K, Inc.

Villager

Mainstreet

The Hometown Trolley Villager model is a front engine trolley capable of many applications from a small private tour operator to a full scale transit agency. The Villager model is available in gasoline, bio-diesel, CNG and propane. The Villager can be equipped with minimal components to make a more economical choice for the small operator or loaded with many transit features such as destination signs, spiral brass railings, bike racks, GPS systems and more.

The Hometown Trolley Mainstreet model is a heavy-duty rear engine trolley combining all the transit components for the high volume urban areas, such as full air suspension, air brakes, Allison B300 transmission, Cummins ISB, LED destination signs, Voice Annunciation systems, instep ADA lift equipment and more. The Mainstreet trolley will provide the quality and reliability of any high demand transit needs while at the same time lending the nostalgic feel of the turn of the century cable car.

Hometown Manufacturing PO Box 175, 750 Industrial Parkway, Crandon, WI 54520 715-301-0149 www.hometown-mfg.com • hi@hometown-mfg.com

Hometown Manufacturing PO Box 175, 750 Industrial Parkway, Crandon, WI 54520 715-301-0149 www.hometown-mfg.com • hi@hometown-mfg.com

Model........................................................................................................Villager Length .......................................................................................................22’, 40’ Width...............................................................................................93”, 96”, 99” Height ............................................................................................................10’6” Wheelbase.....................................................................158, 178, 190, 208, 228 Overhang (front/rear)..................................................Front 28” / Rear 118” Inside Height (min./max.).................................................................Aisle 88” Tire Size ....................................................................................19.5x6.75 & 22.5 Engine .....................................................................................Cummins ISB 6.7 Transmission ........................................................................................Allison 2 Fuel Tank Capacity..................................................................................75 gal. Chassis............................................................Ford, Workhorse, Freightliner Baggage Capacity ..............................................................................Available Wheelchair Lift Option.................................................................................Yes Suspension ...................................................................................Spring or Air

Model..................................................................................................Mainstreet Length.......................................................................................................25’, 40’ Width.................................................................................................................99” Height .............................................................................................................11’2” Wheelbase.............................................................................160, 190, 208, 228 Overhang (front/rear)......................................................................42” / 120” Inside Height (min./max.).................................................................Aisle 88” Tire Size..........................................................................................................22.5 Engine ............................................................................................Cummins ISB Transmission.................................................................................Allison B300 Chassis .............................................................................................Freightliner Baggage Capacity ..............................................................................Available Wheelchair Lift Option.................................................................................Yes Suspension ......................................................................................................Air

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Hometown Trolley By Double K, Inc.

Hometown Trolley By Double K, Inc.

Carriage

Streetcar Trolley

The Hometown Trolley Carriage model is a front engine, low-floor trolley providing ease of entry and exit with no steps. The Carriage low-floor design allows the ADA ratio of 5:1 and minimal step in height when pulled to curb locations. The Carriage is available in gasoline, diesel, CNG and full electric. The Carriage is also available with LED destination signs, DVD player and monitor, HVAC with climate control, brass or brushed stainless handrailing, luggage rack, exterior wood package, forward facing or perimeter seating, 110 volt invertor for Christmas lighting on the interior and exterior, and many more transit components. The Carriage is less than 22-feet in length, making it the perfect size for historical downtown areas, hotels, theme parks and many other shuttle type transportation needs. Capture the nostalgia of a Hometown Trolley in your hometown with the new lowfloor Carriage, built to preserve integrity and craftsmanship true to its era of the “turn of the century.” Hometown Manufacturing PO Box 175, 750 Industrial Parkway, Crandon, WI 54520 715-301-0149 www.hometown-mfg.com • hi@hometown-mfg.com Model ......................................................................................................Carriage Type ........................................................................................Low Floor Trolley Passenger Capacity...................................................................................16-20 Length......................................................................................................20’ - 24’ Width....................................................................................................................8’ ADA ...............................................................................................1 or 2 Position Engine................................................Gasoline, Diesel, CNG or Full Electric Chassis.............................................................................................Chevy 4500 Handrailing .........................................................................Brass or Stainless Comfort Control .................................................................................Full HVAC Mileage .................................................................................................MPG 12-15

The Streetcar Trolley low-floor model combines the nostalgic features of the turn-of-the-century passenger cable car with the modern technology of today’s transit advancements.The Streetcar Trolley is a powerhouse heavy-duty trolley capable of running in any mass transit, high passenger capacity applications. The Streetcar is a full stainless steel lowfloor monocoque chassis design, exceeding the required 1:6 ratio for ADA loading with the fold out ADA ramp. Optional equipment such as LED destination signs, DVD flat screen packages, mahogany finishes and many more choices are available to customize the Streetcar. Standard equipment such as a multiplex wiring system, brass or brushed stainless hand railings, as well as simulated wood trim set the Streetcar in a class all its own. Vintage tram interior, transit flooring, HVAC packages and ADA packages are available. Altoona-tested for 10 years/350,000 miles.

Model.......................................................................................Streetcar Trolley Passenger Capacity..................................................................................28-48 Length .....................................................................................................30’ - 40’ Width...............................................................................................................100” Overall Height .............................................................................................10’6” Wheel Base..............................................................................190”, 208”, 228” Door Opening ......................................................................................48” x 78” GVW.............................................................................................27,500 - 32,000 Engine .............................................................Cummins Diesel ISB and L9N, CNG or Full Electric Transmission.....................................................................Allison B300, B400 November/December 2020

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Cable Car Classics

Cable Car Classics

GILLIG Low Floor Classic

San Francisco

Cable Car Classics restyles modern Gillig low-floor transit-duty buses with the highly desired, top quality features of classic cable car charm. We deliver the fun rider experience and nostalgic image preferred by tourists, shoppers, and travelers; resulting in increased ridership and revenue desired by community leaders and agency boards. Our best-in-class methods and materials ensure excellent performance and durability, offering rider appeal without sacrificing quality, reliability, or maintainability. Maintenance-free exterior trim looks great year after year. Powered by Clean Diesel, CNG, Hybrid Electric, or zero emission Battery Electric, bringing trolleys to a new level by seamlessly integrating modern technology, contemporary transit features, proven dependability, and classic vintage styling. Roof cupola style and service access to roof mounted equipment varies. For more information and photos visit gilligtrolley.com.

A true timeless classic, as beautiful today as cable cars 100 years ago. The nostalgic and fun San Francisco purpose-built unique open-air experience captures the hearts of young and old alike, for maximum rider appeal. Both full size and compact Mini-San Francisco are perfect for sightseeing tours, shuttles for weddings and other special events, and general charter service, for customers who demand rider appeal without sacrificing quality or durability. Mini SF’s compact width is well-suited for historic and tourist districts. Our full size offers more transit features, and Mini-SF offers classic design and value on an economical platform. San Francisco has a full range of sizes, floorplans, and options. For more information and photos visit ccctrolley.com.

“Trolley Show . . . with Transit Go”

Model..........................................................................................Low Floor Classic Seating ......................28 to 40 passengers, solid oak (optional cushions) Length .....................................................................................................29’/35’/40’ Width....................................................................................................................102” Height.....................132” w/Trolley-style cupola roof, 135” hybrid-electric Wheelbase..................................................................................162.5”/230”/279” Overhang (front/rear)........................84.5”+Trolley-style cowcatcher/117” Inside Height (min/max) .........................................................................76”/95” Turning Radius.......................................................................................29’/36’/41’ Tire Size.................................................................275/70R22.5 to 305/85R22.5 Engine........................................................................................................Cummins Transmission.............................................................................Allison, Voith, ZF, (optional GM/Allison Hybrid Parallel Drive) Brakes.......................................................................................Air, “S”Cam w/ABS Fuel Tank Capacity 75 to 120 Gallon (also Battery Electric) Chassis..................................GILLIG, low-floor, stainless steel, rear engine Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) ..................................39,600 lbs. max. Body..........................................................................................................Aluminum Air Conditioning...........................................................Thermo King, Carrier, + Baggage Capacity ..................................................................Options Available Wheelchair Ramp..........................................................................Yes, 31”x 47.5” Steering .................................................................................................Power TRW Suspension........................................................................Full Air, Multi Bellows Page 34

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Cable Car Classics, Inc. 3239 Rio Lindo Avenue, Healdsburg, CA 95448 707-433-6810 www.cablecarclassics.com • sales@cablecarclassics.com

“Modern Function Meets Irresistible Charm”

Model.......................................................San Francisco/Mini-San Francisco Seating....................14 to 40 passengers, solid oak (optional cushions) Length ....................................................................................................21’ to 35’ Width....................................................................................................93” or 96” Height ...........................................139” to 141” w/Trolley-style cupola roof Wheelbase .......................................................................................109” to 176” Inside Height (min/max).................................................79” (91” in cupola) Chassis.....Freightliner XB rear engine or Isuzu N-Series front engine Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) ......................14,000 to 32,000 lbs. Body.....................................................................................................Aluminum Air Conditioning ..........................................................................Thermo King Baggage Capacity ..............................................................Options Available Wheelchair Lift...................................................................Yes, Front or Rear Steering.............................................................................................Power TRW Suspension .................................Full Air (full size), Leaf Spring (Mini-SF)


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Cable Car Classics

â&#x20AC;˘ 100% battery electric with zero emissions â&#x20AC;˘ New leasing options significantly reduce up-front costs â&#x20AC;˘ 12-year full replacement warranty on BYDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safe, non-toxic batteries â&#x20AC;˘ Proven lower total cost of ownership than diesel or CNG â&#x20AC;˘ On-route inductive charging available Cable Car Classics, Inc. 3239 Rio Lindo Avenue, Healdsburg, CA 95448 707-433-6810 www.cablecarclassics.com â&#x20AC;˘ sales@cablecarclassics.com For more information and photos, visit BYDtrolley.com.

BYD Battery-Electric Classic CCC restyles modern BYD battery-electric buses with high quality craftsmanship, features, and the nostalgia of classic cable car charm; providing the experience and image preferred by tourists, shoppers, and travelers; resulting in increased ridership and revenue. These battery-electric trolleys offer clean, safe, cost-effective theme transportation; with dependable, quiet, zero-emission service. Best-in-class methods and materials ensure excellent performance and durability; offering rider appeal without sacrificing quality or maintainability. Maintenance-free trim.

Model .........................................................................................C6 / K7 / K9S / K9 Seating...........................................................................................16 / 24 / 32 / 39 Length .......................................................................................23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; / 31â&#x20AC;&#x2122; / 35â&#x20AC;&#x2122; / 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Width..................................................................................81â&#x20AC;? / 102â&#x20AC;? / 102â&#x20AC;? / 102â&#x20AC;? Height..............................................................................125â&#x20AC;? / 138â&#x20AC;? / 138â&#x20AC;? / 139â&#x20AC;? Wheelbase ....................................................................157â&#x20AC;? / 192â&#x20AC;? / 223â&#x20AC;? / 284â&#x20AC;? Turning Radius ..................................................................26.25â&#x20AC;&#x2122; / 31â&#x20AC;&#x2122; / 39â&#x20AC;&#x2122; / 44â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Single Charge Range..................................Up to 124 / 137 / 230 / 250 miles Full Depot Charging...................................3-4 hrs / 3.5 hrs / 5 hrs / 4.5 hrs

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A

During Challenging Times, It’s Important To

Get Out Of Your Own Way On Path To Success By Rick Mullen, Busline Associate Editor

little more than 20 years ago, workplace culture expert, sociocultural anthropologist and business strategist Jenean Merkel Perelstein was driving late one rainy night with her husband to Flagstaff, AZ, from their home in Phoenix. During that trip, a conversation would set her on a journey of learning the language of success and leadership. Perelstein told her story to an audience of business professionals, during her presentation titled “A Leadership Guide to Navigating Change.” “We were discussing people we knew whose lives had different outcomes,” Perelstein said. “There were the people who seemed to have the Midas touch. Everything they did worked out — they got the job, the girl, the clients, the house, the children — whatever they wanted, they got. “And then there was another camp of people who seemed to come up against roadblocks that stopped them in their tracks at every junction. They didn’t get the job, the girl, the house, etc. I wondered what is it about these people who are doing things right and are overcoming any obstacles, and what it says about the people who are not doing things right, who take what would otherwise be a speed bump and turn it into a roadblock.” Perelstein noted that the people they were discussing all came from similar backgrounds — similar social and economic strata. They also had similar access to resources. “At the time, I was teaching sociocultural anthropology at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. We are taught to look, not only cross-culturally, but across many different disciplines and use pattern recognition to find the results for the questions that we are asking. I was asking the question, ‘What is it that creates these two camps?’ So, I embarked on this journey of learning the language of success and leadership.” Pattern recognition is the classification of data based on knowledge already gained or on statistical information extracted from patterns and/or their representation. In her 20s, Perelstein traveled much of the world. It was during that experience that she fell “in love” with the discipline of anthropology. “Through anthropology we learn some concept pairs that I will share with you because they have so much to do with the subject of ‘getting in our own way,’” Perelstein said. “The first concept pair is the difference between ethnocentrism and cultural relativism. “Ethnocentrism is when you look at another culturally-directed set of beliefs, behaviors, attitudes or values, and you judge them by your ‘morally superior’ standards.” To illustrate ethnocentrism, Perelstein showed a slide of a cartoon depicting two women — one wearing a bikini and sunglasses and the other a burqa. The bikini-clad woman is thinking, as she sees the woman wearing a burqa, “Everything covered but her eyes — what a cruel, maledominated culture.” Page 36

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At the same time, the woman in the burqa is eyeing the woman wearing a bikini and sunglasses, while thinking, “Nothing covered but her eyes — what a cruel, male-dominated culture.” “It is a great example of ethnocentrism, because you begin to judge another way of doing things due to your conviction about the truth of something,” Perelstein said. “A belief is your conviction that something is true. Whatever results you have, you have been behaving in a way that has led to those results, and you have beliefs that are compelling you to behave in those ways.” On the other hand, cultural relativism is the ability to understand a culture on its own terms and not to make judgments using the standards of one’s own culture. “Cultural relativism is when you say, ‘That’s OK. You do things differently. I get it,’” Perelstein said. “The results you are getting in your life, work, etc., are in accordance with the beliefs that you have. The reason this is important is when we, as human beings, embark on navigating the change in the world around us, we need to start challenging the judgments that we have about the way things have always been done. “You have heard people say, ‘We have always done it this way?’ They are killing their innovation. They are killing their creativity. We want to get past that.”

T

ETIC AND EMIC PERSPECTIVES he etic perspective is data gathering by outsiders that yields questions posed by outsiders. This perspective is valuable to consultants and other outsiders in viewing a culture not their own. “As a consultant, when I come into organizations, I’m using an outsider’s (etic) perspective. I’ve never seen your culture before. I’ve never seen your leaders and your leadership style before. So, I can see things clearly through the use of contrasts,” Perelstein said. “That is why, in our own country, we expect a coffee shop might look a certain way. In another culture, the coffee shop might look very different. This is wonderful because the outsider’s perspective allows us to see the contrast very easily, and that is beneficial and very good.” The emic perspective is the insider’s perspective — the perspective that comes from within the culture. “An example of the emic perspective is when a person from within a culture says, ‘Yes, this is the way we do things here.’ This is the insider’s perspective,” Perelstein said. “We use those perspectives when we embark on individual, personal and professional development change. “You (the audience) are the insiders. What do you see? — you can see a speaker, slides, walls, doors, tables, etc. Some of you can see your glasses on your face. But we filter that out. The big problem with emic perspective is what is usual remains unseen. “The big fallacy with ‘we have always done it this way’ is you can’t see a better way of doing things, because it is so normal for you. So, the insider perspective (emic) and the etic perspective work hand-in-hand.”

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Perelstein said she uses some “brain science” when trying to help clients change their beliefs and behaviors. “I take people on a journey through the neurosciences to actually physically rewire their brains using neuroscience neuroplasticity for better results,” Perelstein said. “About 20 years ago, at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, there was a tremendous amount of research trying to figure what is going on in the brain at the moment of the decision-making process. What happens in a brain when somebody is trying to make a healthy choice over an unhealthy choice?” Researchers found about 20 percent of the decision-making process is filtered through logic — the rational brain. The remaining 80 percent is filtered through emotions. Perelstein said more has been learned about how the human brain functions in the past five years than the previous 100 years. “Today, researchers say we use about 4 percent of our conscious brain to process things. So, we are highly capable at that 4 percent, and that is where behavior change happens. “When change occurs in our external environment, such as illness, marketplace fluctuations, budget restraints, mergers and acquisitions or new technologies, you name it, stress comes. What happens to humans when they exhibit stress is we sink to the level of our beliefs, that is the world of the 96 percent of the operating capacity of our brains — ultimately the world of our emotions and beliefs.” Perelstein said the role of the subconscious brain is to keep people safe, maximize pleasure and minimize pain.

“The way your brain keeps you safe by maximizing pleasure and minimizing pain is by acting as a giant filter,” Perelstein said. “At any given time, there are about 2 million bits of information coming into your brain. So, we are filtering out so much, while only allowing about 184 bits of information into our conscious brain from that 2 million bits of information in our subconscious brain.” To further illustrate the concept, Perelstein alluded to the popular TV show, “Gilligan’s Island,” that ran from September 26, 1964, to April 17, 1967, on the CBS network. The plot of the series centered around a group of tourists, along with the captain and his first mate, Gilligan, who were shipwrecked on an island during what was supposed to be a three-hour boat ride. “Somehow, they had everything they needed on that island,” Perelstein said. “I want you to imagine you are on that island, and along with you are 2 million opportunities and possibilities for you to gain success, but when the rescue boat comes, you are only allowed to take 184 of them back with you. “The question is, why did you choose what to bring back with you? Why are you deciding fewer than 200 items are going to make you successful, and the rest you are leaving behind? The answer is in your beliefs. “Where do your beliefs come from? They are enculturated. That means they are given to you by well-meaning adults — parents, teachers, the media, friends, etc. Your belief is your conviction in the truth of something.” Another concept from anthropology is taking a holistic approach. That means looking at beliefs from every perspective.

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“Try to take a look at beliefs from the perspective of your health, career, finances, making money, relationships, family, spouse, children or significant other,” Perelstein said. “Think about it from a sense of your worldview and your spiritual nature. Once you start thinking about your beliefs from all of these different angles, you will have a fighting chance of recognizing where you need to interrupt patterns of self-sabotage. “Also, look for evidence, because your brain is constantly on the lookout for evidence that your beliefs are true. Are beliefs inherently true? No. They are just your convictions in the truth of something.” There is also something that psychologists call a confirmation bias, Perelstein said. Confirmation bias is the tendency to interpret new evidence as confirmation of one’s existing beliefs or theories. “One of the places your brain finds evidence that your beliefs are true is in your behaviors. Your brain is compelling you to behave in accordance with the beliefs you already have,” Perelstein said. “You have a belief, you behave in accordance with that belief, and now your brain says, ‘I knew it.’ The brain then tightens up the feedback loop of that belief. “Now, you have a habit. This is where habits are born and where people start doing things over and over and over again saying, ‘This is the way we have always done it,’ and not challenging themselves to innovate and do something better. “We have beliefs and behaviors, and when we share these beliefs with other people, we have a culture, and that is why workplaces have cultures.”

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AN INVENTORY OF FEARS s an exercise, Perelstein suggested audience members take an inventory of their fears. Understanding fears is part of the path to happiness. Perelstein reminded the audience people are born with two fears — the fear of falling and the fear of loud noises. “Every other fear or worry that you have is a belief that doesn’t serve you,” Perelstein said. “What we know today about the neurosciences, is fear can be overridden with new beliefs that do serve you, and that is what I want for you all. “The first step is to recognize beliefs that no longer serve you. Maybe they served you at one time in your life, but today, those same beliefs are holding you back. Wouldn’t you want to know what those are? Wouldn’t you want your co-workers to know what those are? “Has anybody seen co-workers who are getting in their own way? It is easier to see it in other people than it is in yourself. That is the difference between the etic perspective and the emic perspective.” Although humans aren’t born with it, the fear of failure is a big one that many people struggle to overcome. “It might be time for you to write yourself a new story, and that starts with identifying the beliefs that hold you back and then stating beliefs you need. What beliefs need to be true for you today in order to reach your goals?” Perelstein warns that people who are thinking about embarking on a journey of change, need to be committed. “If you really want change, you need to be committed to it, whether you are adopting new technologies, or bringing on a new product line or adopting a new strategy, whatever it is, be ‘committed’ and not just ‘interested’ in changing. “Make an inventory. What are my behaviors? What are my beliefs? What are my attitudes? What are my values? What am I going to learn from traditions? You will start to see where you are holding yourself back, and you will start to see where you have potential to move forward. “Get crystal clear on where you want to go. You need to know where you are headed so you can get back on course. Learning how to navigate back on course is one of the hallmarks of leadership and high performance success. “What is it costing you to have the people in your organization not operating at their highest potential? What is the cost of having people in your sphere of influence getting in their own way, and not standing in their strengths?” Perelstein asked. “I knew when I started my own business that the more work I did on myself, the more my business was going to grow and shine. Every effort that I have made to get out of my own way and stand in my strengths has profited me greatly. “Emily Dickinson said, ‘Dwell in possibility,’ because that is what is best for you.” Perelstein is the author and creator of “Internal Alchemie: The Welcoming Abundance Blueprint” and “Stand In Your Strength Strategies,” where she provides training to clients worldwide and certifies coaches to use her models for their own clientele. This work is supported by her book, “Finding Your Lighthouse: A Leadership Guide to Navigating Change.” For more information, visit standinyourstrength.com.


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Proterra Unveils Its ZX5™ Next-Generation Battery-Electric Transit Vehicle

“Proterra has introduced its newest batteryelectric transit vehicle, the Proterra ZX5™ electric bus. The bus, Proterra’s fifth generation battery-electric transit vehicle, features a new streamlined vehicle design and maximizes the amount of energy that can be stored onboard the vehicle to increase power and range,” said the company. “The 40-foot Proterra ZX5 can be equipped with 660 kWh of energy storage to deliver up to 329 miles of drive range. The ZX5 is available to customers today as a 35-foot and 40-foot bus and in models featuring 440 kWh and 220 kWh of energy storage capacity.” Jack Allen, Proterra CEO and chairman, said, “A decade ago, Proterra delivered its first battery-electric transit bus. We were at the start of the transportation electrification revolution in North America. As more cities and states make the commitment to 100 percent zeroemission fleets, Proterra is introducing new vehicle and battery technology to meet the needs of our customers. We are excited to

Bailey Coach Donates Bus

unveil our fifth generation electric transit vehicle, the Proterra ZX5, which is designed to tackle the toughest routes and terrains across North America.”

Proterra’s new battery-electric transit bus is designed for full fleet electrification, manufactured for scale, and built from the ground up with a refined composite bus body design and an emphasis on safety, durability, and performance. According to the company, the new ZX5 features a more streamlined body design, a

Bailey Coach of Spring Grove, PA, has donated a pristine 1998 MCI 102D3 to the AACA Museum’s bus collection, bringing the m u s e u m ’s fleet of historic buses to more than 40 vehicles. Bailey Coach was founded in 1998, by John W. Bailey. His family’s roots in passenger transportation date to 1933 when his uncle, Glenn, arranged trips to the World’s Fair in Chicago via train from York, PA. Glenn and his brother, Fred, formally started Bailey Travel Service in April, 1949, and in the late 1970s, they passed the travel business to their nephew/son, John. In 1998, John Bailey decided to operate coaches himself and founded Bailey Coach. The fleet has grown to 30 vehicles, 14 coaches and 16 sedans and vans operated out a modern facility in Spring Grove, PA. This 47-passenger coach was originally purchased by Hegins Valley new in 1998. Bailey acquired the coach when it purchased Hegins Valley Lines, and then sold the coach to Lincoln Bus Lines of Hanover, PA, and then re-purchased the coach in 2015. It was in daily service until December 2019.

lower vehicle height that enables greater route access, as well as new shocks and enhanced ergonomics to provide riders and drivers with a smoother riding experience. The ZX5 is also equipped with an additional front port for vehicle charging. The ZX5 also offers faster acceleration and greater horsepower than earlier Proterra electric vehicle models, and hill-climbing abilities to tackle steep terrain. The bus can be configured with Proterra’s standard ProDrive drivetrain or a DuoPower™ drivetrain. The DuoPower drivetrain features two electric motors that deliver 550 horsepower, accelerating a ZX5 bus from 0-20 mph in under six seconds. In addition, the DuoPower drivetrain can propel a bus up a 25 percent grade. The Proterra ZX5 features Proterra battery systems. Proterra products are designed, engineered and manufactured in America, with offices in Silicon Valley, South Carolina, and Los Angeles. For more information, visit www.proterra.com.

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HVAC Upgrades • Brakes & Suspensions • Interior Facelifts • Mechanical & Electrical Repairs • Body Work • Fire Damage • Painting & Decals • Emission Upgrades • Major Collisions • Glass Repairs & More November/December 2020

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Thermo King Launches Cold Storage Solutions To Support COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution

Portfolio Now Includes Ultra-Low Temperature Solutions To Meet Emerging Needs Of Pharmaceutical Customers

Thermo King, by Trane Technologies, a global climate innovator, has expanded its portfolio of temporary storage solutions that can meet the unique requirements of global pharmaceutical companies developing COVID19 vaccines. Thermo King is the global leader in intelligent end-to-end temperature-controlled cold chain solutions. Pharmaceutical companies in final-stage clinical trials anticipate they will require strict temperature controls to safeguard their products – down to temperatures as low as -70 degrees Celsius. Thermo King’s solutions can enable these companies and their distributors to ensure the efficacy of their products through the entire cold chain – from air transport to marine, rail, trailer, last-mile delivery and at storage points along the way. According to the World Health Organization, nearly 20 percent of temperature-sensitive health care products are damaged during transport, and 25 percent of vaccines reach

their destination in a degraded state due to breaks in the cold chain. “Considering the urgent, global need for a COVID-19 vaccine, the world can’t afford breaks in the cold chain,” said Dave Regnery, president and chief operating officer of Trane Technologies. “Our new Cold Storage Solutions can maintain temperatures of -70 degrees Celsius for an extended period of time, can be leveraged to help reduce degradation of a vaccination, and most importantly, could prevent vaccine ‘deserts’ or lack of accessibility.” Thermo King and its worldwide partners can offer temporary storage solutions that maintain a set point down to -70 degrees Celsius, and can ensure end-to-end temperature control, security and traceability through state-of-the-art telematics. Additional storage solutions include refrigerated trailers, containers and portable cubes that can easily be scaled and repositioned to other locations as demand changes. In addition to launching Cold Storage Solutions, Thermo King has helped customers identify ways to maximize the range of dry ice, which is often used in vaccine transport

and storage but has certain limitations. A container using dry ice to keep a product frozen may require re-icing if it sits for an extended length of time or is exposed to extreme ambient weather. Thermo King offers storage solutions that can substantially extend the life of dry ice, or eliminate the need altogether. “We have been engaging pharmaceutical and transport companies, policymakers, regulators and other industry partners to discuss ways to strengthen the cold chain,” said Regnery. “We know that we can help mitigate risk – we have a long history in cold chain expertise, and are actively working to innovate and address the complexities and potential challenges of the mass distribution of a temperature-sensitive vaccine.”

Thermo King provides sustainable transport temperature control solutions. For more information, visit www.thermoking.com or www.tranetechnologies.com.

NORTH AMERICA BALTIMORE 19-21 JUNE 2021

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Be a part of a revolution in bus industry exhibitions & conferences! Teaming up with the world renowned Busworld, the American Bus Association debuts Busworld North America in 2021. Nowhere else will you meet industry leaders from around the world and experience an event that looks at every aspect of passenger transportation in North America. www.busworldnorthamerica.org Page 40

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CCW Delivers Final Remanufactured Bus To Josephine Community Transit

Complete Coach Works (CCW) has made the final delivery to Josephine Community Transit (Josephine) located in Grants Pass, OR. The project included supplying and rehabilitating two 35-foot Gillig buses.

The project supports the city of Josephine and its efforts to enrich the passenger experience. The work was completed at CCW’s headquarters in Riverside, CA. The job specifics included the installment of engines and rebuilt transmissions. CCW also installed new floorings, ADA wheelchair ramps, driver seats, as well as updated interior and exterior LED lighting. In addition, the buses were painted to reflect Josephine’s branding. “The buses look remarkable, just like brand new buses,” said CCW Regional Sales Man-

ager Jim Paul. “These vehicles were not only economically convenient for Josephine Community Transit, but also help sustain the environment for future generations.” “The rehabilitated buses are an efficient approach to acquire and extend the useful life of the buses well beyond the usual life expectancy, while at the same time saving a substantial amount of money. The cost of a rehabbed bus is a fraction of the cost of purchasing a new bus. The vehicles also enhance safety and offer improved vehicle reliability for years to come,” according to the company. Scott Chancey, transit manager at Josephine Community Transit, said, “The delivery of these vehicles allows us to transition to larger heavy-duty transit vehicles at quicker than anticipated pace. This transition is critical for us to consistently provide good transit access through the urbanized areas of Josephine and Jackson County.” “We are excited and honored to have been selected for the Josephine project. We value their business and relationship and look forward to the opportunity of working together again in the future. We are happy to

be a part of the continued evolution of transit,” said CCW. For more information, visit completecoach.com.

Victor Valley Transit Holds ‘You Have The Ride To Vote’ Promotion

Victor Valley Transit (Victorville/ Barstow, CA) offered free rides all day Tuesday, November 3, to make it easier for riders to vote in the 2020 presidential election. The promotion, entitled “You Have the Ride to Vote,” was geared to highlight the importance of voting and provide the opportunity to be able to get to a polling center or ballot drop-off location on Election Day. On Election Day, fares on all VVTA fixed routes, county routes, and ADA paratransit services were suspended for all riders. All passengers had to wear a face covering and practice proper social distancing measures when riding. All buses were also sanitized.

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November/December 2020

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Go COMO: Continued From Page 25

“We continue to interview for drivers, and I remain hopeful that we can get to 100 percent capacity.” Lynn prefers to hire people who already have experience driving large vehicles and possess a current CDL. “If a candidate has a CDL, then the initial training period at Go COMO is two weeks. However, due to necessity, we will train an applicant with no experience or CDL. We help set up their written tests and provide a full training cycle. The city of Columbia is a third-party tester, which helps our applicants receive prompt testing,” Lynn said. “We have a very strong training program in place, and it’s pretty straight forward. That helps a candidate when trying to receive his/her CDL. In-class training is provided in the morning, and then we will take the candidates to a test course in the afternoon, where they practice operating a bus. That includes straight line backing, parallel parking, general turns, etc. “We train all employees to uphold three key standards — Safety, Service and Schedule.” As anybody who has done it can attest, driving a large transit bus down busy city streets, with the vehicle full of passengers, is not an easy task. Simply put, not everybody is cut out to be a bus driver. Lynn stated some key characteristics he looks for when hiring a driver. “First, I think you have to find candidates who are willing to work with the public, while understanding what that means while also driving a very large vehicle full of passengers,” he said. “Prior to the pandemic, one of our drivers might be driving a vehicle with 80 college students on board. That is a lot of responsibility.

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“A driver not only has to keep the safety of passengers in mind, but also nearby pedestrians and people in other vehicles. It’s important to constantly keep your eyes moving. People who really want to drive a bus for a living must be willing to accept that responsibility.” Lynn is no stranger to being behind the wheel of a bus himself. He has been working in the transportation field for over 37 years. That includes being a driver, bus supervisor, paratransit supervisor and now transportation superintendent. “A long time ago, in 1979, I started driving for a school bus company, but really had no idea what a school bus driver really did. However, I started to really enjoy the job,” Lynn said. “It’s important to enjoy what you do for a living, and know you can make a difference. For me, it’s been very satisfying to know that I can safely operate a large vehicle with a large number of passengers. I believe many of our current drivers feel the same way.” Go COMO’s main facility is also one of the most historic buildings in downton Columbia. Wabash Station serves as the transit system’s main transfer and connection facility. Originally opened in 1910 to serve as a train station, the building was purchased by the city and tranformed into a bus depot many decades later. In 2005, a Go COMO administration wing was added to the building. It is now home to the entire transit system’s staff, which includes those who work in paratransit scheduling and dispatching. “The renovation in 2005 opened the entire lobby area, which is really nice. There is now room for added restrooms, vending services and more seating for those waiting on a bus,” Lynn said. “There is also a large canopy that connects the main Wabash Building to where all of our buses are parked. People can get on and off


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the bus and not worry about rain or snow.” Go COMO also uses the city’s Grissum Building as a transit garage. That facility is shared with the city’s street and fleet maintenance departments, the latter of which is responsible for maintaining both the street department and Go COMO’s vehicles. Unfortunately, room at Grissum Building continues to be an issue. “When I started working at Go COMO, we could put all of our buses and vans inside the facility at night. We can’t do that anymore. Not enough space is available,” Lynn said. “There is a renovation project currently under review for the facility.”

L

A LOOK TOWARD THE FUTURE

ike many sprawling Midwestern cities, most residents of Columbia like to drive their personal vehicles to travel from point A to point B. Officials at Go COMO recognize that, but work hard to make sure all citizens are aware of the transit system’s benefits. “We have a marketing specialist (Ashlyn Sherman), who maintains all of our social media. Our website (GoCOMOTransit.com) includes transit and paratransit contact information. It also lists our hours of operation and provides a route map and schedules,” Lynn said. “Currently, our ridership includes a mix of passengers — from college students to those who are transit-dependent to people who sometimes leave their personal vehicles behind and ride our buses. That latter often happens during bad weather. We are currently reviewing all our routes in an effort to improve the number of shelters on those routes. “At Go COMO, we continue to monitor our ridership, while looking at possible new pick-up locations and how to improve our on-time performance. It’s also important to recognize and understand new patterns of travel and then adjust, when added funding is available. We continue to receive requests for additional hours of service. It all comes down to funding. We must rely of federal funds for most of our operating assistance. The state of Missouri currently provides minimal funding. Hopefully, that will change. Also, with any expansion of service, you have to have the employees in place to support that growth. “I would love to see our system grow. I feel all types of transportation in the country need a more significant review to take place from lawmakers, in order to secure safe and efficient transportation well into the future.” Despite today’s challenges, Lynn recommends a career in transportation for anybody willing to work hard, learn and grow. “Any employment opportunity can provide an opportunity for growth. It’s always good to show an interest in upward movement. If a bus driver, for example, has any ambition to becoming a supervisor, there are opportunities in this industry for that to happen. You have to reach out and grab opportunities that come along,” Lynn said. “I encourage all of our employees, as positions become available at Go COMO, to think about moving up. It’s hard to beat the experience of those who have worked at a specific location for a long time. They might have great ideas on how to improve different things after becoming a supervisor.” Contact: Go COMO, Wabash Station, 126 N. Tenth St., Columbia, MO 65201. Phone: 573-874-2489. Website: gocomotransit.com.

BYD Electric Buses On Streets Of Toronto

BYD Canada announced that 10 zero-emission, 40-foot K9M battery-electric buses will be put into service by the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC), in Toronto, ON, Canada. TTC is Canada’s largest and North America’s third largest transit operator. “This is an important milestone for the city, for the province and BYD, and we can’t wait for Torontonians to see what BYD’s combination of best-in-class technology and Canadian know-how can deliver for their city,” BYD Canada Vice President Ted Dowling said. BYD said, “This is a significant milestone for BYD, as these 10 buses are the first to hit the road from BYD’s 45,000-square-foot assembly facility in Newmarket, Ontario; the first new electric bus plant to open in the province in a generation. The assembly of these buses created 30 jobs, the first buses built in Ontario since Orion closed its plant in 2012.” “Beyond the jobs they create, these 10 buses delivered to Toronto will help remove nearly 8400 metric tonnes of GHG from the atmosphere over their lifetime – just imagine what we could do with more,” said BYD Canada Vice President Ted Dowling. “The Toronto Transit Commission is one of several BYD customers in Canada purchasing zero-emission, battery-electric BYD buses. This order represents a significant advance toward TTC’s goal of purchasing all emission-free buses beginning in 2025 and completing a fleet conversion by 2040. Each of these new buses will remove approximately 9 metric tons of nitrogen oxides, 159 kilograms of diesel particulate matter, and approximately 1,530 metric tons of CO₂ from the atmosphere over the 12-year lifecycle of the vehicle.” For more information on BYD, visit, www.byd.com.

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Due to restrictions brought about by COVID-19, the 2020 CUTA (Canadian Urban Transit Association) Annual Conference and Transit Show, scheduled for November 16-19, will be a virtual event.

“The 2020 Virtual Conference and Transit Show will feature the same quality programming as always, allow for networking as usual, and with more international content,” CUTA said. The theme of the event is “Transit’s New Normal: Moving Forward with Confidence.” The main topics covered during the 2020 Virtual Conference and Transit Show will be: n Funding and financing your transit system; n Health and safety on transit; n Zero emission vehicle (ZEV) technology; n The future of your rail network; n Diversity and inclusion in transit; n Technology shaping the future of transit; and, n Planning our cities for the future.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

n Monday, November 16, 11:25–11:45 a.m. — Catherine McKenna, Member of Parliament for Ottawa Centre and Minister of Infrastructure and Communities:

In 2015, McKenna was elected the first female Member of Parliament for Ottawa Centre and appointed Minister of Environment and Climate Change. Page 44

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As of October 2019, Catherine was re-elected as the Member of Parliament for Ottawa Centre and appointed as Minister of Infrastructure and Communities. As Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, she is working towards building a more resilient, cleaner, and prosperous country and creating a better future for future generations.

n Wednesday, November 18, 11-11:30 a.m — Andy Byford, Commissioner, Transport for London

Presentation: “Managing Health and Safety on Transport for London during COVID-19.” Byford is a transport professional whose 30-year career has spanned three continents. He joined the London Underground in 1989 as a uniformed Station Foreman before working his way up to general manager of the Bakerloo, Central and Victoria Lines. After serving as Operations and Safety Director of two mainline train operating companies, his career took him to Sydney, Australia, as chief operating officer of Australia’s largest railway network, and then on to Canada where he headed the Toronto Transit Commission. Most recently, Byford served as president of New York City Transit, the busiest and largest transit system in North America.


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n Wednesday, November 18, 3-3:20 p.m — Rick Leary, CEO, Toronto Transit Commission

With more than 35 years of experience, Fernandez has made a name for herself as an inspiring leader in the transportation industry.

Centre and Minister of Infrastructure and Communities. Noon-12:30 p.m.: Session 1-A — Planning our cities for the future. • Reimagining public transit. • Preparing for future pandemics: Implementing touchless transit. • The changing mobility landscape: Evolving service models to enhance rider experience and inclusivity. Noon-12:30 p.m.: Session 1-B — Health and safety on transit. • Health and safety lessons learned to prepare transit agencies for future pandemics (Case study based on Metrolinx experience to date with COVID-19). • Ensuring the health and safety of transit users during COVID-19 pandemic – Measures to prevent people from infection and to restore confidence in public transportation. 1–1:30 p.m.: Session 2-A — Funding and Financing your transit system. • Free Fares: How AFC systems can meet social equity goals. • Mid-life refurbishment. • Tackling public transit’s funding gap. 1–1:30 p.m.: Session 2-B — Planning our cities for the future. • The state of demand-responsive transit in Canada. • Transit on a budget: On-demand saved us millions. • Technology shaping the future of transit: from fixed-route to on-demand. 2-2:30 p.m.: Session 3-A — Zero emission vehicle technology. • An insight into energy distribution of electric buses. • Be prepared for your electric fleet — Build electric considerations into the core. • Building resiliency when converting to battery electric buses. 2-2:30 p.m.: Youth and Emerging Leaders Task Force. • Task Force strategic plan — Introduction/ history. • Young Leaders Summit. • Workstreams (vision and workplans). • General Discussion about the strategy and how the industry can build for the future. 3–3:10 p.m.: Message from Jennifer McNeil, vice-chair, Business Members Committee 3:20– 4 p.m.: Happy Hour.

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17

Presentation: “The TTC’s Action Plan on Attracting and Developing a Diverse and Qualified Workforce.” Prior to becoming the CEO of the TTC in July 2018, Leary was chief service officer/deputy CEO for four years. Leary is an award winning transit executive with a long and tenured history in public transit. Prior to his arrival at the TTC in 2014, he was general manager for York Region Transit/VIVA. Leary began his career working for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority out of Boston as a train attendant, rising through the ranks and eventually serving as chief operating officer until he retired in 2009.

FEATURED SPEAKERS

n Monday, November 16, 3–3:10 p.m. — Jennifer McNeill, CUTA Chair, Business Members Committee and Vice-President of Sales & Marketing at New Flyer

McNeill is a transportation industry veteran with over two decades of leadership in transit bus manufacturing and aerospace maintenance.

n Wednesday, November 18, 11:45-noon — Nuria Fernandez, chair of the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) and general manager/CEO of the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA)

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16

11–11:25 a.m.: Welcome • Alain Mercier, CUTA Chair. • Welcome message from CEOs of each province. 11:25–11:45 a.m.: Keynote Speaker • Catherine McKenna, Member of Parliament for Ottawa

9 a.m.–5 p.m.: Transit Show. 9 a.m.–5 p.m.: Rail Theatre.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18

11–11:10 a.m.: Welcome • Marco D’Angelo, president and CEO, CUTA

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11–11:30 a.m.: Keynote Speaker • Andy Byford, commissioner, Transport for London 11:45–Noon: Featured Speaker Nuria Fernandez, Chair, APTA • Repositioning transit in a post-COVID world. Noon– 12:30 p.m.: Session 4-A — Technology shaping the future of transit - ticketing. • Experiences from the first cEMV Open Payment project for public transit in Germany. • Mobile ticketing and contactless fare payments as a response to the COVID-19 crisis. Noon– 12:30 p.m.: Session 4-B — Health and safety on transit. • Future-proof your transit service. • Post COVID-19 health and safety solutions for transit. 1–1:30 p.m.: Session 5-A — Technology is shaping the future of public transit – on-demand. • Flipping transit on its head: How microtransit could unlock the potential of fixed-route transportation. • The benefits of cloud-based technology during a global pandemic. • Purpose built solution for on-demand transit providers. 1–1:30 p.m.: Session 5-B — Technology is shaping the future of public transit - MaaS (mobility-as-a-service). • A multi-modal approach to increasing transit ridership. • What can Leonardo Da Vinci teach us about mobility-asa-service? • A practical guide to MaaS. 1– 2:30 p.m.: Communications and Public Affairs Committee meeting. 1:45–2 p.m.: Ontario Power Generation Presentation: Transit Electrification Solution. 2–2:30 p.m.: Session 6-A — Zero emission vehicle technology. • Financing the transition to 100 percent clean transportation: How to scale battery-electric transit fleets. • Benefits of microgrids for ZEV Fleet Recharging Facilities. • Building Canada’s zero emission buses in Canada and creating a new Canadian testing standard to replace “Altoona.” 2–2:30: p.m.: Small Systems Committee meeting. 3–3:20 p.m.: Keynote Speaker • Rick Leary, CEO, Toronto Transit Commission (TTC). • The TTC’s Action Plan on attracting and developing a diverse and qualified workforce. 3:40-4 p.m.: Happy Hour. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19

11–11:10 a.m.: Welcome • Marco D’Angelo, president and CEO, CUTA. 11:10-Noon: Awards Presentation. Noon–12:30 p.m.: Session 7-A — Health and safety on transit. Page 46

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• Restoring rider confidence through technology and communication. • Cleaner and healthier in a COVID-19 environment – The foundations of rebuilding customer confidence. • The return of safe ridership: How effective and continuous air treatment supports COVID-19 recovery. Noon–12:30 p.m.: Session 7-B — Technology is shaping the future of public transit — on-demand. • Fixed-routes to on-demand and back again: An agile response to COVID-19. • Where to begin with on-demand transit? A step-by-step guide from service design to launch. • From fixed-route to on-demand: Durham Region Transit’s experience. 1–1:30 p.m.: Session 8-A — Health and safety on transit. • Counting crowds: Using vehicle occupancy (APC) data to help riders plan their journeys. • Crowdedness forecaster for STL (Société de transport de Laval) users — an innovation for our reality. • Managing a pandemic at the STM (Société de transport de Montréal) — agile decision-making processes for rapid solution implementation in the field. 1–1:30 p.m.: Session 8-B — Other systems. • Hydrogen will be Canada’s next National Highway. • A panel discussion on fuel cell electric busses with Canadian experts. • ZEV Clean Power. • Renewable natural gas-powered buses. 2–3 p.m.: Equitable transit planning: Gendered perspectives, approaches, and solutions. 2–3 p.m.: New methods of keeping transit workers safe and preventing the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace. 3–3:20: Keynote Speaker • Young Tae Kim, secretary-general, International Transport Forum, OECD. 3:45-3:50: Ottawa Spring Summit 2021 Video Invitation. CUTA is a member-based association that supports public transit as the core of integrated mobility across Canada. It provides members with the resources, networking, training, events, data, research and advocacy needed to support their success in the industry. CUTA’s ongoing activities and services are divided into program areas designed to serve the key requirements of the association’s membership: Communications and Public Affairs, Human Resources and Professional Development, Technical Services, Administration and Finance and Association Governance.

For more information about the 2020 Virtual Conference and Transit Show,

visit cutaactu.ca.


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Nov/Dec 2020 Busline Magazine  

Busline Cover Feature: Hit By COVID-19 Slowdown, Hale Transportation Is Fighting Back (Clinton, NY) • Continues Service With Free Fares, Pas...

Nov/Dec 2020 Busline Magazine  

Busline Cover Feature: Hit By COVID-19 Slowdown, Hale Transportation Is Fighting Back (Clinton, NY) • Continues Service With Free Fares, Pas...

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