Issuu on Google+

       

                          ccc                                                                

   

   

 

               

1    


Machine  converted  by  Lieven  Standaert  &  Kurt  Van  Houte,     www.repairable-­‐machines.be     A  digital  version  of  this  tutorial  can  be  found  at  www.budalab.be       Tutorial  written  by  Lieven  Standaert   Published  as  Creative  Commons  –  Share  and  Share  alike,  2015                

2    


ABOUT  THIS  TUTORIAL  4   PREPARING  YOUR  FILE:  WHAT  YOU  SHOULD  KNOW  5   GETTING  STARTED:  HOME  THE  MACHINE  6   HOMING  8   PREPARE  THE  TOOLHEAD  8   PREPARE  THE  TABLE  SURFACE  12   FIX  YOUR  MATERIAL:  part  1  13   FIX  YOUR  MATERIAL:  part  2  15   SET  THE  ORIGIN  AND  Z-­‐HEIGHT  16   OPEN  THE  EXAMPLE  FILE  18   CHECK  THE  SIZE  19   THE  MACHINE  DOES  NOT  DO  THE  THINKING  FOR  YOU  21   PREPARING  STEP  1  22   TURN  ON  THE  TOOL  AND  THE  DUST  EXTRACTOR  23   START  STEP  1  24   START  STEP  2  25   START  STEP  3  27   TURN  OFF  VACUUM,  DUST  EXTRACTOR,  TOOL  28   CLEANUP  28   CONGRATULATIONS,  You’’  ARE  DONE!  28     -­‐

3    


ABOUT THIS TUTORIAL   In  the  margin    of  this  tutorial  you  will  encounter  these  icons:  

   This  signifies  a  task  to  be  executed.  

 At  this  point  you  should  ask  a  lab  supervisor  to  check  your  work  before  you   proceed  further.  

 

       

   This  signifies  an  important  remark  on  safety.  

The  goal  of  this  tutorial  is  not  to  teach  you  everything  there  is  to  know  about  milling.     Rather  the  objective  is  to  teach  enough  so  you  can  use  the  machine  in  a  safe  way,  without   hurting  yourself  or  the  tool.   To  achieve  this  you  will  mill  an  example  fil,  this  arrow:  

  4    


PREPARING YOUR FILE: WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW   -­‐The  software  accepts  DXF-­‐files.    Most  software  allows  to  save  in  different  versions  of  DXF.   Choose  the  oldest  version  where  your  file  still  looks  ok.     I  use  Autocad  and  export  as  DXF  release  12.  I  convert  all  fonts  to  curves  before  I  do  this.     -­‐The  correct  units  are  centimeters  (if  you  draw  in  millimeters,  your  drawing  will  be  10x  too   large,  you  can  correct  this  in  the  software)   -­‐The  software  does  not  correct  for  the  diameter  of  the  tool,  you  should  implement  an  offset   in  your  drawing  if  you  need  accurate  dimensions.      

  Original  drawing  in  black.  Lines  in  red  are  a  3mm  offset  to  correct  for  a   6mm  milling  tool.     -­‐A  mill  cuts  sideways.  A  drill  cuts  downwards.  You  cannot  use  a  milling  tool  to  go  straight   down.     This  means  you  should  not  try  to  cut  a  6mm  diameter  hole  with  a  6mm  tool.  Instead   implement  a  larger  hole  size  or  a  smaller  milling  bit.              

UNDERSTANDING THE LIMITATIONS OF THE MACHINE   Converting  a  textile  cutting  machine  to  a  milling  machine,  presents  us  with  a  couple  of   limitations:    

 1-­‐The  software  will  not  offset  for  the  milling  bit  diameter,  as  described  above.   2-­‐  Z-­‐height  is  limited.    This  machine  can  mill  flat  boards  up  to  24mm  thick,  but  cannot  do   5  

 


thicker  materials.              

GETTING STARTED: HOME THE MACHINE  

 

0-­‐  Make  sure  the  machine  table  is  free  of  obstacles.     When  we  start  the  machine  the  toolhead  will  move  to  the  front  and  to  the  left,  with  enough   force  to  hurt  you,  your  laptop  or  anything  else  that  is  in  its  path.   1-­‐Turn  on  the  air  compressor.   The  machine  has  moving  parts  which  use  compressed  air.  Without  sufficient  air  pressure,   the  machine  will  not  work.     You  can  find  the  red  air  compressor  in  the  woodworking  room.    

   Go  find  the  air  compressor  and  turn  it  on  (red  button  on  the  control  box)   Next  you  need  to  locate  the  emergency  stop  and  the  machine  controller  

       

  When  you  found  the  controller,  ask  for  a  lab  supervisor  to  check  the  machine.   The  lab  supervisor  will  check:   -­‐if  the  work  surface  is  clear   6  

 


-­‐if  the  air  compressor  is  turned  on   He/she  will  also  assist  you  with  the  next  step.    

 

7    


HOMING   Turn  the  machine  on  by  releasing  the  emergency  switch.  You  do  this  by  rotating  the  button.   The  controller  should  now  display  “Press  any  button  to  home  the  machine”       Press  any  button.     The  tool  head  should  now  run  to  the  front  left  corner  of  the  machine.    

               

PREPARE THE TOOLHEAD     We  will  be  using  the  milling  tool.   0-­‐  To  ease  access,  raise  the  toolhead  to  its  maximum  height  using  the  black  turnwheel  on   top  of  the  toolhead.   1-­‐Start  by  removing  the  cutting  and  creasing  tools.  You  can  detach  these  with  an  allen  key.      

  Remove  both  the  directional  knife,  shown  here,  and  the  creasing  tool..  

8    


2-­‐  Find  the  box  labelled  “BUDA  snijplotter”  .    Put  the  removed  tools  in  this  box  so  they  do  not  get  lost.      Look  inside  this  box  for  a  6mm  milling  cutter.  

    3-­‐  You  will  need  a  hex  wrench  nr  15  and  nr  17  to  change  the  milling  bit  on  the  Kress  tool.  

    4-­‐Remove  the  tool  collet  from  the  Kress  tool  and  have  a  look  at  it:  

9    


These  collets  come  in  a  series  of  sizes.  They  do  not  work  like  the  chuck  of  a  drill,  where  one   size  fits  all,  but  are  much  more  accurate.     You  need  the  one  that  is  just  a  little  bit  larger  than  the  milling  bit  shaft.   Find  the  6mm  collet  and  use  it  with  a  6mm  milling  bit.  

  5-­‐  Mount  the  milling  bit,  using  the  two  hex  wrenches.  It  should  extend  MAXIMUM  30mm.     For  this  tutorial  we  will  be  milling  8mm  plywood,  so  we  do  not  actually  want  it  to  stick  out   that  far.    Have  the  milling  bit  extend  about  15mm.     Consult  the  guidelines  in  the  box  below  “How  long  …”    to  determine  the  optimal  length  of   the  milling  bit  in  different  situations.   10    


You  will  notice  at  one  point  you  will  be  a  hand  short.  Either  ask  someone  to  help  out,  or  find   a  block  of  wood  to  rest  the  bit  on  as  shown  in  the  next  picture.      

  6  Verify  the  tool  length  with  a  tape  measure.  This  is  important  as  this  will  minimize  your   chance  of  damaging  the  machine.        

HOW LONG SHOULD THE MILLING BIT BE STICKING OUT?  

  -­‐It  should  be  longer  than  the  thickness  of  the  material  you  want  to  cut.   -­‐It  should  be  shorter  that  the  thickness  of  the  material    plus  the  thickness  of  the  spoiler   board.(12mm)  This  reduces  the  chances  you  will  mill  into  the  nylon  floor  of  the  machine.   -­‐It  should  never  be  longer  than  30mm,  as  by  then  it  will  be  longer  than  the  ‘touch’  probe   that  is  used  to  measure  the  material.  

11    


PREPARE THE TABLE SURFACE   When  cutting  fabric  the  table  surface  is  covered  with  a  thick  felt.  When  milling  we  will   protect  the  table  with    12mm  MDF.  This  is  called  a  spoiler  board.   As  we  cut  through  our  material,  we  will  cut  a  bit  into  the  spoiler  board,  which  will  degrade   over  time.   We  will  not  cut  into  the  felt  or  in  the  nylon  table  surface.     Or  at  least,  that  is  the  idea  *  fingers  crossed*     Find  the  MDF  boards  and  cover  the  table  surface.    

     

 

REMOVE THE FELT LAYER FIRST?   If  you  want  to  cut  the  maximum  thickness  (24mm  plywood  board),  you  can  gain  5   millimeters  in  Z-­‐height  by  removing  the  felt  first.     For  thinner  boards  this  is  not  necessary.    

 

 

12    


FIX YOUR MATERIAL: PART 1   For  this  tutorial  we  will  use  a  piece  of  8mm  600x480  poplar  board.   You  can  find  these  boards  in  the  shelf  behind  the  machine.       Place  the  poplar  board  on  top  of  the  spoiler  board.      

 

    If  you  have  used  this  machine  before  as  a  textile  cutter,  you  know  this  already:   The  machine  comes  equipped  with  a  vacuum  table.  The  white  nylon  table  bed  under  the  felt   has  a  large  number  of  small  holes  which  suck  the  material  onto  the  table.     The  vacuum  works  through  &  through  the  spoilerboard,  as  MDF  is  porous.                 13    


Let’s  try  this:   Next  to  the  red  air  compressor  you  turned  on  earlier,  you  can  find  the  vacuum  pump.     Use  the  large  black  switch  to  turn  it  on.  

   

G The  vacuum  table  is  divided  in  3  zones.  Go  back  to  the  table.  At  the  side  of  the  controller  you   should  find  the  3  switches  you  see  above.     Flip  the  back  2  up  and  the  first  one  down.     This  selects  the  front  third  of  the  table.   Now  push  against  your  small  board.   Can  you  feel  the  suction?     14    


FIX YOUR MATERIAL: PART 2   This  vacuum  works  great  for  large  sheets.  It  also  works  better  when  you  cover  the  unused   parts  of  the  table.     For  the  small  sheet  we  use  in  this  tutorial  we  don’t  trust  the  amount  of  suction,  so  we  advise   a  second  method  of  fixing  your  sheet:   In  the  “BUDA  snijplotter”  box  you  can  find  screws  in  different  sizes.       Pick  a  size  that  is  shorter  than  the  thickness  of  your  material  +12mm     (you  do  not  want  to  screw  into  the  nylon  table  surface,  only  in  the  spoiler  board)    

  Fix  the  poplar  board  with  a  screw  in  each  4  corners.  

 

   

  Now  ask  a  lab  supervisor  to  check  your  work.   He/she  will  check:  

       

 

-­‐if  you  are  using  the  correct  spoiler  boards  and  material   -­‐if  you  are  using  a  correct  milling  bit  and  it  does  not  stick  out  too  far   -­‐if  you  have  properly  removed  the  directional  knife  and  the  crease  tool   -­‐if  you  have  properly  fastened  the  poplar  board.   15  

 


SET THE ORIGIN AND Z-HEIGHT   Next  you  will  position  the  tool  in  the  bottom  left  corner  of  the  board  of  poplar  wood.  

  Take  the  controller  and  move  the  toolhead  to  the  desired  position  using  the  arrows.   1-­‐Press  ‘Origin’  on  the  controller.   Press  ‘Ok’       2-­‐Press  ‘7’  on  the  controller.  This  will  select  tool  nr  7,  which  is  the  router.       Next  we  will  have  the  machine  measure    the  Z-­‐height  of  the  material.     3-­‐On  the  controller,  press  ‘Menu’  and  then  choose  ‘Calibrate  tool’.       The  machine  should  move,  put  down  the  probe  on  the  left  side  of  the  toolhead  onto  the   material  and  then  retract  a  bit.   It  will  then  ask  you  to  manually  lower  the  toolhead  onto  the  material.   This  is  done  by  turning  the  large  black  wheel  on  top  of  the  toolhead,  behind  the  router.  

16    


Rotate  the  knob  until  the  milling  bit  touches  the  top  of  the  material.     Follow  the  instructions  on  the  controller  and  complete  this  process  by  pressing  any  key.            

ACCURATE Z-LEVELLING   There  are  several  tricks  to  get  the  Z-­‐height  dialed  in  with  greater  accuracy.     One  is  to  slide  a  piece  of  paper  back  and  forth  between  the  milling  bit  and  the  material  while   lowering  the  tool.  When  the  paper  gets  stuck  and  you  can  no  longer  move  it,  the  tool  is  at   the  correct  height.   For  this  exercise  we  can  just  eyeball  it.    

17    


OPEN THE EXAMPLE FILE   The  machine  is  all  set  up  now.  You  will  now  open  an  example  DXF  and  configure  the  settings   to  mill  this  example.     Go  to  the  computer  connected  to  the  machine.     The  software  is  called  ‘Frontend’     You  should  find  a  shortcut  named  ‘Front’  on  the  desktop.   Double  click  to  open.   De  voorbeeldfile  vind  je  in  c:\Tutorial  2D  milling\tutorial_arrow.dxf  

 

 

Open  the  file  and  have  a  look  at  it:  

    You  should  see  a  similar  file  as  the  picture  above,  with  3  different  colours.   The  text,  the  arrow  and  the  four  little  holes  should  be  on  different  layers/colours.  

18    


CHECK THE SIZE   In  the  menu  ‘View’  click  ‘Show  Material’    and  specify  the  size  of  your  board.    

    The  board  size  of  the  plywood  is  600x450  mm.   Click  OK.    

The  software  will  now  show  the  board  as  a  white  rectangle  in  relation  to  the  drawing.   In  the  image  below  you  can  see  the  white  rectangle  in  the  bottom  left  corner.  (it  is  easier  to   see  on  the  computer  screen).    My  drawing  is  10x  too  large.  

  Go  to  ‘Edit’  >  ‘Scale’  in  the  menu  and  rescale  the  image  to  0.1  The  arrow  should  now  fit   19    


inside  the  white  rectangle:  

             

20    


THE MACHINE DOES NOT DO THE THINKING FOR YOU Now,  if  this  was  the  lasercutter,  we  would  just  adjust  the  power  settings  for  the  material   and  go.     On  a  milling  machine  you  cannot  do  that.  Everything  needs  to  be  fixed  in  place  and  stay   fixed.   If  we  would  execute  this  file,  the  machine  would  cut  out  that  arrow  from  the  board.  This   arrow  would  then  be  loose  and  a  soon  as  the  tool  would  push  against  it,  it  would  move,  get   flung  through  the  lab  or  dig  itself  into  the  tool.  It  would  be  a  mess.   There  are  a  number  of  tricks  to  deal  with  this.  Depending  on  your  design  you  might  have  to   think  up  your  own  way  to  fix  stuff  in  place.       Here  is  how  we  will  do  it  for  this  example:  

STEP 1: -­‐we  will  first  mill  het  4  holes  all  the  way  through   -­‐we  will  also  mill  the  letters,  but  only  4mm  deep    

STEP 2: -­‐we  will  then  drill  4  screws  through  the  holes  and  drill  screws  into  the  letters.    

STEP 3: -­‐only  then  we  will  mill  the  letters  all  the  way  through  and  mill  the  arrow,  making  sure  we  do   not  cut  out  the  holes  agein  (there  are  screws  there  now)     -­‐we  will  then  remove  all  screws  and  remove  our  finished  part.     Like  I  said,  there  are  other  ways  to  do  this,  but  this  is  fast  and  gives  us  a  finished  piece   without  scars.   The  main  risk  is  that  you  would  hit  one  of  the  screws  with  the  milling  tool,  which  would  be   bad.  This  technique  has  the  advantage  thought  that  no  clamps  or  mounting  tools  are   sticking  out  above  the  milling  surface.    (which  is  good,  considering  the  low  Z-­‐height  of  the  machine)   21    


PREPARING STEP 1 In  the  top-­‐left  corner  of  the  drawing  window,  right  click.  You  should  see  a  dropdown  where   you  can  select  ‘Job  Ticket’  

This  can  be  tricky  to   find  the  first  time.  It   is  not  the  software   window,  but  the   corner  of  the   window  in  which   your  drawing  is   opened.                                                  

  You  will  see  a  window  similar  to  the  one  in  the  image  above.   -­‐It  will  show  a  bar  with’  Pens  used  2,  4,8’    The  colours  of  these  numbers  match  up  with   colours  in  your  drawing.   -­‐You  can  ignore  the  ‘Caliper’  and  ‘Cutting  Mat’  settings   -­‐You  should  set  4  operations  in  the  bottom  window,  to  match  the  4  lines  in  the  image   above:  

   

 

HPGL  Pen    -­‐  this  is  the  layer  which  will  be  cut   Operation  -­‐  Choose    Cut,  but  this  does  not  seem  to  matter   Tool  –  Choose    Drag  Knife     Pressure  –  Leave  as  is,  does  not  matter    Depth    -­‐  no  more  than  4.5  per  run,  so  for  the  holes  we  add  2  operations,  once  at  4.5mm   and  once  at  9mm  (the  full  depth  of  the  board)    Vel  –  the  speed  with  which  to  cut.    20  is  decent,  you  can  go  slower  if  you  want  

 

IMPORTANT NOTE -­‐The  router  tool  is  called  ‘Drag  Knife’.  This  is  the  tool  you  need  to  select   -­‐The  depth  is  configurable,  but  you  should  not  try  to  cut  through  18mm  plywood  in  one  go.   Instead  you  should  do  several  runs  at  4  or  5mm  per  run.   -­‐If  you  ignore  the  advice  in  the  line  above,  the  tool  will  overheat  and  become  blunt.   22  

 


TURN ON THE TOOL AND THE DUST EXTRACTOR   The  milling  motor  control  is  manual.      Lift  up  the  plexiglass  dust  cover  door  and  turn  on  the  tool.     The  switch  uses  a  double  motion;  you  should  press  down  and  then  inwards.    

  If  the  milling  motor  starts  up,  close  the  cover.  If  not,  check  the  power  connection.   (The  220V  power  cord  of  the  milling  motor  exits  the  machine  in  the  back,  below  Pieter’s   desk)   Next  start  the  dust  extraction  system.  For  now  this  is  the  yellow-­‐hooded  little  vacuum   cleaner:  

    23    


Now  ask  for  a  lab  supervisor  to  check  your  work.   He/she  will  check:   -­‐if  the  size  of  your  drawing  is  correct    

-­‐if  the  depth  settings  in  the  software  are  correct   -­‐if  you  have  turned  on  the  milling  tool  and  dust  extraction  thingie  

       

START STEP 1 When  the  lab  supervisor  has  checked  your  work,  click  ‘RUN’  in  the  ‘Job  Ticket’  popup.   A  second  popup  will  show,  saying  ‘Save’.      Choose  ‘Temporary’  and  click  ‘Ok’  

 

 

  The  machine  should  start  and  cut  step  1.  

24    


START STEP 2 When  the  machine  has  finished  milling  step  1,  use  the  controller  to  move  the  toolhead   clear.     Use  a  cordless  drill  to  fix  all  pieces  in  place,  as  described  in  the  previous  chapter.     Take  care  not  to  use  screws  longer  than  20mm  (8mm  poplar  +  12  mm  spoiler  board)  

 

  This  is  what  the  fixed  part  should  look  like.    

       

25    


ANOTHER FIX-STUFF-IN-PLACE TRICK You  might  have  noticed  I  smuggled  in  another  fixation  trick  into  this  example.     The  ‘U’  of    ‘BUDA’  has  2  small  tabs  designed  into  it,  which  will  keep  it  attached  to  the  arrow.      So  the  ‘U’  does  not  need  screws.   I’m  not  a  great  fan  of  this  method,  as  it  will  leave  you  with  a  ‘scar’  on  your  finished  part,  but:     -­‐it  is  idiot-­‐proof  and  you  do  not  need  to  worry  about  the  screws   -­‐it  works  ok  with  more  brittle  materials,  like  plexi,  that  do  not  take  screws  well   -­‐you  can  keep  a  lot  of  small  parts  together  in  one  board  for  transport,  Revell-­‐kit  style.   -­‐if  you  use  this  method,  make  sure  the  tab  size  is  larger  than  the  tool  diameter.  

26    


START STEP 3  

  Start  a  second  ‘Job  Ticket’  and  configure  as  in  the  image  above.     Take  care  NOT  to  do  the  layer  containing  the  holes  again.  There  are  screws  there  now!       If  you  are  unsure,  consult  a  lab  supervisor,  but  if  you  think  you  have  got  it  you  can  proceed   on  your  own.   Press  ‘Run’  again  and  start  the  milling  process.    

 

27    


TURN OFF VACUUM, DUST EXTRACTOR, TOOL When  the  process  is  finshed,  turn  of:   -­‐  the  vacuum   -­‐the  tool   -­‐  the  dust  extractor.   Leave  the  compressor  on  for  now,  you  need  that  one  to  be  able  to  move  the  toolhead.  

                                               

CLEANUP   -­‐

  To  finish  up:   -­‐move  the  toolhead  out  of  the  way    

-­‐remove  your  part   -­‐remove  the  milling  bit  and  put  it  back  in  the  sorting  box   -­‐remove  the  leftover  parts  of  the  plywood  and  put  it  in  the  trash  

 

CONGRATULATIONS, YOU ARE DONE! If  parts  in  this  tutorial  are  unclear     28    


or  you  have  suggestions  how  to  improve  it,     I  would  love  your  input  at  lieven.standaert@gmail.com    

CNC-CUTTER CHECKLIST       -­‐Did  you  set

THE ORIGIN AND TOOL HEIGHT?

  -­‐Did  you  check  if

THE DRAWING IS THE RIGHT

SIZE?   -­‐Did  you  select

TOOL 7 on  the  controller?  

  -­‐Is

THE VACUUM & THE COMPRESSOR turned  

on?     -­‐Is  the

TOOL RUNNING  ?  

  -­‐Is  the

DUST EXTRACTION SYSTEM  on?  

     

29    


Buda tutorial snijplotter english v20150420