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Big Book of Marketing Guest was Anthony G. Bennett

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Anthony G. Bennett (Washington, D.C.) has worked in marketing for over 22 years, including as an international marketing research analyst with Union Camp (now International Paper), general manager/vice president for Hunt-Marmillion Public Relations (now Ogilvy), Special Assistant promoting the first Bush administration’s National Energy Strategy, and marketing consultant to small companies and national organizations. He now teaches marketing at Georgetown University.

THE BIG BOOK OF MARKETING was released in January 2010 by McGraw-Hill. The book is based on material developed for one of Georgetown University Business School’s most popular marketing courses, THE BIG BOOK OF MARKETING is a unique and comprehensive guide to essential marketing practices from the world’s best marketers. The 86 companies represented in the book are industry leaders representing a range of goods and services, high-tech and low-tech industries, and industrial and consumer fields. Each chapter offers their real-life lessons and practical takeaways on every topic necessary for marketers to master today.

Amazon Link: Big Book of Marketing

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Joe Dager: Thanks everyone for joining this is Joe Dager the host of Business 901 Podcast. Participating in the program today is Anthony G. Bennett who has worked in marketing for over 22 years and recently wrote the book, "The Big Book of Marketing." Now Anthony, could you give me a little bit of background about yourself and what made you write "The Big Book?“

Anthony G. Bennett: Well I've worked for many years in sales and marketing for major corporations in international market research and ran a small PR firm for a couple years in Los Angles. I came back to Washington, DC and worked downtown for a few years, then Georgetown offered me a position to teach marketing. It was loads of fun. A great school, great kids but all the books we used just weren't as good as we liked. The students kept asking for a better book and I thought, "I know bits and pieces of this marketing stuff." But I thought I had a better idea. I called a lot of contacts I had that were the best at their segments of marketing; the biggest PR firm in the world for the PR chapter, the biggest ad agency wrote the ad chapter, et cetera. We had 110 of the leading companies in the world putting together the best marketing book in the world. Joe: I was very intrigued by the list of people that participated in the book, it is tremendous.

Anthony: Well I'm pleased, everyone said yes. It took a long time because they're running their business and they had to take time out of their day to write the material. We edited it, it turned out great, we're happy.

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Joe: Now in the book, it goes through a lot of the different areas of marketing, covers just about all of marketing. What I thought was really unique about it, was it was more about "examples" of each part of marketing, versus the standard text book, a how too. It was GE does marketing planning this way, Costco on retailing and actual examples, which is the way so many people want to learn; through stories. Was that really what you were really trying to accomplish with the whole thing? Anthony: Yes, I wanted people to see that you can always say, "Do XYZ," and they look at you, or they listen to you, or they read it and they say, "Well, that makes sense." But, then all of a sudden you throw out an example, where they understand it because the company's large enough and in most part everyone sees examples. They've seen them on TV; they read about it, they understand it and they say, "Now I get it. This is how they did it? OK." A lot of these companies, they're in the Fortune 100. They've been around for 100 years and they've done it right 100 times. They've done it wrong 50 times. They work it out, figure it out. They go back and do it better. In the book they tell all about it. It's very understandable, very readable. Joe: Now is this book suited for small business, then? Anthony: Well the initial thought was that I needed to make a better textbook for students. As I was doing it and talking to colleagues, they kept saying "Get me a copy. I'd like to read that chapter." Students primarily would probably read all chapters and the small business person would look at this and say, "I don't need to know about

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warehousing, but I do need to know about advertising and PR, " or they may say "I grew up in the ad world, I know that. But I need to know more about distribution." This is geared to small business person, the entrepreneur, or even to major corporate executives who... Firstly, every single author of mine, when I initially contacted them, used the phrase, "Gosh I wish I'd had this book when I was going through school." So there's a lot in here I think even if somebody who already took a marketing class 10, 15, 20 years ago and they're now in a major corporation. I still think they'd even get a lot out of the book. Joe: I looked at a marketing textbook from one of my sons and as I went through it my thoughts were: “This is what they're teaching them?" It was so foreign to what they're going to experience in the real world. Anthony G. Bennett: When students come out at first they don't want to do is say something silly after they've been hired and have somebody look at them and say, "What book did you read that out of?" This is something that this book, The Big Book of Marketing has in it. It's all real. Something that Xerox has done, something that Ford's done, something that Gillette's done. It's the real deal. Joe: It is. I liked the way you described it. The first thing I did was open the book and I went to the sections that I was the most experienced in and the things that I felt very comfortable with. We own a retail store. My wife runs it, but I get to be part owner. I go to the retail section and look to see what's in there. I have a background in manufacturing, so I went to the manufacturing and I picked the points that I knew about and glanced through it to see if the book really applied to me.

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There were good things in it that I thought was very interesting. Whether it was just individual or just team selling or how to handle customer service reps, and wholesale reps. Little bits and pieces and I'm going to say this and I don't mean it to be derogatory or anything, I don't know if it's a book I would read cover to cover. Anthony: It's the sort of thing, that if you were an existing business person, you know what you're good at and you know what you need to get a little more "oomph." Find out a little more what the experts are doing. So if you're an existing business, you probably wouldn't read it cover to cover. If you were starting out a business, you might. Or if you're an entrepreneur, you might. But if you were running a business, you may say, "Hell, I've got the pricing figured out. I don't need to read that chapter." But they probably read most of the other chapters.

Joe: I went through it. I don't know that it wouldn't get read cover to cover in a year or as that need arises. The way that I equate it is, a good example of this book, is most people buy marketing plan software, for the plans are embedded in them. Anthony: The thing about a list of the business plan or marketing plan is that once you have the bullet points there and it says, "Do this." Then you look at and say, "Now what?" That's what this book provides. It provides you, for every bullet point in the business plan, or marketing plan. There's a chapter that would provide you ample resources to have you understand what it is you need to do to fill in that part of the business plan. Joe: Now, so many times authors learn from their books. They learn so much more, because people start commenting on it after they've published. Have you had any feedback like that? What have you learned from writing this book?

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Anthony: One of the things that I thought about was, when people make comments. I put the organization responsibility chapter at the very front. So many people these days, they're in a hurry. They want to start business. They want to make money that's understandable and we all do. But I put the organization responsibility upfront because so many people now realize, that if you're not going to do it right, just don't do it. The greed factor has gotten out of hand. There are so many things that have collapsed and gone wrong and things that were pumped up unnecessarily. Just so one or two people could make millions or billions. Whereas the goal of a lot of people now, is to run a business and create jobs and put out a product that they can be proud of. So that chapter may have, in the past, gone as an afterthought at the end of the book. But now I put at the beginning because so many people would say, "Maybe I need a little guidance. What should I be doing to do it right?" Joe: The other thing I really wanted to ask you about, where do you think marketing is going? You're sitting here teaching school, you are hearing it, and you’re getting a lot of references needless to say you have a lot of contacts in the marketing field just by looking at the book. It seems to becoming a greater part of business, nowadays. Anthony: People need to talk to the marketing people upfront. There are so many aspects to this that weren't looked at 10, 20, 30 years ago. They make a product and put it out there and try to get it into a retail store and that would be that. Now, there are whole elements that might have been done sort of haphazardly in the past but now if done correctly can make a small business leap to a medium, or from medium to large, such as branding.

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As one of the things that a lot of people in a small business arena don't think about is "Of course, I'm running my business. I'm doing X." Whereas people who are the consumers, they need to find a connection between the business and the consumer need. It takes a lot of time for a business person to sit down and say "Who am I? What is my business? What am I doing? What am I offering?“ I read 20 books on branding prior to teaching the global branding class at Georgetown. There were books where you would come away after reading 150 pages and they'd have one paragraph that you could use out of that. Well, our chapter written by Landor, it's 30 pages of the most concise, understandable, how-to branding that I've ever seen. Besides in this first chapter, organization responsibility and that's sort of saying "Well, OK now we have to do it right." But the question then is what are we doing? A lot of people take that for granted and I think you need to sit down and be able to say what it is that you offer that no one else does, or that you offer better so that customers come to you. That's a very important feature. Joe: Sure. Now, and I think that is, because we always talk about differentiation and really I had someone on the other week that we titled the thing as differentiation is really business survival anymore. Anthony: Yeah, there's such a plethora of companies out there, that this day and age, the ability to enter business sometimes has a very low threshold. You can build almost anything, have it outsourced or buy machinery that maybe in the past may have cost millions now may only cost thousands.

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So you've got to do something bigger, better, bolder, cheaper, faster, something than the competition, and what is that you do and how is it that you say that? What's the correct wording that you get from your branding exercise that you put in your advertising in your PR so that your customer says "Ah, OK? I'll buy from you." That's a process that was sort of left out in the past.

Joe: The other thing that I've noticed and have been in discussions lately is there seems to be somewhat of a disconnect still going on between the Internet advocates and social media advocates over here, and what I call real live tangible business. When I looked at your book, you considered both of them; you spent a little more time in the offline world, where I think a lot of business is conducted still today and majority of it actually. It was a nice conduit or a bridge between the two worlds because to me they seem somewhat disconnected right now. Do you agree with that analogy? Anthony: I think the businesses that are going to thrive are the ones that can do both together because there are people who order online who want to be able to take it back to the store and return it or exchange it if it's the wrong color or size or something. They want the ability to be able to flow back and forth. So the ability to buy something online and then yet take it back to the retail store is important. Even if it's just completely online, there are things like once the customer gets the product at home, what's the packaging like? It's just not all sort of this simplistic click, click, click and you order a product. That's wonderful, that's genius. Every day, I thank the people who invented the Internet and the computers. It has just made everyone's life easier.

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But once you get the product home and it shows up at the door and then you open it up and you look at the product, did it get crushed in delivery? Is the plastic... is it overkill packaging? What's the packaging made out of? Is it recyclable? These days you look at a lot of packaging and it doesn't have the little one through seven sign on it and so you're sort of disgruntle the companies. "Well, now you can't let me recycle the package. Now do I have to call the 800 number to find out how to recycle the package?“ So a lot can go on behind the scene, even if you're "merely" an online company, and a lot of companies are going to be "merely" online and do extremely well. You still have to have the right price, you still have to have the right packaging, and you still have to offer the right product. All the things that a "regular" business has been doing are here in the book. So if you're an online business and your forte is computers, you may have not had the expertise in the business world and so the lessons learned in this book are even more important. Joe: That transition to take place between online and offline you mentioned, that people like to order online but they want to return it to a retail store doesn't that become a large problem with distribution? Anthony: Well, the distribution area these days is typically outsourced and there are companies that do it really well. FedEx is one of the authors in the book here and they do a phenomenal job. There are some things that you order online at midnight, the next day it's at your door at 2:00 in the afternoon. Joe: I know, how do they do that? I ordered something from Amazon on Sunday and I get it Monday morning. How did they do that?

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Anthony: Well, I'm pleased with the service in the United States. I just think that sometimes we feel like we're not catching up with the rest of the world. I look at this and I put a check in the mail to a credit union on a Monday and the post office delivered it to them on a Tuesday and I got a return receipt on a Wednesday. So I'm pretty pleased with the way Americans are getting things done. I think that one thing that I wish every business would do is return the workforce here to the United Sates. We have the best workforce, we have the best marketing people, and we have the best product design. We just need to build it here in the United States and I think grow from that. Part of the problem today is we look at all the things that we do and then we take the jobs and send that away. We have a workforce here in the United States whether its service, whether its delivery, whether it's making packages, product design. That's all here in the States and I think in the organizational responsibility chapter talks about we need to do it right. I think customers are looking for the "Made in USA" labels these days. Joe: I think they are. However, do you think people are willing to pay for "Made in the USA" though? Anthony: I think so. I've talked to other people who do. I just bought an American car. I look at certain things. I buy things for the kids at Costco. And you say well, that's a $9.99 sweater, but I'd pay 20 bucks if I knew was made in the woolen mills in New England like it used to be. There's a dozen different ways to do market research that we talk about in the market research chapter. Quality is something where people said "I'd rather pay a little more."

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Witness Lexus, witness Cadillac. Those are excellent products and they charge more than average, and yet people flock to them. Better quality restaurants are still packed. People are willing to pay a little bit extra, not a lot, the little bit extra to keep the quality. So finding out what makes quality. There's a whole chapter on quality written by people who do a great job and there's ways to figure it out. Testing through marketing research and asking the customer "What is it you want? Do you want the price lowered, or do you want the quality better, what is it you're looking for?" I think that's the job of marketing, to help the business owner figure out what the customer's looking for, and then providing it. Joe: What do you think was the most surprising thing that came back to you in this research, in these chapters? If you picked one area out in the book, what was the thing that set you back a little bit? Anthony: Well, the creativity of some of the things. There was a great case by Burson-Marsteller on introducing the new multicolor money into the mainstream here in America. And a question for the Treasury Department was well, what if people refuse to use it? What if they hand back it to the cashier? What do you do with a simple thing like that? It's money. We use it every day. And what happens if it doesn't work? So they did a bang up job and it flowed into the economy smoothly and people use it. In part that was because of regular, hard-nosed PR where you put in the ads. The stuff on TV, the news, and you tell people, "Hey folks. This is what's coming." But they did clever things that were very inexpensive. Like getting that money onto TV shows like the "Wheel of Fortune," and "Who Wants to be Millionaire?" where people are receptive.

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The fact that shocked me was that even though you have a major government agency and a major PR firm, that is one of the best in the world, they came up with clever things that weren't expensive. And it shows the small business person, you can do stuff to get your name out there to the public through means that doesn't cost an arm and a leg. I think that's one of the things that struck me. "Well, they're big because they're big. Or, they're big because they have a $500 million ad budget.“ Well, they all started small. They sold soap bars at the corners, one soap bar at a time or one car at a time. And they got big because they did it right. I think that's the thing that I came away with, was the cleverness factor. The thing is you know your product best and what will be catchy to the public. What would people look for? That's what really surprised me is the ability to do things on a small budget. Joe: Where in your book do you think you got the most diversity? You talk about, let's say, branding, for example. And I notice you have Nordstrom and you have the BzzAgent in there and Washington National's Baseball Club. I noticed that and the branding was very interesting, the diversity that you had just in the Brand Ambassadors section. Where do you think you really had the most diversity within a certain subject area?

Anthony: Well, I think that probably is one of the areas, is branding. We have got an example of a case study where HOLT CAT they sell Caterpillars. One of the things that they did to make their business better was to go through and have the owner talk with every employee. And talked to them about, "What is it we are doing here? Why do we want to be better? What can we do to make our job better?"

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This is the president of the company. He walked through and talked to every single employee. They turned themselves around and now they're doing bang-up business. In the same chapter, you know, the owner of Under Armor writes a case study and says, "I made a better product, and then people flocked to the product." It goes back to the whole question of branding. "What is it that you do, why are you better?" There are a million companies, and each one has their own story. They each have their own rationale as to why people will come to them. One company decided that they would do on time delivery. They had 100 percent of their products shipped the same day as they're ordered. They have 98 percent retention rate for their customers. That's something that they said they wanted to do and they did it, and the result is increased business. Joe: When you look at marketing today and being on such a diverse group and knowledgeable about so many different companies that you're experiencing through your book and everything. Where do you think it's headed? What's out there next for marketing? Anthony: Well, I think there's some challenges. There's the whole environmental issue. Can the products be made recyclable? Can we use less water in our productivity? Can we tell the public we're doing that? We're a better company; we are looking at making sure we don't hire kids to make our products. We are using the right materials to make our products. There's soon going to be a whole need to lower energy usage or make products that provide alternative energy in the future. There are whole elements of people today that

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can say "Well, we put on roofing tiles, but we have the same skills to go up on a roof not just put on roofing tiles, but we can now put solar panels on a roof.“ So the future, it's whole elements that haven't been touched on in the last 1,000 years, that are all going to be new. We're coming up with new designs for finding water. There are new designs for solar panels. We are going to be a service element that installs those solar panels on your house. We're going to do it better because we have put on roof shingles for 100 years. We've got top grade people. I think that one of the things that are going to come of that is the quality aspect of products. Sometimes you can see it and feel it in your hands. But when you're hiring people, and the service element is huge in the United States, I think when you get to the point where we can say, "All my roofers are certified roofers." I don't know what that means, and I don't know how they would do that. But I think that customers want to be assured that they're buying quality, not just products, but service. So I think that the ability to certify that your service personnel are trained will be a huge business in the United States. It's a huge marketing element to be able to say "All the people who show up to your house on Thursday and vacuum, are certified house cleaning people. They're bonded, trained, and insured and rest assured your house will be clean and a good job for the right price." Joe: I have to agree with you because I see that very much because I work in the quality field a lot with consultants, Sigma Black Belt type people. Certification gives you that degree of, "I'm a Black Belt, and I’m a Master Black Belt." Who certifies you and

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who says that you are is really the question. But that's a big business. It's a huge business in that area. Anthony: I think that's a big area that all the trade associations can get into. Certifying the people and having the right test. What is the right test? Because as you mentioned, who are we? We're the trade association that's been around for a 100 years. And what is the test? Who makes the test and who provides the test and what do you to somebody who flunks? Is there a training program to give to move on and pass the test? Another area that I think is going to be huge issue for the United States, and only the United States, because we're so far behind on this on the product area, is going metric. 300 years ago when I was interning on Capitol Hill I had friends on the Metric Board. They were trying to convince congress to set aside some funds to try to convince America to go metric and everyone sort of pushed that under the carpet. But we're only five percent of the population of the world and everyone else is buying products. I think America needs to shift to go metric. That will be any area that small business can get into and move in quickly if the big businesses aren't doing it. So I guess that's another area that can differentiate a company's product that say we are going to sell to the other 95 percent of the world and maybe American will start going metric in their own right and put some pieces together. Joe: I think that's an interesting statement because we have. We have ignored that. Anthony: I know, the kids learn in school, I think it's this sort of thing where if we decided to do it. I mean, there's got to be a business in taking down old traffic signs and putting up new traffic signs instead of saying 15 miles per hour, it's going to say however

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many miles per kilometer per hour and we will just live with that. If someone says zero degrees, you say "OK, I guess that's cold because that's Celsius.“ Joe: After you get out of school, by the time you turn thirty you have forgotten metric. Go back to the four Ps of marketing and it looks like a lot of the things that we are doing now, we are just repackaging them and calling them something different. Is there really anything new in marketing? Anthony: Well, I think that's the basics, some of these things, you have someone making a good bowl in England in the 1200s and they tapped their little initials on the bottom of the bowl and they wanted to tell people, "This is my brand. I built it. This is good quality. Buy from me next time" Some of these things have stood the test of time and so I try not to use the new business lingo. I think product pricing, promotions, distributions, those have been around for 1,000 years now. They always will be and so you need to know the basics in order to whatever it is you do well. Most people do their thing well. They're a good lawyer, they're a good doctor, they're a good dentist, they shovel driveways nicely, and they mow lawns nicely. They do their thing very well, but almost every single person, 10:00 at night, "They go; Ah, I wish I had a little bit more business."

That's where marketing steps in and helps them. I think those same standard four Ps have been around for 1,000 years and they'll be around for 1,000 years and you got to get to know those because that's what's going to help you improve your business and let people know who you are and what you're doing.

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Joe: I have seen a big shift in PR, in the ability, when you look at print publications and the struggles that they're going through right now. What are you teaching in PR to people? Are you a disciple of, or are you listening to what David Meerman Scott have written in the New Rules of PR? Do you agree with that or do you still look at PR in the way that you are trying to get published in print publications? Anthony: Well, I think print publications are essential. I think the new media is essential. I think for anyone to say, "Well, we're sticking with only magazines and newspapers, won't get the job done. I think you need to embrace all of the new areas, spread the word through Facebook. Some of these companies are trying to get people to talk to each other about their product on Facebook. I'm not sure if that's just new and fun and will die out, but certainly using the web and social media to get people to say "Hey, if you like my product, please tell some friends." That goes back to the old hairstyling commercials 20 or 30 years. They told two friends and they told two friends. I think that the new media is a very fast way to do that rather than waiting to bump into somebody at the supermarket. I think PR has to embrace the new way because it's much, much faster. Now the downside, is that is something's bad like a movie, people can tell their friends, "Whatever you do, don't go to see X, Y and Z this weekend." So once again, the product better be good, it better be a good quality movie and then people will talk about it on Twitter and Facebook within minutes of seeing it, and the word will spread very fast, whether it's good or bad. The hope is you've made a good movie, or you've made a good product.

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Joe: If someone wants to find out more about you book they can find it on McGraw Hill's site of course that was the publisher. Also, it's on Amazon. Anthony: On Amazon or hopefully in every bookstore at their local bookstores, so it's available three ways. You can go to the publisher, you can go to Amazon, or you can go to your bookstore. Joe: Well, is there anything you would like to mention that I have not asked you about? Anthony: Well, no you did a great job. I was happy with all of your questions. You have done a great job of bringing a lot of the elements of the book out. I'm pleased with all the authors. They have done a great job of putting forth, not only the text material, the how to part, but also the making it come to life and telling their story and how they did it. You can look at it and say "Wow, they did it and so can I." Joe: Yeah, I have to admit I have been through the book and I still look at it and say I mean from Deming's 14 points you have in there. It's much more than just a marketing book. How did you arrive at the title? Anthony: Well, I think I came up with a dozen ideas but I wasn't happy with and McGraw Hill came up with a dozen ideas. They were all just bouncing around and they kept talking to some of the people who were buying the book, Barnes and Noble, Amazons. They kept talking about how big it was and how many companies were in there. Everybody kept referring to it as, "Oh that's the big book of marketing," when they first started talking about it, and I think the name just stuck.

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Joe: For me, it's hard to get a handle on it, because it's not a reference book, but I kind of treat it like a reference book. Anthony: It could easily be it. If you're in business and you want more sales, this is a book you could go to it and say "Oh, I need to know a little bit more about PR. I need to know a little bit more about advertising; maybe I should tweak my pricing. Maybe that will help." So it's a book where it's very easy to find something that can help your business. So it could be a reference book. It could be a textbook. It could be a how to book. Joe: The way I was going to describe it is that it is like a book of short stories, to me. Within the stories there are even short segments that you can actually get something out of in a minute read. Anthony: Well, thanks, I appreciate that. I'll pass that along in my office. I think they did a great job. Joe: I think they did too. The work that you must have done to organize it must have been tremendous, working with that many people and getting that together. It had to be a lot of work. I truly want to thank you very much for being on this Podcast. This Podcast will of course will be available on the Business 901 iTunes store if you would like to download it. And you can find Tony's book as he mentioned on the McGraw Hill, and the name of the book is "The Big Book of Marketing." Thank you very much, Tony. Anthony: Thank you.

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Joseph T. Dager Lean Six Sigma Black Belt

Ph: 260-438-0411

Fax: 260-818-2022

Email: jtdager@business901.com Web/Blog: http://www.business901.com

Twitter: @business901 What others say: In the past 20 years, Joe and I have collaborated on many difficult issues. Joe's ability to combine his expertise with "out of the box" thinking is unsurpassed. He has always delivered quickly, cost effectively and with ingenuity. A brilliant mind that is always a pleasure to work with." James R.

Joe Dager is President of Business901, a progressive company providing direction in areas such as Lean Marketing, Product Marketing, Product Launches and Re-Launches. As a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt, Business901 provides and implements marketing, project and performance planning methodologies in small businesses. The simplicity of a single flexible model will create clarity for your staff and as a result better execution. My goal is to allow you spend your time on the need versus the plan. An example of how we may work: Business901 could start with a consulting style utilizing an individual from your organization or a virtual assistance that is well versed in our principles. We have capabilities to plug virtually any marketing function into your process immediately. As proficiencies develop, Business901 moves into a coach’s role supporting the process as needed. The goal of implementing a system is that the processes will become a habit and not an event. Part of your marketing strategy is to learn and implement these tools.

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