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Joan Schatz


ENGINEERING SPACES FOR CHILDREN

TO LEARN & GROW Four years ago, St. Cloud school district’s early childhood program lost its home when a bolt of lightning ignited a raging fire at the Roosevelt school. This summer, early childhood staff and students will have a new place to call home — Quarryview Education Center in Waite Park. At Design Tree Engineering, we were honored to help create a space where our community’s youngest students will learn and grow. Our multi-disciplinary team of engineers provided Land Survey, Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, and Structural engineering services for this innovative project. Our experienced team incorporates the following in all of our school designs:  Safe and effective site design QUARRYVIEW EDUCATION CENTER

 Communication with school boards and the public  Familiarity with public bidding and construction processes

 Knowledge of MN Department of Education requirements  Sustainability and environmental stewardship


ORTHOPEDIC Technology From robotic-assisted surgery to nonsurgical therapy, cutting-edge orthopedic options can be found right here—for all bones, all joints, and all ages. Start living better today with St. Cloud Orthopedics.

320.259.4100 StCloudOrthopedics.com


JULY/AUGUST 2018

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CONTENTS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

President’s Letter Top Hats

8 24

Editor’s Note

Network Central

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C E L E B R AT I N G 1 8 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

GROW

34 Cover Story NICHE BUILDER From specialized hauling to wind energy, Rollie Anderson has guided ATS’ growth by doing the hard stuff really, really well. PROFIT

41 Feature THE LITTLE TOWN THAT CAN From an award-winning school district to downtown redevelopment, Sauk Rapids is showing what can be done when a community comes together and builds for the future.

46 Special Focus

WORKFORCE TRANSITION The increasing number of older workers is one of the most significant changes in the Minnesota labor force.

Special Section 49 EDUCATION & TRAINING

34 10 UPFRONT Valuable information designed to guide and educate

26 BUSINESS TOOLS

Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business

50 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Murray Mack, HMA Architects

Only Online // www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

© Copyright 2018 Business Central, LLC

• Building Belonging

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce,

• It’s All About Video

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101,

• Optimizing Productivity • Tried, but True

Business Central is published six times a year

P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


We Are Where You Need Us Same great team. New bank name.

Jim Schleper SVP Business Banking

Jacki Templin VP Business Banking

Bill Eickhoff President Central MN Market

Bethany Schwinghammer Retail Manager

Denise Rosin VP Private Banking

Bucky Chief Awesome Officer

When you stop in and visit us at Deerwood Bank—formerly Plaza Park Bank—in Waite Park or Sartell, you’ll see the same financial team you’re familiar with. We are excited to continue and to grow our legacy of community, relationships, and superior service in central Minnesota. Come and see us at Deerwood Bank in Waite Park or Sartell.

www.deerwoodbank.com


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President’s Letter

Time Passages

Main Phone: 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line: 320-656-3826

“Life is like a roll of toilet paper … the closer you get to the end, the quicker it goes.” I love that saying and also find it a bit scary. If you love your life and what you’re doing, time passes quickly. Unless you’re growing out a bad haircut. THAT seems to take forever. I’ve been honored to serve with 20 Chamber Board Chairs, and have worked with hundreds of CEOs and volunteer leaders during my tenure at our Chamber. This year, three retirements in our community make me especially melancholy. Jane DeAustin, public affairs director for Central Minnesota Builders has been involved with our Government Affairs Division for over 20 years. I met Jane when she was employed with SCSU and have drawn on her knowledge and wisdom throughout my tenure, even as she fought through cancer treatment and came out on the other side stronger than ever. Jane has provided leadership and friendship I have always appreciated, and I will miss her. Dave Borgert, Government Affairs and Community Development Director for CentraCare Health has also been my valued colleague and friend for over 20 years. Dave has attended all 20 of our Chamber trips to Washington, D.C., enthusiastically serving as our unofficial tour guide and sharing his incredible knowledge of American history. He has helped increase our trip participation from three people to almost 30, and has provided committee leadership. Dave currently serves on our Chamber’s Board of Directors. Greg Vandal, retired superintendent of the Sauk Rapids-Rice School District, remained active in our community through his consulting company Vox Liberi. Greg is a past member of our Board of Directors and has been part of the Chamber’s Leadership program

Program Hotline: 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com StCloudAreaChamber.com ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF President: Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 for many, many years. This year he announced that the pull of family and grandchildren had become too strong and he was moving to Fargo. His quiet leadership and guidance will be missed by both staff and volunteers. When Rollie Anderson was recognized as our 2018 Family Owned Business Award recipient, I was drawn back to my early days as Chamber president. Rollie’s father, Harold Anderson, was one of the first CEOs with whom I met and developed a lasting friendship. Harold immediately struck me as a man with a strong vision . . . a man creating a legacy. He was especially talented at recognizing strong women leaders and helping them advance in their careers. Watching and listening to Rollie accept the award I recognized the impact his father had on his leadership, management style and character. The differences in styles between father and son complemented one another and created a stronger, more resilient company that continues to grow and prosper in changing times. For all the people marking “Time Passages” and leaving their imprints on us this year, I offer you these lyrics from the 1978 Al Stewart song: There’s something back here that you left behind Oh time passages Buy me a ticket on the last train home tonight.

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8

Director of Administration: Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 Communications & Workforce Development Coordinator: Kelti Lorence, ext. 130 Special Events Coordinator: Sheri Wegner, ext. 131 Administrative Assistant: Kellie Libert, ext. 124 Administrative Assistant: Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 Administrative Assistant: Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100 2017-18 BOARD MEMBERS Jason Bernick, Bernick’s, Past Board Chair Marilyn Birkland, Times Media David Borgert, CentraCare Health Christy Gilleland, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac Jim Gruenke, Traut Companies Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning Dennis Host, Coborn’s, Inc. Willie Jett, St. Cloud School District Kevin Johnson, K. Johnson Construction Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Bernie Perryman, Batteries Plus Bulbs Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, Board Chair Allison Waggoner, DCI, Inc. Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St.Cloud, Board Vice Chair CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF Main Phone: 320-251-4170 Executive Director: Julie Lunning, ext. 111 Director of Sports & Special Events: Dana Randt, ext. 110 Sales Manager: Nikki Fisher, ext. 112 Sales Manager: Rachel Thompson, ext. 128 Social Media & Marketing Specialist: Emily Bertram, ext. 129 Sales and Services Coordinator: Erin Statz, ext. 113

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

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Vice President: Gail Ivers, ext. 109

Administrative Assistant - Information Specialist: Jennifer Schroeder, ext. 170


Be Back to

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Editor’s Note

Behind the Scenes

Publisher Teresa Bohnen Managing Editor Gail Ivers Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University Vicki Ikeogu, Area Planning Organization Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Kellie Libert, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Kelti Lorence, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Mary MacDonell Belisle, mary macdonell belisle - wordingforyou Cameron Macht, Department of Employment and Economic Development Mike Phillips, BankVista

F

ON THE COVER

.

The sepia drawing of the granite being placed on the truck was done by Rollie’s nephew, Nathan Anderson.

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ADVERTISING Associate Publisher/Sales Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media Cover Photo Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman ADVERTISING PARTNERS

Photo by Joel Butkowski, Butkowski Digital Imaging

or many years, our Business Awards Luncheon has included Editor Gail Ivers helping out behind the videos of our award winners. scenes during the (windy!) July photo shoot of Rollie Anderson, Anderson Trucking. The five minute videos our guests see represent hours of behind the scenes work. It starts with a lengthy interview of each winner. I transcribe the video, then use the transcript to create a story that I think will engage the audience. From there I put together a script. For the last several years I have turned that script over to Joel Butkowski, Butkowski Digital Imaging, who turns my script into the final video we show at the luncheon. When we first started doing videos, I would ask the winners to show up with little or no preparation. I wanted their responses to be spontaneous rather than rehearsed. It seems the more people rehearse the harder it is for them to answer questions because they are trying so hard to remember what they wanted to say. A few years ago, in response to a desperate plea, I relented and provided questions that our award winners could use to prepare their comments. This had mixed results. In some cases it helped remove the unknown. In other cases it made the interviews even harder as the people tried to say exactly what they had carefully prepared. One of the challenges of a video interview is that it is not a typical, conversational interview. My voice and I do not appear on the video. Therefore, even though I ask a question, the subject of the video needs to phrase an answer in such a way that the audience has a clue what we are talking about. Perhaps the most challenging part of the interview is that our subjects have to forget that there is a camera in the room. They are to look at me and only me – not at the camera, not at other guests waiting in the wings, and not at Joel as he moves between cameras, checking angles and focus. They also can’t fidget, rock or wiggle. You’d be surprised how hard that is. I’m embarrassed to admit that I have not been entirely compassionate with our award winners and their video anxiety. Until now. Recently I was asked to be the subject of a video for the Small Business Administration’s 2018 business awards program. They sent the questions out in advance, I looked them over and thought out my remarks and decided I was good to go. Then I had to sit in a room with two cameras pointed at me, looking at the interviewer – not at the camera – and phrase an answer in such a way that the audience would have a clue what we are talking about. What looks simple from behind the scenes turns out to be ridiculously hard! You can watch the videos of our 2018 business award winners, including the video of Rollie Anderson, Anderson Trucking, the 2018 Family Owned Business of the Year and the subject of this issue’s cover story (see page 34), on BusinessCentralMagazine.com. I’ll also post my video there. Meanwhile, I’m going back behind the scenes. It’s waaay easier! Until next issue,

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 BusinessCentralMagazine.com For advertising information contact Wendy Hendricks, (320)656-3808 Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Your Voice in Government

UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

• People to Know

Do it Now! • Top Hat Photos • The Trouble with Business uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

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NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Quest for Meaning

NEWS REEL

Applying these core principles to daily life can help readers find meaning in every day moments. Reviewed by Dr. Fred Hill

Prisoners of Our Thoughts, Viktor Frankl’s Principles for Discovering Meaning in Life and Work, Third Edition, Alex Pattakos and Elaine Dundon, Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc., Oakland, CA, 2017; ISBN (pbk.) 9781626568808

P

risoners of Our Thoughts deals with the human quest for meaning. It is grounded in the philosophy and approach of Viktor Frankl, author of the best-selling Man’s Search for Meaning, which was named one of the ten most influential books in America by the Library of Congress. Frankl, a world-renowned psychiatrist and existential philosopher, is the founder of Logotherapy, a meaning-

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centered, humanistic approach to psychotherapy, which incorporates such insights as the freedom to choose one’s attitude. The purpose of Prisoners of Our Thoughts is to help each of us apply Frankl’s therapeutic system to learn how to bring personal meaning and fulfillment to our everyday lives and work and achieve our highest potential. Authors Alex Pattakos and Elaine Dundon draw on Frankl’s body of work to identify seven core principles: 1 Exercise the Freedom to Choose Your Attitude 2 Realize Your Will to Meaning 3 Detect the Meaning of Life’s Moments 4 Don’t Work Against Yourself 5 Look at Yourself from a Distance 6 Shift Your Focus of Attention 7 Extend Beyond Yourself Three additional chapters explain how everyone can benefit by putting meaning at the core of our lives, work, and society.

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In the foreword, Dr. Stephen R. Covey writes of stumbling onto three lines in a book (whose title he forgot to write down and never found again), that solidified his own feelings regarding our power of choice, and which reaffirmed Frankl’s essential teachings. These lines are: “Between stimulus and response, there is a space. In that space lies our freedom and our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our happiness.” Frankl, a survivor of Nazi concentration camps during World War II, came to know that he was responsible for finding meaning in his circumstances and, importantly, for not becoming a prisoner of his thoughts. Alexander Batthyany, PhD, director of the Viktor Frankl Institute in Vienna, writes of this book: “If you intend to read just one self-help book in your life, pick this one.” Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor at St. Cloud State University

QUINLIVAN & HUGHES OPENS MONTICELLO OFFICE Quinlivan & Hughes opened a new office in Monticello. It is located at 305 Cedar Street.

BERGANKDV ADDS STAFF Bonnie Gilbert and Cameryn Geiselhart join BerganKDV at their St. Cloud location as payroll processors. Matt Cosgriff was selected as BerganKDV’s new wealth management service leader.

STEARNS BANK ADDS DIRECTOR Mary Jepperson has been named to the Stearns Bank Board of Directors.

ST. CLOUD HOSPITAL DESIGNATED IN EQUALITY INDEX, RECEIVES MAGNET DESIGNATION St. Cloud Hospital received the “LGBTQ Healthcare Equality Leader” designation from the Human Rights Campaign Foundation (HRC) in their Healthcare Equality Index (HEI). The hospital again attained Magnet recognition, a testament to its continued dedication to high-quality nursing practice. The American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Magnet Recognition Program® distinguishes health care organizations that meet rigorous standards for nursing excellence. This credential is the highest national honor for professional nursing practice.


CELEBRATING 40 YEARS IN BUSINESS! Don & Sylvia Weeres Don & Sylvia Weeres

We offer the following services within the Midwest:

• Package Delivery • Pallet Delivery • Warehousing/ Fulfillment

www.speedeedelivery.com 320-251-6697


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UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

NEWS REEL

Shop Minnesota

NEW EMPLOYEES JOIN ROTOCHOPPER Rotochopper, Inc. welcomed six new employees to the team: Justin Blommer, Orvie Hagen and Chase Eiden as fabricators/ welders; Bryan Ritt as a product specialist; Andrew Birr as a repair technician; and Thomas Willing as a painter.

NEW EMPLOYEES JOIN U.S. BANK U.S. Bank hired Abby Legatt in the Mid-NE Minnesota Region as an assistant relationship manager, and Caryn Stadther at the downtown St. Cloud location as a treasury management deposits/payments consultant.

BERNICK’S EMPLOYEE WINS CONTEST David Ohnstad, lead route driver at Bernick’s, was selected by the National Beer Wholesalers Association (NBWA) as the winner of the Share Your Story Contest.

CUPERUS ELECTED PRESIDENT, ADDS STAFF The Minnesota Chiropractic Association elected Dr. Sara Cuperus as president for the 2018-2019 fiscal year. Cuperus owns Chiropractic Performance Center in Sartell. Dr. Samantha Shand joined the practice of Chiropractic Performance Center as an associate Doctor of Chiropractic.

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T

he St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce works in partnership with the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce to deliver a consistent message to our state legislators and advocate in the best interests of our members. We also collaborate on several value-added programs in which you may find benefit. MN Supplier Match is one of those programs. It creates value for businesses that want the advantages of sourcing from local suppliers – customization, accessibility, rapid delivery, shared networks, and trusted quality. And it creates value for suppliers looking for new business opportunities and customers in Minnesota. The Minnesota economy wins by keeping more dollars in our state and helping our suppliers and buyers be more competitive.

The idea for MN Supplier Match grew out of our Grow Minnesota! visits. Created in 2003, local chambers visit between 600 and 900 Minnesota businesses annually. The St. Cloud Area Chamber visits 50+ businesses per year. During the visits we discover what it takes for companies to stay and grow in Minnesota. Many of these businesses are vital links in the supply chains of other Minnesota companies. By connecting the visits of over 70 local chambers and the Minnesota Chamber, we have built a network of more than 1,600 manufacturers, nearly 600 professional service firms, and many other companies

that provide goods and services to businesses. Buyers – those companies wishing to access the database – must be Minnesota Chamber members. However, to be listed as a supplier – those seeking to promote their products and services – companies must either be a Minnesota Chamber member, or they must complete a Grow Minnesota! visit. Visits are carried out statewide by the Minnesota Chamber and our St. Cloud Area Chamber staff as a Grow Minnesota! partner. Visits and the resulting supplier listings are complimentary. We want to shine a light on Minnesota suppliers, making it easier for Minnesota companies to find local partners in the state’s diverse and robust business community – and MN Supplier Match is the perfect avenue. There is no other source on the market to find a supplier list that is exclusive to Minnesota, regularly updated, maintained by a trusted entity, and includes suppliers from all sectors.

WANT TO KNOW MORE? To schedule a Grow Minnesota! visit and/or learn more about MN Supplier Match, contact Teresa Bohnen at tbohnen@ StCloudAreaChamber.com.

This information was adapted from the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce

The MN Supplier Match connects companies and helps grow the economy. By Teresa Bohnen


Looking for a financial partner?

More than just a place to deposit your paycheck, our friendly staff is here to help you accomplish your financial goals. Whether you’re looking to save for the future, buy a house, start your own business, or finance that extra acreage, look to Farmers & Merchants State Bank.

Eden Valley 320.453.2000 NMLS #528169

Pierz 320.468.6422 FMpierz.com

Sauk Rapids 320.252.5121 MEMBER FDIC


CLOSE UP: EXECUTIVE EXPRESS - TRANSPORATION RELAXATION SM

EXECUTIVE EXPRESS PLANS JULY OPENING AT NEW LOCATION Family-owned LOCAL business provides more in transportation relaxation

“WE ARE EXCITED FOR THE OPENING OF THIS NEW FACILITY THAT SETS US UP TO PROVIDE EVEN GREATER SERVICE FOR OUR CUSTOMERS.”

E

xecutive Express has partnered with the St. Cloud Holiday Inn as a customer pickup location for the past 39 years. Happily, because of its steady growth, the transportation enterprise is better able to deliver transportation relaxation, comfort, convenience, and more at its new transit center and corporate headquarters, located in Waite Park. “We always base business decisions on customer comfort, even though the result might initially be more expensive for the company,” says owner Larry Logeman. Twenty-eight thousand square feet of dedicated transportation structures are strategically, and conveniently, positioned on

– LARRY LOGEMAN, OWNER, EXECUTIVE EXPRESS

15 acres of former farmland. There’s ample free parking, consisting of 100+ spaces. And this accommodating space offers more room for additional expansion for the company. In addition, state-of-the-art security protects 11 acres of gated and fenced-in property–– video-camera coverage, security lighting and 24/7 staff monitoring of vehicles and clientele. Luggage and check-in assistance to travelers is also offered by the attentive staff. The new and improved fleet consists of over 50+ vehicles, ranging in size from private car service up to 55-passenger coach buses. “We have invested in busses and vans that offer aisle seating,

TRANSPORTATION Relaxation SM 3105 County Road 138, Waite Park MN 56387 / 320.253.2226 Phone: 888.522.9899

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and spacious interiors that allow riders to easily move into and out of their seats. More headroom, too!” says Logeman. Likewise, there are expanded services and guest amenities to experience. Travelers can take advantage of additional daily AIRPORT SHUTTLES to the MSP Airport . . . now at 18 . . . or schedule a PRIVATE CHARTER for business or pleasure trips. Weather can be a concern. However, this new transit center’s arrival/departure area is sheltered to protect guests from excessive sunlight, heat, and inclement weather. There’s ample comfortable seating in the contemporary

customer lounge. Guests can also avail themselves of the free coffee bar and vending machine beverages and snacks. “The staff at Executive Express thanks you for your past business and invites you to come and explore our new Waite Park facility any time,” says Logeman. “Come, see, and relax!”

Leveraging our local relationships: Executive Express is proud to support 28 local contractors from Central Minnesota on this construction project.

Business Description: Executive Express is a shuttle, charter and courier service that provides up to 18 daily shuttle trips to the MSP Airport from 43 Central MN cities. Learn more at executiveexpress.biz SPONSORED PROFILE


IF YOU GO

CHAMBER OPEN

Waite Park Chamber

The 72nd annual Chamber Open is August 13. Network in the sun and on the golf course, then relax and enjoy dinner and awards at 5 p.m. Registration is required.

For businesses interested in Waite Park community issues. 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. July 18: Hosted by The Summit Real Estate Team at Edina Realty; location: Waite Park City Hall. The meeting includes a presentation on “Human Trafficking in Central Minnesota” presented by Dave Bentrud, Waite Park Police Chief, and Janelle Kendall, Stearns County Attorney. August 15: Hosted by Baker’s Hobby Town onsite at 500 Sundial Dr., Waite Park. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance.

Blackberry Ridge Golf Course, 3125 Clubhouse Road, Sartell; shotgun start at 11:30 a.m.

NEXT – Chamber’s Emerging Leaders Offers professional development, leadership and networking opportunities for emerging leaders in Central Minnesota. Meets the second Tuesday of every month, noon-1 p.m. July 10: Tour of Geringhoff Manufacturing, 3405 Energy Dr., St. Cloud Cost is $195 for an annual membership. Register to Kelti, klorence@StCloudAreaChamber.com.

mysentrybank.com J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

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UpFront DO IT NOW!

NEWS REEL

REAL ESTATE AGENTS RECOGNIZED Mike Schmitt and Scott M. Schmitt of Coldwell Banker Commercial Orion Real Estate received the Circle of Distinction Award. Mike received the Silver Circle, and Scott received the Bronze Circle.

RUSHMEYER JOINS FARMERS & MERCHANTS Luke Rushmeyer joined Farmers & Merchants State Bank as a loan officer at the Sauk Rapids location.

ESSIG JOINS MUSEUM Carie Essig joined Stearns History Museum as the new executive director.

Recall

There are many fun, simple and delicious ways to improve your memory.

E

veryone has moments of forgetfulness from time to time, especially when life gets busy. While this can be a completely normal occurrence, having a poor memory can be frustrating. Genetics plays a role in memory loss; however, research has shown that diet and lifestyle have a major impact on memory too. Here are 12 evidence-based ways to improve your memory naturally.

ry a fish oil 2..Tsupplement

1 .Eat less sugar 3

4

Maintain a healthy weight

Make time for meditation

5 Drink less alcohol 7

6 “OPERATION ROUND UP” MAKES CONTRIBUTIONS Stearns Electric Association’s Operation Round Up program contributed $48,900 to 87 area organizations and charitable causes.

STEARNS BANK SELECTED TO 100 BEST COMPANIES Stearns Bank was selected by Minnesota Business Magazine as one of this year’s 100 Best Companies to Work For.

PROCESSPRO WINS GOLD STEVIE AWARD ProcessPro received a gold Stevie Award in the “Customer Service Team of the Year” category for the American Business Awards.

Practice mindfulness

8 Train your brain

Get enough sleep

. ecrease refined 9D carbohydrates

J.Get your Vitamin D levels tested K Exercise more

L Add some

cocoa to your diet

The Bottom Line There are many fun, simple and delicious ways to improve your memory. Exercising your mind and body, enjoying a quality piece of chocolate and reducing the amount of added sugar in your diet are all excellent techniques. Try adding a few of these science-backed tips to your daily routine to boost your brain health and keep your memory in top condition.

For more information, visit businesscentralmagazine.com

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PEOPLE TO KNOW

Kristin Hannon

Josh Vraa

Paul Ravenberg

Carl Newbanks

Minnwest Bank (320) 529-4814 kristinh@minnwestbankgroup.com Chair, Star Celebration ––––––––––– The Star Celebration is the Chamber’s annual volunteer recognition celebration. Committee members are responsible for planning the event and soliciting sponsorships.

Viking Coca-Cola Bottling Co. (320) 251-4602 JSVraa@vikingcocacola.com Chair, B.I.G. (Big Idea Group) ––––––––––– B.I.G. supports and enhances Chamber activities by promoting engagement with fresh and contemporary event and program ideas. Programs include See the City bus tours and Taste.

Central Minnesota CouncilBoy Scouts of America (320) 251-3930 Paul.Ravenberg@scouting.org Chair, NEXT- Chamber’s Emerging Leaders ––––––––––– NEXT- Chamber’s Emerging Leaders provides networking and educational opportunities designed for the NEXT generation of business leaders in Central Minnesota.

UCP of Central Minnesota (320) 253-0765 carl@ucpcentralmn.org Chair, Sauk Rapids Chamber ––––––––––– The Sauk Rapids Chamber, a division of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, promotes a healthy business environment in the community of Sauk Rapids. Volunteers and committee members work in cooperation with member businesses, local government, the public school system and other community organizations.

Jessica Reiter (320) 363-5791 jreiter@csbsju.edu

College of Saint Benedict/ Saint John's University Chair, Waite Park Chamber

The Waite Park Chamber, a division of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, is a place where business, education and government come together for the betterment of the community. Programs include the Waite Park State of the City address.

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A will protect me from probate.

Assets of any kind can lead to probate.

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- Melinda Sanders, Estate Planning Attorney

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Serving in the areas of Business & Employment Law, Trust & Estates, Insurance Defense & Medical Malpractice, Premises Liability & Personal Injury, Government Liability. Learn more at Quinlivan.com or by calling (320) 251-1414

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

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UpFront TOP HATS

NEWS REEL ZOOK RECEIVES CADUCEUS AWARD

Celebrating 45 years! Join us in celebrating businesses who have been chamber members for 45 years - and some even more!

CentraCare Clinic family physician, Patrick Zook, MD, received the Caduceus Award for exhibiting exemplary humanitarian medical efforts.

ST. CLOUD FEDERAL CREDIT UNION WINS PHILANTHROPY AWARD St. Cloud Federal Credit Union, in partnership with Sartell High School and the Kiva Program, received the Simon Hellerman Philanthropy Award. St. Cloud Federal Credit Union has provided over eighty loans to fund high school student projects designed to better local lives and communities in thirty developing countries.

FOSTER EARNS CONSULTANT DESIGNATION Kimberly Foster, Laraway Financial Advisors, Inc., earned the Chartered Financial Consultant designation from the American College of Financial Services. Jennifer Lesmeister joins Laraway Financial as the client relations coordinator.

PARK INDUSTRIES RECEIVES TRAINING GRANT Park Industries and St. Cloud State University have earned a workforce development grant from the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) for $350,000 to create and deliver customized training to every associate. Send News Reel items to Gail Ivers, givers@businesscentralmagazine.com for possible inclusion. News Reel is compilied by Kelti Lorence.

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Pilgrim’s: Distributes chicken products under the local Gold'n Plump and Just BARE brands, 4150 2nd Street S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Liz Kellner, Lynn Holmvig, Bill Lanners.

Eye Kraft optical: Full-service optical laboratory, ranging from glass lenses to both traditional & digital plastic and polycarbonate lenses, 8 McLeland Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Liz Kellner, Michael Moeller, Lawrence Lahr, Roger Schleper.

PleasureLand RV Center, Inc.: RV sales, service, rentals, parts and truck sales, 25064 Augusta Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Chris Panek, Brad Bacon, Whitney Pearson, Tanja Goering.

Mahowald Insurance Agency: Comprehensive insurance solutions for businesses and individuals, 916 W St. Germain Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tanja Goering, Laura Tomczik, David Mahowald, Bridget Faber, Caryn Stadther.

Northwestern Mutual: A financial services, insurance and investment solutions, 3315 Roosevelt Road, suite 300, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Diego Ohmann, Sarah Noble, Dan Cairns, Jared Smith, Dillon Seng, Tami Johnson, Tammy Buttweiler.

DCI, Inc.: Designs, manufactures and services vessels for the food, dairy, beverage, pharmaceutical, chemical and OEM industries, 600 54th Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Jeff Keller, Allison Waggoner, Tanja Goering.

Freightliner of St. Cloud: Truck sales, parts, service, body/paint shop for all makes and models, 25200 Augusta Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Amanda Groethe, Jon Pearson, Tammy Buttweiler.

Bremer: A regional financial service company providing a comprehensive range of banking, investment, trust and insurance services, 1100 W St. Germain Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Amanda Groethe, Matt Laubach, Tom Rickers, Tauna Quimby.

Rex Granite Company: Granite manufacturing, memorials, countertops, landscape, wholesale, nationwide/retail/local market, 414 Lincoln Ave. NE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Caryn Stadther, Mike Zniewkski, Eric Zniewski, Kurt Zniewski, Gary Zniewski, Kris Hellickson.

Newcomer Service: Welcoming new businesses and residents to the area, 21983 Agate Beach Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Susan Dean, Tammy Buttweiler.

Rengel Printing Company: A full-service printer, 1922 7th Street N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Sheri Moran, LaRae Rengel, Peter Rengel, Brian Jarl.

Xcel Energy: 3515 3rd Street N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Matt Knutson, Mark Osendorf, Tanya Goering.


IF YOU GO

SAUK RAPIDS CHAMBER For businesses interested in Sauk Rapids community issues. Meetings are held from 11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m. SEH: Multi-disciplined, single-source consulting firm of architects, planners, engineers, surveyors and scientists, 1200 25th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Patrick Hollermann, Randy Sabart, Sheri Moran.

July 26: Hosted by the St. Cloud Surgical Center at the Sauk Rapids Government Center, 250 Summit Ave. N, Sauk Rapids. Lunch is provided by the host when you

August 23: Hosted by the Sauk Rapids Chamber at the Sauk Rapids Government Center, 250 Summit Ave. N, Sauk Rapids. The meeting is the annual Business Showcase.

register at least two days in advance.

Business After Hours: 4:30 - 6:30 p.m.

A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network! 47 YEAR MEMBER Nemeth Orthodontics: Straighten teeth, align dentition, dentofacial orthopaedics, 3131 12th St. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Caryn Stadther, Dr. Benjamin Nemeth, Dr. Robert Nemeth, Beth Putz.

July 24: Hosted by Hampton Inn & Suites and Homewood Suites, 115 37th Ave. N., St. Cloud

August 16: hosted by Minnesota Concrete Products, 905 35th Ave. NE, Sauk Rapids

Redefining Commercial Real Estate We’ll keep you engaged every step of the way.

LEASING | SALES | DEVELOPME NT

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

320.257.5400 | RICEPROPERTIES.COM

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UpFront DID YOU KNOW?

TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

Vacation Planning If you plan to rent out your home, plan now for the tax consequences.

D

The 400 Club, dining, weddings, banquets, onsite catering on the water's edge of Pleasant Lake, 25958 Lake Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Mark Osendorf, Marlene Dohls, Mike Dohls, Bernie Perryman.

VACATION HOME. This may be a house, an apartment, condominium, mobile home, boat, vacation home or similar property. It's possible to use more than one unit as a residence during the year. PERSONAL USE. Personal use means use by the owner, owner’s family, friends, other

Moore Engineering, Inc., civil engineering and land surveying company, 3315 Roosevelt Road suite 500C, St. Cloud. Pictured: Rory Cruser, Kevin Bucholz, Jeremy Boots, Dan Hanson, Sonia Nordmann.

Jim's Auto Service, Inc., general automotive shop, 22 16th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Ken McGowan, Scott McGowan, Matt Knutson.

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Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8

property owners and their families. Personal use includes anyone paying less than a fair rental price. USED AS A HOME. When the property is used as a home, the rental expense deduction is limited. This means the rental expenses cannot be more than the rent received.

DIVIDE EXPENSES. Generally, special rules apply to the rental expenses of a property that’s used by the taxpayer as a residence during the taxable year. Usually, rental income must be reported in full, and any expenses need to be divided between personal and business purposes. SPECIAL RULES. If the home unit is rented out fewer than 15 days during the year, none of the rental income is reportable and none of the rental expenses are deductible.

IN THE NEWS

IVERS RECEIVES STATE AWARD St. Cloud Area Chamber Vice President, Gail Ivers, received the U.S. Small Business SBA District Director Nancy Libersky, Gail Ivers, Deputy District Director Brian McDonald Administration’s 2018 Minnesota District Director’s Award. She was selected because of her dedicated support for small business over the course of her career. Ivers is also known as a community builder, working with partners locally, and statewide, to promote and support business. “Gail is an inspiring leader who has done so much to help build our local economy here in Minnesota,” said Nancy Libersky, SBA’s Minnesota district director. In addition to serving as editor of Business Central Magazine, Ivers is also responsible for the Chamber’s business awards program, the organization’s largest membership event.

Source: IRS.gov; for more information, visit BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Stella & Dot by Sara Thompson, Independent Stylist, a boutiquestyle accessories company offering flexible entrepreneurship for women, 209 Walnut Street S, Sauk Centre. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Sara Thompson, Inese Mehr.

uring the summer, taxpayers often rent out their property. They usually think about things such as cleanup and maintenance, but owners also need to be aware of the tax implications of residential and vacation home rentals. If taxpayers receive money for the use of a house that’s also used as a taxpayer’s personal residence, it generally requires reporting the rental income on a tax return.


TOP HATS: NEW LOCATIONS, OWNERSHIP AND EXPANSIONS

New Location: DAYTA Marketing, providing small to mid-sized businesses with cost-effective social media and web services, 519 2nd Street N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Caryn Stadther, John Riordan, Luke Riordan, Amanda Groethe.

New Owner: Boser Construction, Inc., construction and remodeling of commercial, medical, and institutional facilities, 7135 5th Ave. NE, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Luke Cesnik, Ryan Cross, Dustin Vaverek, Bernie Perryman.

New Name: Career Solutions, (formerly Stearns Benton Employment & Training Council) providing comprehensive workforce development services for community members age 14+, 1542 Northway Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Angie Dahle, Tammy Biery, Ileana Merten, Matt Knutson.

New name and ownership: St. Cloud Cartridges, locally owned, eco friendly, ink, toner, printer, and service supplier, 3411 W Division Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Liz Kellner, Marie Lego, Tammy Buttweiler.

TOP HATS: NEW BUSINESS Dvorak Eye Clinic, providing comprehensive eye care including routine vision exams and complex eye surgery, 1311 2nd Street N, suite 105, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Liz Kellner, John A. Dvorak, M.D., Irene Berg, Brenda Eisenschenk.

dh Dental Care, family and cosmetic dentistry, 3400 1st Street N suite 102, St. Cloud. Pictured: Sonia Nordmann, Docia Hogan, Rory Cruser.

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UpFront THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

Approved! If you’re thinking about applying for a business loan, your chances for approval are better if you avoid these common pitfalls. By Mike Phillips

B

usiness owners seek financing from banks for a variety of reasons, including purchasing equipment, expanding inventory, and acquiring an office facility. The owner applies to a financial institution for a loan, providing fairly lengthy documentation in order for the loan request to be evaluated by a lender. Despite all that work and preparation, the loan may be refused. Why? Here are the most common reasons a business owner’s request for funding is turned down. Inadequate Cash Flow Loans are repaid either from future cash generated by the business or by liquidation of assets. The lender will typically review cash generated from historical reports, such as tax returns or financial statements, as well as from financial projections normally

provided by the applicant. This is especially true for a new business, or one that is doing a major expansion, such as adding an office or increasing the size of a manufacturing facility. The lender needs to be comfortable that future cash flows generated by the business will exceed the scheduled loan payments by 15-25 percent, providing some cushion for adverse changes in cash flow, such as loss of a key customer or large, unanticipated repairs. Projections are scrutinized carefully as borrowers frequently overestimate revenues and understate expenses. A comparison to industry or historical databases will help a lender identify potential erroneous assumptions or flaws in the projections.

contributor Michael A. Phillips is vice president and a commercial loan officer at BankVista, Sartell. He can be reached at (320) 257-1986 or mphillips@bankvista.com.

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Lack of Cash Equity In most financing transactions, the borrower will be asked to provide a down payment of 15-30 percent of the purchase price of the asset or business to be acquired. In addition, the lender will want to see what other sources of cash or access to cash might be available to help avoid situations where a temporary cash shortfall results in late payments. In some cases a smaller down payment might be available if the financial institution partners with a third-party lender, such as the U.S. Small Business Administration, and the loan request meets the eligibility rules for their program. It can’t hurt to ask! Lack of Sufficient or Tangible Collateral Although most financial institutions are “cash flow” lenders, they will still try to help shore up credit risk by seeking assets from the borrower to be pledged in the event a loan can’t be repaid. The most common collateral is real estate, such as land or buildings, followed by equipment. Each bank develops its own lending policies to determine how much collateral is needed in order to approve a loan. Inadequate Industry Experience or Planning Businesses fail for a wide variety of reasons. Historically, the

most common reason is due to poor management. Financial institutions will review the experience and education of the borrower’s management team as part of the underwriting process. A loan request from a borrower who lacks adequate experience can be a factor in not approving a loan request. Likewise, if a lender is uncomfortable with the effort and quality of the business plan and related financial projections, a loan request may be denied. Poor Credit History For closely held businesses (four or fewer people own the business), most financial institutions will require the owners to personally guarantee business loans. Over time, lenders have observed a correlation between how a business owner handles personal credit and how the related business credit is handled as well. Often, if the owner has a history of late payments, the owner’s business will exhibit a similar payment behavior. Financial institutions consider many factors when reviewing a business loan request. When possible, the financial institution will try to approve the loan…as successful lending is profitable for the bank and for the customer. If a loan is not approved, the applicant should talk to the lender so they understand why the loan was refused.


www.scr-mn.com

Formerly St. Cloud Refrigeration

Central | Metro

IN THE NEWS

St. Cloud • Twin Cities Wilmar • Alexandria 1-800-827-1642

DEMONSTRATING DIVERSITY Preferred Credit, Inc. earns the Chamber’s inaugural diversity award.

T

he St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce presented its inaugural diversity award to Preferred Credit, Inc. during the Community Diversity Conference earlier this year. The Chamber’s Diversity Recognition acknowledges the exceptional efforts of area businesses whose visible efforts foster greater appreciation, advancement and celebration of diversity and inclusiveness in the Central Minnesota business community. The staff at Preferred Credit is dedicated to moving their business toward being a diverse and inclusive operation. Thirty percent of their current workforce of 300 employees is bilingual, and they continue to hire for a variety of languages, including Spanish and Tagalog. Preferred Credit was founded by Gene Windfeldt in 1982 to provide financing to one of the largest in-home consumer sales distributorships in the world. Their mission is to be a relationship-driven finance company by providing honest, superior service with a commitment to operational excellence. In doing so, Preferred Credit strives to create sustainable opportunities for business, consumers and employees.

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BUILDING AUTOMATION FOOD SERVICE

Southern

Rochester 1-877-399-4546 Mankato 1-800-447-3259

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8 //

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UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

Grow! Network! Profit! The 2018 St. Cloud Area Chamber Business Awards Luncheon was sold out as everyone came together to celebrate business. Photos by Jeff Yapuncich, YuppyPhoto

Roger Schleper, (L) Premier Real Estate Services, chair of the Chamber Board, presents the 2018 Family Owned Business of the Year award to Rollie Anderson, Anderson Trucking Service

Dick Bitzan, DJ Bitzan Jewelers, 2010 Family Owned Business of the Year

Don and Sylvia Weeres, Spee-Dee Delivery, 2003 Entrepreneurial Success Award

Kevin Johnson, K. Johnson Construction, 2017 Small Business of the Year

Lee Hanson, Gray Plant Mooty, 2013 Small Business Advocate

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Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8

Dan Pearson, PleasureLand

Mike Fitch (L) and Pat Welty, SCR, 1997 Small Business of the Year

Dan Pearson, (L) PleasureLand RV Center accepts the 2018 Entrepreneurial Success Award from Bill Knoblach, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac, sponsor of the award.


Joel Bauer (L) and Tim Burg, Midsota Manufacturing, 2018 Small Business of the Year

Tom Grones (L) and Dan Rudnigen, retired from GeoComm, 2006 Small Business of the year; Melissa Kruse-Kelley, JF Kruse Jewelers, 2014 Small Business of the Year; Larry Logeman, Executive Express, 2015 Small Business of the Year.

Dan Tideman, (L) GLTArchitects, 2002 Small Business of the Year and Brian Myres, Myres Consulting

Jim McAlister, (L) Tell-A-Vision Productions; Jim Staska, Executive Express; Jeff Yapuncich, YuppyPhoto

Danielle and Joel Bauer, Midsota Manufacturing

Liz Kellner, (L) Odor Eliminators; Rollie Anderson, Anderson Trucking; Caryn Stadther, U.S. Bank

Rick Bauerly and Shelly Bauerly Kopel, Granite Equity Partners, Champion Sponsor

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8 //

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InSIDE THIS ISSUE: Doing Good • Entreprenuerism •

BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

Economy Central by Falcon Bank uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

DOING GOOD

Impact

St. Cloud’s Stearns Bank is putting its money where its heart is.

Stearns Bank also waives 100 percent of the bank’s packaging fees on SBA loans for eligible veteran business owners.

I

n March Stearns Bank made a donation of more than $108,000 to the Wounded Warriors Family Support foundation. The money will be used to purchase vehicles for Native American veterans living on remote reservations. The bank generated the funds by donating all loan packaging fees and documentation fees collected from borrowers during the week leading up

to Veterans Day in November 2017. Stearns Bank also waives 100 percent of the bank’s packaging fees on SBA loans for eligible veteran business owners. Along with its commitment to WWFS, Stearns Bank has also made an annual pledge of $250,000 to support the Red Cross’ Disaster Responder Program. Members of the Disaster Responder program

pledge donations year-round, in advance of major disasters, to ensure the Red Cross can respond immediately whenever a disaster occurs. Stearns Bank initiated its commitment to the Red Cross shortly after Hurricanes Harvey and Irma made landfall, impacting a number of Stearns Bank’s customers throughout Texas and Florida. In addition to the Disaster Responder donation, Stearns Bank employees, with a matching gift from the Norman C.

Skalicky Foundation, gave almost $30,000 to support the American Red Cross. The bank took yet another step to help their hurricaneembattled customers. They extended $5 million in interestfree, no fee-loans. Since its launch on September 18, more than 200 business customers within the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) designated area have taken part in Stearns Bank’s Hurricane Relief Express Loan program.

TECH NEWS

Almost Human It turns out we like our robots to seem human, but not too human. Designers and roboticists say a suggestion, rather than a declaration, of anthropomorphism could help people form closer connections with their robot assistants. That is to say, designers want us to like and use our robots, but not to expect too much human behavior from them. There’s quite a bit of research going into just how human a robot should be.

Check it out at BusinessCentralMagazine.com

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Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8

Source: Wired.com


WWW.DESIGNELECT.COM

GOING GREEN

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Biodegradable Bullets

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he U.S. military is trying to reduce its impact on the environment. The military fires hundreds of thousands of rounds during training, ranging from bullets to 155mm artillery shells. While casings are collected, and often recycled, the bullets themselves generally aren't, and can take hundreds of years to break down in the environment. That can pollute the soil and water supply, harm animals, and frankly, it just doesn’t look very nice. To tackle the problem, the Department of Defense put out a request for proposals earlier this year for a biodegradable composite bullet impregnated with seeds that will survive the initial blast and searing velocities. The seeds should only sprout after being in the ground for several months and be safe for animals to consume. The first phase, which closed in February, required 40-120mm training rounds that met the performance requirement of existing training rounds, with the added biodegradable component. Pending results, the next step is building enough prototypes for the government to perform ballistic tests.

Source: Engadget

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BusinessTools ENTREPRENEURISM

Read This

Of the thousands of resources available to business leaders, which ones are right for you? By Vicki Ikeogu

S

truggling to be a good leader? There’s a book for that. Need advice on how to successfully run your company? There’s a trade publication for that. Management advice? Yup, you guessed it. There’s a podcast for that. “There’s so much information out there,” said Neil Vig, Great River Regional Library patron services coordinator. “It’s definitely difficult to find the right information that is really going to be applicable to you. And because there’s so much information, there are many different ideas and not everything is going to work for one person. You have to try different things.” Many library patrons still request tried-and-true business savvy publications like The Wall Street Journal and the Harvard Business Review, Vig said, but many are also opting for other sources to

28

help them become successful business leaders. “I see a lot of people going toward podcasts,” Vig said. “Podcasts have definitely become more popular in the last few years. And there is a wide variety of different types of podcasts, too, on pretty much any subject.” Vig encourages people to peruse a variety of podcasts. Some of his suggestions include: Marketing Smarts, $100 MBA, 5 Leadership Questions, Off the Charts Business Podcasts, and his current favorite, Getting Things Done. “Getting Things Done just really helps you, even in your personal life, keep things organized, make lists, and actually accomplish things,” Vig said. For those who choose to explore websites, Vig cautions them be vigilant about the content. “There are a few websites that have been around for quite awhile

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8

now and it all depends on what type of information you’re looking for,” Vig said. “Sometimes it takes some digging to find exactly what you want.” Annualreports.com is a good site for business owners to consult for research based on what companies within similar industries are doing. “With annualreports.com you can compare what your business is doing and maybe how you can use what other companies show is working for them,” he said. Ted Talks are another solid suggestion for those looking for a more motivational tone to help inspire employees to think outside the box. Even though there are more online tools, print publications still play a major role in the toolbox for successful business owners, Vig said. “While not all books are created equal, the reader can make the final determination for their success.” “The biggest benefit from all of these materials is implementing new ideas, which might be a struggle,” Vig said. “It’s important that you not only gather the information on how to be a better manager or leader but that you actually apply what you learn.” Vicki Ikeogu is a freelance reporter and transportation planner with the St. Cloud Area Planning Organization.

READING CHECKLIST

Are You Fully Charged? The Three Keys to Energizing Your Work and Life by Tom Rath.

The Captain Class: The Hidden Force that Creates the World’s Greatest Teams by Sam Walker.

Eyes Wide Open: Overcoming Obstacles and Recognizing Opportunities in a World that Can’t See Clearly by Isaac Lidsky.

Competing Against Luck: The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice by Clayton M. Christensen.

Designing Your Life: How to Build a WellLived, Joyful Life by William Burnett.

First, Break All the Rules: What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently by Marcus Buckingham.


TECH NEWS

Better than a Band-Aid A startup called Avro wants to use skin patches to deliver medications to people who may have trouble swallowing or chewing. The company is starting with allergy medications for children, but it will still need approval from the Food and Drug Administration. The big vision is to work with people suffering from neurodegenerative and more intense diseases, like multiple sclerosis, that inhibit their ability to swallow. Source: TechCrunch

Stimulating Interest Interactive content. Speaker-based content. No more fluff. These are some of the shifts trend-watchers expect to see in content marketing – that sharing of material online that doesn’t explicitly promote your brand, but does try to make customers think about your brand. When will these shifts occur? Some are happening now, some may never happen. Apparently the experts are no better at predicting the future than anyone else. Source: Forbes.com

Stearns made the process very easy. I don’t come from the banking world and they made sure to talk me through every step along the way.

STEARNS BANK CUSTOMER

Trevor Goodwin

Owner, Sta-Fit St. Cloud and Sartell, MN

Fast and friendly service. We Get the Job Done! ® Visit StearnsBank.com today Member FDIC

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BusinessTools

Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

Cybersecurity As the need for increased online security grows, so do the potential job opportunities. These numbers indicate the need for increased security by businesses, but also for information security analysts. There are an estimated 3,560 information security analysts in Minnesota, 90 percent of them located in the Twin Cities metro area. If you’re looking for a career move, consider this:

$42.59

I

n the last few years, smaller businesses have become targets for cybercriminals because they have fewer defense resources than large enterprises — and criminals know this. If cybercriminals can breach a small business and steal credentials — like banking accounts or email access — they can use that information to steal money directly, create attacks on customers, and work their way around the business ecosystem in other ways. The most prevalent attacks against small and medium sized business are web-based and phishing/social engineering. But a 2016 survey shows we bring some of these problems on ourselves:

50% Small businesses that have had their security breached in the past 12 months

––––––

59%

Small businesses that have no visibility into employee password practices, such as using strong passwords and sharing passwords with others

65% Small businesses that have a password policy but do not strictly enforce it

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Safeguards Appropriate security controls can help protect company data.

B

usiness owners need to determine the

appropriate security controls for their environment based on the size, complexity, nature and scope of their activities. Security controls

Median hourly wage for information security analysts. This is significantly higher than the median hourly wage for the total of all occupations, at $19.62. The typical information security analyst makes nearly $47,800 more per year working full-time, then the overall worker in the state.

are the management,

151

to complex. Examples of

operational, and technical safeguards used to protect the confidentiality, integrity and availability of customers’ information.

––––––

These can range from simple

Number of vacancies for information security analysts in Minnesota in the second quarter of 2017. Over the year, such vacancies climbed by nine percent.

security controls are:

––––––

11.2% Projected growth through 2024 for information security analysts. For reference, the total of all occupations are projected to grow by 4.3 percent. Expanded demand for analysts will be especially focused within the federal government and health care. Such a job may sound appealing on the surface, but it won’t be for everyone. For instance, of the 151 vacancies, all are full-time positions, 80 percent require postsecondary education, nearly all require prior work experience, and 21 percent require a certificate or license. Plus, the increased demand for information security analysts will be driven by increased frequency in cyberattacks, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Information security analysts will need to come up with innovative solutions to prevent hackers from stealing critical information or creating problems for computer networks. Source: Minnesota Department of Employment & Economic Development (DEED)

–––––––– Locking doors to restrict access to paper or electronic files –––––––– Requiring passwords to restrict access to computer files –––––––– Encrypting electronically stored customer data –––––––– Keeping a backup of electronic data for recovery purposes –––––––– Shredding paper containing customer information before throwing it in the trash –––––––– Encrypting sensitive personal information before emailing it Source: IRS


880,396

$100M

December

$80M

November

Residential 2016 2017 2018* 2016 August #/$ #/$ #/$

$60M

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

TOTAL:$13,476,092*

October April March

$40M

Home Sales C

2017

September BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

TOTAL:$84,908,072

TOTAL:$70,880,396

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

February

St. Cloud 986 622 158 July $32,774,443 $32,230,127 $6,635,740 2018 January

0

500

Sauk Rapids 345 299 62 June $22,647,287 $15,947,945 $1,892,350

$100M

January December 0 Total as of 6/5/18. *Totals are cummulative and up to date at time of print.

Commercial Building Permits

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY September

$900000

TOTAL: $124,064,489*

ST. CLOUD

2018

Sauk Rapids

TOTAL: $221,316,488

Waite Park

8

106 October $3,9550,295 Apr

73 $6,403,398

Food and Bev

ST. CLOUD 23 $1,169,090

TOTAL: 1655

TOTAL: 1752

TOTAL: 1789

2016 St. Augusta 66 13 3 September $0 $2,107,200 $67,563 Mar

TOTAL: $124,064,489* $200M

44

2017 Sartell 33 32 11 November $13,013,812 $14,128,688 $812,130 May

TOTAL: $239,669,534

$150M

555

December $15,684,403 $89,959,156 $4,459,500 June

St. Joseph 71 56 8 August 2018 Feb $32,698,175 $19,525,262 $54,446 $0

$500k

July Total as of 6/5/18. *Totals Jan are cummulative and up to date at time of print.

2000

$100M

Food and Be

St. Cloud 464 341 108 $138,751,046 $89,192,774 $117,501,760 July

1500

TOTAL: $133,773*

$1500000

TOTAL: $1,272,176*

TOTAL: $1,333,423

$1200000

$50M

500

Commercial 2016 2017 2018* August #/$ #/$ #/$

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$0M

November October

Commercial Building Permits

2016

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

$80M

1000

$600000 2017

2016

St. Joseph 186 140 21 February $4,796,651 $4,433,502 $1,878,611

$60M

2018

102 88 16 $9,180,780 $6,116,630 $1,427,250

March

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$40M

2017

$20M

St. Augusta

500

$300000

$0M

2017

Waite Park 78 70 6 April $2,197,513 $4,244,281 $121,650

0

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

ST. CLOUD

2016

2016

2018

2017

2016

$0

TOTAL:$84,908,072

2015

Sartell 252 199 36 May $13,311,389 $7,908,010 $1,520,492

2017

2018

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$20M

2018

July December June

November May

Residential Building Permits

$0M

908,072

COLOR KEY:

Compiled by Kellie Libert, data current as of 6/5/18

2016 2018

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

Economy Central presented by August

TOTAL:$70,880,396 2017

Home Sales C

September

TOTAL:$13,476,092*

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS 2018

October

$100M

$250M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

832,866

316,488

669,534

111,110

Residential Building Permits

$250M

June TOTAL: $221,316,488 Sources: Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph.

2017

May

2017

Unemployment Rates 2017-2018

2016

Non FarmMarJobs

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

August

September

October

4%

O

N

D

J

December

July

S

Jan

1.0%

$0

November

June

May

Feb

April

$250M

March

$200M

February

$150M

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

$100M

1.5%

January

2.0%

$50M

2016 Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

2017-18 % CHANGE

5%

$0M

Apr

TOTAL: $239,669,534

F

M

$500k

0.5% 0.0% -0.5%

3%

-1.0% -1.5% -2.0%

2% A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

-2.5% A

M

J

J

A

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

A

St. Cloud, MN MetroSA Minnesota United States

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

31


80,396

BusinessTools

08,072

32,866

$100M

6,488

9,534

1,110

$250M

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

November

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

October

2018

August

June

July TOTAL: 1789 June

TOTAL: $221,316,488

May

$300000

500

Ready for Development November

$900000

2000

$1500000

TOTAL: $1,333,423 Residential 2016 2017 2018 2016 Stearns Co. 158 84 17

Source: DEED

Benton Co. 39 27 17

$0 $500k $1M $1.5M Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office

$2M

TOTAL: 1789

200

TOTAL: 1752

150

TOTAL: 1655

100

1500

50

SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS

TOTAL: $1,523,946

TOTAL: $133,773*

TOTAL: $1,272,176*

TOTAL: $1,333,423

$1200000

20170

$2M

October Some low-income and ripe-for-redevelopment areas in St. Cloud couldSeptember soon be injected with thousands — even millions — of dollars in private investments. They were on a list of federal August Opportunity Zones announced by the Minnesota Department of July Employment and Economic Development earlier this month. The investmentJune initiative was created by Congress in the 2017 tax bill to encourage long-term investments in low-income urban and May rural communities. The U.S. Treasury officially designated three April local tracts: downtown St. Cloud (including the east side), the airport March industrial park in Benton County, and a segment of Sherburne County along the U.S. Highway 10 corridor, as Opportunity Zones. February

1000

$600000

OPPORTUNITYDecember ZONES

TOTAL: 34*

TOTAL: 221

2016

$1.5M

Total as o 6/5/18. *Totals are cummulative and up to date at time of print.

TOTAL: $369,233*

2018

$1M

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

Food and Beverage Tax Collection TOTAL: 235 ST. CLOUD

2017

$500k

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

$0

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

January

2000

Feb

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions

2018

2017

1500

Total as of 6/5/18. *Totals are cummulative and up to date at time of print.

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

February

TOTAL: $1,333,423

0

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

1000

2016

2016

ST. CLOUD

$0

500

2015

Apr Mar

0

April March

2018

2017

2016

TOTAL: $239,669,534

2017 TOTAL: 1752

Housing/Real Estate St. Cloud Area AssociationJan of Realtors, $150M $200Msources:$250M http://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics.

$100M

TOTAL: $1,523,946

May

2016

TOTAL: $369,233*

July

TOTAL: $124,064,489*

2017

December

2018

November

August

September

October

September

August

July

June

May

TOTAL: 182*

April

September

ST. CLOUD

October

March

February

January

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

December

November

October

September

D, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

August

July

June

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

lding Permits

May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, November ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

January

Total as of 6/5/18. *Totals are cummulative and up to date at time of print.

BY THE NUMBERS

Lodging Tax Dollars

U.S. metropolitan areas in 2016. The research was analyzed by the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce, using the most recently available data, released in 2017.

2017

13

5.3%

2.1%

2016

St. Cloud’s national ranking for economic growth

St. Cloud’s growth in GDP in 2016

Minnesota’s overall 2016 GDP growth

TOTAL: $1,508,301

$0

$500k

$1M

$1.5M

$2M

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud Total as of 6/5/18. *Totals are cummulative and up to date at time of print.

32

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8

Economy Central presented by

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

TOTAL: $1,623,035

St. Cloud had one of the fastest growing economies for January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2018

TOTAL: $403,687*

Source: Minnesota Chamber of Commerce

Business Benchmarks

ST. CLOUD


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Rollie Anderson, Anderson Trucking Service

34

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8


NICHE

BUILDER

From specialized hauling to wind energy, Rollie Anderson has guided ATS’ growth by doing the hard stuff really, really well.

B

y the time he was 18, Rollie Anderson was immersed in the family business. He started loading trucks at 14, handling granite and other heavy loads, working around the office, and by 18 could legally drive intrastate Minnesota. He was the eldest son of Harold Anderson who founded Anderson Trucking Service (ATS) in 1955. “In those days the eldest son was expected to take over the business,” Anderson said. And though he briefly toyed with pursuing a different career, he admits his destiny was to run ATS. Anderson graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1969 and joined the U.S. Air Force. He served for

By Gail Ivers

three-and-a-half years working primarily as a data information officer for the base. “It was probably one of the most formative times in my background,” Anderson said. “It helped me develop a management style, build confidence, and learn to supervise people.” Not only did he develop good management skills, the work also gave him the opportunity to gain practical knowledge of systems that would serve him well throughout his career. In 1972, after his discharge from the Air Force, Anderson took over leadership of K & W Trucking. Harold Anderson had purchased K & W Trucking to serve Alaska. “My dad came to me one day in March and said ‘I don’t know what to do with this thing. Why don’t you take it over and see what you can do,” Anderson said. “I said ok and managed it through

the Alaska pipeline and the drilling in Prudhoe Bay. In 1990-91 we sold it.” That makes it sound so simple. But those were different times and simple is not the word Anderson would use to describe his years with K & W. “Communication was very different then than it is today. I spent a lot of time in Seattle, Texas, Colorado, Anchorage, Fairbanks, and Prudhoe Bay.” He was often gone for two or three weeks at a time. Then home for a few weeks before heading back to Alaska. “My son was born while I was in Valdez, Alaska,” Anderson said. “My wife was very supportive and very patient.” Anderson describes his father as a true entrepreneur. “Dad was more of an entrepreneur that I am. He loved people. He enjoyed talking to people

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8 //

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35


FUN FACT

BUSINESS PROFILE Anderson Trucking Service, Inc. 725 Opportunity Drive, St. Cloud, MN (320) 255-7400 • info@atsinc.com atsinc.com CEO: Rollie H. Anderson President: Jacob D. Wood Other significant officers: Brent J. Anderson, chief operating officer; Scott D. Anderson, executive vice president, treasurer; Paul Pfeiffer, chief financial officer Ownership: Family owned Business description: ATS is a privately-owned, multi-modal transportation company offering transportation services to distinct markets in standard dimension and over-dimensional flatbed trucking, van trucking, ocean and logistics transportation. ATS is the 34th largest for-hire carrier in North America. St. Cloud based employees: 500 Total number of employees: 1,850 employees and 2,000 independent contractors across the U.S. and Canada Previous year sales: $960 million Current year projected sales: $1.1 billion

Timeline

On an average, over 625,000 gallons of fuel are consumed by ATS trucks each week, with an average weekly fuel cost of $1.7 million.

and focusing on people. My focus was more trying to make the business more efficient, more structured and more accountable.” That meant the transition from father to son, which started to occur in 1991 with the sale of K & W Trucking, had its challenges. “It’s never easy to make a transition from one generation to another,” Anderson said. “Your styles are different. Your management techniques are different. Your background is different. And as a dad I can say, Dad always knows best.” But one thing never wavered. “As we worked through our difference, we always said family is the most important thing. Family is more important than business.” One of Harold Anderson’s favorite sayings, according to his son, was, I built the farm. Now it’s up to you. “What he was saying,” Anderson said, “was that he

1956 ATS starts granite consolidation service

1958

JANUARY 3, 1955

Anderson Trucking Service incorporates. The company begins operations on March 1, 1955

36

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8

1960 The company purchases its first specialized trailer

1961

ATS signs its first four independent contractors

Gross revenues exceed $1 million for the first time

1959

1965

ATS establishes its first out-of-state terminal in Lansing, IL

ATS introduces its new “Bull’s Eye” logo

built the infrastructure, the basis for the business so it could grow and now it was up to the rest of us to really grow it. I appreciate what Dad did because he did provide the foundation for the business to grow into what it is today.” And grow it has. In 1994 when Anderson became acting CEO, the company was doing about $128 million in revenue and served primarily the continental United States. They were still hauling some granite (harking back to ATS’ roots), machinery, and construction materials, and they hadn’t yet moved into the oversized business. In 2018 the company will break the $1 billion mark, according to Anderson, which makes it the largest carrier in Minnesota and 34th largest carrier in the United States. In addition to their headquarters in St. Cloud, they have locations in Saskatchewan and Alberta,

1968

1969

ATS begins serving the iron and steel industries

Harold Anderson purchases K & W Trucking to service the Alaskan pipeline


Canada; Hickory, North Carolina; Houston, Texas; Waterloo, Iowa; and Rochester, Minnesota. One of the most significant changes that has occurred under Anderson’s leadership is the company’s move into niche services. “We’re not a generic player,” ATS President Jake Wood said. “We look for different things to do and for companies that do different things. Then we try to build the necessary expertise. That’s how we build our margin – by finding solutions and giving them to the customer.” “In the truck transportation business we have a little over 80,000 competitors and each one wants a piece of what we do,” Anderson said. He explained a philosophy championed by business mogul Warren Buffet that identifies every business as a castle. “You have to build a moat around the castle to protect it from the intruders – the intruders being the competitors. What we’ve tried to focus on over these last 25 years or so are niches that differentiate us from our competitors.” That includes things like heavy haul, specialized flatbed, and logistics. Those niches, Anderson said, are often things other carriers don’t want to do because it’s just too hard. “So we do a lot of hard stuff, but we do it well, and we feel by doing it well we bring value to our customers and the market place,

and we also can protect our castle by creating moats.” “Rollie doesn’t consider himself a risktaker, but he really is,” Wood said. “We got into wind towers 15 years ago when it was brand new and Rollie had the foresight to make the necessary investment. We developed expertise in hauling the towers and now we’re the leading provider of wind tower solutions in the country.” Building that particular niche was no easy matter, according to Wood, in part because at the time it was an immature industry. It involved special driver training programs, safety training, pilot car training, site supervisors, permitting, and developing special equipment for hauling. “Our people met with the trailer manufacturing engineers to help design the equipment, because the equipment

1971

1976

1978

The old wooden warehouse in St. Cloud is razed and replaced with a new concrete and steel structure

ATS develops a trailer to haul Manitowoc crane houses

ATS begins transporting pre-engineered metal buildings

1971

First Lieutenant Rollie Anderson returns home from the Air Force to join ATS

1979 ATS now has 463 employees and contractors

1983 Van fleet, ATS, Inc., starts; the company logo is updated to reflect ATS’ national reach

Anderson Trucking is the largest hauler of wind turbines in the U.S. They specialize in custom transportation using trailers like the one seen above.

didn’t exist,” Wood said. “It’s that level of investment, innovation, and commitment that has made ATS without peer in specialized hauling.” “Getting into the wind business was probably one of the most innovative things we’ve done,” Anderson said. “There was so much involved in making it happen. But that’s not what the public sees. What the public sees is a big load going down the road on a truck.” Lee Hanson, an attorney with Gray Plant Mooty and long-time advisor and friend to the Andersons, defines innovation somewhat differently. He

1989

ATS revenues exceed $100 million; the company begins a brokerage business with Sureway Transportation 1990

ATS initiates service to and from Mexico

1993

2001

ATS purchases Warren Transport in Waterloo, IA

ATS purchases SunBelt Furniture Xpress; company founder, Harold Anderson, passes away at age 85 on November 27

1994 ATS sells their Alaskan division, K&W Transportation

1995 ATS partners to create Intermodal Caribbean Express Inc. (ICE), serving Puerto Rico

J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8 //

2003

ATS forms Wind Energy Services; purchases Brewton Express www.businesscentralmagazine.com

37


PERSONAL PROFILE Rollie Anderson, CEO, Anderson Trucking Service, Inc. Hometown: St. Cloud, MN Education: B.S. in Business Administration/Math and Economics from the University of Minnesota Work History: Chief of Data Automation, United States Air Force; President, K & W Trucking Co., a division of Anderson Trucking; various leadership roles at Anderson Trucking Family: Married to Barbara for 49 years; two adult children, Julie and Brent; five grandchildren Hobbies: Fishing and hunting

recalls the early days of Rollie’s leadership when truck drivers were hard to find. At that time Anderson Trucking would run its trucks until they wouldn’t run anymore, before investing in new ones. That was fine, Hanson said, when there were plenty of drivers. But once drivers became scarce “you couldn’t hire a driver to drive an old truck. Over time – and this was primarily Rollie who did this – they started trading in the trucks when the warranty ended. With good equipment you could hire better people and you could keep them.” Changing that philosophy was not easy, according to Hanson. “There was no

Advice to a would-be entrepreneur: Business starts with a sale. Know and understand your numbers. Know your own talents and surround yourself with people of differing abilities to balance yourself. Don’t get discouraged. Have fun! Best advice you’ve received and who gave it to you: The best advice came from my dad: What’s right is right. Now we have to figure out what’s right. “What he was saying is we have to be honest, we have to have integrity, and we have to be fair.” Make sure you’ve got your facts right. Stay positive!

extra money at that time,” Hanson said. “But Rollie had the vision, the courage, and the discipline to do it anyway. If it wasn’t for Rollie coming along I think I can honestly say that there would be no Anderson Trucking today.” With almost 1,000 employees, there are plenty of people who are happy that ATS has weathered recessions, created niches, taken risks, and invested in assets. Those employees matter to Anderson. “I think people are the key to success,” Anderson said. “And finding the right ones is important. Finding the people who have the right gifts and abilities and

Timeline 2005

2008

ATS breaks ground for its new corporate headquarters and celebrates its 50th Anniversary

2006 ICE expands to ATS International Services, Inc.

38

The age of internet expands as ATS provides WiFi at all terminal locations; revenues exceed $880 million

2007

ATS purchases Midwest Specialized of Rochester, MN and purchases its first 19-axle trailer

Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8

2010 Scott Anderson becomes vice president of safety and claims; Brent Anderson is named

vice president of heavy haul

2011 ATS Logistics expands into transportation management; the company purchases New Energy Transport

2012

ATS reveals their new logo; purchases Waylon Transport of Alberta, Canada


FUN FACT

ATS trucks drove over 220 million miles last year. organizationally managing them into the best possible positions.” His goal is that everyone in the company who wants to move up is given that opportunity. “One of Rollie’s greatest strengths is building team,” Wood said. “I’ve worked for other trucking companies and they usually don’t have a deep management team. That’s not true at ATS. We have leaders with tremendous depth of understanding and management skills. That’s because of Rollie’s willingness to share leadership and develop people. In my 25 years here Rollie has always been building the team because he‘s a believer in team.” “I guess I look at this business as it’s not solely me,” Anderson said. “Our accomplishments are really a team effort and it’s not me who is driving those accomplishments. I might guide them, but when it all comes together and the goals are achieved, it’s because everyone on the team did their part well.”

2014

2018

Scott Anderson becomes exec vice president and treasurer; Brent Anderson becomes chief operating officer; Rollie Anderson, CEO, assumes role of Chairman of the Board; Jake Wood is named president

Rollie Anderson receives the 2018 St. Cloud Area Family Owned Business of the Year Award

HURRICANE MARIA

On the morning of Wednesday, September 20, 2017, Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, devastating the island and plunging all of its 3.4 million residents into a desperate humanitarian crisis. For most in Central Minnesota, this was a headline that came and went. Not so for Anderson Trucking Service. ATS has been doing business in Puerto Rico since 1995. They typically do 30-40 loads a week of anything that can be loaded by a crane or forklift onto a flatbed trailer, with the bulk of their customers and cargo related to manufacturing. That was about to change. Puerto Rico had been suffering for years from an economic recession, according to Jay Thomassen, ATS’ director of maritime. That left their infrastructure completely unprepared to survive such a crushing storm. “Electric, water, transportation – all maintenance was deferred because of the economy,” Thomassen said. “And it had been 20 years since the last big hurricane, so you tend to let your guard down.” The devastation left by the hurricane is difficult to grasp for those who did not experience it. ATS was called on in the immediate aftermath to help the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with generators and pumps to save a dam from breaking. The U.S. Coast Guard required supplies to provide emergency drinking water. “They mounted big plastic tanks for potable water,” Thomassen said. “We’d take full tanks to Puerto Rico, then bring them back to Jacksonville [Florida, ATS’ base of operations], refill them with water, and haul them back to Puerto Rico.” Instead of 30-40 slots per week, ATS negotiated 100 slots per week – out of the available 400 slots – with their water carrier who moved the trailers back and forth between Puerto Rico and Florida. Initially that was for emergency relief, but along the way ATS squeezed in some charitable work. “Relief agencies and churches would gather all this cargo in the U.S., but then needed transportation services to deliver everything to Puerto Rico. We helped where we could,” Thomassen said. There was no end to the supplies that needed to go to the island, according to Thomassen. Shower trailers, laundry trailers, traffic lights, generators of all sizes and shapes, fuel to run the generators, telephone and utility poles and cable, transformers, bucket trucks, portable cellular towers, and the list goes on. “The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers estimated that 28,000 70-foot poles and 60,000 miles of cable needed to be replaced,” Thomassen said. J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8 //

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39


ROLLIE ANDERSON EARNS RECOGNITION

Rollie Anderson’s selection as the 2018 FAMILY OWNED BUSINESS OF THE YEAR recognizes Anderson Trucking’s successful transition from one generation to the next. ATS was started by Anderson’s father, Harold Anderson in 1955. Rollie Anderson joined the company in 1972, taking over leadership in the 1990s. The business has grown from about 500 employees and $100 million in revenues to over 1,000 employees and $1 billion in revenues. Today the company is the largest carrier in Minnesota, the 34th largest carrier in the United States, and the 31st largest logistics company in the U.S. The St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce presented the Family Owned Business Award to Anderson in May.

That deep and strong team is particularly important today because Anderson is participating in his second transition. This time he is passing leadership to his son Brent, and his nephew, Scott. “The transition to Brent and Scott is probably not a whole lot different than the transition from Dad to me,” Anderson said. “They have different styles, different approaches. They’re

already doing most of the day-to-day operations.” The transition has been moving forward for about three years, according to Anderson, and he chuckles as he thinks back to taking over the company from his own father. “You know, when you’ve got your legacy tied up in something and it’s what you’ve devoted your whole life to – and my dad did, too…In some ways doing

a transition with my dad is helping me do it with my son and nephew. I can sit back and watch. Which is not that easy to do as an uncle and as a dad! But I have to say I’m really pretty pleased and confident in their abilities to carry the business into a third generation.” Gail Ivers is vice president of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and managing editor of Business Central Magazine.

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FEATURE STORY

THE LITTLE TOWN THAT CAN From an award-winning school district to downtown redevelopment, Sauk Rapids is showing what can be done when a community comes together and builds for the future.

By Mary MacDonell Belisle

N

o sitting on their laurels. No grass growing underfoot. Instead, Sauk Rapids’ citizenry of 13,631 souls has used its energy and resources to strive, and thrive, along the river.

Bridge Work Certainly, one of the most visible indicators of the city on-the-move is the Sauk Rapids Regional Bridge, spanning the Mississippi River at St. Cloud’s 9th Ave. N and

Sauk Rapids’ 2nd Street N. After some heated, but ultimately, healthy give-and-take between stakeholders, a new bridge was completed in September of 2007, replacing the 1942 era Sauk Rapids Bridge. Benefits of the new bridge is its four traffic lanes and its landing beyond the railroad tracks, eliminating traffic backups from passing trains. The project cost over $56 million. To reduce adverse effects of construction, the City’s downtown mitigation

program provided money to relocate downtown businesses like Manea’s Meat Co. Sales tax money provided ornamental lighting, landscaping, crosswalks and sidewalks, tree planting, and more, especially along Benton Drive and Second Ave. N. Downtown Proud Business retention, downtown beautification, and vibrancy remain important a decade after the bridge’s completion. “Sauk Rapids has always been

proud of having a functioning downtown, but not always happy with how it looked,” said Todd Schultz, Sauk Rapids community development director. “We’ve done some listening and have focused on doing whatever we can to look better and be more inviting to folks.” Signs of investment are apparent. In 2017, the vacant Rapids Locker Plant on Benton Drive was demolished to make way for development. In 2016, a 9,600-square foot expansion by

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Feature TOP NOTCH

AWARD WINNERS From construction of the Sauk Rapids Bridge to the new fire hall, Sauk Rapids is winning awards for the quality and creativity of their community development projects.

1 Economic Development Association of Minnesota awarded the Sauk Rapids Bridge the “Business Retention Project of the Year” (2007)

2 The bridge received the “Best Planning Project,” by the Minnesota Chapter of the American Planning Association (2007)

3 The aesthetically appealing fire station was awarded “Notable Volunteer Fire Station” by Fire Chief Magazine (2007).

4 Minnesota Society of Professional Engineers named the bridge one of the “Seven Wonders of Engineering” (2008). 5 A recent road improvement project connecting County Road 3 to Highway 10 received the “Project of the Year” by the Minnesota County Engineers Association (2017).

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Manea’s Meats was approved, bringing jobs and new business downtown. That same year Torberg Builders started construction on the Mississippi River Lofts on the former American Legion property. This upscale apartment complex of 57 units, with underground parking, fitness center, rooftop terrace, and river views opened in March 2018. “The downtown area also has some really good technology – fast and from good providers, high bandwidth and less costly than industrial parks,” according to Brenda Eisenschenk, owner of InteleCONNECT, Inc., an independent broker/analyst of phone, internet, cable TV, audio, and wireless services. InteleCONNECT recently relocated to Sauk Rapids. “We found the building, but needed to build out. The permits were approved. The City was wonderful to work with.” Over the River, on Up the Hill In addition to being a downtown focal point, the Sauk Rapids bridge is the anchor of the city’s “Up the Hill” project, a partnership with Benton County that connects Second Street N (County Road 3) to

Highway 10. The $12 million effort was designed to improve mobility, safety, and access to the industrial park. “We’re always looking for improvements and the right development to complement downtown,” said City Administrator Ross Olson, explaining that the next commercial area will be located up the hill. The new roadway is a first step, constructed after the city acquired 19 private homes, including one that was moved four blocks to a new location because the owner wanted to keep her house. Parks “Now that the city has redone everything, the updated and beautiful parks are very nice and walking paths around the bridge are very attractive,” said Tammy Christopherson, owner of Relax & Revive Massage. Moving forward, the city expects to more fully use its parks. Plans include a band shell for Southside Park, a splash pad for Lions Park, and a Municipal Park expansion to the Highway 15 bridge. “We want the community out there, experiencing the parks,” said Olson, pointing out that for 18 years the City Council, HRA,

and the Planning Commission have worked with residents to acquire riverfront property so all can enjoy the river. “The owners have told us, ‘If you wait for us, we’ll sell it to you.’ We’re doing it, incrementally.” Public Safety Law enforcement, emergency services, and a volunteer fire department cooperate to make Sauk Rapids safe for its businesses and residents. The new fire station was strategically built downtown, since research showed that older buildings, such as those in a historic downtown, were more of a hazard than new ones. Madelyn Adamski, daughter of firefighter Jason Adamski, led a fundraising effort two years ago that netted $75,000 for an airboat. The “Madelyn Rae” was delivered in March and will handle transport and rescue efforts in grasslands, marshes, swamps, and open water. In addition, the Fire Department bought 30 particulate hoods, to be worn under helmets for skin cancer prevention. The Police Department also gained resources for crime prevention. Two police officers were hired last year and


another is slated for 2018. New thermal imagers, body armor, and ballistic shields will help improve safety for the public and police officers. “We’ve had a couple of break-ins, and the police force is fantastic,” Bob Gruber, Jr., Scenic Sign Company, said. Communication and response times have been swift, and the department has stepped up patrols, he added. “The police drive by often, and that’s important to us,” agreed InteleCONNECT’s Eisenschenk. Roadways “When we opened in 2011, South Benton Drive was ripped open in front of our location, but now it’s wonderful –

new and better traffic,” said Christopherson of Relax and Revive Massage. The improved access to Highway 10 helps draw clients from Foley and Little Falls. Eisenschenk’s location is convenient, too, with easier access to her customers in downtown St. Cloud and Waite Park. She also appreciates the promptness of snow plowing during the winter. “The central location of Sauk Rapids is really good for us,” said Gruber. “As a regional business, we’re one hour to Minneapolis, Alexandria, Brainerd, and Willmar.” School Initiatives Recently, the Sauk Rapids-Rice School District residents voted

ECONOMICS

HEALTHY FINANCES During the 2018 “State of the City” address, Mayor Kurt Hunstiger said Sauk Rapids is in good financial shape, under budget by $197,000 for 2017. The city has also reduced its debt by half over the past 10 years, according to Community Development Director Todd Schultz.

down a levy referendum. On the ballot was a new elementary school, the rebuild of Pleasantview Elementary, and expansions for Rice Elementary and Hillside Schools. “There’s disappointment, of course, that it’s not going forward, but on the other

hand, we know it’s also a true form of grass-roots government,” said Interim Superintendent Bruce Watkins, as reported on WJON radio May 9. “We just have to keep working to find that collaborative measure people can support.”

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Despite the setback on the building referendum, the schools continue to be recognized for their outstanding academic record: –––––––––––––––– In April, 21 Sauk Rapids-Rice High School DECA students headed to Atlanta, Georgia, to attend the International DECA competition. Two of the students received third place in their categories, and six landed in the top ten.

–––––––––––––––– The school’s Knowledge Bowl team had the highest overall score at regional competition, landing them a spot in the state tournament. –––––––––––––––– The Sauk Rapids-Rice High School is an Apple Distinguished School for 2017-19 for their innovative implementation of one-to-one technology and instruction. ––––––––––––––––

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Rice Elementary School is working toward becoming an International Baccalaureate school. If approved, it will be the first elementary school outside of the Twin Cities to earn the distinction. The school hopes to receive their authorization in October. The Sauk Rapids-Rice High School Concert Choir sang the world premiere performance of “Flight,” a new composition by Minnesota composer Isaac Lovdahl. This opportunity was the result of a grant from the Sauk Rapids-Rice Education Foundation. The composer was commissioned to write a song specifically for the Sauk RapidsRice High School Concert Choir. (You can see the video at BusinessCentralMagazine.com)

In addition, the Sauk Rapids-Rice Culinary Team participated in the “Taste of the NFL” as part of Super Bowl weekend. The students worked with chefs from each of the 32 NFL cities. “I am super pleased with the schools,” said Gruber. “I’ve had nothing but positive experiences with the Sauk Rapids schools.” Mary MacDonell Belisle is a freelance copy and content writer with mary macdonell belisle wordingforyou. She specializes in business articles and profiles, web content, and book editing.

For the resources used in this article visit Business CentralMagazine.com


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Special Focus

WORKFORCE

MAP 1

Transition

Northeast

21.6% Un-Tapped Northwest

The increasing number of older workers is one of the most significant changes in the Minnesota labor force.

By Cameron Macht

A

Central

19.6%

Twin Cities Metro

18.5% Southwest

22.7%

Southeast

21.2%

s David Bowie once warned in “Changes,” pretty soon we’re all going to get a little older. As the workforce ages, many employers are already straining to find new workers. The increasing number of older workers is one of the most significant changes occurring in Minnesota’s economy, affecting every industry in every region of the state. Twenty percent of jobs in Minnesota are now

Percentage of Workforce Age 55 and Over, 2015

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held by workers ages 55 and over, up from 13.5 percent of jobs just one decade earlier. And the next decade will likely bring even more change, with another 20 percent of jobs currently held by 45 to 54 year olds (see Table 1). In contrast, the number of jobs held by workers in the youngest age groups has been falling fast. Teenagers dropped out of the labor force in large numbers over the past decade for a variety of reasons. A large number of teenagers and young adults are focusing more on their educations, while others are busier with activities than

Source: DEED, Quarterly Employment Demographics (QED)

22.4%


in the past. Many struggled to compete with more experienced workers for the limited job openings during the recession. However, with the labor market tightening in recent years and older workers starting to retire, teenagers are re-entering the workforce in greater numbers and snatching up entry-level jobs in industries like accommodation and food services, retail trade, health care and social assistance, and arts, entertainment and recreation. Go West, Old Man From a workforce standpoint,

the two oldest regions in the state were the Southwest and Northwest, which both had over 22 percent of jobs held by workers ages 55 and over. On the other side of the state, over 21 percent of the workforce in both the Northeast and Southeast were in the oldest age groups. The Twin Cities, home to 60 percent of the jobs in the state, was the youngest region, with just 18.5 percent of job holders in the oldest age groups. Likewise, less than 20 percent of job holders in Central Minnesota were 55 and older in 2015 (see Map 1).

TABLE 1

Minnesota Employment Demographics by Age Group

2005

2015

100.0%

100.0%

+5.5%

19 years and younger

8.6%

6.9%

-15.6%

20 to 24 years

12.5%

11.2%

-5.3%

25 to 44 years

43.8%

42.1%

+1.6%

45 to 54 years

21.6%

20.2%

-1.0%

55 to 64 years

10.8%

15.5%

+51.7%

65 years and older

2.7%

4.0%

+54.5%

TOTAL JOBS

Central Minnesota This region boasts the youngest and fastest-growing workforce in the state.

The dynamics behind the demographic shifts in this region are unique. Central Minnesota is the only region

2,512 Central Minnesota students experienced a day of hands-on learning last year. Resource Training & Solutions hosts four annual student conferences that focus on science, math, language arts, and the visual arts. Students and experts come together to create, explore, and gain new skills.

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Special Focus

Central Minnesota has seen a strong recovery and was nearly back to 2005 levels in 2015. But while the jobs have returned, the age of the workers holding them has changed. where more jobs are still held by workers under the age of 25 than by workers 55 and older. Central Minnesota, however, also experienced the fastest increase of any region in the number of jobs held by workers over 55 from 2005 to 2015, jumping from 13.3 percent to 19.6 percent. The region’s construction industry suffered severe job cuts during the recession,

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Business Central Magazine // J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 1 8

losing just over one-quarter of total employment between 2005 and 2010. Since then, Central Minnesota has seen a strong recovery and was nearly back to 2005 levels in 2015. But while the jobs have returned, the age of the workers holding them has changed. Workers under 25 years old held 27.7 percent of total jobs in 2005, but

they now hold just 19 percent. This shift was even more significant in the construction of buildings and specialty trade contractors subsectors, which both dropped from more than 30 percent to 20 percent. It was much less earth shattering in the heavy and civil engineering construction subsector, where only about 15 percent of workers were

in the youngest age groups in either time period. Interestingly, the percentage of construction workers between 25 and 44 years of age held mostly steady, rising just 1.2 percent from 2005 to 2015. Instead, the share of workers over the age of 45 jumped from 24.7 percent to 32.2 percent, rising from one in every four workers to one in every three.


EDUCATION & TRAINING

More than 40 percent of workers in heavy and civil engineering construction were 45 years and older. Education Needs The Twin Cities is home to well over half of the state’s population and labor force. Nearly twothirds of that region’s total jobs are held by workers ages 25 to 54, the largest concentration of that age group in the state. This is especially notable in three industries that are more strongly concentrated

in the Twin Cities than anywhere else in the state: finance and insurance, professional and scientific services, and management of companies. Due to higher educational requirements for many of the careers in these industries, it is harder for younger workers to get established, while the number of older workers is in line with the total of all industries.

profile of Minnesota’s workforce continues to change, employers in every industry and region will be affected. Some sectors have embraced the changes, while others have been slow to adapt. Cameron Macht is the Regional Analysis and Outreach Manager for the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED). This is an excerpt of an article that first appeared in Trends

Time May Change Us As the demographic

Magazine, a publication of DEED.

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Business Spotlight

Pen in Hand

TIMELINE

Murray Mack, HMA Architects, still likes sketching designs with a pen, but 3-D modeling lets clients be a bigger part of the process.

1984 Murray and Sue Mack move to St. Cloud from Fargo, ND. Murray accepts a position with Pauly & Olson Architects, where he works with Richard Hagemeister, an architect at the firm.

1986 Hagemeister leaves to begin a solo practice.

1988 Mack leaves Pauly & Olson, joining Hagemeister and creating Hagemeister & Mack Architects. Mack is 35 percent partner and for the first three months they work out of Hagemeister’s basement.

1991

PERSONAL PROFILE // Murray Mack, 58 Hometown: East Grand Forks, MN Education: Bachelor of Arts in Architecture 1982, North Dakota State University; Bachelor of Architecture 1983, North Dakota State University

By Gail Ivers

Business Central: What interested you about architecture? Murray Mack: Maybe it was watching the popular TV sitcom the Brady Bunch and the architect father Mike Brady back in the 70s. I hope not. He didn’t appear to work as much as I seem to. My interest in architecture probably started from an interest in art which was likely handed down from my mother who frequently painted pictures and was very artistic. On the other hand, my father

Family: Wife, Sue; son Spencer, daughter Madison, dog Snickers Hobbies: Golf, family history research, photography, time at the lake cabin

liked to build things like our family lake home. In the end I think it’s the combination of creativity, problem solving, art and science that attracted me to the profession and continues to keep me intrigued.

I think it cost over $50,000. We had to share it among a number of staff members and if you wanted extra time you had to come in at night. Today we have auto-CAD, Photoshop, InDesign, and 3-D modeling.

BC: How have things changed? Mack: When I first started I did design with pen, pencil, and multiple sheets of Mylar. The first computer aided design (CAD) machine I experienced was at Pauly & Olson in 1987. It was one computer and a plotter and some software and

BC: What has been the most rewarding? Mack: Basically, I just really love designing buildings and look for any opportunity to bring something unique and creative to the process. Happy clients and building owners makes it extra special.

Mack becomes a full partner in the firm.

1992 Hagemeister retires and Mack becomes 100 percent owner; Mack relocates the firm to the second floor of the historic First National Bank Building at the corner of 5th Ave. and St. Germain Street (built 1908). Mack receives his first significant commission: a $10 million state project at Camp Ripley.

2013 Firm name is changed to HMA Architects.

2014 HMA Architects moves to their current location, 700 W St. Germain Street, Suite 200, a larger space in the “somewhat” historic First American Bank building (1959).

2018 AT A GLANCE // HMA Architects, Ltd. 700 W Saint Germain St Suite 200 St. Cloud, MN 56301-6347 (320) 251-9155 Email: hma@hma-archs.com hma-arch.com

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Business Description: HMA Architects is an architecture and interior design firm. Owner: Murray Mack, AIA, LEED AP Opened: May 1988 Number of Employees: 12 Chamber member since 1988

The firm celebrates its 30 year anniversary, completing over 2,000 projects during that time. Some really small, some very large.


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JULY/AUGUST 2018  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine