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Key Stage 3 Curriculum Guide 2011-12 Years 7-9 (Grades 6-8)

British School of Washington


National Curriculum- Years 7 – 9 (Grades 6 – 8)

Introduction Students take courses based upon the high quality British style of education. All students take three year courses in the following subjects: English Foreign Language(s) – Two from French, Spanish and Latin Humanities – History, Geography Sciences – Biology, Physics, and Chemistry Mathematics The Arts – Visual Art, Music, Drama Physical Education Technology – Design Technology, Computer Technology Citizenship In Years 7 and 8, all students take Latin plus either French or Spanish. In Year 9, all students take French plus either Latin or Spanish. The new International Middle Years Curriculum (IMYC) will be piloted during the 2011-12 academic year for Year 7 and be fully developed in September 2012. The IMYC will follow on from the International Primary Curriculum. The programme will retain subject content and includes personal and social learning goals and the development of international mindedness. The IMYC has been extensively researched and has been produced to meet the needs of enquiring adolescence learners. BSW believes this style of curriculum is more beneficial to students in helping them prepare for society and to become lifelong learners. The Primary and Lower Secondary Learning Leaders will work closely together in integrating the new curriculum model.

Homework Homework is set regularly for all students from Year 7 upwards according to the homework policy issued to students and parents at the start of each year. All homework should be recorded in the student’s homework diary and will be uploaded to engage. Homework will be marked according to the school marking policy.

English as an Additional Language The Learning Support Co-ordinator assesses the needs of individual students in order to provide the best possible support in school. Students may be offered extra support with English where necessary. Additional support is offered by form tutors and subject teachers in the classroom and the students themselves are offered “buddy” support to help them transition smoothly in their new environment.


Learning Support Whilst the school cannot provide special provision for applicants with significant learning difficulties, the Learning Support Coordinator is available to assess minor learning needs, liaise with parents, teachers, and School Leaders in order to create IEP’s (Individual Educational Plans) to support learning. Strategies may include one-to-one/small group support with the LSC It is possible for students to have private Speech and Language therapy sessions at school, extra tuition with members of staff and individual counselling. Admission is determined by previous school reports, an admission screening procedure, and the school’s ability to support the student’s needs.

Medical Assistance A full time medical administrator is available to assist students who are in need of medical attention or support.

Subject Descriptions The Importance of English English is vital for communicating with others in school and in the wider world, and is fundamental to learning in all curriculum subjects. In studying English, pupils develop skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing that they will need to participate in society and employment. Pupils learn to express themselves creatively and imaginatively and to communicate with others confidently and effectively. Literature in English is rich and influential. It reflects the experiences of people from many countries and times and contributes to our sense of cultural identity. Pupils learn to become enthusiastic and critical readers of stories, poetry and drama as well as non-fiction and media texts, gaining access to the pleasure and world of knowledge that reading offers. Looking at the patterns, structures, origins and conventions of English helps pupils understand how language works. Using this understanding, pupils can choose and adapt what they say and write in different situations, as well as appreciate and interpret the choices made by other writers and speakers. There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of English. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding. These essential concepts promote pupils’ progress in speaking and listening, reading and writing. 1.1 Competence a. Being clear, coherent and accurate in spoken and written communication. b. Reading and understanding a range of texts, and responding appropriately. c. Demonstrating a secure understanding of the conventions of written language, including grammar, spelling and punctuation.


d. Being adaptable in a widening range of familiar and unfamiliar contexts within the classroom and beyond. e. Making informed choices about effective ways to communicate formally and informally. 1.2 Creativity a. Making fresh connections between ideas, experiences, texts and words, drawing on a rich experience of language and literature. b. Using inventive approaches to making meaning, taking risks, playing with language and using it to create new effects. c. Using imagination to convey themes, ideas and arguments, solve problems, and create settings, moods and characters. d. Using creative approaches to answering questions, solving problems and developing ideas. 1.3 Cultural understanding a. Gaining a sense of the English literary heritage and engaging with important texts in it. b. Exploring how ideas, experiences and values are portrayed differently in texts from a range of cultures and traditions. c. Understanding how English varies locally and globally, and how these variations relate to identity and cultural diversity. 1.4 Critical understanding a. Engaging with ideas and texts, understanding and responding to the main issues. b. Assessing the validity and significance of information and ideas from different sources. c. Exploring others’ ideas and developing their own. d. Analysing and evaluating spoken and written language to appreciate how meaning is shaped. English programme of study for Key Stage 3 © Qualifications and Curriculum Authority

Subject content: Year 7 English  Study of a prose text* Study of a Shakespeare text* Study of poetry texts* Study of non-fiction texts* Creative writing Persuasive writing Developing analytical writing skills Essay structure and use of evidence in longer writing tasks. Development of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

Year 8 English

Year 9 English

Study of a prose text* Study of a Shakespeare text* Study of poetry texts* Study of non-fiction texts* Creative writing Persuasive writing Developing analytical writing skills Using evidence effectively and developing personal response in longer writing tasks. Development of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

Study of a prose text* Study of a Shakespeare text* Study of poetry texts* Study of non-fiction texts* Creative writing Persuasive writing Developing analytical writing skills Using evidence effectively and developing personal response in longer writing tasks. Development of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

* Texts to be chosen by individual teachers


The Importance of Foreign Languages Languages are part of the cultural richness of our society and the world in which we live and work. Learning languages contributes to mutual understanding, a sense of global citizenship and personal fulfilment. Pupils learn to appreciate different countries, cultures, communities and people. By making comparisons, they gain insight into their own culture and society. The ability to understand and communicate in another language is a lifelong skill for education, employment and leisure in this country and throughout the world. Learning languages gives pupils opportunities to develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills and to express themselves with increasing confidence, independence and creativity. They explore the similarities and differences between other languages and English and learn how language can be manipulated and applied in different ways. The development of communication skills, together with understanding of the structure of language, lay the foundation for future study of other languages and support the development of literacy skills in a pupil’s own language. There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of languages. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding. 1.1 Linguistic competence a. Developing the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in a range of situations and contexts. b. Applying linguistic knowledge and skills to understand and communicate effectively. 1.2 Knowledge about language a. Understanding how a language works and how to manipulate it. b. Recognising that languages differ but may share common grammatical, syntactical or lexical features. 1.3 Creativity a. Using familiar language for new purposes and in new contexts. b. Using imagination to express thoughts, ideas, experiences and feelings. 1.4 Intercultural understanding a. Appreciating the richness and diversity of other cultures. b. Recognising that there are different ways of seeing the world, and developing an international outlook. Languages programme of study for Key Stage 3 Š Qualifications and Curriculum Authority


Spanish subject content: Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Personal description and classroom language My town Free time activities Talking about myself and others Food

Talking about myself and others Food Clothing Tourism Entertainment Health

Media School Health Future plans The Spanish speaking world Travel

The present tense The near future tense

The present tense The near future tense The preterite tense The imperfect tense

The present tense The near future tense The preterite tense The imperfect tense

French subject content: Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

In town - shopping Tourism School Life and daily routine

Family Food Travel Health

The French speaking world Tourism Hobbies The world of work

The present tense The near future tense The perfect tense (regular and irregular)

The near future tense The future tense The perfect tense The imperfect tense

The present tense The near future tense Reflexive verbs

Latin subject content: The study of Latin helps us to understand so much about the development of the English language and the ‘Romance” languages of France, Italy, Spain and Portugal. About 2/3 of the English language has its roots in the Latin language. There is considerable evidence to show that students who study Latin increase their literacy skills and perform better in standardized tests including SATs. The study of Latin also helps students to improve their knowledge and understanding of English grammar – many English teachers attest to this. Knowledge of Latin helps students to understand much of the terminology in Law, Medicine, Botany and Biology. By studying Latin students are encouraged to pay attention to detail, think logically, analyse a problem and express themselves succinctly – skills that are much in demand in today’s world.


A study of Latin and Classical Civilisation is also the best way to introduce students to the origins and development of Western Civilisation. European Literature, Art, Architecture, History, the origins of Government, Politics and Philosophy and numerous aspects of our everyday lives have all left their mark on Modern Europe and North America. A study of both the language and the culture enables students to understand the importance of the legacy of Rome. Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Cambridge Latin Course Book I

Cambridge Latin Course Book II

Cambridge Latin Course Book III (first section)

Set in the Roman Town of Pompeii during the 1st Century AD.

Set, first, in the province of Roman Britain in the 1st Century AD and, later, in the city of Alexandria in Egypt.

More participles, purpose clauses, indirect questions and commands, result clauses and the gerundive.

Adjectives and their agreement, the use of irregular verbs, relative clauses, the pluperfect tense, the genitive case, 4th & 5th declension nouns, imperative forms and the present participle.

Recognize a variety of grammatical forms, translate a complex piece of narrative as well as answering a set of comprehension questions on a passage of Latin.

Present, imperfect, and perfect tenses of regular and irregular verbs as well as nouns in the nominative, accusative, and dative case.

Translate a short piece of Latin narrative into English and understand its meaning.

Study of the history and daily life of Romans in Pompeii

Recognize a variety of grammatical forms, translate a more complex piece of narrative and answer a set of comprehensions questions on it. Study life in Roman Britain including a study of Queen Boudica, the Palace of Fishbourne, and the city of Alexandria

Study the Romano-British town of Aquae Sulis, Roman Religion, Travel and Communication, the Roman Legions and Fortresses and the Interpretation of Evidence, and factors contributing to the Roman occupation of Britain.


The Importance of Mathematics Mathematical thinking is important for all members of a modern society as a habit of mind for its use in the workplace, business and finance; and for personal decision-making. Mathematics is fundamental to national prosperity in providing tools for understanding science, engineering, technology and economics. It is essential in public decision-making and for participation in the knowledge economy. Mathematics equips pupils with uniquely powerful ways to describe, analyse and change the world. It can stimulate moments of pleasure and wonder for all pupils when they solve a problem for the first time, discover a more elegant solution, or notice hidden connections. Pupils who are functional in mathematics and financially capable are able to think independently in applied and abstract ways, and can reason, solve problems and assess risk. Mathematics is a creative discipline. The language of mathematics is international. The subject transcends cultural boundaries and its importance is universally recognised. Mathematics has developed over time as a means of solving problems and also for its own sake. There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of mathematics. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding. 1.1 Competence a. Applying suitable mathematics accurately within the classroom and beyond. b. Communicating mathematics effectively. c. Selecting appropriate mathematical tools and methods, including ICT. 1.2 Creativity a. Combining understanding, experiences, imagination and reasoning to construct new knowledge. b. Using existing mathematical knowledge to create solutions to unfamiliar problems. c. Posing questions and developing convincing arguments. 1.3 Applications and implications of mathematics a. Knowing that mathematics is a rigorous, coherent discipline. b. Understanding that mathematics is used as a tool in a wide range of contexts. c. Recognising the rich historical and cultural roots of mathematics. d. Engaging in mathematics as an interesting and worthwhile activity. 1.4 Critical understanding a. Knowing that mathematics is essentially abstract and can be used to model, interpret or represent situations. b. Recognising the limitations and scope of a model or representation. Mathematics programme of study for Key Stage 3 Š Qualifications and Curriculum Authority


The framework for teaching mathematics accommodates the six sections of the National Curriculum: Using and applying mathematics to solve problems Using and applying mathematics to solve problems problem solving and applications in a variety of contexts to develop reasoning, thinking and communication skills Numbers and the number system Place value, ordering and rounding Integers, powers and roots Fractions, decimals, percentages, ratio and proportion Calculations Number operations and the relationships between them Mental methods and rapid recall of number facts Written methods Calculator methods Checking results Algebra Equations, formulae and identities Sequences, functions and graphs Shape, Space and Measures Geometrical reasoning: lines, angles and shapes Transformations Coordinates Construction and loci Measures and menstruation Handling Data Specifying a problem, planning and collecting data Processing and representing data Interpreting and discussing results Probability The framework for teaching mathematics is split into four main topics:    

Number Algebra Shape, Space and Measures Handling Data

There are Key Objectives for each of the three years within this program: Year 7 Simplify fractions by cancelling all common factors; identify equivalent fractions Recognise the equivalence of percentages, fractions and decimals


Extend mental methods of calculation to include decimals, fractions and percentages Multiply and divide three-digit by two-digit whole numbers; extend to multiplying and dividing decimals with one or two places by single-digit whole numbers Break a complex calculation into simpler steps, choosing and using appropriate and efficient operations and methods Check a result by considering whether it is of the right order of magnitude Use letter symbols to represent unknown numbers or variables Know and use the order of operations and understand that algebraic operations follow the same conventions and order as arithmetic operations Plot the graphs of simple linear functions Identify parallel and perpendicular lines; know the sum of angles at a point, on a straight line and in a triangle Convert one metric unit to another (e.g. grams to kilograms); read and interpret scales on a range of measuring instruments Compare two simple distributions using the range and one of the mode, median or mean Understand and use the probability scale from 0 to 1; find and justify probabilities based on equally likely outcomes in simple contexts Solve word problems and investigate in a range of contexts, explaining and justifying methods and conclusions Year 8 Add, subtract, multiply and divide integers Use the equivalence of fractions, decimals and percentages to compare proportions; calculate percentages and find the outcome of a given percentage increase or decrease Divide a quantity into two or more parts in a given ratio; use the unitary method to solve simple word problems involving ratio and direct proportion Use standard column procedures for multiplication and division of integers and decimals, including by decimals such as 0.6 or 0.06; understand where to position the decimal point by considering equivalent calculations Simplify or transform linear expressions by collecting like terms; multiply a single term over a bracket Substitute integers into simple formulae Plot the graphs of linear functions, where y is given explicitly in terms of x; recognise that equations of the form y = mx + c correspond to straight-line graphs Identify alternate and corresponding angles; understand a proof that the sum of the angles of a triangle is 180째 and of a quadrilateral is 360째 Enlarge 2-D shapes, given a centre of enlargement and a positive whole-number scale factor Use straight edge and compasses to do standard constructions Deduce and use formulae for the area of a triangle and parallelogram, and the volume of a cuboid; calculate volumes and surface areas of cuboids Construct, on paper and using ICT, a range of graphs and charts; identify which are most useful in the context of a problem Find and record all possible mutually exclusive outcomes for single events and two successive events in a systematic way Identify the necessary information to solve a problem; represent problems and interpret solutions in algebraic, geometric or graphical form


Use logical argument to establish the truth of a statement Year 9 Add, subtract, multiply and divide fractions Use proportional reasoning to solve a problem, choosing the correct numbers to take as 100%, or as a whole Make and justify estimates and approximations of calculations Construct and solve linear equations with integer coefficients, using an appropriate method Generate terms of a sequence using term-to-term and position-to-term definitions of the sequence, on paper and using ICT; write an expression to describe the nth term of an arithmetic sequence Given values for m and c, find the gradient of lines given by equations of the form y = mx + c Construct functions arising from real-life problems and plot their corresponding graphs; interpret graphs arising from real situations Solve geometrical problems using properties of angles, of parallel and intersecting lines, and of triangles and other polygons Know that translations, rotations and reflections preserve length and angle and map objects on to congruent images Know and use the formulae for the circumference and area of a circle Design a survey or experiment to capture the necessary data from one or more sources; determine the sample size and degree of accuracy needed; design, trial and if necessary refine data collection sheets Communicate interpretations and results of a statistical enquiry using selected tables, graphs and diagrams in support Know that the sum of probabilities of all mutually exclusive outcomes is 1 and use this when solving problems Solve substantial problems by breaking them into simpler tasks, using a range of efficient techniques, methods and resources, including ICT; give solutions to an appropriate degree of accuracy Present a concise, reasoned argument, using symbols, diagrams, graphs and related explanatory text. Year 9 objectives for able pupils Know and use the index laws for multiplication and division of positive integer powers Understand and use proportionality and calculate the result of any proportional change using multiplicative methods Square a linear expression and expand the product of two linear expressions of the form x + n; establish identities Solve a pair of simultaneous linear equations by eliminating one variable; link a graphical representation of an equation or a pair of equations to the algebraic solution Change the subject of a formula Know that if two 2-D shapes are similar, corresponding angles are equal and corresponding sides are in the same ratio Understand and apply Pythagoras' theorem


Know from experience of constructing them that triangles given SSS, SAS, ASA or RHS are unique, but that triangles given SSA or AAA are not; apply these conditions to establish the congruence of triangles Use measures of speed and other compound measures to solve problems Identify possible sources of bias in a statistical enquiry and plan how to minimise it Examine critically the results of a statistical enquiry and justify choice of statistical representation in written presentations Generate fuller solutions to mathematical problems Recognise limitations on the accuracy of data and measurements

The Importance of Science The study of science fires pupils’ curiosity about phenomena in the world around them and offers opportunities to find explanations. It engages learners at many levels, linking direct practical experience with scientific ideas. Experimentation and modelling are used to develop and evaluate explanations, encouraging critical and creative thought. Pupils learn how knowledge and understanding in science are rooted in evidence. They discover how scientific ideas contribute to technological change – affecting industry, business and medicine and improving quality of life. They trace the development of science worldwide and recognise its cultural significance. They learn to question and discuss issues that may affect their own lives, the directions of societies and the future of the world. There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of science and how science works. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding. 1.1 Scientific thinking a. Using scientific ideas and models to explain phenomena and developing them creatively to generate and test theories. b. Critically analysing and evaluating evidence from observations and experiments. 1.2 Applications and implications of science a. Exploring how the creative application of scientific ideas can bring about technological developments and consequent changes in the way people think and behave. b. Examining the ethical and moral implications of using and applying science. 1.3 Cultural understanding a. Recognising that modern science has its roots in many different societies and cultures, and draws on a variety of valid approaches to scientific practice. 1.4 Collaboration a. Sharing developments and common understanding across disciplines and boundaries. Science programme of study for Key Stage 3, Š Qualifications and Curriculum Authority.


Subject content: Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Cells Reproduction Environment and feeding Variation and classification Acids and alkalis Simple chemical reactions Particle model of solid liquids and gases Solutions Energy resources Electrical circuits Forces and their effects The solar system and beyond

Food and digestion Respiration Microbes and disease Ecological relationships Atoms and elements Compounds and mixtures Rocks and weathering The rock cycle Heating and cooling Magnets and electromagnets Light Sound and hearing

Inheritance and selection Fit and healthy Plants and photosynthesis Plants for food Reactions of metals and metal compounds Patterns of reactivity Environmental chemistry Using chemistry Energy and electricity Gravity and space Speeding up Pressure and moments

The Importance of History History fires pupils' curiosity and imagination, moving and inspiring them with the dilemmas, choices and beliefs of people in the past. It helps pupils develop their own identities through an understanding of history at personal, local, national and international levels. It helps them to ask and answer questions of the present by engaging with the past. Pupils find out about the history of their community, Britain, Europe and the world. They develop a chronological overview that enables them to make connections within and across different periods and societies. They investigate Britain's relationships with the wider world, and relate past events to the present day. As they develop their understanding of the nature of historical study, pupils ask and answer important questions, evaluate evidence, identify and analyse different interpretations of the past, and learn to substantiate any arguments and judgements they make. They appreciate why they are learning what they are learning and can debate its significance. History prepares pupils for the future, equipping them with knowledge and skills that are prized in adult life, enhancing employability and developing an ability to take part in a democratic society. It encourages mutual understanding of the historic origins of our ethnic and cultural diversity, and helps pupils become confident and questioning individuals. There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of history. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding.


1.1 Chronological understanding a. Understanding and using appropriately dates, vocabulary and conventions that describe historical periods and the passing of time. b. Developing a sense of period through describing and analysing the relationships between the characteristic features of periods and societies. c. Building a chronological framework of periods and using this to place new knowledge in its historical context. 1.2 Cultural, ethnic and religious diversity a. Understanding the diverse experiences and ideas, beliefs and attitudes of men, women and children in past societies and how these have shaped the world. 1.3 Change and continuity a. Identifying and explaining change and continuity within and across periods of history. 1.4 Cause and consequence a. Analysing and explaining the reasons for, and results of, historical events, situations and changes. 1.5 Significance a. Considering the significance of events, people and developments in their historical context and in the present day. 1.6 Interpretation a. Understanding how historians and others form interpretations. b. Understanding why historians and others have interpreted events, people and situations in different ways through a range of media. c. Evaluating a range of interpretations of the past to assess their validity. History programme of study for Key Stage 3, Š Qualifications and Curriculum Authority

Subject content: Year 7 Key History Skills Roman Empire Medieval Period Native Americans

Year 8 Tudors and Stuarts Empire Royal Power Renaissance Reformation Civil War

Year 9 Industrial Revolution WW1 WW2 Dictators Holocaust Civil Rights Contemporary conflict


The Importance of Geography The study of geography stimulates an interest in and a sense of wonder about places. It helps young people make sense of a complex and dynamically changing world. It explains where places are, how places and landscapes are formed, how people and their environment interact, and how a diverse range of economies, societies and environments are interconnected. It builds on pupils’ own experiences to investigate places at all scales, from the personal to the global. Geographical enquiry encourages questioning, investigation and critical thinking about issues affecting the world and people’s lives, now and in the future. Fieldwork is an essential element of this. Pupils learn to think spatially and use maps, visual images and new technologies, including geographical information systems (GIS), to obtain, present and analyse information. Geography inspires pupils to become global citizens by exploring their own place in the world, their values and their responsibilities to other people, to the environment and to the sustainability of the planet. There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of geography. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding. 1.1 Place a. Understanding the physical and human characteristics of real places. b. Developing ‘geographical imaginations’ of places. 1.2 Space a. Understanding the interactions between places and the networks created by flows of information, people and goods. b. Knowing where places and landscapes are located, why they are there, the patterns and distributions they create, how and why these are changing and the implications for people. 1.3 Scale a. Appreciating different scales – from personal and local to national, international and global. b. Making links between scales to develop understanding of geographical ideas. 1.4 Interdependence a. Exploring the social, economic, environmental and political connections between places. b. Understanding the significance of interdependence in change, at all scales. 1.5 Physical and human processes a. Understanding how sequences of events and activities in the physical and human worlds lead to change in places, landscapes and societies. 1.6 Environmental interaction and sustainable development a. Understanding that the physical and human dimensions of the environment are interrelated and together influence environmental change. b. Exploring sustainable development and its impact on environmental interaction and climate change.


1.7 Cultural understanding and diversity a. Appreciating the differences and similarities between people, places, environments and cultures to inform their understanding of societies and economies. b. Appreciating how people’s values and attitudes differ and may influence social, environmental, economic and political issues, and developing their own values and attitudes about such issues. Geography programme of study for Key Stage 3, © Qualifications and Curriculum Authority.

Subject content: Year 7

Year 8

Mapskills

Ecosystems: Antarctica, Deserts and Tropical Rainforests

Weather and Climate Development Issues and Economic Activities

Year 9 Natural Hazards (Hurricanes, tornadoes, volcanoes and earthquakes)

Geomorphological Processes (Rivers and Coasts)

Population and Resources

Population and Settlement

Globalisation

Exploring the UK and the USA (if time allows)

Limestone scenery (if time allows)

The Importance of Music Music is a unique form of communication that can change the way pupils feel, think and act. Music forms part of an individual’s identity and positive interaction with music can develop pupils’ competence as learners and increase their self-esteem. Music brings together intellect and feeling and enables personal expression, reflection and emotional development. As an integral part of culture, past and present, music helps pupils understand themselves, relate to others and develop their cultural understanding, forging important links between home, school and the wider world. Music education encourages active involvement in different forms of music-making, both individual and communal, helping to develop a sense of group identity and togetherness. Music can influence pupils’ development in and out of school by fostering personal development and maturity, creating a sense of achievement and self-worth, and increasing pupils’ ability to work with others in a group context. Music learning develops pupils’ critical skills: their ability to listen, to appreciate a wide variety of music, and to make judgements about musical quality. It also increases self-discipline, creativity, aesthetic sensitivity and fulfilment. There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of music. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding.


1.1 Integration of practice a. Developing knowledge, skills and understanding through the integration of performing, composing and listening. Participating, collaborating and working with others as musicians, adapting to different musical roles and respecting the values and benefits others bring to musical learning 1.2 Cultural understanding a. Understanding musical traditions and the part music plays in national and global culture and in personal identity. Exploring how ideas, experiences and emotions are conveyed in a range of music from different times and cultures. 1.3 Critical understanding a. Engaging with and analysing music, developing views and justifying opinions. b. Drawing on experience of a wide range of musical contexts and styles to inform judgements. 1.4 Creativity a. Using existing musical knowledge, skills and understanding for new purposes and in new contexts. b. Exploring ways music can be combined with other art forms and other subject disciplines. 1.5 Communication a. Exploring how thoughts, feelings, ideas and emotions can be expressed through music opportunities. Music programme of study for Key Stage 3, Š Qualifications and Curriculum Authority

Subject Content: Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Musical Elements Graphic Score & Notation Major, Minor and Pentatonic Composing a Tune Instruments of the Orchestra Binary & Ternary Form Musical Cliches Medieval Music Programme Music Music of China

Music of India Asian Music & Culture Bass Clef Notation Blues & Jazz Dance Music Baroque & Classical Periods Rondos & Rounds African Music & Cycles Music of the Arab World Minimalism

Music & the Media Jingles & Advertising Music Theatre Movie Music Variation Form History of the Orchestra Music for Special Events History of Pop Music Riff & Hook Fusions


The Importance of Art In art, craft and design, pupils explore visual, tactile and other sensory experiences to communicate ideas and meanings. They work with traditional and new media, developing confidence, competence, imagination and creativity. They learn to appreciate and value images and artefacts across times and cultures, and to understand the contexts in which they were made. In art, craft and design, pupils reflect critically on their own and other people’s work, judging quality, value and meaning. They learn to think and act as artists, craftspeople and designers, working creatively and intelligently. They develop an appreciation of art, craft and design, and its role in the creative and cultural industries that enrich their lives. There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of art, craft and design. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding. 1.1 Creativity a. Producing imaginative images, artefacts and other outcomes that are both original and of value. b. Exploring and experimenting with ideas, materials, tools and techniques. c. Taking risks and learning from mistakes. 1.2 Competence a. Investigating, analysing, designing, making, reflecting and evaluating effectively. b. Making informed choices about media, techniques and processes. 1.3 Cultural understanding a. Engaging with a range of images and artefacts from different contexts, recognising the varied characteristics of different cultures and using them to inform their creating and making. b. Understanding the role of the artist, craftsperson and designer in a range of cultures, times and contexts. 1.4 Critical understanding a. Exploring visual, tactile and other sensory qualities of their own and others’ work. b. Engaging with ideas, images and artefacts, and identifying how values and meanings are conveyed. c. Developing their own views and expressing reasoned judgements. d. Analysing and reflecting on work from diverse contexts. Art programme of study for Key Stage 3, Š Qualifications and Curriculum Authority.


Subject Content: Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Cubism – Students will produce an oil pastel final piece based on a series of drawings from their personal objects. Braque based. Shoe project – Students produce a 3d shoe in a particular theme. Relief collage final piece. Under the sea – Students get to experiment with media and produce a final piece based on Henri Matisse’s cut outs.

Structure collage – Students produce a cityscape cardboard relief structure inspired by Gaudi. David Hockney landscape/landmark – Students produce a layered print based on the work of David Hockney Yann Arthus Bertrand – Students produce an extension of their favorite photo by the artist using multimedia.

Rob Ryan - cut out project based around a quote or famous saying. Body art/tattoo/plaster cast – Anthony Gormley based project that also incorporates body art from different cultures. Surrealism – Salvador Dali inspired final piece with paint and collage.

The Importance of Drama The study of Drama helps to provide students with essential life skills as well as enhancing their capabilities within the subject as a creative art form. Students will learn the skills and disciplines needed to create effective performances through their use of movement, gesture, voice and facial expressions. However, the study of Drama also helps to develop their skills in constructive group work, self and peer evaluation and the ability to work independently which, in turn, help to promote self confidence and self awareness. There are three focus areas in which students will develop throughout their study of Drama: 1. Making Use of group and independent work to create performances by implementing various dramatic techniques and applying to a range of theatrical genres. 2. Performing Performing their work either informally during class time or during a more formal setting such as an assembly 3. Reflecting During and after the making and performing process, students will spend time reflecting on their final product and also the process they went through to get that final result. This will involve both peer and self assessments and helps students to develop their ability to use constructive criticism.


Subject Content: Year 7 Drama Group work skills Devising and performing Improvisation Use of soundscapes Use of gesture, voice & movement to create characters Structuring a performance Effective use of props in performances Planning performances for a specific audience

Year 8 Drama

Year 9 Drama

Use of gesture, voice & movement to create characters Group work skills Devising and performing Improvisation Developing spontaneous improvisation Skills and techniques of Stanislavski Abstract drama techniques Use of props as symbols

Use of gesture, voice & movement to create characters Group work skills Devising and performing Improvisation Developing spontaneous improvisation Skills and techniques of Stanislavski Abstract drama techniques Use of props as symbols Develop skills in refining, editing and selecting when devising a performance Use of stimulus material Implementation of the ‘fourth wall’

The Importance of Physical Education PE develops pupils’ competence and confidence to take part in a range of physical activities that become a central part of their lives, both in and out of school. A high-quality PE curriculum enables all pupils to enjoy and succeed in many kinds of physical activity. They develop a wide range of skills and the ability to use tactics, strategies and compositional ideas to perform successfully. When they are performing, they think about what they are doing, analyse the situation and make decisions. They also reflect on their own and others’ performances and find ways to improve them. As a result, they develop the confidence to take part in different physical activities and learn about the value of healthy, active lifestyles. Discovering what they like to do, what their aptitudes are at school, and how and where to get involved in physical activity helps them make informed choices about lifelong physical activity. PE helps pupils develop personally and socially. They work as individuals, in groups and in teams, developing concepts of fairness and of personal and social responsibility. They take on different roles and responsibilities, including leadership, coaching and officiating. Through the range of experiences that PE offers, they learn how to be effective in competitive, creative and challenging situations. There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of PE. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding.


1.1 Competence a. Developing control of whole-body skills and fine manipulation skills. b. Selecting and using skills, tactics and compositional ideas effectively in different types of physical activity. c. Responding with body and mind to the demands of an activity. d. Adapting to a widening range of familiar and unfamiliar contexts. e. 1.2 Performance a. Understanding how the components of competence combine, and applying them to produce effective outcomes. b. Knowing and understanding what needs to be achieved, critically evaluating how well it has been achieved and finding ways to improve. c. Appreciating how to make adjustments and adaptations when performing in different contexts and when working individually, in groups and teams. d. Understanding the nature of success in different types of activity. 1.3 Creativity a. Using imaginative ways to express and communicate ideas, solve problems and overcome challenges. b. Exploring and experimenting with techniques, tactics and compositional ideas to produce efficient and effective outcomes. 1.4 Healthy, active lifestyles a. Understanding that physical activity contributes to the healthy functioning of the body and mind and is an essential component of a healthy lifestyle. b. Recognising that regular physical activity that is fit for purpose, safe and enjoyable has the greatest impact on physical, mental and social wellbeing. PE programme of study for Key Stage 3, Š Qualifications and Curriculum Authority

Subject Content: Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Invasion games Swimming Volleyball Fitness Track and Field Striking and Fielding

Invasion games Swimming Volleyball Fitness Track and Field Striking and Fielding

Invasion games Swimming Volleyball Fitness Track and Field Striking and Fielding


The Importance of ICT There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of ICT. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding. 1.1 Capability a. Using a range of ICT tools in a purposeful way to tackle questions, solve problems and create ideas and solutions of value. b. Exploring and using new ICT tools as they become available. c. Applying ICT learning in a range of contexts and in other areas of learning, work and life. 1.2 Communication and collaboration a. Exploring the ways that ICT can be used to communicate, collaborate and share ideas on a global scale, allowing people to work together in new ways and changing the way in which knowledge is created. 1.3 Exploring ideas and manipulating information a. Solving problems creatively by using ICT to explore ideas and try alternatives. b. Using ICT to model different scenarios, identifying patterns and testing hypotheses. c. Manipulating information and processing large quantities of data efficiently. 1.4 Impact of technology a. Exploring how ICT changes the way we live our lives and has significant social, ethical and cultural implications. b. Recognising issues of risk, safety and responsibility surrounding the use of ICT. 1.5 Critical evaluation a. Recognizing that information must not be taken at face value, but must be analyzed and evaluated to take account of its purpose, author, currency and context. b. Reviewing and reflecting critically on what they and others produce using ICT. IT Programme of study for Key Stage 3, Š Qualifications and Curriculum Authority

The Importance of Design Technology In design and technology pupils combine practical and technological skills with creative thinking to design and make products and systems that meet human needs. They learn to use current technologies and consider the impact of future technological developments. They learn to think creatively and intervene to improve the quality of life, solving problems as individuals and members of a team. Working in stimulating contexts that provide a range of opportunities and draw on the local ethos, community and wider world, pupils identify needs and opportunities. They respond with ideas, products and systems, challenging expectations where appropriate. They combine practical and intellectual skills with an understanding of aesthetic, technical, cultural, health, social, emotional, economic, industrial and environmental issues. As they do so, they evaluate present and past design and technology, and its uses


and effects. Through design and technology pupils develop confidence in using practical skills and become discriminating users of products. They apply their creative thinking and learn to innovate. There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of design and technology. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding. 1.1 Designing and making a. Understanding that designing and making has aesthetic, environmental, technical, economic, ethical and social dimensions and impacts on the world. b. Applying knowledge of materials and production processes to design products and produce practical solutions that are relevant and fit for purpose. c. Understanding that products and systems have an impact on quality of life. d. Exploring how products have been designed and made in the past, how they are currently designed and made, and how they may develop in the future. 1.2 Cultural understanding a. Understanding how products evolve according to users’ and designers’ needs, beliefs, ethics and values and how they are influenced by local customs and traditions and available materials. b. Exploring how products contribute to lifestyle and consumer choices. 1.3 Creativity a. Making links between principles of good design, existing solutions and technological knowledge to develop innovative products and processes. b. Reinterpreting and applying learning in new design contexts and communicating ideas in new or unexpected ways. c. Exploring and experimenting with ideas, materials, technologies and techniques. 1.4 Critical evaluation a. Analysing existing products and solutions to inform designing and making. b. Evaluating the needs of users and the context in which products are used to inform designing and making. c. Exploring the impact of ideas, design decisions and technological advances and how these provide opportunities for new design solutions. DT Programme of study for Key Stage 3, Š Qualifications and Curriculum Authority


Subject Content: Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Students learn to design and make a product as independently as they are able by applying knowledge, skills and understanding which they develop during product evaluation activities and focused practical tasks. Through this they will broaden their knowledge of design, design communication techniques and making skills, tools, materials, safe working practices and industrial production methods.

Students learn to design and make a product either as design teams or individuals by applying knowledge, skills and understanding which they develop during product evaluation activities and focused practical tasks. Through this they will broaden their knowledge of design, design communication techniques and making skills, tools, materials, safe working practices and industrial production methods.

Students learn to design and make a product either as design teams or individuals by applying knowledge, skills and understanding which they develop during product evaluation activities and focused practical tasks. Through this they will broaden their knowledge of design, design communication techniques and making skills, tools, materials, safe working practices and industrial production methods.

Pastoral Care The Pastoral system at BSW provides both academic and emotional support for each individual child, parent or family group. A structured in-school framework of communication between Class Teachers/Form Tutors, Key Stage Coordinators and Learning Leaders provides all learners with the academic and emotional support they need to ensure academic success and emotional wellbeing throughout the academic year. Each learner at the school has a class teacher or form tutor who is main hub for the child, his or her family, and the rest of the school community. In addition to these roles the school also provides on-site access to a School Counsellor. The Counsellor provides our learners and their families with the opportunity to gain an objective and more detailed exploration of any issue that may require a longer-term approach. Our Counselors also work with our learners in group sessions to help resolve disputes or address any issue that may be affecting a whole class or group of friends. Referrals to the School Counselors are made via the SEAL Learning Leader.


SEAL (Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning)

Rationale At BSW we seek to provide an environment of mutual respect in which all children are “welcomed, accepted and valued”. We want our children to “leave school prepared for the next stage of their lives and confident in their ability to make a contribution to the world”. We believe that the SEAL curriculum is central to being able to achieve these objectives as it helps the pupils to learn to understand themselves physically, emotionally and socially; to understand their relationships with others; to become responsible members of society. In this way, social and emotional learning are at the heart of everything we do in our school.

Aims and Purposes of SEAL Our aim is to deliver a curriculum which supports our school mission statement and which underpins the values of our school community. This is done through a clear and planned curriculum delivered within an environment which is supportive to emotional health and well-being, and which motivates and equips our learners to develop: Personal learning (self-awareness, management of feelings and motivation) Interpersonal learning (empathy, social skills) Effective and satisfying relationships with others Respect for similarities and differences Independence and responsibility Awareness of how to keep themselves and others safe An ability to make the most of their abilities An ability to play an active role as members of our society Knowledge of a healthy lifestyle The skills needed to make choices An awareness of social and moral dilemmas

School Environment Our school ethos is one where everyone is valued and encouraged, where positive relationships are seen as important, and where the environment is safe, secure and conducive to learning. Therefore we have developed a whole school approach to SEAL which involves all members of the school community. The SEAL objectives have been woven across the curriculum, with structured focus on key skills and explicit discussion around these skills and rewards at all levels.


Years 7 – 9 Assessment

Assessment at BSW is carried out according to the guidelines contained within the Assessment Policy document outlined in the School Handbook. In Years 7 - 9, criterion-referencing is used to assess a student’s progress at the end of each year. In each Attainment Target (any given skill), a student is assessed and given a level of 1 – 8. The majority of students will have already reached level 4 by the end of Key Stage 2 and level 6 by the end of Key Stage 3. For 2011—2012, departments set at least one formal assessment per term based on National Curriculum Attainment Targets. Teachers also use a variety of data to support their student assessment including Key Stage 2 SATs results in English, Maths and Science as well as baseline data derived from the MIDYIS tests taken in Year 7. The tests are used widely in the UK and overseas to measure a student’s developed ability rather than testing them on what they have learnt at school. The resulting data can then be used to measure a student’s potential in a range of subjects and to provide predictions for future exam performance as well as assessing a student’s academic strengths and weaknesses. BSW also uses data provided by SOSCA tests (Secondary 0n-Screen Curriculum Assessments) which are taken by Year 9 in the summer term. These tests in Reading, Maths and Science are marked externally and provide the school with further information about student progress. In exercise books, teachers mark work according to their departmental policies and employ a variety of grading methods, including a mark out of 10, a percentage grade, an effort grade ( A – E), a “National Curriculum” level or simply a comment at the end of the piece of work which gives appropriate feedback and/or a suggestion for improvement.

What Level Should My Child Be Working At? At the end of each Key Stage, children are expected to reach certain levels of knowledge, skills and understanding in each subject. The expected Attainment Level for children at the end of key stage 2 and 3 are as follows: Most children expected to work between levels

Expected attainment at end of Key Stage

Key Stage 2

2-5

4 (at age 11)

Key Stage 3

3-7

5 or 6 (at age 14)

Key Stage

If children are working a long way above or below the expected level, the school must provide extra support. Your child's teachers will be able to tell you how your child is progressing and will be able to offer advice about any concerns.


Year 9 SOSCA Results (Secondary On-Screen Curriculum Assessments) These curriculum-based tests in Reading, Math and Science also provide National Curriculum-based levels. They are marked externally by Durham University in the UK and provide the school with further information about student progress.

Yr 9 English

Math

Science

Grade A B C D A B

2011 (% of students ) 44% 44% 12% 0% 44% 26%

2010 (% of students) 42% 38% 15% 5% 50% 35%

C D

26% 4%

7% 8%

A B C D

61% 26% 4% 9%

54% 35% 7% 4%

Key Stage 3 Reporting In Years 7 - 9, student progress is reported in two full written reports and two grading reports. Grades for attainment are awarded according to the English National Curriculum level that the student has performed consistently in all subject areas. Students also are awarded a grade for their Attitude to Learning.

Lower Secondary Leader and Form Tutors 2011-12 Lower Secondary Leader

Year Class 7

Adrienne Taylor 8

9

Form Tutor

Support

Manchester

TBD

San Francisco

Simon Steff

Katie Stewart

Plymouth

Abi Long

Houston

Montse Learner

London

Simon Amselli

Seattle

Karen Casterton

Gareth Hall

Kath Hatchard


Characteristics of Children in Early Adolescence Intellectual Functions at wide range of cognitive development Movies from concrete to abstract thought Demonstrates curiosity Prefers active learning Prefers working with peers during learning activities Enjoys meaningful learning – developing skills that relate to real life Exhibits independent, critical thought Places personal-social concerns first; academic goals are secondary Experiences metacognition – understands what they know and do not know

Physical Increases in height, weight, heart size, lung capacity, and muscular strength Matures at varying rates – girls earlier than boys, typically Lacks coordination due to uneven muscle/bone development Functions at high levels of energy that may be followed by long periods of idleness Focuses on appearance

Psychological/Emotional Exhibits a wide range of emotions as a function of chemical and hormonal imbalances Exhibits moodiness, restlessness, self-consciousness, and introspection Feels optimistic, hopeful Searches for adult identity Takes risks and loves danger and adventure; feels immortal Cries easily and frequently Needs time to grow up emotionally as well as physically – the body will outgrow the mind Exhibits sensitivity to criticism, yet highly self-critical Overreacts to any form of rejection and often feels inadequate Hides true feelings behind sarcasm

Social Looks to peers for standards and models of behavior Rebels toward parents, yet still influenced by family values Responds to fads and displays loyalty to peer group Wants to be independent from family Needs love and affirmation from significant adults Challenges authority figures; acts out in unusual ways Develops an awareness of social problems and the welfare of others Worries about what their friends think about them Exhibits a new interest in friends of the opposite sex Wants increased rights and responsibilities but frequently will not be able to handle them


National Curriculum Information

www.direct.gov.uk/en/Parents/Schoolslearninganddevelopment/ExamsTestsAndTheCurriculum/index.htm www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize www.bbc.co.uk/schools/parents/work/curriculum_guide/national_curriculum.shtml http://curriculum.qca.org.uk/key-stages-3-and-4/index.aspx


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British School of Washington - Key Stage