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MCGOUGH IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE OPENING OF OUR

ST. CLOUD OFFICE

McGough’s history in Central Minnesota began with the construction of ST. JOHN’S ABBEY CHURCH in Collegeville in the late 1950s. The company is currently completing construction of a major expansion at CENTRACARE’S ST. CLOUD HOSPITAL, one of the largest healthcare projects in the state. McGough has also begun construction of the new Integrated Science and Engineering Laboratory Building for ST. CLOUD STATE UNIVERSITY. Building world-class projects for best-in-class companies for more than 50 years. Our experienced team will help with your planning, development, construction, and facilities management needs.

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ST. JOHN’S ABBEY

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Business Tools

24 Entrepreneurism

Faceoff Leadership vs.

Management: Is it just one or the other?

25 Going Green 25 Tech News 26 TechStrategies What’s Your ROI?

28 Doing Good

Give Thoughtfully

34 COVER STORY NEVER GIVE UP

Joyce Brenny sums up her philosophy of life and work in one sentence: Give more than you get, love more than you receive, don’t give up when you’re tired, and always believe.

10 News Reel

What’s happening and who’s moving. Business news from

around Central Minnesota.

10 Book Review

Smart Thinking: Three Essential Keys to Solve Problems, Innovate, and Get Things Done by Art Markman, PhD.

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presented by Falcon Bank

32

Quarterly Cost of Living Report

PROFIT

This Issue 42 Feature Couponing

Are coupons just another way to discount your products …or are they the new age of advertising?

46 Special Focus

Women Helping Women

Now more than ever, women are serving as role models and support systems for each other.

52 Encore Entrepreneurs For many older adults, starting a small business can be an opportunity to transform a lifetime hobby or interest into a lucrative line of work.

58 Business Spotlight

PROFIT

Special Sections

Roger Bonn and Glen Sunder, Peters Body Shop

45 Smart Business 47 Redefining Business

Women in Business Directory

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53 Senior Health and Living 12 Your Voice In Government 14 People to Know 18 Regional Round-Up

Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year: Ray Schlichting

ONLY ONLINE •• Bring Air Service to St. Cloud •• 6 Ways to Boost Sales

•• Marketing Stunts that Backfired •• SBA Increases Size Standards

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Compassionate, personal care Delivering compassionate, personalized care to every patient, every day — it’s part of our commitment to quality care.

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PRESIDENT’S LETTER

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NETWORK

My mentor, my colleague, my friend By the way, “loyal” is an appropriate adjective for most of our committee members, so maybe I should call Dave “super-loyal.” Dave has traveled to Washington, D.C. with me to meet

David Borgert, CentraCare Health System and retiring chair of the Chamber’s Government Affairs Committee with Chamber President Teresa Bohnen.

information between Dave and me.

with our federal elected officials

Many of you may know what

more often than any other loyal

Dave does for a living, but you may

Government Affairs Committee

not know the kind of man he is.

member. By the way, “loyal” is an

He still opens doors for ladies. He

ugust 31 is the end of our

appropriate adjective for most of

removes his hat strictly by rules of

Chamber’s fiscal year. It is

our committee members, so maybe

etiquette. He is honest and ethical.

the time our programs reset

I should call Dave “super-loyal.”

His granddaughters have him

A

for the year. Our committee chairs

Dave is my mentor, my

wrapped around their tiny pinky

and board members retire, allowing

colleague and my friend. He always

fingers. He’s a techno-geek who

new recruits to assume the reins for

has an ear for any government

loves Apple products.

our organization.

issue I wish to discuss, whether

David Borgert has far too many

it is business-oriented or not. He

special personality and character

fortunate to work with and get

will give his educated opinion and

facets to list here. I am glad he has

to know many of our volunteers.

answer tireless questions without

chosen to share them with our

All of them are committed and

making me feel inferior. He is a

Chamber and with me. Thank you,

do important work. This year, a

patient teacher.

my friend. I look forward to many

In my role as President, I am

volunteer who has given much

This year, Dave and I made a

future coffee dates.

to me and to our organization is

call together in Washington, D.C.

THANK YOU to all of our

retiring from his role as chair of

(See Your Voice in Government,

hard working 2012 volunteers.

our Government Affairs committee

page 12.) I had to hide my smile

Whether you’ve been on the

after three years of service.

as an elected official said, “Do you

Chamber’s Board of Directors,

want to know about Health Care

led a committee, been involved

of government relations for

Reform? Let me tell you about

in a committee or simply chosen

CentraCare Health System. When

Health Care Reform . . . “ then

membership in our five-star

I started my employment with

proceeded to recite the sound

Chamber, I appreciate you all.

the Chamber more than 14 years

bites we’ve all heard. It was all I

ago, David was one of the first

could do not to tell him, “You are

“Government Affairs Junkies” I

sitting next to the only person I

David Borgert is the director

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employer.” But I chose to keep that

encountered. He attended every

know who has not only READ

Government Affairs Committee

the entire Health Care Reform

meeting and always made himself

Act, but has highlighted, studied

available for consultation.

and summarized most of it for his

B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

Sincerely,

Teresa Bohnen President


Main Phone | 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line | 320-251-2940, ext. 126 Program Hotline | 320-251-2940, ext. 125 www.StCloudAreaChamber.com email: information@StCloudAreaChamber.com ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF President | Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 Vice President | Gail Ivers, ext. 109 Director of Administration | Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 Special Events Coordinator | Virginia Kroll, ext. 105 Communications & Workforce Development Coordinator | Whitney Bina

A Tradition of Building Success for Almost 60 Years

Membership Sales Specialist | Wendy Franzwa, ext. 134 Administrative Assistant | Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122

You can depend on Rice Building Systems to handle everything from concept and design all the way through the completion of your project. When you choose Rice Building Systems, you also have the peace of mind that comes with knowing your project is guaranteed for years to come. We call it The Rice Difference.

Administrative Assistant | Cindy Swarthout , ext. 100 Administrative Assistant | Sharon Henry, ext. 124 CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF Executive Director | Julie Lunning, ext. 111

Building Relationships Since 1953

Sales Manager | Lori Cates, ext. 113

1019 Industrial Drive South, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 • 320.252.0404 www.ricebuildingsystems.com

Director of Sales & Marketing | Judy Okerstrom, ext. 112 Director of Sports & Special Events | Kelly Sayre, ext. 128 Director of Visitor Services | Jean Robbins , ext. 129 Receptionist | Nikki Fisher, ext. 100 2011-12 BOARD MEMBERS Jim Beck | Minnesota School of Business Gary Berg | G.L. Berg Entertainment, Performing Artists & Speakers Craig Broman | St. Cloud Hospital/ CentraCare Health System, Board Vice Chair Linda Feuling | Westside Liquor Neil Franz | Neils-Franz-Chirhart, Attorneys at Law Todd Fritz | InteleCONNECT, Inc. Jayne Greeney Schill | St. Cloud Area School District #742 Diane Hageman | College of Saint Benedict Steve Hahn | HahnMark, LLC John Herges | Falcon National Bank Scott Johnson | Times Media Dolora Musech | Batteries Plus Kris Nelson | Custom Accents, Inc. Bernadette Perryman | Past Board Chair

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Trucking Company $249,000

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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NETWORK

Collaboration I’m stumped, I told her. I don’t want to repeat what everyone else has said. I don’t know where to go with this story.

It’s the one I asked myself. There

“J

oyce Brenny is having a good year.” That’s how I

start this issue’s cover story on page 34. Joyce is the owner of Brenny

balance when I’m worried or

are willing to share in public. When

nervous. My son-in-law works here.

you’ve been covered by the St. Cloud

I’m a guarded person. I’ve had to

Times, Minnesota Business, and two or

learn how to be more open. There’s

three industry publications, you’ve

a spiritual side of me. No one wants

probably divulged as many secrets as

to talk about these things.”

you care to share. When I sat down with Joyce to

It turns out, I do. So why read this story? Because

Transportation in St. Joseph, MN.

do our formal interview, I put the

it’s something we’ve never done

She has received several honors in

question to her. I’m stumped, I told

before in Business Central and

the past year or so. She’s traveled

her. I don’t want to repeat what

you haven’t seen in any other

around the country as a speaker.

everyone else has said. I don’t know

publication where Joyce has been

She’s been to Washington, D.C. in

where to go with this story.

profiled. I serve as narrator, filling in

her role as chair of the Minnesota

Joyce sat in silence, looking at

gaps and adding tidbits I’ve picked

Trucking Association. She was

me. Then she leaned forward, hands

up from previous conversations

honored at a Chamber luncheon

clasped on the table, and said, “Let

with Joyce and her staff. But the

in May as the Business Central Mark

me write it.”

final result is an inside view of the

of Excellence – Women in Business

My knee-jerk reaction to that

thoughts, concerns, feelings, and life

Champion. And she’s received a lot

was “No. This is journalism, not a

of Joyce Brenny … by Joyce Brenny.

of press. A lot of press.

promotional brochure for Brenny

Now here she is on the cover

words came out of my mouth,

thinking that most of you are

the part of my brain that thrives

wondering: Why should I read the

on creative problem solving was

story? What can Gail possibly say

shrieking “Why not?”

Good question.

B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

Until next issue,

Transportation.” But even as those

of Business Central and I can’t help

that I haven’t read already?

8

is only so much information people

Indeed…why not? “I’m a wife. I’m a mother,”

Gail Ivers

Vice President

Editor

Photo by Joel Butkowksi/BDI

Editor Gail Ivers and Joyce Brenny in the Brenny Transportation reception area. The fireplace mantel is a nose clip from a Peterbilt truck – specially ordered just for their fireplace by Joyce.

Joyce said. “My daughter is my


Publisher Teresa Bohnen Managing Editor Gail Ivers Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Whitney Bina St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Bill Blazar Minnesota Chamber of Commerce Sharon Henry St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Dr. Fred E. Hill St. Cloud State University

Gail Ivers St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Tracy Knofla High Impact Training Mary MacDonell Belisle mary macdonell belisle writerforhire Dawn Zimmerman The Write Advantage

ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media Cover Photo Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Accountant Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher/Sales Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media

110 Sixth Avenue South P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 •  Fax (320) 251-0081 www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com For advertising information contact Wendy Hendricks, (320) 656-3808, 110 S. 6th Ave., P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. © Copyright 2012 Business Central LLC Business Central is published six times a year by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, 110 Sixth Avenue South; P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 • Phone (320) 251-2940 •  Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.

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Serving Sauk Rapids since 1995, and a part of Pierz since 1908.

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Book Review

It Happened When?

Your Voice in Government

13 Point of View

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People to Know

Business Calendar

Regional Roundup

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The author provides insights into the functioning of the mind and synthesizes this understanding into practical tools.

Get Things Done by Art Markman, PhD, Penguin Group, New York, 2012, ISBN 978-0-399-53722-6

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rt Markman has written a three-part formula for smart thinking, which demonstrates how anyone can (1) develop smart habits, (2) acquire high-quality knowledge, and (3) use highquality knowledge when needed. The author provides insights into the functioning of the mind and synthesizes this understanding into practical tools and exercises that develop new skills and help you achieve personal goals. Smart thinking and intelligence are not the same.

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Smart thinking is a skill. Companies that take time to cultivate it will reap the rewards in innovation and productivity. Reviewed by Fred E. Hill

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Smart Thinking: Three

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Intelligence is defined as an inborn quality that determines how well you are going to be able to think. Smart thinking is about the content you know and how you use it – it is the ability to solve new problems using your current knowledge. Smart thinking is not an innate quality. It is a skill that can be developed. Chapter Eight, Creating a Culture of Smart, is my favorite. Starting from the premise that adults rarely work alone, we can assume that most businesses put teams together to solve hard problems. All the members of the team or group need to participate in the problemsolving. Educational systems concentrate too much on individual work and responsibility. What is needed is a culture of smart where the people work hard to make the others around them smarter – a special kind of “smart sharing.”

B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

There are ten components in creating a culture of smart. They are: (1) Encourage people to learn more about thinking. (2) Create an environment in which smart habits thrive. (3) Be open to ideas. (4) Explain clearly and explain often. (5) Create desirable difficulties. (6) Use the Role of 3. (7) Negotiate meanings. (8) Develop labels to aid analogies. (9) Discourage multitasking. (10) Don’t let I stand in the way of WE. The Role of 3 can have the fastest influence on the smart thinking of you and everyone around you: it is the principle that we must remember roughly three things about every experience. The Role of 3 can always be used whenever developing a presentation or running a meeting. The Role of 3 awaits your reading… BC Dr. Fred E. Hill is a professor of Learning Resources Services, at St. Cloud State University.

Saint John’s University receives grant The Donald McNeely Center for Entrepreneurship at Saint John’s University and the College of Saint Benedict was awarded a $750,000 grant from the Manitou Fund. The grant will be dispersed over five years beginning with the 2013-14 academic year. The money will be used to maintain the Donald McNeely Center for Entrepreneurship, which emphasizes both business and social entrepreneurship.

Jewell elected to Council Quinlivan & Hughes, P.A. attorney Sarah Jewell Jewell was elected to the Minnesota State Bar Association (MSBA) Rural & Ag Law Section Council at the MSBA Rural & Ag Law Section Annual Institute & CLE held at the River’s Edge Convention Center in St. Cloud. She was elected to a three-year term, starting July 1.

Beste achieves membership James J. Beste, a financial advisor with Ameriprise Financial, has achieved membership in the Million Dollar Round Table (MDRT) — The Premier Association of Financial Professionals. Attaining membership in MDRT is achieved by less than 1 percent of the world’s life insurance and financial services professionals.


IT HAPPENED WHEN?

April 1984 Celebrating Student Success

In April 1984, the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce held the Honor Students Awards Banquet. At this annual banquet, the Chamber presented scholarships to St. Cloud area high school students. In 1984, Mike Ives (left of podium) was the chair elect of the Chamber board,

Diana Kasper (speaking), education division chairperson, was the master of ceremonies and Earl C. Joseph (right of podium), Futurist, was the guest speaker at the Honor Students Awards Banquet. Today, the Chamber’s “Unite for Success” Scholarship Program is still providing scholarship opportunities for area high school students. This year, the Chamber was able to award over $64,900 in scholarships thanks to the following donors:

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Bernick’s Beverages & Vending CentraCare Clinic Central Minnesota Farm Show Coborn’s Inc. Granite Financial Gray Plant Mooty Minnesota School of Business PineCone Vision Center Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year Committee St. Cloud Area Chamber Connection/ Glenn J. Imholte Memorial St. Cloud Ear, Nose & Throat, Head & Neck Clinic St. Cloud State University College of Business Executive Council Wolters Kluwer Financial Services

The Sky’s the Limit! •

Get in the Cloud without leaving the ground.

What if you could keep your hardware on-site, control your own data, and have access to all the software you need without the upfront investment? You can! Marco has an innovative subscription-based model for providing locally hosted, remotely managed server hardware and software on a pay-as-you-go basis. That means you get the benefits of services “in the Cloud” with the responsiveness and consistency of on-premise server hardware and applications. Has your technology been bumping its’ ceiling? If you’d like to discuss raising the roof and learn how the Cloud can help, we’re all ears. Get peace of mind knowing your data is securely on-site and under your control. Learn about the Marco Hybrid Cloud at www.marconet.com/GetintheCloud marconet.com

J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m

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UPFRONT

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NETWORK

YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

N E WS R E E L Rice Building Systems hires Larsen Don F. Larsen recently joined Rice Building Systems, Inc. Larsen has over 19 years of experience in commercial, religious, retail and restaurants. He is certified with the American Institute of Architects and the National Council of Architectural Relations Board.

St. Cloud Goes to Washington, D.C.

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t. Cloud Area Chamber volunteers and staff spent three days in Washington, D.C. meeting with Minnesota’s Congressional delegation. “We visited with as many Congressional offices as would grant us appointments,” Teresa Bohnen, Chamber president, said. “With elections quickly approaching, it’s an important year to let all of our federal decision-makers know the challenges small businesses are facing and how decisions made in Washington impact our local economy.”

Robert’s Fine Jewelry wins second place Robert’s Fine Jewelry won second place in the Professional Jewelry Design Contest for Minnesota/ North Dakota Jewelry Association. This is a contest of professional jewelers and is judged by jewelers throughout Minnesota and North Dakota. The creative staff recognized by the award are: Sergey Gavalove, Sally Brutger, Stella Adams and Robert Lien.

Magnuson

Kubat

Wynne

Dingmann

Senator Amy Klobuchar and Chamber President Teresa Bohnen

(L-R) Dave Borgert, CentraCare Health System; Giovanni Coratolo, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, vice president of small business policy; Jason Bernick, Bernick’s Beverages and Vending

Epsen

Bremer Bank hires, promotes staff Kimberly Magnuson, Jason Kubat and Kayla Epsen have been promoted to assistant vice president at Bremer Bank in St. Cloud. Magnuson has an accounting degree from Bethel University in St. Paul, Kubat has an accounting degree from St. Cloud State University, and Epsen has a bachelor’s degree in finance from St. Cloud State University. Brooke Dingmann was promoted to client service associate supervisor for the St. Cloud West branch. Nga Wynne was hired as a client service associate supervisor for the St. Cloud downtown branch.

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Minn. Representative Michele Bachmann and Jason Bernick

Senator Al Franken and Teresa Bohnen

WHAT MATTERS MOST

The top 3 issues raised by Chamber members were: 1) Concerns about the implementation of the Health Care Reform Act

B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

2) National Labor Relations Board regulations determined without Congressional oversight

3) The continued adverse local impact of past banking regulation


POINT OF VIEW

Business Central asked readers: What are three things in your office, unique to you, that you cannot live without?

A photo of my family, my telephone head rest and my calendar.”

Tom Steinkopf Holiday Inn & Suites

A carving that says ‘Follow your dreams, you never know where they’ll go,’ a digital picture frame and a candle.”

Liz Kellner Odor Eliminators

An echo pen (it records what you’re writing as you write it) a stuffed animal from a company campaign to remind me of the importance of branding, and the thermostat technology that lets me change the temperature of my home from work.”

Brian Hart Sandler Training

John Riordan DAYTA Marketing

A dead baby great white shark in a jar of formaldehyde, a pen that has a pull out 2012 calendar, and a mini basketball hoop.”

Rachel Lolmasteymaugh RP Enterprises

Sorted binders from co-worker Vicki Langston, my kitchen table, which is my desk, and earplugs for music.”

If you’re ready to go for the whole nine yards, count us in. There’s a Bremer business banker right near you, with all the financial resources you could want. And straight-from-the-shoulder business advice to help you succeed. Talk to a Bremer banker at one of nearly 100 locations in Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin.

Downtown St. Cloud • 251-3300 West St. Cloud • 656-3300 Sauk Rapids • 252-1938 Sartell • 255-7121 Rice • 393-2600 1-800-908-BANK (2265) Bremer.com

COUNT US IN.

Member FDIC. © 2012 Bremer Financial Corporation. All rights reserved.

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12/27/11 3:05 PM J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m

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UPFRONT

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NETWORK

N E WS R E E L Marco staff recognized, Marco distributed $2.1 million in stock benefits to eligible employees. Marco’s 421 employees celebrated at the annual shareholders’ meeting where they received certificates identifying their ownership stake in the company. The company was able to increase its market share through two acquisitions within the last year. Jeff Gau, CEO, was named a finalist for the 2012 Ernst & Young Gau Entrepreneur of the Year program in the Upper Midwest. The award recognizes outstanding entrepreneurs who demonstrate excellence and extraordinary success in areas such as innovation, financial performance and personal commitment to their businesses and communities.

The company received two 2012 Perfect Image Awards from imageSource Magazine at the ITEX National Expo & Conference in Las Vegas. Marco also received the 2012 award for Dealer of the Year and Outstanding Managed Services Program. Barry Opatz and Trevor Akervik were present at the conference to receive the awards. Williams receives award Beth Williams, Charter Business, has received the Charter Communication’s Platinum Circle Award for outstanding performance in 2011. The recipient of this award is chosen from Charter Business locations around the country and represents the very best performers. As the recipient, Williams receives a four-day trip to San Diego, CA.

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PEOPLE TO KNOW

Get to know them Meet some of the Chamber volunteers who served in leadership roles during 2011-12.

Jen Novak PineCone Vision Center

(320) 258-3915 jnovak@pineconevisioncenter.com Chair, Sauk Rapids Chamber The Sauk Rapids Chamber, a division of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, promotes a healthy business environment in the community of Sauk Rapids. Volunteers and committee members work in cooperation with member businesses, local government, the public school system and other community organizations. Programs include the Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year.

Della Ludwig Schlenner Wenner & Co.

(320) 251-0286 dludwig@swcocpas.com Chair, Waite Park Chamber The Waite Park Chamber, a division of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, is a place where business, education and government come together for the betterment of the community. Programs include the Waite Park State of the City address.

Jean Dotzler Events Extraordinaire by Jean, Inc.

(320) 267-8609 jean@eventsbyjean.com Chair, Star-Studded Celebration The Chamber’s annual volunteer recognition event, known as the Star-Studded Celebration, focuses on networking and recognition. Volunteers plan the program, solicit sponsorships, and help during the evening.

Beth Putz Custom Accents, Inc.

(320) 654-9600 beth@customaccentsinc.com Chair, Technology and Education Conference Committee The Technology and Education Conference Committee organizes the Chamber’s annual fall conference covering technology and education topics related to medical, legal, business, and information technology. Volunteers recruit speakers and sponsors who provide educational seminars and display booths. The event is open to all Chamber members and the general public.

B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

Jessica Mergen Ward

Minnesota School of Business

(320) 257-2000 jward@msbcollege.edu Chair, Volunteer Coordinating Committee The Volunteer Coordinating Committee creates and maintains a system to communicate volunteer opportunities at the Chamber to interested members, helps recruit volunteers, and helps recognize current volunteers and their companies throughout the year.


IN THE NEWS

Big Sister Shari Wahlin receives national award

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hari Wahlin, development director for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Minnesota, was named the National Big Sister of the year by Big Brothers Big Sisters of America. Wahlin and her Little Sister, Kirsten Skjonsby, Foley, have been matched since April 2008. In June, they traveled to Washington, D.C. for the annual Big Brothers Big Sisters National Leadership Summit where they shared their story. Wahlin was also named the Minnesota Big Sister of the Year. In a record setting event, the Central Minnesota Chapter also took home the state award for Big Brother of the Year. This recognition went to John Kokula, DeZURIK. It’s the first time that both the state Big Brother and state Big Sister of the Year were selected from the Central Minnesota Chapter, which was started in 1969.

Melanie Tank receives awards Melanie Tank, general manager at GrandStay Residential Suites Hotel in St. Cloud, was awarded both the Sales & Marketing and the 2011 General Manager of the Year. Blue Sky Hospitality, LLC manages the hotel and presents these awards each year.

J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m

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UPFRONT

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NETWORK

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BUSINESS CALENDAR

N E WS R E E L

Asheim

Gay

Haney

JULY / AUGUST 2012 •• Visit events.StCloudAreaChamber.com for a detailed calendar.

Can’t miss opportunities to influence, promote, and learn. Hendrickson Mattson McCullough

Mitchell

Paa

AUGUST 13

Schneiderman

Chamber Open Schnurstein Stellmach

The 66th annual Chamber Open is August 13 at Blackberry Ridge Golf Course, 3125 Clubhouse Road, Sartell; shotgun start at 11:30 a.m. Dinner follows the event at 5:30 p.m.

Swanson

Marco hires staff; Receives Certifications Marco hired the following people: Stacy Asheim, Ross Gay, Pat Haney, Jeffrey Hendrickson, Danica Mattson, Justin McCullough, Taylor Mitchell, Dawn Paa, Matthew V. Schneiderman, Aaron Schnurstein, Betty Stellmach and Andy Swanson.

July 18 & August 15 Dyrud

Schoenherr

The following employees receive technical certifications: Ryan Dyrud, VMware Certified Professional on vSphere 5, and Amber Schoenherr, Microsoft Academic Volume Licensing.

G.L. Berg Entertainment partners with Target Field G.L. Berg Entertainment was selected as the official entertainment provider for Target Field and the Minnesota Twins from now until December 31, 2013. They will work hand-in-hand with the Target Field event staff to provide professional entertainment for clients holding events at Target Field.

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July 19 & August 21

Waite Park Chamber

Business After Hours

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

4:30 - 6:30 p.m.

For businesses interested in Waite Park issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance.

A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network!

July 18: hosted by

July 19: hosted by D. J. Bitzan

InteleCONNECT, Inc., at the Municipal Athletic Complex, 5001 8th St N, St. Cloud with Tara Tollefson, Plaza Park Bank presenting “Social Networking”

Jewelers, 203 Waite Ave. N, Waite Park

August 15: hosted by Rasmussen College, 226 Park Ave S, St. Cloud with Mike Roth, Northland Business Development Network, presenting “Are you running your business or is it running you?”

B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

August 21: hosted by St. Cloud Hospital/CentraCare Health System, 1406 6th Ave N, St. Cloud August 10

Government Affairs 7:30 - 9 a.m.

A discussion of local government issues on the second Friday of the month, at the Chamber office, 110 6th Ave. S

July: No Meeting August 10: 2012 Election Issues August 23

Sauk Rapids Chamber 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

For businesses interested in Sauk Rapids issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. Located at Good Shepherd Fellowship Hall, 1115 4th Ave. N, Sauk Rapids

July: No Meeting August 23: Member Showcase featuring eight businesses, sponsored by the Sauk Rapids Chamber For information on these or other business events, call 320-251-2940.


IN THE NEWS

PineCone Vision’s Novak elected to board, center staff receive certifications

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ennifer Novak, PineCone Vision Center, was elected secretary of the Minnesota Optometric Association Paraoptometric Board at the 2012 Minnesota Optometric Association’s annual meeting. Several PineCone Vision Center staff members recently received certifications in their respective areas of practice:

Mary Robertson, Lasik Coordinator and Gail Grundman, Certified Optician – Certified Paraoptometric (CPO) – Through the American Optometric Association

Theresa Johnson and Rebecca Groetch, Certified Opticians American Board of Opticianry Certified – Through the American Board of Opticinary

Chrissy Henry, Billing Coordinator Certified Para-optometric Coder (CPOC) – Through the American Optometric Association

Hinds featured in online magazine Patricia Hinds, Granite Financial, was featured in the March issue of Registered Rep, an online magazine for financial advisors. The story, “Spreading Retirement Smarts,” featured Hinds’ history as well as the Retirement Resource Center, a philanthropic program through Granite Financial. Through the center, Hinds serves families with average income of $75,000, who don’t know where else to turn for advice. Her goal is to educate 500 families over the next 10 years.

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UPFRONT

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NETWORK

N E WS R E E L Hemeseth named president of SJU Michael Hemeseth, formerly economics Hemeseth professor at Carleton College, was named the St. John’s University president. Hemeseth is the first lay president in the school’s 155 year history. He has a degree in economics from St. John’s University and master’s and doctorate degrees in economics from Harvard University. He will begin his official duties on July 1. Heartland Glass adds staff Tony Pfieifer was hired as a Pfieifer senior sales and project manager for Heartland Glass. He has several years of experience and has accreditation in the Green Associate LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) program. Norton joins SkinFitNessMD Jesse Norton joined SkinFitNessMD Norton as a physician’s assistant. Norton graduated from the Augsburg College physician assistant program in 2001 and is a member of Minnesota Academy of Physician Assistants, American Academy of Physician Assistants and is licensed through the Minnesota Board of Medical Practice. Mehr joins Rengel Printing Inese Mehr recently joined Rengel Printing Company Mehr in business development and sales. Compiled by Whitney Bina For consideration in Business Central’s News Reel, please send press releases to Gail Ivers, Editor at givers@ StCloudAreaChamber.com

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REGIONAL ROUNDUP

Ray of Sunshine Volunteer hours, helpful approach make the 2012 Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year a standout. By Whitney Bina

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n April 26, 2012, Ray Schlichting became the 2012 Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year. Over 70 Sauk Rapids community members and friends and family members gathered to honor him at the Sauk Rapids-Rice Middle School. City Council member Brad Gunderson was there to declare April 26, 2012 as “Ray Schlichting Day” in Sauk Rapids. The Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year award is presented annually to recognize someone who has played a positive role in making Sauk Rapids a better place to live and work. Candidates must show community volunteerism and dedication, involvement in community activities that foster a positive image of Sauk Rapids, or involvement through employment that serves as an asset to the Sauk Rapids community. Schlichting has given over 1,600 hours of service to 24

Ray Schlichting, (R) the 2012 Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year, looks on as Sauk Rapids City Council member Brad Gunderson (L) reads the announcement proclaiming April 26, 2012 as Ray Schlichting Day.

different organizations over the last 10 years through the Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP). He has volunteered at the Good Shepherd Community, Benton County Emergency Management, and the City of Sauk Rapids Clean Sweep Week, among other activities. “It means a lot to me, the volunteering that I do,” said Schlichting. “I’ve been able to develop great friendships with volunteers that I work with side by side.”

Volunteers enjoy working events with Schlichting. “If I see Ray’s name on the volunteer list, I want to volunteer with him,” said Bob Erickson, volunteer with RSVP. Jenny Zimmer, The Good Shepherd Community, nominated Schlichting for this award. “Ray is our ray of sunshine at Good Shepherd,” Zimmer said. “I hope I can follow in Ray’s footsteps and give back to my community as he has done.”

•• JM Oil •• Jimmy’s Pour House •• Opatz Insurance •• Rapids River Food Fest •• St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce •• Sauk Rapids Chamber •• Sauk Rapids Lions Club

•• Sauk Rapids-Rice Community Education and Schools •• Sauk Rapids Riverside Lions •• The Good Shepherd Community •• Thermo-Tech Windows •• SEH

The 2012 Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year Sponsors •• Braunreiter Dental •• Bremer Bank •• C & L Distributing Inc. •• City of Sauk Rapids •• Coborn’s Superstore •• Farmers & Merchants Bank •• Goldeneye Framing & Gallery •• Neils-Franz-Chirhart, Attorneys at Law

B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2


Past recipients of the Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year: (L-R) Doris and Dick Busse (2011); Lisa J. Braun (2002); Duane Grandy (2005); Ray Schlichting (2012); Bill Bard (2006); Terry Sylvester (2003).

The luncheon was special for Schlichting; seven of his children were there as well as his fellow volunteers and

other Sauk Rapids community members. “It’s a great honor to receive this award and I’m thankful for all who have helped me volunteer,” Schlichting said. Schlichting’s name will be placed on a plaque which will be displayed in the new Sauk Rapids Government Center. He also received a certificate and special congressional recognition from Representative Michelle Bachmann’s office. Roland Doroff, Steve Hovanes, Ashley Krueger, April Myers and Mary Vos were also recognized at the luncheon for being nominated for the 2012 Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year recognition. BC Whitney Bina is the communications and workforce development coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

Past Recipients of the Sauk Rapids Citizen of the Year Award 1987 Carmen Peters

2001 John Benoit*

1988 LuVerne Neils

2002 Lisa J. Braun

1989 Dan Coborn

2003 Terry Sylvester

1990 Jule Machula*

2004 Greg Vandal

1991 Rich Gronau*

2005 Duane Grandy

1992 Erv Blattner*

2006 William

1993 Doug Madson

“Bill” Bard

1994 Art Daniels

2007 Marla Elness

1995 Mara Jahnke

2008 Phil Pederson

1996 Pat Burski

2009 Mike Lehnen

1997 Thomas Braun*

2010 Annette Jesh

1998 Harold Jesh

2011 Doris and

1999 Connie Driscoll

Dick Busse

2000 Steve Ellefson, Jr.

* Deceased

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Powerful Business Communications 124128/4-12/7540

J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m

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UPFRONT

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NETWORK CENTRAL

NETWORK CENTRAL

Grow

The 2012 St. Cloud Area Business Awards Luncheon recognized some of Central Minnesota’s most successful and engaged businesses. Photography by Denise Gagner, Studio D; Portraits by Design

The 2012 St. Cloud Area Business Awards Recipients (L-R): Joyce Brenny, Brenny Transportation, Business Central Mark of Excellence-Women in Business Champion; Jim Christensen, Array Services Group, Entrepreneurial Success Award; Mike Meyer and Pat Huesers, PAM’S Auto, Small Business of the Year.

Sandy Neutzling (L), Jennings Insurance, the 2002 Athena Recipient and Linda Feuling, Westside Liquor, the 2007 Entrepreneurial Success Award Recipient.

Laura Supan, US Bank and Keith Schupp, Winkelman Building Corporation, the 2005 Small Business of the Year.

Bill Knoblach(L) and Christy Gilleland, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac; Jim Feneis, First Fuel Bank, the 1991 Small Business of the Year.

Diane (L) and John Schlecht, Crafts Direct, the 2011 Entrepreneurial Success Award Recipients; Steve Bresnahan and Penny Casavant, Catholic Charities.

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B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

Melody Peterson, Playhouse Child Care, the 2003 Small Business of the Year and Top Hatter Owen Peterson, Stearns Insurance.

Mike Markman, US Bank and Deb Kosloske Kittridge, Granite City Armored Car, the 2008 Small Business of the Year.


Network!

Business After Hours – Extra! gives businesses an opportunity to show off their products and services in a fun and festive environment.

(L-R) Chris Dolney, FaceTime Business Resources; Ashley Hahn, United Way of Central Minnesota; Jami Lea Lewison, Gypsy Lea’s; Dave Faust, Stonehouse Resources; Monica Voth; Eric Alf, Charter Communications

Hoobie Eskuri (L) and Steve Sahlstrom, Strategic Equipment & Supply Co.

Vein Clinic PA was one of over 50 businesses that exhibited at Business After Hours – Extra! in April.

Gloria Vande Brake, Minuteman Press St. Cloud; Mark Kroska, AGC Agency

Jodi Speicher, The Good Shepherd Community and Bill Winter, St. Cloud Federal Credit Union

Larry Logeman, Executive Express and Susan Dean, Newcomer Service

Jim Gruenke, Mark J. Traut Wells and Liz Kellner, Odor Eliminators

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We are here when you need us!

TOP HATS | New Members

Continuing to Make a Difference! Vaultas, develops, owns and operates public and private Minnesota IT data centers, combined with business continuity and disaster recovery complexes, 3701 18th St. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Ohmann, Joe Unger, John Unger, and Paul Konsor.

Celebrating 40 Years of Excellence in Caring for You! Accredited by Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc.

Sandler Training, sales training and business development services to businesses and individuals in Central Minnesota, 220 Park Ave. S, #100, St. Cloud. Pictured: Bob Lien, Brian Hart and Kris Nelson.

Northland Business Development Network, business consultants for process improvements and business sale preparation, 11190 Grand Lake Road, Cold Spring. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Mike Roth and Kris Nelson.

Super Consulting Services, LLC, human resource solutions to businesses of all sizes, 934 Sundance Court, Sartell. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Michelle Super and Tauna Quimby.

Carol Lewis, Attorney, 14 7th Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Ohmann, Carol Lewis and Tauna Quimby.

Mastey Financial Group, LLC, financial planning, 2351 Connecticut Ave., Suite 310, Sartell. Pictured: Diane Ohmann, April Mastey, Carin Bzdok and Brenda Eisenschenk.

Western Products, seamless siding, Anderson replacement products, exterior products for buildings, 3660 32nd St. SE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Dolora Musech, Josh Stahlecker, Chris Morse and Jason Bernick.

Penske Truck Leasing, 3322 Southway Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Jason Bernick, Sam Aiello, Dan Virnig and Kris Nelson.

Moose Family Center, members-only organization dedicated to providing care for needy and at risk children and for senior citizens who are members of the Moose, 1300 3rd St. N, Waite Park. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Sue Willing, Jim Baker and Jason Bernick.

Dohrmann Enterprises, family owned manufacturer/wholesaler of agricultural spraying equipment, used for applying additives to crops for animal feed, 316 33rd Ave. S, Waite Park. Pictured: Diane Ohmann, Amber Dohrmann, Dan Dohrmann and Dolora Musech.

St. Cloud Surgical Center 1526 Northway Drive • St. Cloud • 251-8385 • 800-349-7272 www.stcsurgicalcenter.com

NOT A CHAMBER MEMBER YET? Call Wendy Franzwa, Membership Sales Specialist at (320) 656-3834 for more information. 22

B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2


TOP HATS | New Members

Noble Custom Homes, residential builder and contractor specializing in custom home design and construction, 411 3rd St. N, Suite 110, Waite Park. Pictured: Dolora Musech, Shawn Brown, Rick Poplinski, Steven Noble and Jill Magelssen.

Guadalajara Mexican Restaurant, 1001 Division St., Waite Park. Pictured: Tauna Quimby, Bertha Alvarez and Jill Magelssen.

Looking for Meeting Space? Donlar Construction, general contracting, construction management and design build services, 601 28th Ave. S, Waite Park. Pictured: Jill Magelssen, Jane Mohs, Bill Trout, Gary Trout, Kevin Kremers, Don Kainz and Dolora Musech.

Kramer Financial, financial planning and investment services, 1260 32nd Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Owen Peterson, Pat Goltz, Peter Mullin, Jodi Kramer, James Kramer and Dolora Musech.

TOP HATS | New Business

Conferences | Meetings | Presentations | Receptions | Trainings | Workshops SCSU Welcome Center Advantages:

Adjacent parking Conference planning services Flexible catering options Personalized customer service Registration services available State-of-the-art technology

SCSU Welcome Center Location:

355 Fifth Avenue South (4 blocks north of campus) St. Cloud, Minnesota Contact:

320.308.6100 welcomecenter@stcloudstate.edu

www.scsutraining.com/rentwc

CherryBerry Frozen Yogurt Bar, 3701 W Division St., Suite 1108, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tauna Quimby, Dan Nelson, Alicia Mitchell and Chris Panek.

TOP HATS | Milestones

25 year Chamber member TDS, local and long distance phone service, internet, data, VOIP, and email. Pictured: Chris Panek, Al Karasch and Inese Mehr.

Prairie River Home Care, a licensed Medicare certified home care agency offering a range of professional medical and non-medical care-giving services from pediatrics through seniors, 18 Riverside Ave. S, Suite 220, Sartell. Pictured: Diane Ohmann, Shannon Petroske, Dawn Rund, Sandy Barclay, Carrie Mueller and Inese Mehr.

25 year Chamber member Cathedral High School, 312 7th Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tauna Quimby, Mike Mullin and Brenda Eisenschenk.

TOP HATS | New Locations, New Ownerships & Expansions

Cold calls shouldn’t make you sweat. Sandler Training® utilizes continual reinforcement through ongoing training and individual coaching sessions not only to help you learn but also to ensure your success. With over 200 training centers worldwide to provide support, you won’t fail…because we won’t let you.

Duet, locally owned and operated, offering wireless services to residential and business customers, Crossroads Shopping Center, Waite Park. Pictured: Jason Bernick, Carl Koehn, Scott Widor, Jenny Ratzloff, Todd Willegalle, Jason Watercott, and Dolora Musech.

Pro Staff, temporary help services, 1400 St. Germain St. W, Suite 102, St. Cloud. Pictured: Kathy DeZeller, Tanya Pedersen, Chris Bichman, Dan Klabunde and Dolora Musech.

Brian Hart 220 Park Avenue South, Suite 100 St. Cloud, MN • 320-224-2121 www.brianhart.sandler.com S Sandler Training Finding Power In Reinforcement (with design) and Sandler Training are registered service marks of Sandler Systems, Inc. © 2012 Sandler Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Tech News

Tech Strategies

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Faceoff

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Leadership vs. Management: Is it just one or the other?

t’s a curious thing. When you research the word leadership in the dictionary, it lists ‘management’ as a synonym. However, when you find the word management in the same dictionary, ‘leadership’ is absent from mention. No wonder it’s hard to navigate the role of supervisor. If the dictionary is inconsistent in its characterizations, how are you supposed to know what to be? A sampling of thoughts on

the subject from 20th Century lecturer and author, Albert Edward Wiggam provides clarity: The boss says “Go”; the leader says “Let’s go!”The boss inspires fear; the leader inspires enthusiasm. The boss assigns the task; the leader sets the pace. The boss depends upon authority; the leader depends on good will. It seems as if the leader has greater potential for fun!

But more than that, the leader has greater potential for buy-in from employees and creating a workplace where everyone feels appreciated for their contribution – leading ultimately to a more productive work environment. Today’s successful businesses and organizations recognize the need for proficiency in the areas of collaboration, creativity, engagement, entrepreneurialspirit, optimism, inquiry and future-centered thinking. Additionally, there are far fewer employees in most companies today, making it necessary for remaining employees to consistently perform at very high levels without much supervision. This new workplace requires leadership. It requires supervisory skills that will engage employees in the process of achieving shared goals. Managers tell others what to do and how to do it. Leaders see the value of including employees in the process. They see great benefit to the organization in creating opportunities for dialogue and encouraging differing opinions. They know that the work of the company

is accomplished by people who are doing their jobs out of a keen desire for success and not merely the fear of being fired. And yet, a strong case can be made for the need for management. When you are working on a complex project for instance, a directive attitude might be the most effective way to accomplish the tasks. In highly automated settings, where there is little employee interaction, a managementbased supervisory style could be appropriate. During times of organizational chaos or distress, using a strong management plan and style could help shepherd the company through the tough times. Now consider the benefit to a company working on a complex project if both leadership and management traits were used with employees. Encouraging employee input into the project, being open to feedback, coaching for enhanced performance and celebrating the group’s success, are all leadership skills that will produce results. Having someone pay attention to deadlines and details, hold

About the writer Tracy Knofla is the co-owner and featured consultant of High Impact Training. She has been presenting to audiences across the country for more than 25 years.

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B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2


employees accountable, adhere to established guidelines and practices, and defend the bottom line, will also produce positive results. The combination of both skill sets ultimately creates the strongest environment for your company’s success. Supervisors must be quick change artists and intuitive individuals who can maneuver through the complexities of today’s business climate, guiding employees to success. For the best results, teach supervisors to be both strong managers, and strong leaders within the framework of their positions. BC

GOING GREEN

MONEY-SAVING TIP Adjusting shades and curtains when the sun is shining can help reduce solar gain and summer cooling bills. The hot summer sun warms up a room rapidly and more energy is required to keep indoor air cool. Closing blinds and shades during the day on windows that receive direct sun can reduce heat gain by 30 percent or more. High reflexivity film may also be applied to windows to keep the air cool. Source: Energy Smart TECH NEWS

Gone Fishin’

A new dome-based prototype promises an affordable method of rooftop aquaculture for apartment and commercial buildings. The bamboo dome houses a mini-ecosystem in which plants clean the water where fish swim and fish waste fertilizes the plants. The unique structure of the dome supports the weight of the fish tank, enabling installation on flat roofs without adapting the structure of the building. The project’s creators promise a harvest of about 880 pounds worth of vegetables and 220 pounds of fish each year, including everything from tomatoes to spinach to trout. Source: GOOD; View an artist’s rendition at www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m

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BUSINESS TOOLS

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G R OW

TECH STRATEGIES

What’s Your ROI?

Businesses that are fully engaged in social media are seeing expanded market share and increased sales leads. By Dawn Zimmerman

Companies that fully embrace social engagement experienced four times greater business impact than less engaged companies.

H

ow would you rate your social media engagement scale? A new study shows that it matters. The most socially engaged companies are seeing four times the ROI as their less engaged peers. Highly engaged businesses are seeing return in the form of expanded market share,

more sales leads and a more efficiently honed marketing message, according to “The Economics of the Socially Engaged Enterprise.” This study was conducted this year by Austin-based PulsePoint Group (www.pulsepointgroup.com) and The Economist Intelligence Unit. The groups surveyed more than 300 executives for their

About the writer

social engagement perspectives on everything from drivers and barriers to results and future expectations. The groups defined a socially engaged enterprise as one that actively engages constituents (employees, customers, partners, and other stakeholders) in meaningful conversations through social technologies. This mutual exchange of value is not just about products, but also about useful information that builds commonality of interests and a sense of trust. Here’s a look at some of the findings and what businesses can learn from them: Go all in for the highest return. Social engagement can be time consuming, but dabbling does not bring in the dollars. Companies that fully embraced social engagement experienced four times greater business impact than less engaged companies. In fact, companies that cannot fully

Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based communications company that specializes in social media.

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B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

engage are better off walking away because the return can be as little as 2 percent. C-level commitment is critical. Two-thirds of the organizations seeing the highest returns considered C-level leaders (CEO, COO, CFO, etc.) active advocates. Social media needs to be seen as a strategy to gain engagement that impacts the bottom line. Measuring return is important. Social media engagement is an investment, and like any smart investment, it needs to be measured, monitored and compared to other investments to ensure you’re spending your money wisely. Twentyeight percent of executives reported not believing in social engagement – the No. 1 reason being an inability to gauge ROI. In reality, social media tools have some of the most robust analytics when it comes to marketing tools today. Leverage them to set metrics based on business goals and measure your progress monthly – at a minimum.


Customers want to be engaged. More than half of executives said that customers’ expectations of social engagement are driving their social media plans. Companies seeing the highest return on social engagement use social media to gain feedback on new products (57 percent), or let customers participate in developing ideas. New studies are constantly being released on the impact of social media. While the results may vary, it’s clear that social media requires commitment, consistency and conversation. That needs to be in place first before the business will see the value – let alone a return. BC

TECH NEWS

SMILE! There are those who believe that video is the next big marketing opportunity. According to one study, nearly 85 percent of brand managers are using online video for marketing products and services. With YouTube outpacing Google as a search engine it may be time to embrace the web as a distribution medium for video. Source: Business News Daily

(M)etail

Up, Up & Away United States e-commerce sales will grow 62% by 2016, to

$327 billion.

Giving customers a uniquely personalized or tailored experience is something that successful e-commerce sites have done for years. Today, consumers aren’t just the center of attention, they actively contribute to the experience. Retailers who understand the trend and make the move toward more personalized online experiences will reap the greatest rewards from the (M)etail trend. Source: Trendwatching.com BC July/Aug 2012 Ad_Layout 1 5/31/12 8:06 AM Page 1

ARCHITECTURAL ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN DESIGN DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT CONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION SERVICES SERVICES

Delivering Creativity, Results, & Rock Solid Dependability

Since 1874

Single source. Superior service. Remarkable results. 3 2 0 . 2 51. 4 10 9 • w w w. m i l l e r a b . c o m

J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m

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BUSINESS TOOLS

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G R OW

DOING GOOD

Give Thoughtfully

If you struggle to know when to say “yes” to donation requests, creating a charitable giving plan can help.

E

very year the Minnesota Chamber, in partnership with local chambers, sponsors the Minnesota Business Gives program. This program recognizes businesses that give cash and/or in-kind contributions to charitable organizations amounting to 2 percent or more of their pretax earnings. The program is based on the Minnesota Keystone Program Standard, criteria established in 1976 by the Minneapolis Regional Chamber of Commerce. Participation in Business Gives programs provides an opportunity to present a uniform and comprehensive picture of how businesses contribute to the quality of life in our communities. To determine if your business qualifies for Business Gives or to set up a charitable giving plan, the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce provides these steps:

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B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

1)

Decide which areas of giving are the most important to your business. Would you like to:

.

Support organizations that align with your business goals?

.

Work on issues you care about?

. Support organizations

to which your employees already contribute?

.

Support organizations that are important to your customers? Source: The Minnesota Chamber of Commerce.


2) Determine the purpose of 5) Create a written policy your contributions.

. Do you want to create something physical and long-lasting?

that will establish the criteria for all company decisions about charitable contributions.

. Do you want to start

a new project or organization?

. Do you want to support existing organizations?

3) Decide if you want

to focus on one or a few organizations or distribute your contributions throughout the community.

4) Establish where you

would like to donate your contributions.

Online now For more information on the Business Gives program and for resources to help your company create a charitable giving plan, visit www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com or contact Whitney at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, 320-656-3830.

GOING GREEN

Cha-ching!

Save Green by Going Green Only 16 percent of companies that either have or are developing an environmental sustainability strategy said their tax or finance departments are actively involved in it, according to a survey by Ernst & Young. This lack of integration between tax departments and sustainability programs means many companies may miss opportunities for tax deductions and rebate opportunities. “Reducing energy consumption and carbon emissions, switching to alternative energy and fuel sources, innovating for cleaner technologies and offsetting carbon emissions – all of these efforts have tax considerations,” said Ernst & Young’s Paul Naumoff. Source: Ernst & Young, LLP

They were

&friendly.

professional

–Karla Schneider, K&S Pharmacy

L to R: Sarah Kaufman, Karla Schneider and Brian Schneider of K&S Pharmacy; Matt Kruetzer and Shannon Bertram of CMCU

“Working with the Central Minnesota Credit Union was wonderful. They were professional and friendly. It was comforting to have someone on our side that really cared, especially during a new business venture...thanks again for all your help and hard work.” —Karla Schneider, K&S Pharmacy, Avon

Get customized solutions tailored for your business! Talk to one of our lending experts today–888.330.8482 myCMCU.org facebook.com/mycmcu Federally Insured by NCUA

J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m

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ECONOMY CENTRAL

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PRESENTED BY FALCON BANK

BY THE NUMBERS

What Women Think

Helping companies solve problems to protect and create jobs is the focus of Grow Minnesota! By Bill Blazar

S

t. Cloud companies are weathering today’s fragile economy. They’re doing it through innovation, increased use of technology and growing their markets. Those trends were reflected statewide in Grow Minnesota! visits during the 2010-11 program year. St. Cloud businesses, however, are taking these efforts to the next level. Grow Minnesota! is the distinctive privatesector initiative of the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce focused on business retention and job creation. The St. Cloud Area Chamber is among the nearly 60 local partners that form the network. Volunteers statewide conducted almost 1,000 one-on-one retention visits. Local chamber volunteers conducted 49 visits in St. Cloud. In 18 instances, volunteers reconnected with companies they had seen in previous years. Delivering one-on-one assistance – helping companies solve problems to protect and create jobs – is fast becoming the trademark of Grow Minnesota! Approximately 4,900 jobs at 122 businesses were protected this past year due to follow-up assistance. Four of those companies were in St. Cloud. Innovation remains a strength of Minnesota companies. Approximately 70 percent of companies visited during the past seven years have consistently reported plans to develop new products. This year, 80 percent of the St. Cloud companies visited

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reported similar intentions. Thirty-five percent of the St. Cloud companies identified the local region as their fastest growing market. Another 18 percent identified the United States, 22 percent said Minnesota, 18 percent earmarked the Midwest, and six pointed to exports. Overall the Central Minnesota economy remains fairly healthy. Local employers were split about 50-50 on whether they expect to add employees or remain stable in the next year. The companies that do want to expand, however, are challenged to recruit qualified workers – a finding that has been underscored by the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development. The biggest shortages locally were in clerical/ office staff, precision production and information technology. The role of the St. Cloud Area Chamber and its Grow Minnesota! affiliation remains invaluable in fostering economic development. Twenty-five percent of the respondents in a Grow Minnesota! statewide survey said they would turn to the local chamber of commerce for business assistance. If you would like to receive a Grow Minnesota! visit, contact Ginny Kroll at the St. Cloud Area Chamber, 320-656-3805. BC Bill Blazar, Minnesota Chamber senior vice president of public affairs and business development, spearheads the Grow Minnesota! program.

B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

In a recent survey from The Hartford, women business owners were asked what they thought about business and the economy.

91%

say their business is successful

55%

rate themselves as conservative risk takers

53%

are optimistic that the economy will improve in 2012

15%

say access to capital is not a major barrier

50%

say increased cost of doing business is a major barrier

Economy Central presented by

Source: The Hartford Financial Services Group Inc.

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$1.5M

$393,348 41 37 121 57 152 24 141 35 59 32 42 17

St. Augusta St. Augusta $.5M

M O

$23,294,590

$5,434,857

$3,425,316

$1M D J A J

$0 J J A A S M O N J $2M No. permits 39 of40 43 38 55 44 52 37 27

M

No. of permits 23 44 $1M

St. CloudWaite Park Sauk Rapids

Sartell

$0

A

62 128 160

$.5M

$0 J

D

$5,173,500

$10,914,217

$1.5M F

25

$1.5M

30 No. 40 31 27 15 42 No. 31 of41 27 28 15 No. 31 of40 346 of8permits 4 of41 8permits 935 6 permits 152 141 98 28 31 23 permits 23 44 39 43 38 55 44 52 37 27 41 37 121 57 No. 24of permits 35 59 32 5 42 5 17 1 27 No. 045 5641 5242 No. 3 of41 2permits 4 28 4 44 8

of permits No. of permits 136 59 224 200 233 27 256No. 241 206 106 3062 4025 4162 35 128 45 160 41 41 121 152 141 42 17 46 98

37

$3M

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITSBUILDING PERMITS RESIDENTIAL

J

$.5M

$2M

$1M D J

N

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$1M

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$46,115,239

$5,434,857

$23,294,590

$1M J J F A MS AO

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No. of permits 41 121 152 141 136 59 224 200 42 17 233 27 256 46 241 98 206 106 62

37

Waite Park Waite Park

TSBUILDING PERMITS AL $0

J

$2.5M

$1.5M

$215,190

$.5M

$.5M

apids

$5,173,500

$0 A M $2M No. of permits 38 44

A

62 128 160

$1.5M

$3M $1M

$2M $1M

$2M

$2M

$5,475

M

$3M

$.5M

$215,190

F

25

$.5M

$5M $1M

$3M $1M

$2M

$2M

$1M

$4M

$2,544,033

$2,841,238

$1M

$1M D J

N

$2,076,302

$1.5M

$1.5M

106 62

$5M $1M

$2M

$2M

MS

$0 N AD MJ

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$2M $0 JM AA A S

JF

M O

JJ

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40 3

3 24of 3permits 43 55of permits 52 27 0 37 1 57 No. 35 1132 53 0 No.6 16 $1.5M

$1.5M

Sauk Rapids Sartell St. Augusta Waite Park

$0 J S FAO M

$0 JD AJA SFM O MJ N AJ DA

J N

5No. 37 11 810 14 28 412 927 6 0 of11permits 7 No. 1 of823 permits 017 19 31 19

$1.5M

St. Joe Waite Park Sauk Rapids

St. Augu

BUILDING PERMITS BUILDING PERMITS BUILDING PERMITS RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS BUILDING PERMITS RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS TS,RESIDENTIAL CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING COMMERCIAL PERMITS, RESIDENTIAL CONSOLIDATED BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING COMMERCIAL PERMITS, BUILDING CONSOLIDATED PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING COMMERCIAL PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLID RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL $2M

$5M $1M

$2M

$1M

JF

$1M $0 MS AJO J J FAA M

$1.5M $0 AD SJ OF A

JN

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Waite Park Waite Park St. Joe

NM

DA J

St. Joe

JJ

$1.5M $.5M

7

3

$0 N AD MJ

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M O

$1M $0 J A D JA

J N

S OJ FM M

No. 10 19 50 of11permits 37 11 8 14 28

N AJ

$39,800

564

AF

35

$40,000 32 No.74of permits 43 8

No. 30 40 3 of8permits 28 31 4

41 8

935

645 541

242

J

J

A

D

J

F

M

31

41

27

28

15

S

31

$1M

$.5M 0.8

$39,800 90

20

F

M

A

A

M

J

No. of permits 0

1

$0 A

J N

JD

AJ

SF

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No. 3 of 3permits 11 53

50

11

37

8 11

28 14

31 7

M

J

J

A

S

N A

D

J

F

M

41

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9

6

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A

$1.5M

$1.5M

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J

A

J F $0 S OA

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J

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DJ

JJ

No. of permits 0

4

No. 0 6 of 5permits 11 14

1 12

37

3 13

2

0.6

$2M $1M

15

13

$1M

$1.5M $.5M

$1.5M $.5M

AA

$0

$.5M

ST. CLOUD

$18,600

$2M

150

$120,000

$1M $0 S A O MN J D J J A F M S M OJ A NJ

$60,000 $0 2.0 $0$1M DA JS A FOM MN J AD J J A F S MO AN

JM

FJ

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13 5

of 50 permits 7 6 13 22 6 120 of4permits 17 45 4422 50 717 2345$40,000 6No. 1927 07 13 12 5 9 44 11 9147 14No. 12 7 13 944 27 9147 6 of permits 34 No.76of permits 35 110 14No. 44 22

1 23

$100,000

0.6

1.5

0.0

$5,475

0

S A

O M

N J

D J

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3 of 3permits 11 53 No.

50

11

37

11 8

14 28

A -0.6M

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5

-1.0

J

A

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9

6

5

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0

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1.0

$60,000 N A DM J J F J MA A S $0 A M

ST. CLOUD $120,000

2.2%

$40,000 No. of permits

2

0

O

13

N

D

J F $0 S OA

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NM

DJ

JJ

4

6 of 5permits 11 14 No. 0

12 1

7 3

13 3

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FA 0.5 MS 911

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60

1

7

11

14

7

A -0.8 1

2nd quarter

DJ

0

1

0

$40,000 0 of permits 0 0 No.

M A M 1st Quarter

J

J

A

$60,000

XX

0.6

2.0 Jobs oss Domestic United ProductStates Nonfarm 1.8% $1M

$1M

UNITED STATES % CHANGE QUARTERLY % CHANGE IN REAL GDP - MONTHLY 0,000 $40,000 120 1.0 3.0 1.5

0,000$.5M

2.8% $195,840

$.5M 0.8

N/A

90 6%

2.5

D

1.8% J60

1.5 A

0,000

0

1.3% S O

1 N

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1.0 $0

30

J

A

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0.0

-0.2

2.2%

$20,000

M

JN/A

$1.5M

ST. CLOUD

ST. CLOUD

2.2%

$120,000

M

J

J

M

J

J

A

D

J

F

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1

0

2nd quarter

1

$0

XXXX

SA -0.6 OM NJ

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-0.8

0

A

-1.0 J F 4th quarter

D

J

F

MINNESOTA

M

$1M

$1M

UNTRY WIDE

3rd quarter

S

J

3.0

40

$80,000 $.5M 35

N/A

$.5M $80,000

2.5

$600

20 -1.0 J F M A M 4th quarter 1st Quarter

$20,000 O N 15

10 $0

$200,000 J

A

S

O

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COUNTRY WIDE 10%

$150,000

$150,000

D

2.0

QUARTERLY % CHANGE IN REAL STEARNS COUNTY2011 $100,000 $100,000 6% GDP

N/A

$15,075 15

$600

1.5 J

J

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D $20,000 J

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6%0.0%

N

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11

13

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J

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8

3

A

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J

J

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J

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0.0 A

4th A quarter

2.0

0.8

JF A M SA O M NJ

3

12

DJ

A

S

$60,000 2.0 $0

J

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134

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10 $0 JD

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41

60

15

N

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J

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No. 0 of permits 0 0 00 1

$2M

$2M

A N O 5 0 14 0 12 11 0

2.8%

Food & Be Unemployment Rates $1.5M

$600COUNTRY

$1.5M

ST. CLOUD $15,075

WIDE $15,075

1.8%

1.3%

D

F

$0 A S 0.5M A

7

13

9

9

J

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$600

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D

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6

JD

JJ

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No. 6% of permits 3

12

0.0

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23$40,000 10 7 0 10 1 No.5 of permits

Minnesota Nonfarm Jobs Minnesota Nonfarm$20,000 Jobs

D

A

M

J

J

A

N/A

S 2ndOquarter N D 3rd J quarter F M N/A

2.0 AO

MN

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4th A quarter

1st Quarter

2.0

SM

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$200,0001.0

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40 1.0

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MINNESOTA BENTON AND STEARNS COUNTY -

20 -1.0

1.0

15 -1.5

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$0

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M D J OA N

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NSt. CloudD

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$100,000 0.4 -1.0 JJ FA M S A O N D J

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1st Quarter

10%

Median Local Nonfarm JobsHo 1.5

25

D

OA N M D J

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St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. P 6% Rochester

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-1.5 Minneapolis/St. Paul 0.2 Minnesota Benton & Stearns Counties United States Minnesota -2.0 $50,000 D

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St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Rochester D

J

MINNESOTA - MONTHLY % CHANGE COUNTRY WIDE

30 0.0

$100,000-1.0

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Minnesota Unemploy Nonfarm J

35

$150,0000.0

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STEARNS COUNTY

MINNESOTA

2.2%

$0

4%

J F M A M J J A Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions Median Housing Prices 1.5 1.5

20 15

AN

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23$40,000 10 7 3 1012 9 23 11 5 13 10 3 7 8 10 3 9 No. 5of permits

1.5

$40,000

J $20,000 J

MO

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MINNESOTA - MONTHLY % CHANGE - MONTHLY % CHANGE MINNESOTA

O

A quarter 4th

FS $0

No. of permits 0

$20,000 1.0

St. Cloud 35 -1.5 Paul Minneapolis/St. Paul Minneapolis/St. Minnesota Minnesota United 30 States United States $60,000 $50,000 -2.0

6%

$0 0.8

M

15

25

S 2ndOquarter N D 3rd J quarter F M A M N/A

1st Quarter

A

$20,000 $28,785

00

JA

COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMIT COMMERCIA

$.5M $80,000 2.5

$600

20 $195,840

Local Nonfarm Jobs Local Nonfarm Jobs

S 2ndOquarter N D 3rd J quarter F M

1

DJ

$1M

25

St. Cloud Source: $50,000 www.positivelyminnesota.com 10 4% $0 Minneapolis/St. Paul $0 J F M A M J A J M A J SJ OA NS S AO M N JD JJ AF S M OA N D J F M A Minnesota BENTON AND STEARNS COUNTY MONTHLY % CHANGE - MONTHLY 5 BENTON AND -STEARNS COUNTY % CHANGE United States

MINNESOTA - MONTHLY % CHANGE- MONTHLY % CHANGE MINNESOTA

7

$1.5M

$.5M

35

St. Cloud $80,000

0.0-2.0% $100,000 A

14

$40,000 No. of permits

40

-1.0% $150,000 -1.5%

11

STEARNS COUNTY $100,000

MINNESOTA

1.0

4% M JJ 0.5 M A

7

A

Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions -0.5 Median Prices 1.8% Housing -0.5

$15,075

2.2%

1

ST. CLOUD

$200,000

Minnesota Nonfarm Jobs Minnesota Nonfarm Jobs 2.0

COUNTRY WIDE

1.3%

-0.5%

60

OM NJ

M

Unemployment Rates Food & Beverage Tax Collections 0.5 0.5

1.0

5 0

1.3% S O

0.5%

1.5

20 2.8%

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MINNESOTA

$200,000 M A M 1st Quarter

25

30 $60,000 $60,000 10 4% J S A O MN J D J J A F SM O A N D J F M A -0.6 $0 2.0 $0 A M J J A S A OM N J D J J A F S MO AN 25 5 -0.8 $40,000 $40,000 No. of permits 3 12 23 5 10 7 10 9 11 13 3 8 3 No. of permits 3 12 23 0 5 10 7 10 9

A

nemployment Rates Unemployment Rates Economy Central presented by 2nd quarter

1

XXXX XXXX XXXX 2.5

1.0%

F

$0

2.8%

8%

Gross Domestic Product Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions

Median Housing Prices Median Housing Prices0.5

J A FS MO AN

30

A

3rd quarter

J

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com 0

A

35

$120,000

-0.4

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Y

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uctions Auctions oreclosure 0.5

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0.4 A F M A $0 S A O M N J D J J A F 0.5 S MO AN 0.2 0No. of 0 permits 0 00 0 1 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

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N/A

0.6

0,000

0,000 o. of permits

0.4

8% Food & Beverage Tax Tax Collections Lodging Dollars

$3,105,391

150 8%

0,000

2.5

0.8

$3,105,391

ST. CLOUD

2.8%

$80,000

$3,105,391

$3,536,834

. CLOUD

A

S

Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Gross Domestic Auctions Product

$3,105,391

$3,536,834

$5,000,000

$5,000,000

$60,000

$80,000 odging TaxHome Dollars Sales Closed - Total $1.5M

M

N/A

Gross Domestic United ProductStates Nonfarm Jobs

SA

A

J

93

$60,000

COUNTRY WIDE COUNTRY WIDE 2011-2012 % CHANGE COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED $120,000 10% $120,000 10% 0 0 $0 0 $2M $0 $0 $2M O N D J F M A J F M A A M J J A 10% S $2M O N A DM J J F J M A A S A M J J A $2M SA OM NJ DJ JA FS MO AN D A M J J A S 2.0% NGE 2011 QUARTERLY % $100,000 CHANGE UNITED IN REAL STATES GDP - MONTHLY % CHANGE STEARNS COUNTY2011 QUARTERLY % CHANGE IN REAL GDP $100,000 3.0 3.0 1.5% 1.0 40

arm Jobs

J

D

30 $60,000

F

JA FS MO AN D J F M A $0 $0 A M J J A S A O M N

$40,000 No. of permits

-1.0 J F 4th quarter

3rd quarter

J

N

QUARTERLY % CHANGE IN REAL GDP STEARNS COUNTY2011 $100,000 $100,000 3.0 40

$120,000

Unemployment Rates Unemployment $20,000 Non Farm JobsRates$20,000

D

11 9

M

AO

$1M

ST. CLOUD

$60,000

SA -0.6 OM NJ

N

93

0.0

M

AO

$19

$.5M

N/A

Gross Domestic Product Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions

$195,840 $1.5M

XXXX

-0.4

$0

J60 A

M

J

MS

$80,000 Lodging Dollars Food & Beverage Tax Tax Collections

0.4 $1M $1M $0 AA S A O M N J D J J A F S M O A N D J 0.2 $100,000 $100,000 06No.22 0of permits 0 00 01 40 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 19

1.8% JM 60

JF

FA

$1.5M

$2M

2.8% $195,840$1.5M

$.5M0.8

90

$18,600

2.5

$.5M

COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, BUILDING CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED $120,000 $120,000

$1M

$80,000 Sales Closed - Total Lodging TaxHome Dollars

30

Lodging Dollars Food & Beverage Tax Tax Collections St. Joe St. Augu ST. CLOUD ST. CLOUD

UNITED STATES 2011 QUARTERLY % CHANGE IN REAL GDP - MONTHLY % CHANGE $100,000 120 1.0 3.0

30 30 Dollars Food & Beverage Tax Collections ax Food & Beverage Tax Collections $20,000 St. AugustaUnemployment St. Joe CLOUD ST. CLOUD St. Augusta ST.Rates St. Joe 2011-2012

$1.5M

A

Gross Domestic United ProductStates Nonfarm Jobs

$1M$2M

$28,785 ST. CLOUD

10

MJ

$1.5M

$1M $1M $0 $0 DJ JJ A FA M MS J AO J N A D S JAO FM

NM

St. Joe

$8,990

N A DM J J F J M A A S $0 A M

COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED 150 $120,000

$.5M

Employment

J

A

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XXXX

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J $0

1

20

-0.4 D

No. of permits 0

$2M $0 A

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J

5 1.3% 30 30 $.5M $.5M $.5M $80,000$.5M $20,000Sartell, Waite Park, St. N/A $80,000 -0.2 $80,000 -0.2 Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sources: Augusta, and St. Joseph. $28,785 $8,990 90

= exceeds chart$8,990 scale $.5M

60

J

$1.5M

$39,800$28,785

0.4 $1M $1.5M $0 $0 $0 M O A N DA M N J D J JA A FMS MJ O AJ N AD S JA O FM NMJ DAJ J A F S 60 0.2 No. of permits 1 7 11 14 7 1 o. of permits 10 19 19 12 23 27 17 4 6 5 3 7 3 1 3 3 11 3 0 1 7 11 14 7 1 No. of permits 10 19 19 12 23 27 17 4 60 120 $1M 15 0.0

N

A

M

$1M

$3,425,316

1.0

$46,659,823

$.5M

$.5M

M

A

UNITED STATES - MONTHLY % CHANGE 120

$2M $8,990 BENTON COUNTY

90

J $0

United States Nonfarm Jobs

$2.5M

150

F

$1.5M

Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions ome Sales Closed - Total

$8,990 CLOUD

D

$8,990

COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDA 0 $0$2M $2M

$3,536,834

$1.5M

$3M $1M

$1.5M $.5M

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$0 J60 OA M AA S

JF

2

$1.5M $.5M

45 7 44 11 0 2 13 3 4 0 No. 6 6 of 5permits 0No.12 1of permits 37 13 3 22 91144 93147 No. 6017of1permits 16 11 14 1050 14 19

St. Joe

Home Sales Closed Sheriff - Total ’s Foreclosure Auctions Lodging TaxHome Dollars Sales Closed - Total Waite Park Sauk Rapids ST. CLOUD St. Augusta Waite Park ST. CLOUD BENTON COUNTY ST. CLOUD

COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED 150 $2M $1M

O

A

$5,000,000

$1.5M

M

N

A O

$20,000

$28,785

$3,536,834

1

AO

M S

$0 N AD MJ

JJ

526

$1.5M $.5M

$.5M

90 $28,785

$8,511

AJD

$.5M

$.5M

$3,536,834

5

FA MS

6

J

$80,000$.5M

$1M $0 O MM N JS FA

DA

19 12 31 7 No. 4 1 of823 927 0617 permits

St. Augusta St. Augusta

$5,000,000

of permits 5

e Auctions Sauk Rapids Sartell

JJ

F

23

J

5

30

$46,659,823

A

$46,659,823

J

$46,659,823

J

$1.5M

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$0 S OA NM DJ

M

$2M $1M J

7

M

$60,000

$0 JM AA A S

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$5,000,000

$2M

A

D

$393,348No. of permits 22 44 147No.120 17 45 4422 5044 27147 7 17 23 45 6 4422 50 19 27 of permits

A

$100,000

ITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITSBUILDING PERMITS RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITSBUILDING PERMITS AL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL 0 0 0 $2M $2M $2M $2M $2M $2M $0

$46,659,823

$3,425,316

3

$8,990

$.5M

043No. 655of permits 16 3 24of 3permits 52 27 0 37 1 57 No. 35 1132 53

$8,990

$.5M

5

A

COMMERCIA COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMIT

$2M $1M $0$1M A S A OM N J D J J A F S MO A N

$1M $0

M

10

60 MS

FA

6

$1.5M $.5M

$5,475

$5,475

M O

$0 JM AA S OA NM D J

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57 No. 24of permits 35 32 641 5242 No. 331 of41 2permits 4 4 44 8 39 231 40 3 346 of8permits 30 No. 40 4 of41 8permits 935 0645 5 27 28 15 121 152 141 59 5 42 5 17 1 27 No. 98 28 31 23 $1M 5

St. Augusta St. Augusta apids $.5M

$0 A AD MJ N

D J 37 41

$215,190

F S

$46,659,823

19No.12 23 2710 1719 4 19 6 12 5 23 3 27 7 17 3 4 of permits $1M 15

$.5M

90

$8,511

$2M $1M J F

D

$3,105,391

$.5M

$2M $1M S A O MN J D J J A F SM O A N

$3,105,391

No. of permits 10 19 120

16

COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED 150 $120,000

20

$1.5M $0 A

J

$5,000,000

$1M

6

J

$18,600

$3,105,391

$1.5M $.5M

0

M

$3,105,391

5 No. 3of permits 2$2M4 0 4 6 8 5 2 3 3 2 0 4 6 4 16$393,348 8 2 3 $2.5M

A

$1.5M

$18,600

$46,659,823

6

$1M $0

A

10

$1.5M $0 $0 A J J A S O N N D J F M A A M J $2M No. permits 39 43 38 55 44 52 37 27 31 of 41 27 23 28 44 15 No. 31 of40 permits $1M

$2M

$1.5M

$1.5M $.5M

$39,800

$5,475

No. of permits 0 $1M 15

M

$1.5M $.5M

$1.5M

$39,800

$2M

$3,425,316

$3M $1M J F

D

$1.5M

$.5M

COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED 150

$2M $1M S A O MN J D J J A F SM O A N

J

$.5M

$1.5M $.5M

$46,659,823

32

$2M

$1M$2M

Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions Sales Closed - Total Home Sales Closed - Total Lodging TaxHome Dollars BENTON COUNTY ST. CLOUD ST. CLOUD Waite Park Sauk Rapids ST. CLOUD St. Augusta Waite P

$215,190

35

$0

A

$8,511

M

$46,115,239

$3M

24

J

$2M $1M

$2M

$2.5M

$10,914,217

$8,511

$1.5M

A

$5,434,857

$4M $.5M

A

$23,294,590

57

M

$3,425,316

$.5M

37

$1.5M$0

F

$5,173,500

$215,190

44 2739 3740 57 4324 5535 52 32 27 $2.5M

$46,115,239

$2M

$1.5M

20

$5M $3M$1M $1M MN J D J J A F SM O A N D J

$23,294,590

$.5M

COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED$3M COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED

$2M

$3,425,316

$.5M

St. Cloud

Sartell

$4M

Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions Sartell BENTON COUNTY Sauk Rapids

$1.5M

$2M

$3M $1M

$393,348

$5,173,500

$1.5M

$2.5M

$10,914,217

$46,115,239

$23,294,590

$393,348

$2M $1M

$2M

$5,434,857

$3M $1M

$2M

$5,475

$2M

J

F

M

A

United States

J

F

J

F

M

A

M

A

4% M

0.0

-0.2

J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m

31

$0

M

JJ

FJ

M

AJ M J J


$8,990

$80,000 $0

ECONOMY CENTRAL

40,000

$0 N/A A M J J BY A SFALCON O N D J BANK F M A PRESENTED

$0

5

1

3

8

28

31

4

8

J

A

S

D

J

9

6

5

$.5M 8% $0

$20,000

A

$0

M A $28,785 62 128 160

XXXX 25

M

J

J

A

13

4

6

5

A

M

J

J

A

No. of permits 6% 0

1

3

3

11

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS $20,000 Waite Park St. Augusta Sartell Sauk Rapids St. Cloud A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

S

O

N $8,990 D J

11

14

12

7

13

N

D

J

F

J

J

A

No. of permits 38 44

37

41

121 152 141 59

M

A

9

9

6

D

J

F

M

A

1

7

11

14

7

1 M

J

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

35

$3M

MINNESOTA 120 $200,000 $60,000

$0

A

M

60 $20,000 J J

$.5M

$0 S AO MN J D J J A F SM OA N

D

J

2

3

$100,000 30$0 A

5

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

F N/A M 0 M

6

A

$0

$.5M 0.8

$40,000 $60,000

$100,000

A

$0 J

M

$0 $20,000

A

M

J

A

M

J

J

0

A $50,000 S A OMN J D J J A F S MO AN

$0 D

J

F

M

A

A M J

J

60 N

D

J

F

M

A

1

0

0

0

0

0

4

1

0

1

0

0

S

O

11

14

J

J

A

6

5

A

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F

J A-1.0 J A

M

S

J

$2M

$1.5M

O

N

D

M

J

$2M

$120,000

3.0% 2.5%

$1.5M

0.6

F

M

A

M

J

$1M

0.8

$1M

0.5%

$80,000

$.5M

0.00.0% $39,800

$.5M

A

S

SF

O

N

No. of permits 0.0 23 44

39

40

43

55

J

A

OM NA

-0.4

D

N

-1.5% F N/AM

J

St. Cloud -0.8 N/A D J F M A -3.0% Minneapolis/St. Paul Rochester -1.0 J

N

D

J

$0

A

$0 J

A 0.2 M

= exceeds chart $0 scale M FNJ M DJ AJA NA DSA JO

JA

M SJ OJ A $40,000

-2.0%7 No. 3 of permits No. 5 of5permits 1 30 -2.5%

5-0.6 3

F

M

No. 5 of31 3permits 4 44 2 28 42 822 94St.147 68 517 Cloud

68

4% $20,000 J

0.0

1.5

$8,511

2345

$.5M $0

Mpls/St.Paul

F

M Minnesota A M J

MO

$0

-2.0 S

O

N

D

J

J

F

F

M

M

A

A

M 2006

A

M J 2007

J

A 2008

-0.2

J

A

F

S

O 2009

M

N

D

$0 M

A

JA

J M

JA

JS

2.0

COUNTRY 1.5 WIDE 10% 1.0

$1M

$1M

1.8%

2.2%

0.5 0.0 8%

= exceeds chart scale $.5M $.5M

-0.5 -1.0

AN

D

J

F

M

7

23

6

22

J

A

O

AO S N O D N

N

J

F

$

$0 St. Cloud $0 A M JA JM AJ6%SJ OA NS -1.5 Minneapolis/St. Paul

3rd quarter

M

XX

A

19 No. of0 permits No. of permits 1 310 19 3 Minnesota

19 11

United States

N/A D

2nd quarter

D

J

Unemplo

$1.5M

1.3%

0.0

J

Minneso

$2M

$2M

2.8%

50 16 27 6 0.5

D 2010

M

MINNESOTA -

044

United States

F

A

No. of permits 0

$18,600

S

A

No. of permits 3

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PE COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS,

1.0

FS

N $600 27

Augusta SaukSt. Rapids S

2.0

$.5M

52

-1.5

2.5

6% $60,000

0.4

-1.0%

J

O

S

$1.5M

$1M

8% $100,000

0.6

0.2

JD M AJA

A

A

3.0

$393,348

1.0%

JN F

J

J

-1.0

St. 30 Cloud N D J F Paul M A Minneapolis/St. Minnesota 12 7 13 9 9 6 United States 0 A

J

0.8

12 3

023

127

J

F

-2.0

4th quarter

1st Quarter

4%

A

J

F

Sources: Minnesota Compass led by Wilder Research; Bureau of Economic Analysis - www.BEA .gov.

0.0

$0

O

$1M $.5M O

M

COUNTRY WIDE

1.03.5%

S$0 OA NM DJ J J FA MS AO

A

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Rochester

J$28,785 A S

COUNTRY WIDE BENTON $1.5M AND STEARNS COUNTY - MONTHLY % CHANGE ST. CLOUD

16 permits No.$50,000 of permits No. 23 44 39 40 52 1927 37 23 57 24 17 35 432 6 30 of40 41 35 45 No. 41of permits 42 43 31 1055 41 1927 28 1215 31 27 0.4

A

J

4

XXX

A

-0.5

M

XXXX XXXX XXXX XXXX

0.6 $0 A N AS D MOJ

JO

98

M

$2M

$3M

-0.5%

0.2 0

D

-0.2

$20,000 M JS A $40,000

AJ

46

13

0.41.5%

$60,000 $80,000

27

St. Cloud -1.5 Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS RESIDENTIAL PERMITS COMMERCIAL BUILDING BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED United States -2.0

BENTON AND STEARNS COUNTY - MONTHLY2.0% % CHANGE

$1M

$8,511

37 No. 41of permits 121 152 0141 6 59 5 42 317 227 446 498 8

A

$1M

J O FN M D

17

90

10% United States Nonfarm Gross Domestic Product Annual change inNonfarm realJobs GDP Local FoodJobs & Beverage Tax Collections UNITED STATES - MONTHLY % CHANGE 2011 QUARTERLY % CHANGE IN REAL GDP

$80,000Local Nonfarm Jobs $100,000

$2M $150,000

$393,348

90 $40,000 $150,000

No. 10 of permits 38 44

ST. CLOUD $100,000 $120,000

$1M

$.5M

$.5M

20

$5,434,857

$200,000

$1.5M

$1.5M

$1M

30

15

MINNESOTA

Median Housing Prices $80,000

$1M

25

$5,173,500

$1.5M

$1.5M

S

A

A

$2.5M

$120,000 Median Housing PricesTax Dollars Lodging

TEARNS COUNTY ST. CLOUD $100,000 40 150

N

ST. CLOUD

$4M

A

M

Gross Domestic Product Unemployment Rates

O

Food & Beverage Tax Collections

ST. CLOUD

$120,000 heriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions Home Sales Closed - Total

S

$46,115,239

A

$23,294,590

J

$215,190

J

$10,914,217

M

J

F

No. of permits 0

-0.5

4%

J

SartellWaite ParkSt. Joe

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS RESIDENTIAL PERMITS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGBUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED 4% F M A M J J A $2M J $2M $5M

Housing/Real Estate

Lodging Tax Dollars A

$2M

$2M

0.5A

$0

N

0

A

42

0.0

O

0

1.0

No. of permits 0

3 A

S

0.5 $0

$195,840

$.5M $0

6%

F

N/A S

M

$1M $.5M 1.5 O N D

M

N/A

RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITSBUILDING PERMITS $0

XXXX XXXX

A

5

$0

2

F

1.0

120

2.0

8% $0

10

No. of permits 0

$60,000

No. of permits 5 $40,000

J

$40,000

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$80,000

$1.5M $.5M

$3,425,316

$120,000

80,000

-0.2

Cost of Living - Minnesota

M J J A S O N D J F M A Sheriff ’sA Foreclosure Auctions Median Housing Local Nonfarm Jobs Sheriff ’s Foreclosure AuctionsPrices Home Sales Closed - Total Lodging Tax Dollars Waite Park St. Augusta St. Joe Sartell STEARNS Sauk Rapids Waite Park COUNTY MINNESOTA BENTON AND STEARNS COUNTY - MONTHLY % CHANGE ST. CLOUD St. Augusta BENTON COUNTY ST. CLOUD COMMERCIAL PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS,BUILDING CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PERMITS, CONSOLIDATED COMMERCIAL BUILDING PE $200,000 150 $120,000 Gross Domestic Product Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions Median Housing Prices Local No A

S

O

T

$1M

$1M

25

15 10

20

1.3%

1.0

$.5M

$50,000

5

$.5M 5

$28,785

$.5M

$5,475

1.5

$1M

$195,840

$.5M

15

$8,990 10

0

0.5 A

M

No. of permits 5

5

J

A

J

A

M J J A S O N D J F M A $0 J F M S AO MN J D J J A F SM OA N D

0

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M

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5

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JJ AS MO

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AF JN

S M O A N D J JD AJ SF OM NA

115 Cloud 142 12 Area 7 13 9 9 6 of Realtors, No. ofhttp://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics; permits 0 1 No.3of permits 8 28 0Estate 31 13 4 4sources: 8 6 9 5 6 St. 1 No. 3 of permits 3 11 0 3 1 0 0 1 0 7 011 014 07 Housing/Real Association 0.0 0 A M J J A S O N D quarter 3rd quarter quarter 1st Quarter Benton2ndCounty Sheriff’s Civil4th Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office; http://thething.mplsrealtor.com/

41

F M A D

J

1

0

J

F

F

M

A

J A $0 A

1

0

0

No. of permits 0

M

ST. CLOUD

ST. CLOUD

$120,000

150

0.4

$100,000

120

$80,000

-0.2 -0.4

$60,000 $40,000

-1.0

$20,000

S A O MN J D J J A F SM O A N

D

J

F

M

A

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J

J

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A

S

O

JS

F O

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M DA JM F J M N

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A

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S

O

1.5

1.3%

$100,000 0 Oct-06

1.0

Oct-07

Oct-08

Oct-09

Oct-10

Oct-11

$50,000

0.0

2nd quarter

$0

3rd quarterA

32

M4th quarter J J A 1stSQuarter O N D

J

F M A

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35

25

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75.1

81.3

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109.5 92.7 10

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115.9 99.9

109.2 102.6

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S J O FN MD

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228.3

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J M

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XXX

8% 103.8

5

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Minnesota United States

F

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30

113.3 101.6 104.3

88.6

D

0

Unemployment Rat

Eau Claire, $60,000 WI

Manhattan, NY

0

J

40

94.9 15

D

A

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J

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J

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A

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S

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183.1 165.8 166.5

Local Nonfarm Job

145.9

BENTON AND STEARNS COUN

154.3

Stamford, CT

10

St. Cloud Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Incorporations - MN Secretary of State, Graph courtesy of SCSU5 Rochester

0.5

103.9

Median Housing Prices

XXXX

0 -0.2

110.6 102.5

91.4

San Francisco, CA

0.4 20 Visit www.BusinessCentral 15 Magazine.com 0.2

0

STEARNS COUNTY

97.1

87.4

San Jose, CA

0.6

1

Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auc

76.3

N

0.8

No. of permits 0

0.5 97.9

$200,000

25

10

95.5

-1.5residential housing *IncludesMinneapolis/St. single-familyPaul and multi-unit

Now online

1.8%

76.8

$20,000

N/A

3

91.7

Wausau, WI$40,000

40

30

F M A

97

STEARNS COUNTY BENTON AND STEARNS COUNTY - MONTHLY % CHANGE MINNESOTA Queens, NY

2.2%

20

$150,000

J

2nd-quarter 3rd quarter 4th quarter 1st Quarter Source: C2ER The Council for Community and Economic Research. St. Cloud

Local Nonfarm Jobs Sheriff ’s Foreclosure Auctions 35

2.5

O N D

St. Cloud A M J J A S O 0.0N D Minneapolis/St. Paul$0 A M J J A S A Rochester

101.5 1.0 95.9

0.0

D

1.5

Brooklyn, NY

2.8%

8

$80,000

1.3%

Honolulu, HI

$200,000 30

3.0

M

101.9 108.5

0.5

50

40

D

3

11

2.2%

2.0

1.0

ST. CLOUD AREA

2011 QUARTERLY %MINNESOTA CHANGE IN REAL GDP

13

F

69

107.8

1.8%

Cedar Rapids, IA

Number of Incorporations

Median Housing Prices Gross Domestic Product

N

910

250

$0

J

S

200

A

J

A

150

J

M

J

97

St. Paul, 2.0 MN

100

J

A

A M J

$0

10 13

102.6 COUNTRY 107.5 WIDE

50

M

$20,000

M

75

Minnesota Nonfarm Jobs Food & Beverage Tax Collections

$100,000

6% F

23 12

MINNESOTA - MONTHLY % CHANGE 108.4 106.6 114.1 102.7 105.6

0

A

N/A

J

12 14

ST. CLOUD 2.5 Minneapolis, MN

1.5

8%

-0.8 $40,000

J

94.7 2.8%106.2

Rochester, MN

$60,000

-0.6

60

J J A S O DJ J F F M M A A M $0 J A SA OM NJ DJ JA FS MO AN D

N

J

No. 3 4 of6permits 5 11

St. Cloud, MN

$120,000

XXXX XXXX

$80,000

90

0

10%

0.2 $100,000 0.0

30

3.0

COUNTRY WIDE

$120,000

O

M 13

2011 QUARTERLY % CHANGE IN REAL GDP

Unemployment Rates Lodging Tax Dollars ST. CLOUD

S

Gross Domestic Product

1.0

0.6

J

A

UNITED STATES - MONTHLY % CHANGE

0.8

M

X

Minnesota and other Upper Midwest Cities of Comparable Size to St. Cloud

United States Nonfarm Jobs Commerce/Services & -Beverage Home Sales Food Closed Total Tax Collections

A

First Quarter 2012

Al l It em s

$0

XXXX

G Se ood rv s/ ice s

30

$100,000

10

$3,105,391

2.2%

1.8%

$1M

35 $1.5M

$1.5M

$2M

T po ran rta stio n He Ca alt re h

20

$150,000

15

$2M

$2M

MINNESOTA BENTON AND he Cost of Living index measures regional differences in the 0.8 $100,000 $200,000 120 cost of consumer goods and services, excluding taxes and non$1.5M $1.5M $1.5M = exceeds chart scale $80,000 consumer expenditures,0.6 for professional and managerial households 0.8 90 $150,000 in the top income quintile. It is based on more than $60,000 90,000 prices 0.4 0.6 $1M $1M $1M 60 covering almost 60 different items for which prices are collected 0.2 $40,000 0.4 $100,000 quarterly by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.Small $.5M $.5M $.5M St.30 Cloud 0.0 $20,000 differences should not be interpreted as showing$15,075 any measurable 0.2 Minneapolis/St. Paul $28,785 $600 Rochester $50,000 difference, according to-0.2ACCRA. 0 $0

STEARNS COUNTY 40

2.8%

D

$3,105,391

2.5 25

$2M

$2M

N

Ut ili tie s

J

Ho us ing *

J

$3,536,834

$1.5M

2.0

M

$46,659,823

$3,425,316

30

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Joyce Brenny sums up her philosophy of life and work in one sentence: Give more than you get, love more than you receive, don’t give up when you’re tired, and always believe. BY GAIL IVERS AND JOYCE BRENNY PHOTOS BY JOEL BUTKOWSKI, BUTKOWSKI DIGITAL IMAGING

J

oyce Brenny is having a good year. The owner of Brenny

EDITOR’S NOTE:

This issue’s cover story is a collaboration between editor Gail Ivers and business owner, Joyce Brenny. To learn how this came about, see the Editor’s Note on page 8.

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Transportation, she is the first woman trucker to chair the Minnesota Trucking Association. She was named the 2012 Women in Trucking “Influential Woman of the Year.” Her company was selected as one of the “Top 100 Companies to Work For in Minnesota” by Minnesota Business. She was selected as the 2012 Business Central Mark of Excellence – Women in Business Champion. Awards and accolades were not always part of Brenny’s life, though admittedly, they were part of her dreams.

Dear Diary: When I grow up I have a dream of traveling to far off lands. I really

don’t like being poor, so when I grow up I want to be financially stable and well off enough to help others. Maybe when I grow up I will be a flight attendant, or maybe a family counselor, but somehow I must be a philanthropist. Maybe I will find my Prince Charming and have a family; but a family can’t happen until after I have had some amazing life adventures! Oh dear diary, I can’t wait to grow up and make all my dreams come true! I want to be a winner, I want to be a Champion!

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Living Her Dreams Joyce Brenny, Founder, President and CEO of Brenny Transportation, Inc.

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Brenny grew up on a farm in rural St. Joseph. She has two brothers and is a self-proclaimed tomboy. Driving trucks and tractors was no big deal so it was no surprise when, in 1980, she started driving a semi truck for a small family-owned company that has since gone out of business.

Dear Diary: Rather than the excitement of a jet plane

flying to far-off lands, I got a first class ticket behind the windshield of an 18 wheeler. Driving truck was both exciting and scary, however, I always felt respected by those who also drove. Truck drivers became my confidants and friends. They didn’t treat me differently because I was a girl. When you are on the road and away from family, you all have something in common – you yearn to do your best to make a buck and then return home again to family. Many days I felt like giving up, but I kept telling myself “Champions never give up, and I want to be a Champion some day!”

Brenny has great respect for truckers and the work they do. “Professional truck drivers are the lifeblood of our country,” she said. “Truck drivers will always be my heroes and I will always lobby for their rights and respect. I wish every trucking executive could spend some time behind the wheel of a truck. I believe the trucking industry would be a better place for all involved.”

Dear Diary: When I grow up, once I travel and see the

world of course, I will marry my Prince Charming and live happily ever after. I will go to college after high school and earn a degree. I will have a career where I am respected and revered.

In 1983 Brenny’s years behind the wheel ended with the birth of her daughter. In 1984 she left her trucking job for one in administration at Anderson Trucking in St. Cloud. She immediately began seeking promotions, moving into dispatch and eventually into sales. Though an introvert by nature, Brenny knew sales was the best way to make money in trucking if she wasn’t behind the wheel. “I didn’t want to be stuck in a low-paying job,” she said. “Poverty was not in my plans.”

Dear Diary: My fairy tale did not follow the intended

plan. My daughter Holly was born in 1983 and I left an unsuccessful first marriage in 1987. With a small child to care

Not So Fun Fact: There have

been 34 new regulations put on trucking firms in the last two years.

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for, truck driving had to end. I went to work in the compliance department for a trucking company in Central Minnesota I worked my way up, and switched trucking/transportation companies as opportunities presented themselves. I soon found out they didn’t often present themselves to women. I eventually landed a job in transportation sales and began to travel frequently. I somehow found time in between being a single mom and my work travels to begin working on my dream to obtain my college degree. This had become an important goal to me. No one in my family had earned a college degree. In 1990 Brenny started working for Crossroads Transportation. This was a new brokerage company in St. Cloud. She was able to work part time while taking some classes at the College of St. Benedict. The company soon added a trucking division called Saturn Trucking where Brenny worked her way from customer service to general manager. Together, she and the owner took the business from his basement office to terminals in St. Cloud and St. Paul.

Dear Diary: Being a single mom isn’t easy. Holly doesn’t

know this, but she is my angel and she keeps me motivated to “keep on trucking.” I must remember to be an example to her. I must show her that Champions never give up! However, dear diary, I admit I want to meet my Prince Charming and live happily ever after! Oh, and dear diary, I want my Prince to be rich and not a truck driver, because I know how hard a trucker’s lifestyle is. I want my husband home every night!

While at Crossroads Transportation, Brenny met two people who would become critical to her future: Bonnie Supan and Todd Brenny.

Dear Diary: You’ll never guess what happened. I met

Todd Brenny, a truck driver with honest brown eyes and a quiet charm that I could not resist. Todd was offered a job with a different trucking company. On his last day of work with us, he asked me out. I married my “truck driving” Prince Charming on December 16, 1995. My daughter Holly was a junior bridesmaid. She looked so cute in her purple velvet dress. Purple is Todd’s and my favorite color.

Initially, Brenny enjoyed the work at Crossroads/ Saturn Transportation. She was building something

Fun Fact: When year-end goals are met at Brenny, the entire

team enjoys a team retreat to a tropical location. The Brenny team has been on four team retreats in the past eight years.


Photo courtesy of Brenny Transportation

The Women Leadership Team at Brenny

(L-R): Beth Johnson, Area 1 Team Lead; BobbiJo Dinesen, Safety Manager; Joyce Brenny, President/CEO/Founder; Bonnie Supan, General Manager; Trisha Phelps, Media/IT Director; Sarah Hanabuth, Specialized Team Lead

important. The work was interesting, challenging and financially rewarding. At one point, they had about 50 truck drivers and almost 15 people between the St. Cloud and St. Paul offices. But gradually things changed. “I couldn’t get raises for the employees,” Brenny said. “Drivers were being lied to. They would be told they didn’t have to drive somewhere – like New Jersey – and then suddenly they were assigned to drive to New Jersey. Then he lowered my commission – it was a $15,000 hit.”

Dear Diary: Being the general manager of a

transportation company has become trying beyond my moral boundaries. I only wish the executives in the trucking industry would be as kind and considerate as the drivers. I dream of helping people at a higher level and I desire to be in a positive, caring environment, an environment that is fun, as well as community minded. I want truck drivers to get the respect they’ve earned and I want women to be treated fairly. I want women to be offered opportunities in the trucking industry! Could I build a company like this? Could I do my own trucking thing? Could I create a Champion environment — a place where people are respected and treated fairly?

Business Profile BRENNY TRANSPORTATION, INC. HEADQUARTERS: 8505 Ridgewood Road, St. Joseph, MN              PHONE: 320-363-6999 FAX:  320-363-6988  EMAIL: general@brennytransportation.com WEBSITE: www.brennytransportation.com PRESIDENT, FOUNDER AND CEO:  Joyce Brenny  CFO: Todd Brenny GENERAL MANAGER: Bonnie Supan OWNERSHIP:  Certified WBE, 51% Joyce Brenny, 49% Todd Brenny  BUSINESS DESCRIPTION:  Brenny Transportation is a Certified Women’s Business Enterprise founded in 1996. They provide global transportation solutions; Brenny also runs a fleet of 50 over-the-road trucks through its asset-based sister company Brenny Specialized, Inc. NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES:  70: 30 in the office and shop; 40 company drivers; 10 owner-operators 2012 PROJECTED SALES:  $20 million 

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Brenny stayed for another year, but began having conversations with her husband about starting her own company. “I didn’t like the ego and the power. I despise greed,” Brenny said. “It’s hard to respect someone who drives a new Cadillac and won’t give a 10-cent raise to the staff.” To the bottom of her soul, Brenny believed that you could have a business that both treated employees well and was successful. Privately Brenny approached some of the employees at Crossroads Transportation about joining her in a new business. One of those was Bonnie Supan. “Bonnie said ‘I’m with you. Just let me know.’ That was inspiring,” Brenny said. “To know that someone has that kind of confidence in you.”

Dear Diary:

On a trip back from a weekend up north, I expressed my concerns about my displeasure regarding my current employment to Todd. I told Todd, I am either going to go back to school and change my career or do my own trucking thing! Todd, being the supportive husband he is, said “I will support whichever decision you make.” June 17th 1996 Brenny Transportation opened its doors. We had three employees and Todd was still driving truck. Our company color was purple and I decided our mission statement must have the word Champion in it. This would remind me

that Champions never give up! So our mission statement – Grand Champions of Customer Service – was born, with a purple ribbon on the logo. I felt like a Champion! I want to become a successful business woman, to be a respected woman in this man’s world of trucking. I will grow a company that is community minded, one that has a plan for success, a vision for the future, a Champion trucking team! Companies are not allowed to run both a brokerage firm and a trucking business out of the same company. Brenny Transportation was a brokerage company, making arrangements for freight to be hauled and working with existing trucking companies to do the hauling. “I remember our first load,” Brenny said. “It was a broker load from the Twin Cities that went to Michigan.” Today the company averages 1,000 loads per month. Brenny credits her husband Todd, and general manager Supan, with much of the company’s success. “Without Bonnie and Todd, we wouldn’t be as big as we are. Bonnie is the other half of my brain. What I forget or don’t know, she knows, and vice versa. I trust her completely – it’s all about trust. If she can’t handle something I know she’ll say so or she’ll find someone who can.” Supan was part of Brenny’s plan all along. Not so with Todd.

Personal Profile JOYCE (SAUER) BRENNY AGE: 49 TITLE: Founder/President/CEO, Brenny Transportation and Brenny Specialized HOMETOWN: St. Joseph, MN EDUCATION: BA Organizational Behavior/Psychology from the College of St. Scholastica  WORK HISTORY: 32 years trucking/transportation                                                     FAMILY: Husband Todd, daughter Holly, son-in-law Scott Simon HOBBIES: Camping, traveling, weekend trips in the Old Black Pete, the original black Peterbilt Truck purchased by Brenny in 1997.  ADVICE TO A WOULD-BE ENTREPRENEUR: When you give up perceived power and ego, you grow in your purpose, which is to serve others. BEST ADVICE YOU’VE RECEIVED AND WHO GAVE IT TO YOU: The best advice came from my hero, my grandfather, Claude Dullinger: “Picking rocks might not be a fun or glamorous job, but it makes you want more from your life!  So quit whining and start picking!!”

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Working Together Media/IT Director Trisha Phelps with Brenny. The company has 30 office/shop employees and 40 company drivers.


Todd Brenny joined the company in 1997. “That wasn’t in my plan,” Brenny recalled. “I was actually a little bit shocked. I started this business because I was tired of men telling me what to do. I kind of felt like ‘How dare he presume that he can work here?’ And then I thought ‘Am I going to hurt his feelings if I tell him I don’t want him in the business?’ But we were so busy. He started helping because we were so far behind – and it was Ok. I tell him he’s a good secretary,” she said with a laugh. “People always think Todd is in charge. When it bothers me too much, I have to realize it’s my ego in the way and let it go.” It turned out that Todd had a natural ability in accounting and math, a field he had always wanted to pursue. “It’s not my strength,” Brenny admits. “I’m involved, of course. I know what’s going on. But I don’t have to worry about it in detail because someone I trust is doing that. I can direct my efforts toward other parts of the business. I say ‘Todd is the hardware and I’m the software.’” In 1997 Brenny also opened Brenny Specialized, a trucking firm offering over-sized and padded hauling as well as regular freight.

Dear Diary: Our brokerage company was doing well, but

Old Black Pete

Timeline 1980 Joyce Brenny graduates from high school and starts working as a truck driver for a St. Cloud company. 1984 Brenny begins working for Anderson Trucking in administration. She gradually works her way through logging, dispatch and into sales.

Todd and Joyce Brenny with “Old Black Pete,” their first truck.

1997 Brenny opens Brenny Specialized, a trucking company with a focus on over-sized and padded hauling services, as well as standard freight. Todd Brenny joins the business.

we needed trucks to fulfill more of our customer’s contracts. We purchased a 53’ logistics van trailer, but we could not find a truck to pull it. (Putting the cart before the horse was not in the strategic plan!) We finally found a good used black Peterbilt, and as luck would have it, our customers didn’t have a load for us to pull. We had freight and no truck. Now we have trucks and no freight.

1988 Brenny takes a job working for a trucking company in Dallas, Texas. 1989 Brenny returns to St. Cloud and takes a job at Stemm Transfer in dispatch, then moves into sales

2000 Brenny builds an office and truck garage on 10 acres at 8505 Ridgewood Road, St. Joseph

In 2000 Brenny moved her company from their office in Waite Park to their current site on Ridgewood Road in St. Joseph. “We just built this building and then 9/11 occurred,” Brenny said. “Then in 2008, we put on a big addition and the recession hit.” The company, which had enjoyed 10 percent-plus growth annually, went into a holding pattern. “But we never laid anyone off and we never had a year when we didn’t make a profit,” Brenny said. “We’re so diversified; it really helps. Usually brokerage is booming and trucking is down or it’s the other way around. And we can haul such a variety; we’re not just flatbed trucks.”

1990 Brenny leaves Stem Transfer for a part time job at Crossroads Transportation. She starts attending the College of St. Benedict as part of a life-long dream to receive a college education. During her tenure at Crossroads Transportation, the company adds a trucking division called Saturn Trucking. Brenny works her way through customer service, dispatch, billing and eventually is named general manger. Finishing college is put on hold.

2008 Brenny puts on an 8,200 square foot addition to their St. Joseph facility

Dear Diary: Something happened that I didn’t expect. Our

employees are fighting and cliqueiness is running rampant. We have lots of employee turnover and turmoil. Once again, dear diary, my plan is off course and the challenges are more than I ever dreamed. I am beginning to wonder if doing my own truck company was the right decision? I’m tired and feel like giving up. As I look at our purple logo ribbon with the word Champion on it, I am reminded that Champions never give up! I must forge on. Brenny determined to use her degree in organizational behavior to help create the team she had dreamed about.

2011 Brenny graduates from the College of St. Scholastica with a Bachelor’s Degree in Organizational Behavior & Psychology. 2012 Joyce Brenny is named the St. Cloud Area Business Central Mark of Excellence-Women in Business Champion and the 2012 Women in Trucking Association’s Influential Woman Trucker of the Year.

1995 Joyce and Todd Brenny marry. JUNE 17, 1996 Brenny and three employees open Brenny Transportation, a brokerage firm with an office in Waite Park. In the first six months, they have $1 million in sales.

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“I wanted a team that understood my vision, the vision to be a Champion,” she said. “I wanted to be the Grand Champion of Customer Service to our customers, not just say we were. And I wanted to build a brand of trust.” She began a formal team building program that continues to this day. As a company they wrote the culture and code of ethics. Each week they shut off the phones and the team members discuss what is and isn’t working. They confront each other on behaviors. They hold each other accountable. “When we started the team building program, we had some folks leave because it was painful,” Brenny said. “Our culture is not for everyone, but we have 10 percent turnover now and that’s unheard of in the industry.” That’s in part because not all team-building activities are confrontational. There are exercise breaks, office parties, milestone celebrations, charity drives, and annual sales goals that when achieved result in a four-day trip to Cancun for the entire company.

Dear Diary: One of my goals long ago was

“We’re different because we live and breathe community service and involvement,” Brenny said. “I believe we’re truly called to a higher level of service. Trucking is the vehicle for us to earn money so we can help others.”

Dear Diary: My business is growing and moving forward!

We now have a global division, a warehouse, and our team is strong. We have been named one of Minnesota’s Top 100 Employers to Work For! We have built a brand of trust! I wanted to become a voice for truckers by gaining status in the trucking industry and I was elected to the Minnesota Trucking Association Board of Directors. I was scared to death! What did I get myself into? I wanted to run away. There is only one other woman on the MTA board. I must remember, I am a Champion, I can’t give up! And now I’m the first woman trucker to chair the MTA board. I have traveled to many states, accepting speaking invitations, speaking for the rights of women in trucking, as well as for professional truck driver’s rights. I have traveled to Washington, D.C., lobbying for the trucking industry and truckers’ rights.

to become a philanthropist. We have a lot of fun raising money for charities! We pick a charity a month. We have a fund to help team members who need financial assistance. My philanthropist activities have led to the esteemed Samaritan award from the TIA (Transportation Intermediaries Assoc.) and for four years, we have been recognized by the Governor as a St. Cloud Area Business Gives company. It’s never been about the money. It’s always been about how we can help other people with the money! Look at the letter I received from the American Legion:

Giving Back Brenny Transportation donated $1000 to the St. Joseph American Legion when it was selected as Brenn y’s “Charity of the Month.” Joyce Brenny of Brenny Transportation unexpectedly called one day last year and said the St. Joseph American Legion was selected as their Charity of the Month. That meant that the American Legion would receive a $1,000 dollar gift from Brenny Transportation and its employees to help us with our financial need when the City of St. Joseph raised the cost of our liquor license by over $2,000 a year. But the gift of $1,000 was just the tip of their charity and patriotic support. Several Legionnaires went to the Brenny Transportation office to receive the money gift. Joyce and Todd Brenny and their employees welcome d the Veterans with wonderful hospitality that continued the entire time we were there. Then as the veterans departe d, the employees stood and cheered. The money gift was greatly appreciated, but the welcome and esteem was greatly treasured by all Legionnaires. And Brenny Transportation gives gifts of cash to some nonprofit in the area each month. Whether it’s the St. Joseph Area Food Shelf, the Catholic Charities Toys for Tots Drive, or some other worthy cause, the employees of Brenny Transportation are there each and every month with open hearts, heartfe lt support and a gift of money or articles. I have never seen such an outpouring of generosity from a business anywher e. – Norman A. Hansen, Jr., Commander, Post 328, The American Legion, Saint Joseph, MN

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Photo courtesy of Brenny Transportation

Caption Header Caption Body

Going the Distance

They’ve come a long way since opening their doors in 1996 as a brokerage firm. Today Brenny Transportation is a Certified Women’s Business Enterprise and runs a fleet of 50 over-the-road trucks through its sister company, Brenny Specialized.

Give more than you get, love more than you receive, don’t give up when you’re tired, and always believe! You, too, will become a Champion! – JOYCE BRENNY

I wanted to help make trucking a safe and welcoming place for women. I took a lot of butt-kicking and didn’t have mentors. I took a path and had to back up and try again on my own. I wanted to help other women avoid my errors. Today, Brenny Transportation employs 70 people. True to her goals, Brenny has made a point of creating trucking jobs for women. Her management team is women: Supan and safety manager BobbiJo Dinesen. Most of the team leads are women. “It’s not that I don’t give men a chance,” Brenny said. “It’s just that sometimes a woman is the best person for the job.” This year Brenny was recognized for her efforts when the Women in Trucking Association named her Influential Woman Trucker of the Year. “I have no time for weakness and excuses,” Brenny said. “But mentoring is different. Mentoring is finding solutions – working with people who are looking for answers.”

Dear Diary: Todd and I have been married 17 years.

My daughter Holly has made me so proud. She is an RN at

the St. Cloud Hospital and is happily married to Scott Simon who works at Brenny. I graduated with a college degree in the spring of 2011 with my 87 year-old Grandmother there. I was so proud – FIRST in my family to get a college degree! I have found a love for learning and will soon be heading back to school to earn my master’s degree. I need to be ready for my next level of service. I have traveled beyond my dreams. I have financially helped many others, I have counseled and mentored, I found my Prince Charming and we have a loving family. My adventures have been to conquer life’s challenges and to accept a path of fearful takings. My life truly has become better than I ever could have imagined! I can’t wait for the next amazing adventure! And to those who didn’t think this poor, small town girl could make it: How do you like this Champion now? BC Gail Ivers is the vice president of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. Joyce Brenny is the owner of Brenny Transportation and the 2012 St. Cloud Area Business Central Mark of Excellence-Women in Business Champion.

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FEATURE

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PROFIT

Couponing

Are coupons just another way to discount your products … or are they the new age of advertising? By mary macdonell belisle

T

he frenzy over coupon savings is escalating. Computer and mobile phone technology, Internet and social media are transforming the humble one-cent prototype coupon C.W. Post put into Grape Nuts® a hundred years ago into today’s digital dynamo. Ken Fenyo, CEO of YOU Technology, predicts retailer websites, social networking, and mobile couponing will continue to have an impact throughout 2012 and beyond. Jeff Hudson, co-founder of Grocery Coupon Network, notes the “SoLoMo” (social-local-mobile) trend “is the next cutting edge move for digital businesses.” John Audette, 406Strategies.com, makes this ominous observation: “In the

15+ years that I have been doing Internet marketing, I have never encountered a marketing strategy as potentially dangerous as this one.” So, let’s meet Jennifer Z., couponer. A single working mother and university student, she says using 20 coupons while shopping isn’t considered extreme. Jennifer hasn’t paid for laundry detergent for a year and averages $50 weekly on household shopping. She uses local newspaper, retail, web, digital, and manufacturers’ online coupons, plus sales and register rewards savings in any creative combination one can imagine.

Goals & Strategy Online couponing is a way

The Future

for consumers, like Jennifer, to try the service, according to Bill Hatling of HatlingFlint, a St. Cloud and Minneapolis marketing and communications firm. “Once we’ve made a connection, now we’ve got the opportunity to reconnect on an ongoing basis. Then we move customers to your preferred platform – Facebook or other e-mail marketing – in order to communicate with them. What’s the endgame? For the consumer to become a ‘Fan’ in the social environment.” “But, remember, only a portion of your market will take advantage of the coupon, so it shouldn’t eat up so much of your budget that it prevents you from promoting through

other media,” advises Kelly Zaske, owner of Gaslight Creative, a St. Cloud company that specializes in multi-media marketing campaigns. “I would be comfortable with a 15 percent budget allocation,” she said. Hatling suggests 10–20 percent.

Daily Deals Groupon® and LivingSocial® offer Daily Deals in select U.S. cities, including Minneapolis/ St. Paul. Customers register online to receive email vouchers, which they print or save as digital coupons on their smartphones. Discounts are 50 percent and more. In Groupon’s case, the company takes half of that 50 percent, leaving the retailer with 25 percent.

TESCO/HomePlus in South Korea offers customers virtual grocery stores in subways. Lighted billboards replicate the actual physical store, allowing customers to scan QR codes and pay for groceries with their smartphones. The groceries are then delivered to their homes. For a video of the HomePlus virtual grocery experience, visit www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

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B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2


www.scr-mn.com

POINT OF VIEW

Strong Offers

“ “ “

Make sure the deal is a perceived value to the consumer, relevant and true, and unique to the distribution channel.” — Bill Hatling, HatlingFlint Don’t overdo it. If businesses discount more frequently than quarterly, customers become trained to only buy at discounts.” —Don Farleo, ADCo

Watch your ROI. When figuring costs, keep in mind the cost of running the coupon, but also the discount that you are offering. Businesses sometimes forget that honoring a coupon can mean a smaller profit margin per sale.”

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— Kelly Zaske, Gaslight Creative

“The obvious benefit is that it doesn’t cost a business anything out-of-pocket to do this,” according to Don Farleo, ADCo, St. Cloud and Minneapolis, noting that the sites also market for you. Customers have asked to receive this offer, and when they purchase coupons and redeem them, they’re open to giving feedback about their experience. “Businesses love this,” says Farleo. These sites also have tracking tools that tally purchases, redemptions, and addon sales. In a recent Rice University study, 66 percent of businesses said their experience was profitable; 32 percent said unprofitable, and 40 percent won’t use Groupon again. There ARE some potential pitfalls, notes Hatling. “You haven’t enough inventory. You’re inundated with calls. Or worse, consumers aren’t interested in your deal and don’t respond to it. Seventy-five percent of the time the deals don’t apply to us in this market.” “Don’t be afraid to ask a lot of questions and to ask for references of other businesses that have used the service,” advises Zaske. Learn from Jesse Burke, Posie’s Café in Portland, Oregon, where the average sale

RefRigeRation HVaC SeRViCe Building automation food SeRViCe

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OUT OF DATE?

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FEATURE

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PROFIT

is about $5. She lost $10,000 with Groupon in 2011, as nearly 900 customers used her half-off coupon on a $13 value. (Google “Posie’s Café” for the story of her marketing misfire.)

Retailer Websites “Retailer websites are becoming the primary destination,” blogs YOU Technology’s Fenyo, noting 25 percent of shoppers visit a retailer or CPG Facebook page at least once a month, and 80 percent of all digital coupons are downloaded from retailer websites. Locally owned Ciatti’s Ristoranté works the web angle. Its site features Click ‘n’ Save (and print) discount certificates, a “Join Our eClub” email capture, and a coupon on the “Frugal Finders” blog. Click the Facebook link, and “Like” Ciatti’s for additional coupon offers.

Digital coupons

CHECK OUT our NEW Digital format. www. Business Central Magazine. com

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B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

According to Nielsen polling, 79 percent of consumers used smartphones or tablets while shopping during the first quarter of 2012 – 62 percent used their phones for price checking; 42 percent used their tablets to make a purchase; and 28 percent of tablet users and 27 percent of phone users paid via the device. Customers scan QR and UPC codes that bring them to a retail website, or to the product itself, for information and to buy. The smartphone is scanned at the checkout. Currently, of the 257 million mobile phones in the U.S., 50 percent are smartphones, according to Nielsen and the Pew Internet & American Life Project survey year. “The smartphone is the bomb,” says Jennifer, our

couponer. “You always have it with you.” BC Mary MacDonell Belisle is a St. Cloud freelance writer, doing business as mary macdonell belisle – writerforhire. For information regarding the sources used in this story, visit www. BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Local Variations Local coupon programs combine traditional and online options.

DealChicken.com Operated by the St. Cloud Times, customers register online to view deals and receive email deal notifications. Vouchers are bought and downloaded. The exclusive deals run from 50–90 percent off, and each retailer’s particular deal is negotiated with the account rep. TheBestofCoupons.com Brad Stroot, MB Marketing, Inc., Sartell, offers deals that are exclusive to his clients and packaged in monthly directmail coupon books, promoted on the website, Facebook, and other social media. Stroot charges a flat fee. St. Cloud Radio Marketplace Leighton Broadcasting offers coupons that are promoted via broadcast and the station’s website. Customers register and buy coupons online, pick them up at the station, and redeem them with local vendors. In exchange, businesses receive the value of the item in radio advertising. The Value Connection Owned by Townsquare Media, The Value Connection is one of the area’s older business coupon programs and works in a similar fashion to Leighton’s Marketplace. The Value Connection offers goods and services from Central Minnesota businesses at a discount, typically 20-30 percent. Shop ‘N Save Spirit 92.9 offers discount coupons on their website. Visitors can choose from a large inventory of retail coupons and pick them up at the station’s studio or receive them by mail.


SMART BUSINESS: HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinics

Skilled surgical trio joins HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinics It’s Never Been Easier.

Photography by Studio D.

The surgeons share HealthPartners’ commitment to deliver exceptional care, make the patient care experience a priority, and keep medical costs at a minimum.

From left: Dr. Alan Tims, Dr. Patrick Oakes, and Dr. Manuel Moran

H

ealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinics is pleased to announce the addition of general surgery and colorectal surgery to its suite of medical services. Doctors Manuel R. Moran, Patrick M. Oakes, and Alan L. Tims, formerly of Central Minnesota Surgeons, LTD, joined the clinic in June 2012 after years of professional collaboration and affiliation. The clinic surgeons look forward to this closer relationship because it will provide growth and improvement in services for the clinics’ patients. The surgeons share HealthPartners’ commitment to deliver exceptional care and to make patient care experience a priority while, at the same time, maximizing outcomes and value for patients. Patients will benefit from these physicians’ varied experience. Dr. Tims, a specialist in colorectal surgery, is a native of Worthington, completed his General Surgical Residency in Lexington, Kentucky, and returned to Minnesota

SPONSORED PROFILE

after a Colon and Rectal Surgery Fellowship at the University of Illinois – Urbana. He joined the former Central Minnesota Surgeons, LTD in 1982. Dr. Oakes trained in V.A. affiliated programs at the universities of Iowa and Minnesota. He moved to St. Cloud in 1990 after he served with a Christian hospital in Swaziland, Africa for 3 years. “Ours has been wonderful growth into this new experience,” says Dr. Oakes, specialist in general and laparoscopic surgery, and veins. “We consider HealthPartners to be a premier group of medical practitioners.” Dr. Moran, also a specialist in colon and rectal surgery, hails from Spain and trained at the Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, prior to moving to St. Cloud in 1999. “We know them quite well,” says Dr. Moran. “It will be a ‘win-win’ for everyone, especially the patients.” Together, the three surgeons will continue to provide excellent surgical care in St. Cloud, as well as outreach

services to the Paynesville and Sauk Centre communities. “We are pleased with the addition of the surgeons to our practice,” says Andy Vinson, executive director for HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinics. “They will help us continue to do what we do best...provide exceptional care for our patients,” — mary macdonell belisle

HEALTHPARTNERS CENTRAL MINNESOTA CLINICS Main Clinic Address: 2251 Connecticut Avenue South Sartell, MN 56377 320.253.5220 www.hpcmc.com Monday – Friday: 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m

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WO M E N I N B U S I N E S S

Women Helping Women Now more than ever, women are serving as role models and support systems for each other.

By Whitney Bina

W

e don’t always know the impact we have,” Tauna Quimby said. “The best you can do is take advantage of the everyday moments to learn and grow yourself and you will surely take others along with you.” Quimby, who works

for Girl Scouts of Minnesota and Wisconsin Lakes and Pines, knows the impact of mentorship. As both a mentor and a mentee, she believes in the importance of women helping women in the business world. Although most of her mentoring experiences have

been informal through her family members, professors and volunteers, Quimby did choose a formal mentor a few years ago when she hired a life coach. “I found out Cheryl Gilchrist had recently opened a life-coaching business,” Quimby said. “For several months, we met and Cheryl

would help me set goals and provide activities that would help me reach them.” Over the months, Quimby learned how to view life events from a 360 degree viewpoint, which was the greatest benefit of that mentorship. Diane Hageman, College of Saint Benedict, has also had

DID YOU KNOW?

Off the Charts The phenomenal growth of women-owned businesses has been making headlines for 25 years. Women consistently have been launching businesses at nearly twice the rate of men. As important, their growth in employment and revenues has continued to outpace the economy. The Guardian Small Business Research Institute projects that women-owned businesses will create 5 to 5.5 million new jobs by 2018 – more than half the 9.7 million new small business jobs expected to be created and about one-third of the 15.3 million total new jobs anticipated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics by 2018. Source: “Launching Women-Owned businesses on to A High Growth Trajectory,” National Women’s Business Council; to read the entire report, visit www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

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B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2


“Sister Rita has this amazing sense of civility, respect and hospitality. She had a pretty big influence on my life.” —DIANE HAGEMAN, COLLEGE OF SAINT BENEDICT

various mentors at different points in her life. One of Hageman’s mentors who still stands out to her today was Sister Rita Budig. Hageman worked for Budig at St. Benedict’s Senior

Community early in her career. “Sister Rita was an amazing leader. Every step of the way, that woman was ahead of the pack,” Hageman said. Sister Rita had an impact on Hageman in many ways.

“Sister Rita has this amazing sense of civility, respect and hospitality,” Hageman said. “She had a pretty big influence on my life.” Although many women in today’s society serve as

excellent mentors, achieving success can be a difficult task for women in the business world. “Even though both my mom and grandma worked outside of the home, I wouldn’t say I got the impression from either of them that the world was wide open for women in the workplace,” Quimby said. Most people are familiar with the societal barriers when it comes to women advancing in the workplace.

WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

On the following pages the 2012 Women in Business Directory introduces you to some of the women who are Redefining Business.

NOT YOUR MOTHER’S AD AGENCY Good advertising never goes out of style. We’ll transform your business using modern methods backed by timeless marketing principles. Gaslight Creative has your marketing back.

GaslightCreative.com (320) 257-2242

creative

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WO M E N I N B U S I N E S S

BY THE NUMBERS to impact women through their actions and experiences. “Working at a college campus allows me to work with women every day,” Hageman said. “I hope I have been a positive influence to the many interns and student workers I’ve had.” “There are opportunities for mentoring moments every single day,” Quimby said. “Look for a mentor not as a single person, but as a way of using interactions with others to learn and grow.” BC

The Women’s Fund at the Central Minnesota community Foundation is celebrating 10 years of helping women and girls live their best lives. Over the past decade, the Women’s Fund has provided nearly $600,000 in grants for programs for girls, women and elder women in the St. Cloud area.

Whitney Bina is the communications and workforce development coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

$1 million

Dollars raised by women

$580,257

Dollars invested in the community since 2002

128

Grants awarded to community causes

$90,000

Scholarships provided for women in transition

37

Scholarships provided for domestic abuse survivors

WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Deb Dingmann CFSP Funeral Director, Owner

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Emily Grow

Funeral Director

B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

Sarah Schmidt Funeral Director

Ashley Prentice Funeral Director

Summer Hagy

Administrative Assistant

Source: Central Minnesota Community Foundation

Barriers such as the glass ceiling and unequal pay status between men and women are still present in today’s society. Therefore, guidance from successful women is crucial for women looking to thrive in their careers. “Women function differently than men,” Hageman said. “This isn’t bad, it’s just different. It’s important that [women] are supportive of each other.” Today, both Quimby and Hageman are in positions to experience the act of mentoring from a different standpoint. Although not formal mentors to any one individual, both of them have had opportunities


SMART BUSINESS : Danise Miller, O.D.

SPONSORED PROFILE

There is more to vision than simply seeing 20/20. Danise Miller – Doctor of Optometry

“I

Photography by Studio D.

believe in ‘Golden Rule Optometry,” says Dr. Danise Miller, who’s committed to professional service, patient education, and personal enrichment. “I imagine how I’d feel in the patient’s chair.” Professional service. Dr. Miller graduated from St. Cloud State University with a B.A. in Bio-Medical Science. She then earned her doctorate from the Michigan College of Optometry. Dr. Miller has been working with Wimmer Opticians for two years; she has been practicing optometry for 10 years. Her office is the only downtown private practice with an on-site optometrist. Patient education. She listens to patient concerns; she thoroughly explains medical conditions and the

prevention necessary for overall health and the health of the eyes. Dr. Miller is tenacious about answering patients’ questions. Personal enrichment. Dr. Miller is pursuing a specialty in Behavioral Optometry. Behavioral Optometry explores how vision applies to thinking and learning. — mary macdonell belisle

WIMMER OPTICIANS, INC.

Jon & Joel Wimmer, proprietors 901 W. St. Germain St. St. Cloud, MN 56301 320.252.5404 Monday – Friday 7 a.m.– 5 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m.–12 p.m. Exams • Prescription glasses Complete Repairs • Contact lenses Name brand frames

WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Making Our Community Stronger. Recognizing the leading voices, visions, and contributions of women that sustain and strengthen business in Central Minnesota. Jennifer ElstonBrondell

Pamela A. Pamela A. Steckman Steckman Tonya T. Hinkemeyer

Stefanie L. Brown

Keri A. Phillips

Suite 300, US Bank Plaza . 1015 West St. Germain St. St. Cloud, MN 56301 . www.rinkenoonan.com J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 • •   w w w. B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e . c o m

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

C entral M innesota H abitat

for

H uManity

WOMEN BUILD 2012 more than houses

Get involved at any time! Join us! Organizing: June—July--August Building Opportunities: Early September

StewardShip For more information visit my website at www.janbensen.com

Jan Bensen, CFP® First Vice President - Financial Consultant Consulting Group (320) 251-4213 • jan.bensen@rbc.com 1015 W. St. Germain, Ste. 400 • St Cloud, MN 56301

Circle of Corporate Sponsors

Team Building Fun

Circle of Women

Meet New People

Circle of Friends

ith Friends

Quality Day w

Contact Michelle Redding at (320) 656-8890 or visit www.cmhfh.org

© 2010 RBC Wealth Management, a division of RBC Capital Markets Corporation, Member NYSE/FINRA/SIPC. All rights reserved.

ADVERTISER INDEX Women Build provides the opportunity to build f/k/a Gwen M. Sefkow friendships andgraduated networks, from St. Cloud State University in 1982. personally and professionally. Ms. Sefkow received her Juris Doctorate in 1985 from Hamline University School Call 320-656-8890 of Law. She is a member of the to find out how you or your Minnesota State Bar Association and company can become a sponsor! the Stearns-Benton Bar Association.

Gwen Anderson • Real Estate • Estate Planning • Probate • Family Law

763-262-2889 171 Lake St, Big Lake

320-240-9423

803 West St Germain, St. Cloud

ADVERTISER NAmE Bernick’s - Beverages & Vending ............................................ 43 Central Minnesota Federal Credit Union ................................ 27 Charter Communications ........................................................... 2 Coldwell Banker Commercial - Orion ..................................... 25 College of Saint Scholastica ........................................................ 7 Grand Casino Mille Lacs and Hinckley .................................... 25

320-348-2001

HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinics ............................... 5

101 Red River Ave. N, Cold Spring

JDB Associates ........................................................................... 22 Jennings Insurance .................................................................... 29

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LarsonAllen LLP ......................................................................... 22

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Mi Famiglia Ristorante at 912 Regency Plaza ........................ 43

The Women’s Fund of the Central Minnesota Community Foundation congratulates Minnesota Chamber of Commerce.......................................... 19 MOLLY RENSLOW, 2012 ATHENA Award recipient. 6/13/10 Miller Architects & Builders, Inc .............................................. 27

BC_JA10_FINAL.indd 48 •  Divorce & Family

Skinfitnessmd ............................................................................. 11

•  Divorce & Family Kay Kay is is aa partner partner in in the the •  Divorce & Family Kayfirm is a partner in the law of Jeddeloh and •  Guardianship/  Guardianship/  law firm of Jeddeloh and    Conservatorship •  Guardianship/  law firm of Jeddeloh and Snyder. She serves on the    Conservatorship Kay Snyder Snyder. She serves on the Kay Snyder    Conservatorship Snyder. She serves on the St. Cloud Area Legal Kay Snyder •  Wills & Trust St. Cloud Area Legal •  Wills & Trust St. CloudBoard Area and Legal Services the Volunteer Attorney •  Wills & Trust Probate Services Board and the Volunteer Attorney •  Probate Services Board and the Volunteer Attorney Program Probate Program Advisory Advisory Board. Board. She She practices practices in in •  Real Estate •  Real Estate Program Advisory Board. She practices in the area of family law. the area of family law. •  Real Estate Business the area of family law. •  Business •  Business 763-262-2889 320-240-9423 763-262-2889 320-348-2001 320-240-9423 763-262-2889 320-240-9423 171 Lake St, 803 West St Germain, 101 Red River Ave. N, 171 Lake St, Big Lake 803 West St Germain, St. Cloud 763-262-2889 320-240-9423 171 Lake St, Big Lake 803 West St Germain, St. Cloud Big Lake St. Cloud Cold Spring 171 Lake St, Big Lake 803 West St Germain, St. Cloud

Regional Diagnostic Radiology & The Vein Center................. 29 Robert’s Fine Jewelery .............................................................. 22 Rice Building Systems, Inc. ...................................................... 13 Schlenner Wenner & Co., CPAs .............................................. 23 Shingobee Builders, Inc. ............................................................ 33 St. Cloud Hospital / CentraCare Health System....................... 3 St. Cloud Medical Group ........................................................... 15 St. Cloud Orthopedic Associates, Ltd. ..................................... 17 St. Cloud State University ............................................................ 9

Jeddeloh_regular.indd Jeddeloh_regular.indd Jeddeloh_regular.indd

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9:08:00 AM 9:08:00 AM 9:08:00 AM

St. Cloud Surgical Center .......................................................... 24 Stearns Bank .............................................................................. 33 Strack Construction Co. Inc. ..................................................... 24

6:04 PM


WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY

TRAILBLAZER: Diana White

SPONSORED PROFILE

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Diana White Administrator St. Cloud Medical Group StCloudMedical.com

he experience of teaching choral music at Rocori High School would someday help Diana White conduct physicians, supervisors, and managers to create harmonies of a different kind. Now, as Administrator at St. Cloud Medical Group, Diana provides each campus administrative direction and coordination to stay productive. “We’re a compassionate team of health professionals providing excellent personal care to Central Minnesota,” says Diana. With four campus locations, 60 physicians and physician assistants, and dozens of support staff, St. Cloud Medical Group is a multispecialty clinic committed to providing patients with direct access to quality primary care physicians and specialists. “I am passionate about our healthcare delivery system and want to continue to see improvement in the efficiencies of it.” Diana says. “Our employees come to work each day ready to meet the needs of the patients they serve and that is inspiring to see.” When she’s not managing budgets, improving operations, or developing relationships with state and federal agencies, Diana enjoys spending time with her family, golfing, walking, swimming, and cheering on the Minnesota Twins.

Find us on Facebook!

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H E A LT H CA R E

Encore Entrepreneurs For many older adults, starting a small business can be an opportunity to transform a lifetime hobby or interest into a lucrative line of work.

SBA has set up a dedicated web page for Americans over the age of 50 featuring: • an online self-assessment tool that will help potential small business owners understand their readiness for starting a business • information to help with business planning • ideas for shaping a winning business idea • professional counseling • financial services • information to find local resources SBA and AARP also will jointly develop and host a customized online course, selfassessment, and webinar series for older entrepreneurs. BC

DID YOU KNOW?

Relocating A study by MetLife’s Mature Market Institute shows senior housing programs would do well to target the 55+ crowd. • More than 1.2 million households are choosing to move to communities designed to meet their needs. • The share of minorities has trended upward in age-qualified and other 55+ owner-occupied communities, and is likely to continue.

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• The share of home buyers in agequalified communities with some college education or more increased from 50 percent in 2001 to 73 percent in 2007. • Active adult communities are attracting more buyers who are age 60 and under

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• The main reasons for moving to a 55+ owner-occupied community are: •• family or personal reasons •• financial or employment reasons •• the desire to have a higher quality home

Source: US Small Business Association

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he U.S. Small Business Administration and AARP are launching a strategic alliance to provide counseling and training to entrepreneurs over the age of 50 who want to start or grow a small business. Through SBA’s online training courses and its nationwide network of business mentors and counselors, the two organizations expect to train 100,000 “encore entrepreneurs,” men and women over 50 who are starting or running a small business. The belief is that Americans over the age of 50 who have years of professional experience working for others are ideally positioned to step out and become their own bosses. In doing so, they will become job creators and drivers of economic growth in their communities.


HEALTH CARE: The Vein Center

Photography by Studio D.

Visit The Vein Center for beautiful results

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reat yourself to a relaxing, spa-like getaway to beautify inside and out, and indulge in a procedure you’ve neglected far too long – safe, easy, and same-day medical treatment for your veins. Doctors Jody Bolton Smith, Rochelle Wolfe, and Danielle Leighton – skillful interventional radiologists with Regional Diagnostic Radiology – give their cosmetic and medical attention to men and women, ages 18 to 90, through image-guided venous treatments at The Vein Center. First, it will be easy to forget this is a state-of-the-art medical clinic. There are no sterile walls of white or harsh lights. Instead, you’ll relax with the comfortable tranquil blue furniture, warm toffee brown walls, and diffused rays of area lamps. In addition, a

pleasant greeting from the reception staff is a wonderful welcome. Second, thanks to advanced technologies and minimally invasive procedures, you’ll undergo laser treatment in a comfortable reclining bed, under little or no local anesthesia. You may immediately return to your busy lifestyle after one of the following: • Laser vein ablation – faulty veins are sealed at their origin with a beam of light • Micro-phlebectomy – large varicose veins are removed through tiny incisions

— mary macdonell belisle

THE VEIN CENTER

•• Danielle Leighton, MD RPh, Residency

• 30+ years in operation • 24/7 service

“Vein problems and arteries, we can diagnose and treat both, based on patient symptoms and imaging.” —DR. BOLTON-SMITH

Meet the Radiologists:

and Interventional Radiology Fellowship

•• Rochelle Wolfe, MD, Residency–

– Brown University, Providence, RI

University of Minnesota, Interventional Radiology Fellowship – UCSD Visit us online at www.beautifulresults.com

SPONSORED PROFILE

•• Jody Bolton-Smith, MD, Residency – University of Iowa

• Sclerotherapy – veins are naturally absorbed over time after an injection of medicine Third, you may want to schedule an entire day of skin pampering and cosmetic procedures at SkinFitNessMD, located in the same aesthetically appealing clinic on Connecticut Avenue, north of Hennen’s, along Highway 15, in Sartell. Ultimately, there’s really no time like the present to contact The Vein Center, for YOUR beautiful results.

• Partnerships: CentraCare, VA Hospital, Central Minnesota Hospitals • Sub-specialties: MRI, CT, Breast Health, Ultrasound, Nuclear Medicine, Interventional Radiology

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H E A LT H CA R E

Online now For more information visit BusinessCentralMagazine.com

BY THE NUMBERS

GENERATION GAPS Marketers who ignore Baby Boomers do so at their peril. As Baby Boomers are aging and accumulating wealth, their spending is growing at a pace that’s leaving younger generations far behind.

116 million

$2.9 trillion

$14-$20 trillion

$87 billion

The number of U.S. consumers age 50 and older compared to 182 million younger than age 50

The amount of money people 50 and over are expected to inherit in the next 20 years

The amount of money spent by consumers age 50 and over in 2009; up 45 percent in the previous 10 years

The amount consumers over 50 spent on cars in 2009

SENIOR HEALTH & LIVING

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$3.3 trillion

The amount of money spent by consumers under age 50, up just 6 percent during the same decade

Source: USA Today

ROUND TWO For more than 70 million Americans over 50, business ownership is a practical option. It can be a second career or a chance to leverage life experiences into an interesting and financially practical encore career.


HEALTH CARE: Vein Clinic PA

NEW Vein Clinic PA specializes in legs “For legs you deserve”

We are not like many other practitioners who do veins on the side. Every day, this is our specialty. And, we do it very well.

Dr. Dan Morehouse, Board Certified Vascular Surgeon registered ultrasound technologists,

medical assistants, front office and billing specialists solely devoted to this field. Because Vein Clinic, P.A. utilizes only

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ou don’t deserve restless, heavy, aching, or

state-of-the-art diagnostic and treatment equipment, the

cramping legs simply because you’re active, your

clinic can release you to work or the gym in an hour with

profession keeps you standing, pregnancy has

no pain and very little discomfort.

affected your legs, or you’re aging. Nor do you want to

“As an active person, I did not want to be laid up,” says

experience pooling issues (due to a reversal of blood flow

Allison, a dental hygenist. “So, it (the procedure) was very

in the veins) or run the risk of a hidden clot. The team of

easy. I got to do it over my lunch break.”

Phlebologists (vein specialists), at Vein Clinic, P.A. can help you at St. Cloud’s new medical facility.

You deserve better legs that receive the care and attention of specialists solely devoted to your leg health.

“We treat only veins,” says Dr. Dan Morehouse, a Board Certified Vascular Surgeon, Registered Vascular Technologist, and Phlebologist, experienced in treating complex vein disorders for over 15 years. “We are not like many other practitioners who do veins on the side. Every day, this is our specialty. And, we do it very well.” Along with Dr. Morehouse, VCPA’s elite medical team includes Board Certified Physicians, Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants who are highly trained in the treatment of venous disease. Supporting your care are

SPONSORED PROFILE

VEIN CLINIC, PA

2719 W. Division St., Suite 5, St. Cloud, MN 56303 320.223.7160 • info@veinclinicpa.com • www.veinclinicpa.com Monday – Friday: 8a.m. – 8p.m. Saturday: 8a.m. – 4p.m. (Evening and Saturday hours available in select clinics) St. Cloud • Hutchinson • Lakeville • Blaine • Baxter Duluth • Oakdale • Chanhassen

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SENIOR HEALTH & LIVING

SkinFitNessMD

SENIOR HEALTH & LIVING

Who we are: St. Cloud Hospital Home Care & Hospice provides high-quality medical care and compassionate emotional and spiritual support to patients who are best served at home.

On the following pages you can learn more about the many programs, services, and opportunities available for older adults in Central Minnesota.

What we offer: A team of skilled professionals work to together with the patient’s physician to provide a total continuum of care. Services include home care, palliative care, hospice, telemonitoring, infusion/IV therapy, pediatrics, rehabilitation, wound care and more. Our team includes: registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, physical and occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, medical social workers and home health aides. St. Cloud Hospital Home Care & Hospice 48 29th Ave. N., Ste. 15, St. Cloud Phone: (320) 259-9375

Jessie Norton PA-C, Injection Specialist (320) 230-NESS (6377) jessie@beautifulresults.com www.beautifulresults.com

Expect beautiful results at SkinFitNessMD. The MD in our name means that all of the treatments and products we offer are Medically Directed. Jessie Norton is skilled at the art of Botox and dermal fillers to achieve full facial contouring and volume restoration. Her in-depth understanding of facial anatomy allows for safe and effective results while ensuring patient comfort during treatments. Under the skillful direction of Board Certified Plastic Surgeon, Dr. John Allan Ness MD, and PA-C, Injection Specialist, Jessie Norton, we’ll help you look better and improve your confidence and self-esteem. Please call for a personalized complimentary consult.

Website: www.centracare.com

1.800.955.VEIN(8346) VeinClinicPA.com Nearly 60% of adult men and women suffer from vein disorders. Vein Clinic PA specializes in non-surgical varicose vein treatment utilizing the latest in laser technology known as Endovenous Laser Ablation. Symptoms of varicose veins include restless legs, leg pain, heaviness, itching, burning, leg cramps, and swelling. Treatment is typically covered by most insurance including Medicare and MHCP. Treatments are performed on an outpatient basis, and there is no downtime; patients resume normal activities immediately. Teya Rydrych • Marketing Director 1-800-955-8346 • Trydrych@veinclinicpa.com VeinClinicPA.com

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JOIN US ONLINE AND SEE WHAT YOU’VE BEEN MISSING

Featuring: Page-by-page magazine layout Only online content Past issue archives www.BusinessCentral Magazine.com


SENIOR HEALTH & LIVING

When you get a second chance... Beautiful gardens, scrumptious food, entertainment and social outings . . . sound like a vacation? Leave behind the work and worry of house repairs and yard work — move to an apartment home at Benedict Village. With a nature path through the woods, a gazebo, raised garden plots and a deck with a breathtaking view, the setting is a nature lover’s dream. Come for lunch and a tour to see what you’re missing. Assisted living apartments and residential memory care also are available.

from something as traumatic as heart failure – even recovery scares you. At the Short Stay Unit of St. Benedict’s Senior Community, heart-failure certified nurses excel at helping cardiac patients back to their highest level of independence.

(320) 654-2355

St. Benedict’s Senior Community sbcinformationregistry@centracare.com Phone: (320) 203-2747 www.centracare.com and click on For Seniors

www.centracare.com

Living Actively with the

Comforts of Home!

“I like to be busy! There’s always someone to visit with at the store.” ~Dorothy Good Shepherd Tenant & Gift Store Volunteer

Coming September 2012

GROWTH GUIDE Featuring: New Businesses • New Ownership • New Locations • Expansions The Face of Leadership & Smart Business Profiles

SENIOR APARTMENTS HOME HEALTH CARE ASSISTED LIVING SUB-ACUTE REHAB MEMORY COTTAGES NURSING HOME The Good 1115 4TH AVE N Shepherd Community SAUK RAPIDS www.GoodShepherdCampus.org

For more information contact Wendy Hendricks - 320.656.3808 or whendricks@BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Check us out online at www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

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BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

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PROFIT

Fun Fact:

Roger Bonn and his father, Darwin, were selected as the 1993 St. Cloud Area Small Business Owners of the Year

BUSINESS PROFILE

Roger Bonn and Glen Sunder, Peters Body Shop

Problem Solvers

Peters Body Shop doesn’t just repair your car, they fix your problem. By Gail Ivers

PERSONAL PROFILES Roger Bonn, 56 Education: Graduated from Cathedral High School Family: Wife Jill, children Rachael and Matthew Hobbies: motorcycling, aviation

Glen Sunder, 42 Education: Graduate of the St. Cloud Business College with an emphasis in accounting and business management Family: Wife Brenda, daughter Amber Hobbies: Pretty avid fisherman – all year ‘round; bowling in the winter

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Business Central: What’s new at Peters Body Shop? Roger Bonn: We’re putting on an addition. It’s an estimation area, office space and conference room. Sixty percent of our customers are women. We want to create a welcoming environment for them, something that’s more comfortable than what we have now. Glen Sunder: We’ve expanded our mechanical business just since April. We’re doing brakes, suspension, air condition, light mechanical…. It allows us to better serve our current customers and to make that service available to the general public. BC: The car industry has seen a lot of changes. Bonn: When I started, you could have a mentor and be taught how to do the work. The pressures on business now are such that you can’t take two people to do one job. Our new hires will be mentored, but they have to have some education or training before they come to us.

B u s i n e s s C e n t r a l M a g a z i n e   • •   J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 2

BC: What’s the best part of being in business? Bonn: All the friends I’ve made. This business is all about relationships. The electronic age is hurting those relationships – you order parts on a computer, you don’t talk to vendors, the insurance agents who sell the policies have nothing to do with getting your car repaired anymore. Sunder: Helping people is the best part of the job. Someone comes in here and they’re distraught. The second largest investment of their life is a wreck. We fix their problem. We have the satisfaction of fixing it like new and taking away the problem. Bonn: That’s exactly right. When we send out customer service cards, the compliments aren’t about how the car was fixed. They expect the car to be fixed. The compliments are about all the other things we do to take care of them and fix their problem. BC

Peters Body Shop, Inc. 205 N Osseo Ave. St. Cloud, MN 56303-4453 phone: 320-252-2993 fax: 320-252-0137 Fixit@PetersBodyShop.net www.petersbodyshop.net Owners: Roger Bonn, 51%; Glen Sunder, 49% Business Description: Auto body repair, painting, and mechanical repair; Peters is an I-CAR GOLD Certified member Number of employees: 27 Joined the Chamber: 1979

TIMELINE

1957 Nick Peters opens Peters Body Shop on Osseo Avenue in St. Cloud August 1, 1966 Darwin Bonn and Vern Klein purchase Peters Body Shop from Nick Peters for $4,000 June 1, 1973 Roger Bonn begins working at Peters as an auto body technician Nov. 1, 1987 Roger Bonn buys into the business when Vern Klein retires Nov. 1, 1997 Glen Sunder starts working at Peters in the office Nov. 2010 Bonn and Sunder begin a succession plan allowing Sunder to buy-out Bonn over time 2012 Peters adds a 3,400 square foot office addition and expands their mechanical repair business


When joints wear out, we rebuild. Stay active with minimally invasive joint replacement surgery from St. Cloud Orthopedics.

re pair

(verb) restore to sound condition after damage or injury See also: St. Cloud Orthopedics In 2011, our orthopedic surgeons successfully completed over 7,500 surgical procedures.

1901 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell StCloudOrthopedics.com 320.259.4100 orthopedics redefined Knee & Shoulder • Joint Replacement • Sports Medicine • Hand Center Trauma • Spine Center • Foot & Ankle • Physical & Occupational Therapy


Business Banking Main Street not for

Wall Street

Contact Us for Professional & Personal Banking Services

West St. Cloud 2915 Second Street South (320) 654-9555 MEMBER

FDIC

East St. Cloud 525 Highway 10 South (320) 257-5000

Offices also in Long Prairie and Browerville

July/August 2012  

Business magazine

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