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BRITISH BASEBALL FEDERATION SAFEGUARDING PROJECT STATEMENT E-mail: safeguarding@britishbaseball.org www.britishbaseball.org SCOPE: A systematic requirements process was used to identify the scope of the BBF safeguarding project. For example, what was required as best practice was examined, followed by consultation and research into a variety of leading experts on the topic, as well as user input. We created the project requirements documentation, the requirements policies and procedures plan, and the requirements traceability matrix for what we need to do based on this information.The following safeguarding policies, procedures, templates and best practice are comprehensive and are effective 1st April 2021. For this exercise they are collated. Please note, not everything included is mandatory, rather some elements (guidance, templates, etc), act as resources to assist you to manage safeguarding. All of the contents within this document are subject to change. The page numbering system starts on page three (cover page) e.g., page one.

Authors

Functional description

Who are the authors of this document?

How does the safeguarding policies and procedures apply?

- British Baseball Federation (BBF)

Reviewers Who are the stakeholders that will review this document?

- All affiliated BBF clubs. - Designated Welfare Officer (DWO). - Anyone working with children.

- The following safeguarding policies and procedures are the requirements for all affilated clubs to the BBF to safeguard children. - All affilated clubs and their participants are required to comply which have children (under 18 years of age) involved. - The BBF safeguarding policies and procedures are mandatory requirements as part of the BBF insurance and membership terms. - Exclusions: Any affilated club which does not have any children involved and/or it is defined in their governing documents (however DBS checks may apply). That is, if you have one child involved in any capacity in your club or organisation you must comply with these safeguardling policies and procedures.

User interface

Prioritisation

Online which can be found through the www.britishbaseball.org website.

Plot each element on a matrix to help prioritise and track them as they are completed.

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Online registration for club and all their participants Online Policies and procedures Online training (as a result of COVID-19) Online Guidelines Online Best practices Online Templates Online Videos

Duty of care to children (under 18 years of age). Risk assessment. Recruitment of a Designated Welfare Officer (DWO). DBS check where applicable. Review and compliance of BBF safeguarding policies and procedures. Reporting concerns. Continual improvement of the above, and corrective actionsf or any gaps. Clear communications with your clubs stakeholders

Goals and milestones What are the major goals your software is trying to achieve? What are the major milestones or checkpoints needed to complete this safeguarding plan?

- Club registers online to become an affliated member to the BBF - Risk assessment. - Each individual of the club registers (includes players, coaches, officials, mangers, volunteers, etc). - Review of the BBF safeguarding polices and procedures. - Recruitment of a DWO. - DBS checks (cleared). - Authorised (cleared) apppointment of DWO. - Club assignment of responsibilities.

- Implementation of safeguarding policies and procedures. - Communications to go to all involved in our club or organisation about what is required, who is responsible and information to safeguard children. - Year end review. Corrective actions as required.

Timeline Help visualize the roadmap ahead.

1st Apr il 2021

Safeguarding assigned to BSUK

Mar

BBFt akes ov er saf eguar ding

Apr

Current and proposed solutions Is ther ane existing solution in place already? How does a user interact with your proposed solution?

- Prior to the 1st April, the BBF has released this draft of safeguarding policies and procedures. - Affiliated clubs are required to review and prepare for the above implementation. - Currently, BSUK is assigned the responsibility of safeguarding. - The BBF has exchanged emails with BSUK to meet and discuss the handover of safeguarding. The mentioned is pending a reply.

- The BBF is open to collaborate with BSUK for a seamless transistion. However, we want to manage all affilated clubs expectations, there may be some inconvience. Moreover, we expect all affilated clubs to follow our guidelines as of the 1st April, 2021. - Between today and the 1st April, the release of these safeguarding policies and procedures are a part of our beta testing. - We aim for continual improvement. This document is not complete and is subject to change.


Affilated Club

BRITISH BASEBALL FEDERATION SAFEGUARDING CLUB PROCESS (but not limited to)

Reviews BBF safeguarding policies and procedures

Risk Assessment

Recruit Welfare Officer

MANDATORY: every club participant individually needs to be registered with the BBF

Authorise roles and responsibilities

Welfare Officer

DBS Cleared

Implement safeguarding policies and proecedures and risk mitigation activities

Communicate plan to club stakeholders

Monitor and detect concerns

Recordkeeping

Report to BBF, authorities or etc i.e., which ever is applicable. Keep record of report and confidentiality.

Continual review and improvement

Annual risk assessment

Cleared: Yes

Assess concerns report and action plan DBS Decision

BBF

Training

No

Review with candidate

Assistance

Communications

Compliance

Continual Improvements

Recordkeeping

Risk assessment


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BRITISHBASEBALLFEDERATION THENATIONALGOVERNINGBODYOFBASEBALL

SAFEGUARDINGCHILDRENPOLICYANDPROCEDURES w w w.br it ish baseball.or g

The electronic version of this policy is the latest revision. Any printed version of this Safeguarding Policy is uncontrolled, except when provided with a document reference and revision. This Safeguarding Policy and Procedures is the sole property of the British Baseball Federation (BBF); it must not be reproduced or edited in any way without the express consent of the BBF senior management. We may update or make changes to this policy at any time, for any reason at our sole discretion, without notice to reflect changes following government guidelines or continual best practice. Compliance with these safeguarding policies and procedures cannot confer immunity from legal obligations. Users are responsible for its correct application. The British Baseball Federation will be taking over safeguarding on the 1st of April. NOVEMBER 2016 ISSUE # 2232


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1. FOREWORD There is a clearly defined need to promote and practice safeguarding policies and procedures to provide the framework to protect children in our sport (baseball). The following documents are in full or in parts (in hard copy or online) the property of the BBF, are referenced and required to understand to carry out your safeguarding duties ultimately. This document is generally applicable to all four UK nations: England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. However, there may be differences applicable at each national level. We ask you to refer to your local nations legislation and guidelines for more clarification. All questions or concerns should be directed to the BBF, by e-mail at safeguarding@britishbaseball.org It is essential that any affiliated member of the British Baseball Federation (BBF), which is the National Governing Body (NGB) of our sport, understands the needs and widely promote the following (but not limited to): -

all children are a priority and deserve to participate in an environment which is enjoyable and safe, recognise child abuse, understand what is required of you (statutory), properly recruit Designated Welfare Officer, and keep away unsuitable persons, conduct the necessary checks (DBS), to ensure you know the importance of confidential good record keeping, perform a risk assessment of your club's or organisation, communicate clear safeguarding policies and procedures, for those involved in safeguarding, to understand their roles and responsibilities, continually improve safeguarding standards throughout the community we play our sport, escalate concerns to the Designate Welfare Officer (DWO), BBF or proper authorities, provide assistance where required when a concern is raised, and be supportive.

This document sets out the responsibilities of all clubs, teams and organisations, in the United Kingdom to safeguard and promote the welfare of children who participate (directly or indirectly) in our baseball community. The core BBF safeguarding policies and guidelines: -

are with the intention for the protection for all children under the age of 18, aim to protect all children regardless of where they participate and are free of bullying, harassment, victimisation and unlawful discrimination, promoting dignity and respect for all, apply to children, regardless of age, disability, gender, race (including colour, nationality, and ethnic or national origin), religion or belief, and sexual orientation, allegations and concerns should be reported promptly to the Designated Welfare Officer (DWO), the BBF or the authorities (when required). apply to anyone who comes into contact with children and young people through our sport.

NOTE: For young people ages 16 and 17, are legally considered allowed to have consensual sexual activities. However, the above may be regarded as a breach of trust for adults engaging in such activities. The respective baseball club or Designated Welfare Officer (DWO), reserves the right to report such activities to the appropriate authorities. 2. WE ARE ALL RESPONSIBLE All baseball clubs or organisations should adopt the BBF safeguarding policy and procedures to ensure that their duty of care towards children is covered with their statutory safeguarding responsibilities. Safeguarding involves any form of actions that raise a concern for adults' (players, coaches, managers, officials, scorekeepers, venue staff, volunteers, administrators, members of the public or other young persons) behavior. Safeguarding has a broad definition, including (but not limited to) concerns about inappropriate behaviors (i.e., grooming, sexual or physical abuse, unauthorised photography, etc). Circumstances surrounding safeguarding cover not only on the playing and practice fields but activities elsewhere (indoors, at home, the park, travel to and from events, etc). Everyone who witnesses a concern has a responsibility to report their concerns to the club's or organisations Designated Welfare Officer (DWO), the BBF directly, or the authorities.


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These policies and procedures are just one part of a broader BBF safeguarding framework that also involves activities to govern one or more risk management process instances and continual improvement. More (separately) supplement policies and procedures, can be found through our website and other links. The BBF safeguarding framework should be integrated into all levels of your organisation, culture and environment. 3. COM M ON PURPOSE We are all commonly committed to safeguarding children. Anyone working with children is required at every level to adhere to and to promote our safeguarding policies and procedures. There must be clear communications, defined responsibilities and systems and controls which must be followed to detect and prevent breaches of our safeguarding policies and procedures.

Safeguardingchildrenat everystageisasolemn responsibility,whichis entrustedtoeveryone. You areentrustedtoupholdit.

These safeguard policies and procedures are the assigned Designated Safeguarding Officer (DSO) and the club or organisation's management committee. Where local authorities laws and regulations apply, they supersede these guidelines. You should follow safeguarding guidelines to protect children who are more vulnerable than adults, protect your club or organisations reputation, your reputation (when there is a breach and you do nothing when you could have done something to prevent it). You mustn't have personal views that some forms of discipline and religious beliefs offer tolerance to safeguarding. Use the duty of care rule, i.e., refer to the statutory safeguarding guidelines, identify concerns: -

promptly decide on the appropriate action, share information (your club's Designated Welfare Officer "DWO", BBF, the authorities), record your actions and concerns.

4. SAFEGUARDING FRAM EWORK The BBF recommends understanding, developing, implementing, maintaining proportionate and timely commitments to our safeguarding policies and procedures. For example, but not limited to 4.1 Tact ical: The planning, organisation of implementing safeguarding policies and procedures; collaboratively working with others and children; monitoring performance; reporting, recruiting; working on developing a culture whereby safeguarding matters. 4.2 Assist an ce: Training; induction process (Designated Welfare Officer); senior management support, resources made available, etc. 4.3 Oper at ion al: Day to day operations, including managing people, processes, record keeping, security, protecting confidentiality, continuity, checks (DBS), etc. 4.4 En vir on m en t : The promotion and best practice of a recruitment process, reporting process, confidentiality, equality, code of conduct, whistle-blowing, anti-bullying policy, DEI policy, safeguarding awareness of children, etc. 4.5 Com m u n icat ion: Clear communications are essential in promoting sound safeguarding policies and procedures. A club or organisation should ensure they have done the relevant research on what is appropriate, how to raise a concern, responsibilities are mapped, who to contact, how to make a complaint, how to appeal decisions, recruiting policies, checks, etc.


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5. DETECT ABUSE 5.1 Abu se an d n eglect can h appen an yw h er e. Abuse can come in different forms: -

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Sexual abuse: Indecent exposure, inappropriate touching, being forced to take part in unacceptable acts (watching pornography). Emotional abuse: Making unreasonable demands of a child, continually criticising, constantly creating arguments for the sake of arguing, etc. Physical abuse: Being physically shaken, hit or slapped. Neglect: Not taking proper care of a child, not giving a child the right medicine, not paying attention to the needs of a child, etc.). Bullying: Bullying as reoccurring, intentional hurting of a child by another person or group, where it involves an imbalance of intimidation of power (verbal, sexually, physically, online, emotional, etc.) over a person.

Abuse can come from a friend, coach, adult, official, volunteer, another youth, someone in a position of trust, etc. Anyone can abuse children i.e., female or male.

Your responsibilityisto recognisethelikelihoodof abuse. It isnot your responsibilitytodiagnose abuse.

Signs of abuse vary, e.g., behavior, attitudes, appearances, signs of injuries which are inconsistent with an explanation, sexual awareness for a child of their age, behavior changes (aggressiveness). Remember, your responsibility is to raise concerns of abuse, not to conclude whether there is abuse. Consequences, of the above types of abuse are damaging to a child. For example, impacts on the development (emotional, cognitive, physical, social), safety, and ever lasting trauma scars of the child. 5.2 Developm en t A child's development centres on many factors, e.g., cognitive, physical, language, etc. Noticing a child's development may help you detect abuse. For example, it was bruising. However, consider the scenario. Playing a sport involves contact, i.e., bruising may result from getting hit by the ball or bumping into another player during practice and playing. Thus, consider your observations carefully when assessing whether there may be some form of abuse.

Safeguarding


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During development, attachment goes to the relationship link (bond) between a child or young person and their primary caregiver (parent, guardian). This bond is formed in the early years and has a long-term impact on a child's sense of self, development, growth and future relationships with others. There must be a positive bond between a child and his or her caregiver. For example, a caregiver giving constant support goes to the positive attachment. While delinking from a child (emotionally) can have adverse effects, e.g., a child may be withdrawn emotionally. Other instances can be whereby the caregiver does not care when their child is crying or needs help or another abuse sign. Minority and ethnic children may be more susceptible to abuse for several factors. For instance, there may be ethnic customs that mask abuse, but they are abuse in the UK. No ethnicity gets a pass on abuse, i.e., abuse is abuse regardless of race and culture. 6. REPORTING CONCERNS

Childrentakingpart in baseball inafunandsafe environment isuptoall of us. Weneedyour support tomakesafeguarding childrenasuccess!

When someone reports concerns to you, you must listen carefully and consider what is being said carefully. Do not rush to judgment, and try to distinguish the facts. For example, direct disclosure is when a young person informs you about an uncomfortable incident and maybe considered some abuse. It is essential to realise that the child is scared and may be hesitant to tell the whole story in the above situation. Do not discard the child's concerns. Rather be attentive and listen carefully. Remind the child you are willing to support them in any way you can, reinforcing them with care and staying calm. The child needs patience and reassurance; it is OK to report their concerns to the DWO, and BBF. Th in gs you sh ou ld r ef r ain f r om doin g t o a ch ild w h o r epor t s h is or h er con cer n s: -

be judgmental. refuse to listen. discard the child's concerns. be negative towards the child for taking up your time. make the child guilty for making you listen. being impatient.

If you do come across a report of concerns, follow the process outlined by your club, the BBF or other assigned entity. You must realise you have a statutory responsibility to protect children and young people. If a concern is reported and unsure what to do next, find the appropriate person and report it to the DWO, the BBF (the NGB of the sport) or the authorities. Each organisation should be aware of what to do next if a child safeguard concern is reported. If you don't belong to an organisation and unsure who to contact, you can always contact the NSPCC helpline 0808 800 5000 for advice. Reporting guidance of what is expected full name of the child, gender, ethnic identity, concerns, Repor t in g gu idan ce of w h at is expect ed -

full name of the child, gender, ethnic identity, concerns,


Br it ish Baseball Feder at ion | Saf egu ar din g Policies an d Pr ocedu r es -

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date and time of report, where, when, witnesses, any material information (name of accuser, etc) raised by the child, any other persons who know about the child's concerns. write down what you can, if you are unsure speak directly to the DWO, the BBF or authorities. if it is a material urgent matter, promptly report it to the designated person or authorities. Do not hesitate.

IMPORTANT: Children from different nationalities, may not speak your language. Be careful not to discard there attempt to confide in you or to spot abuse. Abuse happens in all nationalities. If you have concerns about a child because you witness something e.g., neglect, you can speak to the Designated Welfare Officer (DWO). Steps to consider when reporting

Safeguardingchildrenis not aninconvenience, rather adutyof care.We oweeverychildour commitment toprotecting them.

1. Check the child's medical needs do not require immediate attention. If a criminal offense has occurred contact the police and report it. 2. Contact the lead DWO or the BBF. 3. If appropriate (you witness neglect), discuss your concerns with the child's parents or guardians. If not, or you are still concerned after speaking to the above, contact the DWO, social care worker or the NSPCC on telephone number 0800 800 5000. 4. Provide all the information you have gathered the child, your concerns and yourself. 5. Get advice from the DWO, BBF and the police (in certain circumstances), as to what are the next steps. 6. Record all of your facts and keep them secure. 7. Be prepared to provide your account of what happened to the DSO, BBF or authorities. Reporting plays a critical part in our safeguarding framework. However, the child's needs come first. Afterwards, record everything materially you recollect. Here is some guidance on recording: -

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-

Keep to the facts, remove opinions and be accurate and clear. Your recording is important for a good follow-up by the respective DWO or authorities. So make it a priority to record and secure your facts. Record promptly when possible. If you have taken any decisions or actions, ensure you record them. You may have to share your records, however, it is on a need to know basis. Record on a blank sheet of paper of the organisations template, online template, or plain paper. If you write the facts, do so legibly. Always record, your full name, date, where, what (date and time of concern, time of referral) when, who is involved (child, accuser, witness, etc), and what are the facts. Sign your record.


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8. Wh o does t h ese saf egu ar din g policies an d pr ocedu r es apply These policies and procedures apply to anyone in contact with children or on behalf of your BBF club or organisation. The BBF expects everyone's co-operation and vigilance in promoting these safeguarding policies and procedures. Everyone in your club or organisation is accountable for safeguarding children. Any breach of your duty of care may impact your insurance coverage, and the BBF reserve the right to revoke your affiliated status at any time. The Designation Welfare Officer is the lead person in your club or organisation responsible and the critical point of contact for safeguarding framework and raising concerns. 9. Respon sibilit ies (bu t n ot lim it ed t o) BBF Affiliated club or organisation: -

Your responsibilityisto recognisethelikelihoodof abuse. It isnot your responsibilitytodiagnose abuse.

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Review and implement BBF Safeguarding policies and procedures. Recruit properly a Designated Welfare Officer (DWO). Assign the key contact responsibilities to the DWO. Monitor the safeguarding policies and procedures are being implemented. Safeguarding risk assessment. Continual improvement. Clear communications are going through its clubs participants. Priortise any breach of safeguarding to the senior management of the club. Assign other responsibilities where applicable. Information sharing, report concerns or gaps in your risk assessment to the BBF.

Designated Welfare Officer (DWO): -

take part in training, co-ordinate a DBS check with the BBF for him or her, recording concerns, raising concerns to the BBF, or authorities, secure and confidential record keeping, DBS checks are co-ordinated with the BBF, monitor policies and procedures, continually looking to improve the process of safeguarding in the club, updating your clubs and BBF records about safeguarding, communicating their details to all of those involved, make him or herself available to receive questions or concerns about safeguarding, collaborate and work in an open manner with the BBF. Whistleblowing or raising complaints to the club or BBF. Information sharing with the BBF or clubs management.

All coaches, managers, officials, or other volunteers assigned to work with children: -

review and follow the safeguarding policies and procedures. DBS check where necessary, training where applicable, report concerns to the DWO, promote safeguarding as a priority, raise any safeguarding concerns to the DWO, keep up to date with DBS and training. Whistleblowing or raising complaints to the club or BBF.


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10. Fr am ew or k t o m it igat e you r saf egu ar din g r isk s The club or organisation's supervisory team should develop a risk management policy designed to oversee safeguarding policies and procedures. Risk management is essential and should be a part of the clubs' systems and controls. The aim is to integrate the BBF safeguarding policies and procedures to mitigate the risks to children. Begin by consulting with your clubs' stakeholders, recognise constraints, realise your statutory responsibilities, identify risks and gaps, commit resources to mitigate risks and gaps, document your risk mitigation and assessments, record your risk findings and work openly and transparently with the BBF to mitigate your risks. Assign key responsibilities to those who will implement, monitor, and continually improve the club's safeguarding policies and procedures. Your risk management best practices require priority and agreed upon at the senior level of the club. Any good risk management plan requires clear communication with those involved in your club. A sound risk management system protects those in charge of your club from failing their duty of care for safeguarding and helps protect children.

TheBritishBaseball Federationwill beyour mainpoint of contact for questions,training, reportingyour concerns, DBSchecks, record-keepingand communications.

Exempt affiliated clubs or organisations: -

Any baseball club or organisation which does not have registered children involved in their club (under the ages of 18). Which their governing documents exclude youths. However, DBS checks may still be required for managers, coaches, or other supervisors.

We are committed to continual improvement for safeguarding. Please expect continual updates throughout your affiliation with the BBF. We are here to assist you, and if you have any questions, email safeguarding@britishbaseball.org BRITISH BASEBALL FEDERATION


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SAFEGUARDING(VULNERABLE) ADULT'S POLICY This policy aims to make sure that all British Baseball Federation (BBF) affiliated clubs, coaches, participants, and volunteers are aware of the laws, policy, and procedures for safeguarding vulnerable adults and that they know what to do or who to contact if they have a concern about an adult's safety in baseball. Adult protection can be a difficult task, and although there are many parallels with child protection, there are also some significant differences. As a result, the BBF has established its own Safeguarding Adults Policy. Despite the challenges, which will be discussed further in the regulation, the underlying safeguarding values and duty of care for adults and children remain largely the same. St at em en t Regardless of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil union, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation, the BBF is committed to ensuring that anyone participating in baseball is protected and kept safe from violence or neglect whilst they are with coaches, volunteers, and staff. Adults, like children, have the right to a life free of violence and neglect. All affiliated members, staff, volunteers, coaches, representatives, and competitors of the BBF are responsible for adhering to and endorsing this policy and its guidelines and procedures.All clubs?representatives should be aware of their duty of care and how it applies to their role in providing activities and being responsible for others, and working within an acceptable code of ethics. The BBF is dedicated to ensuring that any question posed about anyone involved in baseball is taken seriously, replied to quickly, and followed up on compliance with the BBF policies and procedures. Protection and keeping people safe in a sport like baseball is all about risk management and minimising risks at all levels of involvement. Although we all have a duty to protect others, we have a higher degree of responsibility in organised action. As a result, we should be mindful that the key risks are linked to the standard of control exercised by those in charge. Coaches, umpires, officials, and administrators should all take "reasonable" precautions to protect those directly participating in activities, as they can be held accountable for those in their care at any time:in cars, during travel to and from the activity, during competitions, team training events, tournaments, for example. Everyone has a duty of care, e.g., "it is an individual or club's responsibility to take all appropriate measures to ensure the protection of any person participating in any baseball activity directly or indirectly for which that individual or organisation is responsible." This document's content contains detailed details about safeguarding adults so that everyone can understand their duty of care in these matters; risk evaluates their roles and helps and advises those at risk. Adults' have the right to live in peace, free of abuse and neglect, must be protected by people and organisations working together to reduce the risk of abuse and neglect and to prevent it from occurring. We all have a duty of care to ensure that people's well-being is promoted by considering their perspectives, wishes, emotions, and values. (Commission on Healthcare Quality, 2015) It refers to the need to protect those in vulnerable positions that may be at risk of violence or neglect due to another person's behaviour or inaction (s). For the protection of adults, there is already a legislative system in place. The Care Act 2014, which went into force in April 2015, establishes a structure for all those responsible for the protection of adults. Any Local Authority is mandated by the Act to create a Safeguarding Adults Board (SAB) and to make inquiries, or allow anyone to make inquiries on their behalf, about any adult in their area who they feel is, or is at risk of being, abused or neglected, to evaluate their care and support needs and decide whether further action is appropriate. Where additional intervention is deemed necessary, it will be person-led and outcome-focused, taking into account the individual's opinions, desires, emotions, and values, and assisting them in maintaining their lives' autonomy and making informed decisions (making Safeguarding Personal).


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SAFEGUARDING(VULNERABLE) ADULT'S POLICY(CONTINUED)

Safeguarding where it applies The term 'Adults at Risk' has become commonly recognised as a substitute for the term 'Vulnerable Adults,' and it is described in The Care Act 2014, as detailed below. Safeguarding roles extend to an adult who: has care and support needs (whether or not the local authority is addressing either of those needs) and is experiencing, or at risk of, violence or neglect; and is unable to defend themselves from either the risk of or the experience of abuse or neglect as a result of those care and support needs. For this policy's purposes, the British Baseball Federation will apply to 'Safeguarding Adults' since the concept of an Adult at Risk could include any adult depending on their circumstances at the time. Six main values govern all adult safeguarding work, according to the Care Act: -

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Em pow er m en t : People are respected and encouraged to make their own choices and agree based on their own knowledge. Pr even t ion: Preventing damage is preferable to reacting after it has occurred. Pr opor t ion alit y: Refers to the least intrusive solution that is suitable for the risk. Pr ot ect ion :Aid and representation for those who are most in need. Par t n er sh ip: Local solutions are offered through services that partner with their communities. Communities must play a role in preventing, identifying, and disclosing child abuse and neglect. Accou n t abilit y: Accountability and clarity in the delivery of safeguarding.

The British Baseball Federation recognises that some people are at a higher risk of violence or neglect than others, making them potentially more vulnerable. This may be due to a range of causes, including health or social care needs, as well as unique circumstances at a given time. These factors can occur at any time and can be transient, temporary, or permanent, depending on the individual's circumstances and the amount of knowledge and support available. Some individuals would prey on others they believe are more vulnerable than others in order to bully or exploit them. If you suspect someone is at greater risk or is in a position that could raise their vulnerability, you should be extra careful.

Adu lt s ar e h u m iliat ed an d ign or ed by w h o? Abuse or neglect may be perpetrated by anyone, including: spouses/partners or other family members; neighbours or local residents; friends or acquaintances; teammates, coaches, people who intentionally manipulate adults they view as vulnerable; volunteers or strangers. The perpetrator is often familiar to the adult and may hold a position of confidence and influence. Respon din g t o abu se or n eglect If an adult discloses that they are being abused or if information is received that causes alarm, the person receiving the information should:


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SAFEGUARDING(VULNERABLE) ADULT'S POLICY(CONTINUED) -

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Take it seriously and listen carefully to what is said, allowing the adult to proceed at their own pace. Explain that the information will most certainly have to be shared with others; do not pledge to keep the information private. Keep your questions to a bare minimum; just ask questions if you need to describe or explain what the person is saying. Appease the person's fears by assuring them that they did the right thing by disclosing the details. Inquire about what they want to happen next. Explain what you want to do next and ask if they are okay with you sharing the details so that you can assist them. As soon as possible, write down what the adult said in his or her own terms (see Record Keeping).

Do not: Ignore the issue. -

Allowing panic or distaste to show is not a good idea. Inquire for more detail than what is given. Make promises you won't be able to keep. Investigate the situation. Create disparaging statements about the suspected attacker.

DIFFERENCES IN REPORTING ADULTS-RELATED Issues Where there is a suspicion that a child has been harmed, it is a duty of care to report the suspicion and follow up on it without obtaining the child's or guardian's permission. The following key points must be considered when reporting a complaint about an adult: -

Before reporting any complaints, the adult's permission must be received (except for the exceptions listed below). It is important to respect an adult's decision. Until proven otherwise, assume an adult has capacity. The adult must be included in any discussion and decision-making process about their welfare (if they have capacity) and be given the opportunity to make their own choices, whether or not you think they are wise- in the end, an adult should choose not to act at all to protect themselves.

Wh en t h e f ollow in g con dit ion s apply, t h e per son's decision is over r idden : 1. An adult is determined to be incapable of making their own choices. 2. Where there is an overarching public obligation to interfere due to the possibility of harm to others. 3. Where failing to act would expose the individual to further danger. If an adult refuse to report an issue and none of the above applies, clarify why it may be in their (and others') best interests if the matter is referred. Ascertain that they are aware of all possible choices and that they are willing to make an informed decision.


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SAFEGUARDING(VULNERABLE) ADULT'S POLICY(CONTINUED)

2005 MENTAL CAPACITY ACT It is not for you to decide whether an adult lacks ability; however, understanding the concept of capacity and adhering to the Act's principles is helpful. Definition Unless it can be shown otherwise, the starting presumption must always be that an individual has the capacity to decide. The word "lacks power " refers to the inability of an individual to make a specific decision or take a specific action for themselves at a specific time, even though they are capable of making other decisions. For example, they may be able to make minor decisions about daily matters such as what to wear to a sporting event or what constitutes a balanced sports diet, but they may lack the capacity to make more nuanced financial decisions. It is possible that a person who loses capacity to decide at one time due to illness or an accident would be able to do so at a later time. The key principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 are: -

A person must be presumed to have capacity until it is proved otherwise. An individual is not to be regarded as unable to decide until all practicable steps to assist him or her have been taken without success. A person is not to be treated as unable to decide simply because he or she takes a ?unwise' decision.

REPORTING A CONCERN If the adult is in imminent danger, contact the police or the Local Safeguarding Adults Board as soon as possible. Contact the clubs Safeguarding Officer and/or BBF Safeguarding Officer with the specifics of the issue if permission is given for you to refer the information obtained. If you do not obtain permission but also have questions, contact yourSafeguarding Welfare Officer,the BBF, or the NSPCC who will be able to inform you about what steps to take. Whenever practicable, you can justify and include the adult in your plans and why you are doing them.

RECORD KEEPING (r ef er t o ou r policy) Keep a record of what you've been told/what your concerns are if you've been made aware of/or have a complaint, in as much detail as possible, in case it's needed in the future. It can also be used to chart a series of events that may indicate a pattern of violence over time. You can refer to our record keeping policy for more insights. In brief, -

If you are being told about a question by someone else, clarify that you are taking notes so that you can be as precise as possible in your recording; Try to recall what the person said, using their own words and phrases where possible. Factual facts and expressions of opinion should be explicitly divided in your written report;


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SAFEGUARDING(VULNERABLE) ADULT'S POLICY(CONTINUED)

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sign, date, and time your report (along with who you gave the information to and when/details of your concern). Make sure you keep a copy of the document for yourself. Be mindful that your report may be requested later as part of a legal proceeding, disciplinary process, or litigation claim; In all recording, the provisions of current data protection legislation must be considered.

BEST PRACTICE FOR BASEBALL CLUB AND ORGANISATIONS Having high standards of conduct in your club or association, as well as simple, noticeable rules and procedures for both children and adults, is likely to inspire more people to enter and stay in the sport, as well as discourage those with poor intentions. We suggest that you review your existing policies and procedures once a year to ensure that they are updated and represent current legislation and best practices. Disclosu r es In the case of dealing with adults, a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) review is only needed when very particular types of operation are being carried out (as detailed in DBS Regulated Activity- Adults Workforce). While it is extremely unlikely that a volunteer or staff member of a baseball club or centre will participate in some sort of Supervised Activity with an adult, we suggest that you double-check.


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GOODSAFEGUARDINGPRACTICEGUIDELINES -

Refrain from situations you are required to be alone with a child. Ask parents to take the responsibility for their children if they have to be accompanied to the bathrooms or changing room. When there are mixed gender teams (u18) they should always have an adult chaperon. Discourage games for children which are physical rough or inappropriate (language, gestures, etc). Do not impose excessive demands on a child e.g., training, which puts unnecessary pressure on a child. Do not allow anyone to photograph or record a child without the express consent of the DWO, parent or guardian. Follow guidelines. If you need to physically touch a child during an activity, ask for guidance and ensure it is necessary. Explain the need to do the above, e.g., as to why and involve the child and parent or caregiver. Avoid any adult to get involved with the club, team or organisation to work with children, unless he or she has been screened. Ensure recruiting best practices are followed for the Designated Welfare Officer (DWO) or others. Keep calm, listen carefully, record everything when a concern is reported. Report concerns to the DWO or BBF if required. If you hurt a child in the course of a coaching activity or other report the incident to aother supervisor or coach. If you are unsure what to do, contact the DWO. You can detect abuse, but you do not have to diagnose abuse. You have a duty of care for safeguarding children and vulnerable persons. There are no excuses. Have clear club responsibilities for anyone involved with children. Conduct regular checks of the BBF safeguarding policies and procedures are being followed. Ask for feedback and take corrective actions. For any event you should nominate a responsible person for safeguarding e.g., DWO or support. Screen persons to be your DWO. Training for your DWO is essential. Contact the BBF. Confidentiality is important for reports of abuse, and record-keeping. Good communications to everyone involved about safeguarding mitigates the risk of anyone not knowing what is safeguarding and their responsibilities. Everyone has a duty of care towards safeguarding. Learn how to detect and what is abuse. Do not visit or accompany a child alone or unsupervised. Do not pressure a child (verbally) whereby you upset him or her. Organise risk assessments and follow through on mitigating any gaps. Strangers visiting your club or team, are not allowed to involve themselves with children (which includes taking photography) without express consent from management or the DWO. Keep good records of training, DBS checks, responsibilities, etc. If in doubt, to report, ask the DWO, the BBF or the NSPCC. Keep things fun and safe for children, its all our responsibilities. When taking a report of concerns, record, full name (of child, bully or other directly involved persons, when, what, where, etc.) Record your name taking the report. Follow BBF guidelines. If there is a material case of abuse which requires medical attention, call the emergencies services first and the police. Afterwards, the DWO and BBF. When bullying takes place, contact the the DWO or the parents, and explain your concerns. Advice everyone of the action plans to mitigate bullying and be supportive to the victim. Reassure any child raising a concern, you are there to listen and support them. When in doubt ask the DWO or the BBF. Safeguarding starts with you! Take notice, and take action to develop a culture in your club or team of safeguarding children and vulnerable persons. Practice good guidance with emailing or texting which children are involved e.g., bulk emails are better.


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CODEOFCONDUCT Effective 1st April 2021 FOR PARTICIPANTS -

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Please st ick t o t h e r u les an d play by t h em . Respect ever y on e of t h e par t icipan t s. You h ave a r espon sibilit y t o pr ot ect ch ildr en an d vu ln er able people. you sh ou ld r epor t pr om plt y an y con cer n s abou t ch ildr en an d vu ln er able per son s t o t h e design at ed saf egu ar din g of f icer , t h e BBF, or t h e au t h or it ies (w h er e applicable). Wor k w it h you r t eam m at es, coach es, an d u m pir es t o ach ieve you r goals. Keep in m in d t h at you ar e par t icipat in g in or der t o h ave f u n w it h t h e gam e. Do n ot ju dge ot h er s based on t h eir abilit ies, er r or s, or losses. Accept ever yon e, r egar dless of t h eir age, disabilit y, gen der r eassign m en t , m ar r iage an d civil par t n er sh ip, pr egn an cy an d m at er n it y, r ace (in clu din g colou r , et h n icit y, an d r acial or n at ion al or igin ), r eligion or belief , sex, or sexu al or ien t at ion . Avoid u sin g abu sive lan gu age, bu llyin g, cyber bu llyin g, or excessive ph ysical con t act in an y w ay. Alw ays pr act ice aw ar en ess of all sit u at ion s an d f ollow all saf et y pr ecau t ion s. En su r e t h at t h e gam e is played f air ly. You m u st com m u n icat e t o t h e BBF t r an spar en t ly an d co-oper at ively. You r con du ct can n ot be disgr acef u l, pr eju dicial t o t h e in t er est s of t h e BBF or t h e gam e of baseball. Don't disgr ace t h e r epu t at ion s of ot h er s, you r clu b, t h e Gr eat Br it ain Baseball Nat ion al Team Pr ogr am m e, t h e BBF (it s boar d m em ber s), or baseball it self . En cou r age a posit ive en vir on m en t in w h ich com pet en ce, t eam w or k , an d saf et y can be developed. Reject t h e u se of per f or m an ce-en h an cin g dr u gs (An t i-Dopin g) an d illicit dr u gs. Cr eat e a sen se of social cooper at ion an d en gagem en t based on h igh st an dar ds an d valu es. Pr ovide pr ecise an d t im ely in f or m at ion t o leagu e, even t , clu b, an d BBF or gan iser s.

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Wh er ever t h ey oper at e, t h ey con du ct BBF bu sin ess h on est ly an d et h ically. M ain t ain a r epu t at ion f or f air n ess, r espect , r espon sibilit y, in t egr it y, t r u st , an d sou n d bu sin ess ju dgem en t by con t in u ally im pr ovin g t h e qu alit y of ou r m em ber s' exper ien ces, or gan ised even t s, an d oper at ion s. Th ey m u st exer cise du e cau t ion , con sider at ion , an d diligen ce in t h eir act ion s. Th ey m u st t ake appr opr iat e st eps t o en su r e t h at pr opr iet ar y, con f iden t ial, or BBF-sen sit ive in f or m at ion is st r ict ly pr ot ect ed an d is con f iden t ial w h en t h ey com e in t o con t act w it h it or h ave it in t h eir possession . Repor t all in f or m at ion accu r at ely an d h on est ly. To en su r e t h at t h e BBF's in t er est s, asset s, st r at egic goals, policies an d pr ocedu r es, an d con st it u t ion ar e alw ays pu t f ir st an d pr ot ect ed. Oppose an d pr even t discr im in at ion based on age, disabilit y, gen der r eassign m en t , m ar r iage an d civil par t n er sh ip, pr egn an cy an d m at er n it y, r ace (in clu din g colou r , n at ion alit y, an d r acial or n at ion al or igin ), r eligion or belief , sex an d sexu al or ien t at ion . Th ey r equ ir e BBF su pplier s an d agen t s, t h eir em ployees, volu n t eer s, sen ior m an agem en t an d su b-su pplier s t o oper at e in accor dan ce w it h t h e pr in ciples an d et h ical st an dar ds of good gover n an ce (t r an spar en cy, f air n ess, accou n t abilit y, an d r espon sibilit y). En cou r age DEI (Diver sit y, Equ it y, an d In clu sion ) t h r ou gh ou t t h e Feder at ion . Cr eat e an en vir on m en t f r ee of bu llyin g, h ar assm en t , an d illegal discr im in at ion , w h er e ever yon e is t r eat ed w it h dign it y an d r espect . In all of t h eir dealin gs, act w it h r espect an d r espon sibilit y t ow ar d t h ose in volved in ou r spor t . Accept f u ll accou n t abilit y f or you r act ion s.


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SAFEGUARDINGCOUNTERMEASUREMATRIX

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RISKASSESSMENTINSIGHTS A risk assessment is conducting several trials on the vulnerabilities of your organisation elements to ensure they are safe. It would help if you aimed to analyse the threats posed to elements that can harm human capital, assets, IT, reputation, confidentiality, the integrity, soundness of your systems and controls and organisation. Vulnerabilities are the gaps that allow the threat to occur.

When conducting a risk assessment, it is good practice to define the element, assess the likelihood (measurable) of the risk occurring, what is the impact on your assets (persons and things), calculate the risks score of the particular risk on an element. For example, Risk = Lik elih ood x Im pact St eps f or a r isk assessm en t : 1.Create a scope statement e.g., a short brief description as to what is the common purpose of your project, how you will communicate to your stakeholders the plan to mitigate the identifiable risks and assigning roles and responsibilities to key persons, and specific activities. 2.Analyse (search online, speak to others, review policies and procedures, etc) the different scenarios. 3.Prioritise a list of material risks for your risk assessment. 4.Determine whether any mandatory requirements (safeguarding of children) are identified and being successfully complied. 5.Detect and prevent. 6.Test each prioritised element to check for gaps 7.Take the necessary actions to mitigate any risks identified. 8.Monitor for gaps and new risks. 9.Update your risks assessment activities periodically. 10.Report and communicate to those key persons.


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SAFEGUARDINGRISKMATRIXTEMPLATE

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RECRUITINGDESIGNATEDWELFAREOFFICERINSIGHTS(clickbelow)

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RECRUITMENT: DESIGNATEDWELFAREOFFICERDESCRIPTION| NAMEOFYOURCLUBHEREGUIDELINES BRIEF DESCRIPTION Designated Welfare Officer (DWO) position consists of being the primary responsible person for providing administrative safeguarding policies and procedures to a select club or organisation to ensure effective and efficient child safeguarding. The person (he or she) will work in conjunction with the British Baseball Federation (NGB of the sport of baseball) to provide advice and implement safeguarding guidance. The position is unpaid (volunteer) and will require a background check to ensure the candidate is suitable for the post. Task s -

Understand, monitor, implement and take corrective actions when necessary for safeguarding policies and procedures. Be known to the club?s participants as the key contact for all issues relating to all safeguarding queries or concerns. To provide safeguarding advice to others in the club or organisation. To create and disseminate safeguarding documents, templates and best practices examples to the club?s participants. To work with the BBF to ensure a consistent and cohesive approach to safeguarding is represented throughout the club. To design, deliver and procure training programmes as required to both internal and external stakeholders. To promptly make reports to the managing clubs board or the BBF to ensure regular updates can be provided about safeguarding issues or reviews. To maintain and develop knowledge and skills relevant for the position of Designate Welfare Officer through regular training and development. Be the point of contact for all safeguarding concerns to be raised to you. Keep clear and defined records of concerns or material safeguarding actions. To raise concerns to the BBF or the authorities of any concerns raised. To attend any safeguarding training or meetings required. Take and background checks when required (DBS). Keep good records and practice good practices (security and confidentiality). Ensure any adult working with children has gone through a DBS check and training. Attend meetings to record minutes.

Qu alif icat ion s an d r equ ir em en t s DBS check. This role required an Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service Criminal Records Check (CRC). Applicants will be asked about any previous convictions, cautions, reprimands that are not ?protected?as defined by the Rehabilitation Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) Order 1975 (Amended 2013). Enough time to do the volunteer work (safeguarding). Com pet en cies (in or der of im por t an ce) -

Integrity ? Job requires being honest and ethical. No criminal activity ? DBS checked. Attention to Detail ? Volunteer job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing tasks. Dependability ? Volunteer job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable in fulfilling obligations. Cooperation ? Volunteer job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude to adults and children.


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DESIGNATEDWELFAREOFFICERDESCRIPTION| NAMEOFYOURCLUBHEREGUIDELINES(continued) -

Concern for Others ? Volunteer job requires being sensitive to children?s' needs and feelings and understanding and helpful on the job.

Lin es of com m u n icat ion -

Please Identify where the position fits within the hierarchy of your baseball club.

Wor k in g con dit ion s -

Please indicate the days and times forecasted here.


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SELF-DISCLOSUREFORMTEMPLATE These forms are an example of some of the documents that organisations can use to ensure that safeguarding is at the forefront of the staff and volunteer recruitment process. Depending on the role they will be performing, there is legislation in place across the UK that specifies what you can ask applicants about previous cautions or convictions. Any information you give on a self-disclosure form should be treated as private. Any disclosures a candidate has made on the form should be properly risk assessed, and you should ensure that you follow your legal obligations when acting on the information received. These forms are for positions that require interaction with children. Self-disclosure form for roles which are covered by the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 in England, Scotland and Wales or the Rehabilitation of Offenders (Northern Ireland) Order 1978. For completion by the person applying for the role.

Fu ll Nam e of t h e can didat e:

Pr eviou s n am e(s): Please in clu de dat e(s) each n am e w as u sed (M M / YYYY) Addr ess w it h post code: Please in clu de dat es f r om an d t o (M M / YYYY) f or each addr ess Teleph on e/ m obile n u m ber :

Dat e of bir t h :

Gen der :

Because the position you've applied for includes working with children, you'll have to go through the necessary vetting and background checks. This may include checking for criminal convictions and ensuring that you are not prohibited from working with children, depending on the nature of the position. All information you provide will be kept private and managed in accordance with applicable data protection laws and guidelines. You have the legal right to see any information that has been collected about you.


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SELF-DISCLOSUREFORMTEMPLATE(continued)

Have you ever been k n ow n t o an y Ch ildr en?s Ser vices depar t m en t or police as bein g a r isk or pot en t ial r isk t o ch ildr en ?

YES or NO?

If yes, please pr ovide f u r t h er in f or m at ion :

Have you been t h e su bject of an y in vest igat ion an d/ or san ct ion by an y or gan isat ion or body du e t o con cer n s abou t you r beh aviou r t ow ar ds ch ildr en ?

YES or NO?

If yes, please pr ovide f u r t h er in f or m at ion an d in clu de det ails of t h e ou t com e: Have you ever been t h e su bject of disciplin ar y san ct ion s or been asked t o leave em ploym en t or volu n t ar y act ivit y du e t o in appr opr iat e beh aviou r t ow ar ds ch ildr en ?

YES or NO?

If yes, please pr ovide f u r t h er in f or m at ion :

Do you h ave an y u n spen t con vict ion s in t h e UK or over seas?

YES or NO?

If yes, please pr ovide f u r t h er in f or m at ion :

In accor dan ce w it h t h e or gan isat ion?s pr ocedu r es if r equ ir ed I agr ee t o pr ovide a valid cr im in al r ecor d cer t if icat e an d con sen t t o t h e or gan isat ion clar if yin g an y in f or m at ion pr ovided on t h e disclosu r e w it h t h e agen cies pr ovidin g it .

YES or NO?

I agr ee t o in f or m t h e or gan isat ion w it h in 24 h ou r s if I am su bsequ en t ly in vest igat ed by an y agen cy or or gan isat ion in r elat ion t o con cer n s abou t m y beh aviou r t ow ar ds ch ildr en or you n g people.

YES or NO?

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SELF-DISCLOSUREFORMTEMPLATE(continued)

I u n der st an d t h at t h e in f or m at ion con t ain ed on t h is f or m , t h e r esu lt s of t h e cr im in al r ecor d ch eck an d in f or m at ion su pplied by t h ir d par t ies m ay be su pplied by t h e or gan isat ion t o ot h er per son s or or gan isat ion s in cir cu m st an ces w h er e t h is is con sider ed n ecessar y t o saf egu ar d ch ildr en .

YES or NO?

Do you h ave an y u n spen t con vict ion s or con dit ion al cau t ion s? Do you h ave an y spen t adu lt cau t ion s (sim ple or con dit ion al) or con vict ion s t h at ar e n ot ?pr ot ect ed?as def in ed by eit h er : t h e Reh abilit at ion of Of f en der s Act 1974 (Except ion s) Or der 1975 as am en ded in En glan d, Scot lan d an d Wales - t h e Reh abilit at ion of Of f en der s Act 1974 (Except ion s) Or der 1975 as am en ded in En glan d, Scot lan d an d Wales

YES or NO?

Sign at u r e of can didat e:

Pr in t f u ll n am e:

Dat e:

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DESIGNATEDWELFAREOFFICER(DWO) BACKGROUNDCHECKFLOWCHART

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DEFINITIONS -

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Af f iliat ed BBF clu b: Any club which is a member of the BBF and adheres to their rules, policies, standards, procedures and guidelines. At t ach m en t (developm en t ): Attachment refers to a relationship bond between a child or young person and their primary caregiver. This bond is formed in the early years and has a long-term impact on a child's sense of self, development, growth and future relationships with others. BBF: British Baseball Federation, the National Governing Body of Baseball. Bu llyin g an d cyber bu llyin g: Bullying is when individuals or

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DEFINITIONS

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Ch ild: A child or young person under 18 years of age. However, in Scotland a child is legally an adult when he or she turns 16 years of age. Further, in Scotland a child means someone who has not attained the age of sixteen years; a child over the age of sixteen years who has not attained the age of eighteen years and in respect of whom a supervision requirement is in force; or a child whose case has been referred to a children's hearing by virtue of section 33 of this Act (Effect of orders etc.made in others parts of the United Kingdom). Ch ild abu se: When a person harms a child i.e., physically, emotionally, sexually, neglects, etc. Ch ild developm en t : It the measurement of a child's progression through his or her development years considering the elements of language, thinking, social interaction, physical mobility. Ch ild pr ot ect ion : Interlinked to safeguarding, and means to take action to protect certain children who are being abused or may be at risk to being abused. Ch ild sexu al exploit at ion : Exploiting a child into coerced or groomed exploitative situations or connections. DBS (pr eviou sly k n ow n as CRB) Ch eck : This is a check of your criminal record which will show details of all spent and unspent convictions, cautions, reprimands and final warnings held on central police records (apart from protected convictions and cautions). GB Baseball: Great Britain Baseball National Teams. Neglect : Discarding a child's' physical and psychological needs. Ph ysical abu se: Intentionally hurt a child i.e., beating, kicking, burning, shaking, punching, burning. Saf egu ar din g: Protecting children from harm, damage to their health and development, ensuring children can grow up safely, be proactive in ensuring the framework exists to protect children.


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DEFINITIONS -

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Sexu al abu se (con t act or n on -con t act ): Soliciting, enticing and forcing a child to take part in sexual activities. The above can happen visibility (on the field) or on the internet). Un af f iliat ed clu b: Any club which is not a member of the BBF. Welf ar e Of f icer : A person who is delegated by an organisation to be the first point of contact for safeguarding. He or she is responsible for all safeguarding tasks and responsibilities. Designated Welfare Officer (DWO).

DEFINITIONS OF APPLICABLE SAFEGUARDING LEGISLATION

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Th e Ch ildr en's Act (1989): The Children Act 1989 is a United Kingdom Act of Parliament which allocates duties to local authorities, courts, parents, and other agencies in the United Kingdom, to ensure children are safeguarded and their welfare is promoted. Applicable in England. Th e Ch ildr en's Act (2004): The Children Act 2004 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The Act amended the Children Act 1989, largely in consequence of the Victoria Climbié inquiry. Applicable in England. Th e Ch ildr en an d Social Wor k Act 2017: Modifies both of the above Acts, e.g., by initiating the Child Safeguarding Practice Review Panel to oversee any report of breaches for safeguarding children on a national level. Applicable in England. Ch ildr en (Nor t h er n Ir elan d) Or der 1995: The Children (for Northern Ireland) Order 1995 is the principal statute governing the care, upbringing and protection of children in Northern Ireland. It affects all those who work and care for children, whether parents, paid carers or volunteers. Ch ildr en (Scot lan d) Act 1995: The Children (Scotland) Act 1995 marks a significant stage in the development of legislation on the care of children in Scotland. ... It sets out the duties and powers available to public authorities to support children and their families and to intervene when the child's welfare requires it. Pr ot ect ion of Ch ildr en (Scot lan d) Act 2003: The Protection of Children(Scotland) Act 2003 was then introduced, aiming to improve the safeguards for children by preventing unsuitable people from working with them. The Act allowed the Scottish Ministers to set up the Disqualified From Working With Children List, which came into operation on 10 January 2005. Th e You n g People (Scot lan d) Act : The Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014 is an Act of the Scottish Parliament passed on 19 February 2014 and received royal assent on 27 March 2014. Tue legislation is part of the Scottish Government's Getting it right for every child policy implementation. Ch ildr en Act 1989 (Wales): The Ch ildr en Act 1989 is the principal piece of legislat ion which makes provision about the safeguarding and promotion of the welfare of ch ildr en . Th e Social Ser vices an d Well-bein g (Wales) Act 2014: Social Ser vices an d Well-bein g (Wales) Act 2014. The Social Services and Well- being (Wales) Act came into force on 6 April 2016


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PHOTOGRAPHYANDFILMINGPOLICY The British Baseball Federation (BBF) gives recommendations in the following photography and filming policy applicable to anyone who works, volunteers, or is in proximity to children. This publication does not purport to include all the necessary provisions of the guidelines and laws applicable. Users are responsible for its correct application. Children are defined as anyone under the age of 18 years of age. Compliance with this policy does not confer you, your club or organisation is immune from legal obligations. This policy has been drawn up on the basis of legislation, policy and guidance that seeks to protect children. Summaries of key legislation and guidance is available on: -

online abuse lear n in g.n spcc.or g.u k / ch ild-abu se-an d-n eglect / on lin e-abu se child protection lear n in g.n spcc.or g.u k / ch ild-pr ot ect ion -syst em

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Everyone has a duty of care to protect children at all times. Adults should take notice, there are dividing lines when in proximity to children and they must be respected at all times. Adults should not exchange personal information with children, to follow you or vice versa on social media. Treat children with respect. Treat all children equally and accept them without prejudice. Report any concerns to the Designated Welfare Officer (DWO) of the club or organisation. Alternatively, the BBF safeguarding@britishbaseball.org Do not come in contact with children unless it is necessary. Overall the aim is to protect children who take part in baseball activities (directly or indirectly). Data protection rights apply when making use of images, recordings, video recording. Please view the BBFprivacy policy. Parental and/or guardian consent is required to take any images, videos or recordings of children. Clubs or organisations should take a risk assessment and take corrective actions (if required) to protect children. When children are involved they should be accompanied by an authorised adult. Any third party (media, visitors, etc) who wants to take images of children need to follow safeguarding guidelines (including photography and images) and require express consent of the authorised representative and child?s parent/guarding of the club or organisation. Children, their parents and carers have a right to decide whether their images are taken and how these may be used, regardless of age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex or sexual orientation. Consent to take images of children is only meaningful when children, their parents and carers understand what are the intended use. Never make public personal information about individual children. That is, cloak any identifying information about children. Disclose to parents, guardians and children how images of children will be securely stored and for how long. Mitigate the risk of images being copied and used inappropriately by: Using images which do not show the child in a compromising position or whereby the child can be easily identified. Use images that positively reflect young people?s involvement in the activity. Photos taken during an activity should not to be shared on social media without express consent from children, their parents and carers. Concerns raised about taking images or recordings of children should go to the Designated Welfare Officer or the BBF. If your club uses a photographer ensure the terms (unsupervised access to children is not allowed) of taking pictures are defined and clear (refer to the terms within this document).For example, (but not limited to):


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PHOTOGRAPHYANDFILMINGPOLICY(continued) Any hired photographer should have visible ID at all times during an event.They should provide: the name and address of the person using the camera the names of children they wish to take images of (if possible) the reason for taking the images and/or what the images will be used for a signed declaration that the information provided is valid and that the images will only be used for the reasons given. The club does not permit staff and volunteers to using any personal equipment to take photos and recordings of children without consent. Only cameras or devices belonging to the club should be used. Organisations that store and use photographs to identify children and adults for official purposes, such as identity cards, should ensure they are complying with the legal requirements for handling personal information. -

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BRITISHBASEBALLFEDERATIONSAFEGUARDINGKEYRECORDKEEPINGCHECKLIST Good record keeping is essential to efficient baseball club safeguarding operations. It is also critical for all legal related issues. Setting up a record keeping system can be time consuming. But creating and maintaining a well-organised system mitigates safeguarding risks and provides confidentiality. Every affiliated club or organisation should have clear guidelines for the storage, and destruction of safeguarding protection records. Any records relating to a child?s welfare and safety, and/or concerns about perceived risks posed by persons working with or in contact with children. Here are some ways to organize important business records.Combine one or more of these categories or break them down, depending on the nature and complexity of your business.

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The affiliated club or authorised participants are expected to keep records which contain adequate, relevant and are not excessive. Records should be sufficient, accurate and up to date. Make use of a common platform (online) to secure your records. Keep records which are only necessary. Store records in a way which they secure, can be easily accessible and identified. With respect to retention periods, the general principle is that records should be retained for as long as is relevant for the purposes for which they are made. Control storage and access. To ensure that digital and paper files are stored securely. All your records need to be clear, accurate and legible. Individual digital files should be encrypted, as can folders or entire disk volumes and USB storage devices. Before any records are destroyed, they should be reviewed as the retention periods are the minimum required and a decision should be made as to whether it is appropriate to destroy them or not. Where there has been a concern or action arising from safeguarding which is ongoing, the records should be retained until the matter is concluded. keep files containing sensitive or confidential data secure and allow access on a ?need to know?basis keep a log so you can see who has accessed the confidential files, when, and the titles of the files they have used. Assign someone who is responsible and dependable to keep and secure your records. Whether your child protection records are electronic or paper-based, they need to be kept confidential and stored securely. Electronic files should be password protected and stored on computers with protection against hackers and viruses. - The child protection file should be started as soon as you become aware of any concerns. - It?s good practice to keep child protection files separate from a child?s general records. You should mark the general record to indicate that there is a separate child protection file, which is segregated from each other. Personal information is expected to be kept confidential which includes (but not limited to) things to keep accurate record of a concern: - the date and time of the incident/disclosure - the date and time of the report - the name and role of the person to whom the concern was originally reported and their contact details.


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BRITISHBASEBALLFEDERATIONSAFEGUARDINGKEYRECORDKEEPINGCHECKLIST(continued) the name and role of the person making the report (if this is different to the above) and their contact details - the names of all parties who were involved in the incident, including any witnesses - the name, age and any other relevant information about the child who is the subject of the concern (including information about their parents or carers and any siblings) - what was said or done and by whom - any action taken to look into the matter - any further action taken (such as a referral being made) - the reasons why the organisation decided not to refer those concerns to a statutory agency (if relevant). If you need to share records (within your own organisation or externally), make sure they are kept confidential. Use passwords and encryption when sharing electronic files. If your staff and volunteers use their personal computers to make and store records, you need a clear agreement to ensure the records are being stored securely. If the person responsible for managing your child protection records leaves your organisation, make sure you appoint somebody to take over their role and arrange a proper handover. Further he or she has to confirm they have deleted or turnover all of the files over to the authorised representive of the club. If concerns have been raised about an adult?s behaviour around children, the general rule is that you should keep the records in their personnel file either until they reach the age of 65 or for 10 years ? whichever is longer (IRMS, 2016; Department for Education (DfE), 2020). This applies to volunteers and paid staff. For example: - if someone is 60 when the investigation into the allegation is concluded, keep the records until their 70th birthday - if someone is 30 when the investigation into the allegation is concluded, keep the records until they are aged 65. -

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If you have any questions, please contact the BBF at safeguarding@britishbaseball.org


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GUIDELINESFORYOUTHINVOLVEDINBASEBALLACTIVITIES Everyone should be able to enjoy taking part in baseball. However, not all activities are acceptable. All youths should consider the following guidelines as proper conduct when taking part in baseball (parents or guardians are encouraged to explain them): -

Play for fun. Do not swear or use abusive language on and off the baseball diamond. Fighting is not tolerated. Be on time; don't keep others waiting. Wear your team baseball cap, and clean team uniform to games. Wear the right shoes to practice and games. Bring the right baseball equipment (bat) to all activities. Do not leave the premises without express permission from your coach, parent or supervisor. Raise any concerns you have to the club Welfare Officer. Do not play injured. Report it to the coach. Juniors, you cannot drink alcohol, smoke, take drugs, or pass them to others to take. Do not make fun of others. Pick up your rubbish. Do not take pictures or images of others without asking their permission first. Do not allow others to take pictures of you without checking with the coach or your parent. Accept everyone for who they are. If you get hurt, report it to the coach immediately. Do not play rough or touch someone unless in a game situation or with your coach's supervision. Wear a baseball helmet when you are going to bat. Do not swing a baseball bat unless you are about to bat or are supervised. That is, others may be around, and you can hurt someone. Do not throw the baseball without checking who is around you and there is no one that can get hurt if it gets away. Take care of your equipment and others. Do not yell or be abusive to others. Go to the bathroom or changing rooms accompanied by a parent/guardian/club supervisor only. Check you are going into the right changing room. No bullying or cyber bullying will be acceptable.


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REPORTCONCERNSGUIDELINES This document provides guidelines for reporting concerns or accusations made by someone or you which you have witnessed. Each Welfare Officer or club participant working with children is responsible for reviewing the elements of these guidelines below. 1.If someone or you need medical attention, or are of material risk of harm or danger, call the police or ambulance service (dial 999 or 112), straight away. 2.If you have a concern: a.Report your concern to the Designated Welfare Officer of the club. b.Alternatively, i.Inform someone you trust. ii.Call the Childline helplines at 0800 1111 or NSPCC 0808 800 5000. iii.Contact the British Baseball Federation by e-mail:safeguarding@britishbaseball.org 3.If you (the Designated Welfare Officer) have a concern about another person, your duty is to pass your concerns in a report, to the responsible person or the BBF. See appendix ? Reporting Form Template.You must record all relevant information about the concerns and keep it as simple, factual and accurate as possible. 4.Report your concerns to the BBF by e-mail:safeguarding@britishbaseball.org 5.If case of an urgent material matter, contact the police. 6.Ensure confidentiality and do not share your concerns unless required and authorised. 7. Secure a copy of your concerns report for future review


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SAFEGUARDINGREPORTINGCONCERNSFORMEXAMPLE The British Baseball Federation (BBF) takes reports of safeguarding of children as serious matters. So that we may properly investigate your concern, you are requested to fill out this form as completely as possible. Please use additional sheets of paper where needed. After a prompt and thorough investigation into your concerns, you will be notified of the BBF intended action. Should you have any questions about the process, please set them forth at the end of this form and we?ll do our best to answer them. Thank you. Fir st n am e of t h e ch ild Last n am e of t h e ch ild Gen der Et h n ic iden t it y in k n ow n Dat e of alleged in ciden t Tim e of alleged in ciden t Con cer n s


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SAFEGUARDINGREPORTINGCONCERNSFORMEXAMPLE(continued) Wh er e t h e alleged in ciden t t ook place Wh en t h e alleged in ciden t t ook place Wit n esses det ails An y m at er ial in f or m at ion (n am e of accu ser , et c) r aised by t h e ch ild An y ot h er per son s w h o k n ow abou t t h e ch ild's con cer n s. All ot h er com m en t s

I declare that the facts set forth in this safeguarding concerns report form are true and accurate pursuant to the penalty of perjury under the laws of England. Person submitting the report signature:______________________________________________

Date: __________________________________________________________________________________


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RATIOGUIDELINESOFCHILDRENSUPERVISEDBYAUTHORISEDADULTS Rat ios: Any club or organisation which has youths involved needs to have a declared and authorised Designated Welfare Officer (DWO). The mentioned must go through the BBF. Adults below are considered individuals the club has designated as authorised chaperones. If an adult will be working with children on a periodic basis or unaccompanied we ask he or she goes through DBS vetting and etc. The following guidelines are not statutory. However, they serve the purpose to consider the ratio of children accompanied by club authorised adults supervising children. ·0 - 2 year s -one adult to three children ·2 - 3 year s -one adult to four children ·4 - 8 year s -one adult to seven children ·9 - 12 year s -one adult to nine children ·13 - 18 year s -one adult to eleven children Ch ildr en w it h addit ion al n eeds or disabilit ies If you are working with children and young people who have special needs or disabilities you should have more adults assisting. Toilet r at ios One authorised adult (preferably his or her parent or guardian) should accompany a child to the toilet. For large groups, of children use a team system, whereby one authorised supervised adult accompanies a child to the toilet (e.g., woman with a girl) and the other adult stays with the group. Fir st aid r at ios We recommend one adult is trained in first aid in the club and available for activities. Note: -

First aid insights from the NHS https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/first-aid/ First aid training:https://www.sja.org.uk/courses/

Tr avelin g r at ios w it h ch ildr en -

Children should always be accompanied by an authorised adult. Consider the size of the group, ages, behaviour and vehicle size when deciding the best ratio of children to adults when traveling. For example, do not overload the car with children as they can be a distraction to the driver. Consider the guidelines of the care (safe ratio of passenger ?s vs driver). Larger groups of children require a minimum of two adults (one driver and one overseeing the children).

For questions, e-mail safeguarding@britishbaseball.org


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ENFORCEMENTPROCESSFORMANAGINGSAFEGUARDINGALLEGATIONSAGAINST VOLUNTEERS Respon sibilit ies BBF affiliated club and Designated Welfare Officer (DWO) responsibilities: inform the BBF of a material injury, accident, children or adult abuse, death, or neglect promptly. Safeguarding allegation (against a child who is under the age of 18 years old) definitions: -Anyone who has harmed a child is going to or will put a child at material risk or harm. -Someone unauthorised is working with children in a concerning material manner. Wh er e t o r epor t allegat ion s Suppose there is a report of an allegation. In that case, the person receiving the allegation should report it to the clubs Designated Welfare Officer (DWO), the BBF Designated Welfare Senior Officer (president), NSPCC or authorities (police). Please follow the BBF Concerns Template. How t h e En f or cem en t Pr ocess w or k s: 1. Appointment of Examiner(s): The BBF appoint investigated examiner (s) of an incident and, if appropriate (optional), send or advise a Notice of Appointment of Examiners to the club, team or individual as soon as practicable. In some cases, involving both general and specific concerns, the BBF reserves the right to appoint or refer the matter to an outside party or law enforcement. That is, the BBF may trigger a police investigation of a possible criminal offence. 2. Scoping: Our [BBF] initial probe with the club, team or individual(s) are intended to provide a clear indication of why we have appointed Examiners; the scope of the review; how the process is likely to unfold and an expression of the possible timing of the critical milestones and next steps in the study. 3. Review work: The appointed Examiner(s) review the incident. The mentioned may include, for example, requests for safeguarding concerns reports, documents, images, recordings or information and interviews from witnesses or persons under review. Information may also be provided to the BBF voluntarily 4. Preliminary Findings: If appropriate (optional), the examiner (s) send a document to the club or individual summarising the case as they find it and giving a period in which the club, team or individual may provide a written response. They can apply for extra time to complete their answer. During an allegation is being investigated or any breach of safeguarding policies, procedures, or the protection of children, can lead to immediate suspension from the clubs and the BBF activities.The act of suspension does not indicate a person?s guilt, and it is a neutral act.


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ENFORCEMENTPROCESSFORMANAGINGSAFEGUARDINGALLEGATIONSAGAINST VOLUNTEERS(continued) 5. Final Enforcement Notice and Options: When the Examiner(s) have a sufficient understanding of the case to make a reasonable assessment of the appropriate sanction, a club, team, or individual will be may be informed (confidentiality will be exercised as required) if required; however, the club, team or individual will be allowed to appeal. The following definitions will be used by the Investigating Manager when recording the outcome: -

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Su bst an t iat ed: there is sufficient identifiable evidence to prove the allegation False: there is sufficient evidence to disprove the allegation M aliciou s: there is clear evidence to prove that there has been a deliberate act to deceive, and the allegation is entirely false Un f ou n ded: there is no evidence or proper basis that supports the allegation being made. It might also indicate that the person making the allegation misinterpreted the incident or was mistaken about what they saw. Alternatively, they may not have been aware of all the circumstances Un su bst an t iat ed: this is not the same as a false allegation. It means that there is insufficient evidence to prove the alleged behaviour occurred

Note: At the end of the process of managing an allegation and its conclusions, the Investigating Manager is responsible for the identification of any lessons to be learned about the procedure, the actions are taken, and the support offered. This learning should feed into policy and procedural revisions as well as the safeguarding learning and development strategy.


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ADVICEONTEXTANDEMAILMESSAGING BBF em ailin g an d t ext in g gu idelin es The following are the safeguarding risks associated with texts and emails for children and young people: -

unwanted contact with children and young people by adults with bad intentions. peers texting others or online bullying being sent offensive or otherwise inappropriate materials grooming for sexual abuse actual abuse and direct contact

Adults who are involved face the following risks: -

misinterpretation of their communications with young people possible investigation (internal or by statutory agencies) possible disciplinary action

The following guidelines have been developed to assist coaches and volunteers when using text and/or messages to communicate with young people in order to ensure that effective safeguarding measures are put in place and to minimise risk. Individual arrangements between coaches/volunteers and children offer more opportunities for misuse and abuse than bulk texting and emailing (i.e. the same message being sent to many young people). Wherever possible, clubs and organisations are urged to use a bulk messaging system. Commercial companies provide bulk text or email services, but practical arrangements may differ. In exceptional circumstances, sending an individual text or email may be warranted, subject to appropriate safeguarding considerations. For example, the coach of an athlete who is not part of a group of competitors may need to communicate information about realistic training arrangements or competition results to another coach. Gen er al In st r u ct ion s 1.When sending group messages, they must be sent as part of a bundle to a group of young people, i.e. the same standard message must be sent to all members of the group. The text/email messaging system should never be used to send messages to a single person or to groups of less than five people. 2.The content should be entirely focused on sports. The professional relationship between the coach and the athlete, as well as the coach's position of confidence, should be reflected in the messages. Text messages, cell phones, and emails must never be used for any other purpose. 3.At the bottom of all bulk messages sent, there should be a sentence that allows young people and parents to opt out of receiving future messages. 4.Any bulk or bundled text/ email messages sent to young people should also be sent to an external moderator ? preferably someone in the organisation with designated safeguarding responsibility, such as a Club Welfare Officer. The moderator 's job will be to make sure the system is being used properly and to address any issues that arise. 5.Use the blind copy (Bcc) facility when sending bulk email to keep addresses private, and include a circulation list in the email. 6.Any issues arising from the use of text/email messaging should be reported in accordance with the organization's safeguarding policies and procedures, according to the information provided to young athletes and their parents. 7.The number of people who have access to data about children and teenagers should be kept to a bare minimum, and their information should be documented by the organization's lead child protection/welfare officer. It's a good idea to keep track of the contact information that will be used to deliver messages ? ideally, a single number/address that will be used continuously.


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ADVICEONTEXTANDEMAILMESSAGING(continued) 8. If texting a single child, the decision to use text messaging should be discussed and agreed upon with the organization's appointed safeguarding/welfare officer. This will allow the organization's safeguarding expectations and requirements to be explained, as well as a commitment from the coach to follow through. 9. The young person?s mobile phone numbers and email addresses should be kept in secure or in a password-protected electronic system, with access limited to the persons. No one else should have access to your contact information. 10. Consent must be obtained before sending text/email messages to minors. Parents' permission is required for young people under the age of 16 years old. Parents of younger children should be given the option of being copied on any messages sent to their child. Although parental consent is not required for young people aged 16 and up, written consent must be obtained from these individuals, and it is still recommended that their parents be informed of the intention to send text/email messages to their children. 11. All messages sent must state clearly which organisation sent the message to the young people receiving it. 12. Bulk messages can only be used to communicate in one direction. Young people should not be allowed to respond to the system through text or email. Individual messages should be avoided, and emails should be avoided as well. Young people should be informed that if they need to text the coach (for example, to confirm attendance or advise on a travel delay), they must ensure that the content of messages is only related to the sporting activity, and that they (like the coach) must copy in either a parent or the designated moderator (e.g., the club welfare officer) to all communications. 13. The language used in the messages must never be offensive, abusive, or inappropriate. It's important to avoid over-familiarity or language that could be misinterpreted or misconstrued when sending individual texts or emails.


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DIVERSITY,EQUITY,INCLUSION(DEI) POLICY 1.SCOPE The British Baseball Federation (BBF) is committed to encouraging equality and diversity among our participants, volunteers, coaches, officials, with the aim to eliminate unlawful discrimination. The aim is for our volunteers to be truly representative of all sections of society and our member clubs?participants and for each person to feel respected and able to give their best. The BBF - in providing (not exhaustive) operating and organising its baseball services, leagues, events - is also committed against unlawful discrimination of participants playing its sport, volunteers or the public. NOTE: The BBF has no paid staff, it is an all volunteer organisation. 2.APPLICABLE This policy applies to all current volunteers of the British Baseball Federation and its affiliates, including full-time and part-time, and volunteers. 3.COM M ITM ENT FROM THE BRITISH BASEBALL FEDERATION The British Baseball Federation (BBF) is committed to encouraging equality, diversity and inclusion among our volunteers and members, and eliminating unlawful discrimination.

The aim is for our volunteers and members to be truly representative of all sections of society, and for each participant to feel respected and able to give their best. The BBF - in providing services and/or baseball events - is also committed against unlawful discrimination of the public. The policy?s purpose is to: -

provide equality, fairness and respect for all in our volunteers, whether temporary, part-time or full-time

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not unlawfully discriminate because of the Equality Act 2010 protected characteristics of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race (including colour, nationality, and ethnic or national origin), religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation

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oppose and avoid all forms of unlawful discrimination. This includes in pay and benefits, terms and conditions of volunteering, dealing with grievances and discipline, dismissal, and selection for promotion, training or other developmental opportunities.

The organisation commits to: -

Encourage equality, diversity and inclusion in the workplace as they are good practice and make business sense

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Create a working environment free of bullying, harassment, victimisation and unlawful discrimination, promoting dignity and respect for all, and where individual differences and the contributions of all staff are recognised and valued. This commitment includes training managers and all other volunteers about their rights and responsibilities under the equality, diversity and inclusion policy. Responsibilities include BBF volunteers conducting themselves to help the organisation provide equal opportunities in employment, and prevent bullying, harassment, victimisation and unlawful discrimination. All staff should understand they, as well as their employer, can be held liable for acts of bullying, harassment, victimisation and unlawful discrimination, in the course of their employment, against fellow employees, customers, suppliers and the public


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DIVERSITY,EQUITY,INCLUSION"DEI"POLICY(continued)

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Take seriously complaints of bullying, harassment, victimisation and unlawful discrimination by fellow employees, customers, suppliers, visitors, the public and any others in the course of the organisation?s work activities. Such acts will be dealt with as misconduct under the organisation?s grievance and/or disciplinary procedures, and appropriate action will be taken. Particularly serious complaints could amount to gross misconduct and lead to dismissal without notice. Further, sexual harassment may amount to both an employment rights matter and a criminal matter, such as in sexual assault allegations. In addition, harassment under the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 ? which is not limited to circumstances where harassment relates to a protected characteristic ? is a criminal offence.

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Decisions concerning BBF volunteers being based on merit (apart from in any necessary and limited exemptions and exceptions allowed under the Equality Act).

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Review volunteer practices and procedures when necessary to ensure fairness, and also update them and the policy to take account of changes in the law.

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Monitor the make-up of the volunteer workforce regarding information such as age, sex, ethnic background, etc and disability in encouraging equality, diversity and inclusion, and in meeting the aims and commitments set out in the equality, diversity and inclusion policy. Monitoring will also include assessing how the equality, diversity and inclusion policy, and any supporting action plan, are working in practice, reviewing them annually, and considering and taking action to address any issues.


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ANTI-BULLYINGPOLICY BBF An t i-bu llyin g st at em en t The goal of this policy statement is to: -

prevent bullying between children and young people who are members of our organisation or participate in our baseball activities;

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ensure that bullying is stopped as soon as possible if it does occur, and that those involved receive the support they require; and

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provide information to all staff, volunteers, children, and their families about what we do.

Affiliated members: senior managers and the board of trustees, staff, volunteers, officials, scorekeepers, employees, agency personnel, GB Baseball National Team representatives and students are all covered by this policy statement. Separate documents detail: -

our code of conduct for children, and adults; and

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our policies and practises for preventing and responding to bullying and harassment among adults who are members of our organisation.

What is the definition of bullying? Bullying is defined as a pattern of abusive behaviour that is repeated and meant to cause physical or emotional harm to another person. Our ethos Children and adolescents should never be subjected to any form of abuse; we have a responsibility to promote the welfare of all children and adolescents, to keep them safe, and to practise in a manner that protects them. Observations -

Bullying adds a lot of pain all children, regardless of age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex or sexual orientation, have the right to equal protection from all types of harm or abuse.

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Everyone has a role to play in preventing all forms of bullying (including online) and putting a stop to bullying.

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Affiliated clubs?representatives should promote holding regular discussions with staff, volunteers, children, young people, and families who use our organisation about bullying and how to prevent it in face-to-face and online interactions, as well as within and outside of our activities. The following topics will be discussed:

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group members' responsibilities to look after one another and follow the behaviour code

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practising skills such as listening to one another - acknowledging that we are all unique

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ensuring that no one is lonely - dealing with problems in a positive manner - ensuring that our anti-bullying measures are effective

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providing support and training for all staff and volunteers on dealing with all forms of bullying, including racial, sexist, homophobic, and sexual bullying

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periodically reviewing the plan developed to address any incidents of bullying to ensure that the problem has been resolved in the long run.


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ANTI-BULLYINGPOLICY(continued)

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practicing skills such as listening to one another - acknowledging that we are all unique

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ensuring that no one is lonely - dealing with problems in a positive manner - ensuring that our anti-bullying measures are effective

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providing support and training for all staff and volunteers on dealing with all forms of bullying, including racial, sexist, homophobic, and sexual bullying

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periodically reviewing the plan developed to address any incidents of bullying to ensure that the problem has been resolved in the long run.

We understand that bullying is inextricably linked to how we value and appreciate diversity. As adults you can assist by being good role models. For example, practice positive actions and conduct. You cannot expect for children to appreciate anti-bullying when you cyber-bully or bully others privately or publicly. The mentioned sends the wrong example, and it fosters bullying (any form) to be acceptable behaviour. Pause and reflect. We will encourage everyone in: -

seeking out opportunities to learn about and celebrate diversity;

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increasing diversity among our coaches, volunteers, children, and youth; and

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welcoming new members to our organisation.


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DBSGUIDANCE BBF DBS Gu idan ce Following the merger of the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA) in December 2012, the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) now issues all disclosure certificates. The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 was signed into law on May 1, 2012, and it imposes new safeguarding and vetting conditions on anyone who comes into contact with children or adults who are at risk. The aim of this guidance is to explain who is now qualified for a DBS Barred List search and/or a DBS Enhanced Disclosure. You should be aware of different forms of DBS checks: -

-

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Basic ch eck : A basic DBS check is for any purpose, including employment. The certificate will contain details of convictions and conditional cautions that are considered to be unspent under the terms of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act (ROA) 1974. An individual can apply for a basic check directly to the DBS through the DBS Baring online application route, or an employer can apply for a basic check on an individual?s behalf, through a Responsible Organisation, if they have consent. St an dar d ch eck : A standard DBS check is suitable for certain roles, such as a security guard. The certificate will contain details of both spent and unspent convictions, cautions, reprimands and warnings that are held on the Police National Computer, which are not subject to filtering. An individual cannot apply for a standard check by themselves. There must be a recruiting organisation who needs the applicant to get the check. This is then sent to DBS through a registered body. En h an ced ch eck : An enhanced DBS check is suitable for people working with children or adults in certain circumstances. The certificate will contain the same details as a standard certificate and, if the role is eligible, an employer can request that one or both of the DBS bar r ed list s are checked. The certificate may also contain non-conviction information supplied by relevant police forces, if it is deemed relevant and ought to be contained in the certificate. An individual cannot apply for an enhanced check by themselves. There must be a recruiting (BBF affiliated club) organisation who needs the applicant to get the check. This is then sent to DBS through a registered body (BBF).

Eligibilit y Eligibility for standard and enhanced checks is prescribed in legislation. Recruiters should only request a DBS check on an individual when they are legally allowed to do so ? they must be entitled by law to ask an individual to reveal their full criminal history, known as asking ?an exempted question.? An exempted question applies when the individual will be working in specific occupations, for certain licences and specified positions. These are covered by the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) Order 1975. The minimum age at which someone can be asked to apply for a criminal record check is 16 years old. Regu lat ed Act ivit y is described: -

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as ?unsupervised? interaction between children (under the age of 18) of a specific nature (teaching, training, care, supervision, advice, treatment, or transportation) in a specific location (club playing fields, training centre, etc). It happens on a regular basis, at least once a week. Intensively - for at least four days in a month. During the night (between 2am and 6am).

Note: In baseball, unsupervised activity is described as being out of sight or hearing of a supervisor, coach, etc. Ch eck list f or a DBS ch eck ? -

Are you working in unsupervised activities? If the above does happen? How much do you do it (once a week or more)? Intensively (for four days or more in a 30-day period)? Overnight (between the hours of 2 and 6 a.m.)?


Br it ish Baseball Feder at ion | DBS Gu idan ce

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DBSGUIDANCE(continued) -

If you answered "No" to all of the above, you do not need a DBS check. If you answered "Yes" to any of the above, you need a DBS check.

Note: An individual with a criminal record is not required to report any expended convictions unless the position they are applying for or currently holding is classified as an exemption under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974. Before any organisation considers asking a person to complete a DBS check application, they must first ensure that they have the legal authority to require the person to report their criminal history. These eligibility requirements have been updated as a result of the Protection of Freedoms Act of 2012. According to the DBS's guidelines, sports positions are listed as reference number 06. As a result of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) Order 1975, the following places in sport are eligible for DBS checks: Any position which otherwise involves regularly caring for, training, supervising or being solely in charge of children. There are a few club roles that are excluded from being reviewed. For example, (but not limited to) Chairman, Club, and Membership Secretary positions on the Club Committee are only eligible for a check if they have other responsibilities that fulfil the eligibility criteria. For example, if a committee member serves as a nominated chaperone in the home club setting or on away trips in addition to their committee role, they will be DBS tested for the qualified role of chaperone rather than their committee role. The concept of eligibility excludes a photographer who takes photos of children at a club function. A photographer would only be considered qualified if they were regularly left in charge of the child(ren) they were photographing, as defined above. Likewise, the club officer in charge of administering and overseeing the club website will not be eligible for a DBS search in that capacity. In both cases, you're looking to see if the person's job entails training, caring, supervising, or being in charge of children on a daily basis. If their primary position does not fulfil the criterion, you (the Designated Welfare Officer and the management committee of the club) must evaluate all of their other responsibilities to see if they meet the requirements (regulated activity). If this were the case, the individual would be tested for the role that qualifies them for the check, not their primary role at the club.


Br it ish Baseball Feder at ion | Saf egu ar din g Policies an d Pr ocedu r es

4747

CHILDRENMENTALWELLBEINGGUIDANCE It may be difficult to know how to speak to your child about their mental health or to understand the signs that they might be struggling. Signs of depression or anxiety in children may appear to be normal behaviour, particularly in adolescents who are able to hide their emotions. It's also normal for children to be nervous or worried about stuff like performing on the field or joining a new team. Although these incidents can be upsetting, they are not the same as long-term depression or anxiety, which affects how a child or young person feels on a daily basis. Consider what is usual for your child and if you've seen any signs that they've been acting differently lately. Signs of depression: -

persistent low mood or enthusiasm not enjoying activities they used to love being withdrawn and spending less time with friends and family experiencing low self-esteem or feeling "worthless" crying or angry on a regular basis.

Take care of yourself and get help if necessary. Try not to blame yourself for what's going on and keep a positive outlook on your child's recovery. Sign s of an xiet y: -

alterations in eating or sleeping patterns. withdrawing socially and avoiding social situations with friends or relatives constantly felt anxious or "on edge" getting panic attacks difficulty sleeping and changes in eating habits - crying, distressed, or angry

Helpin g a ch ild w it h an xiet y or depr ession It can be difficult to understand that your child is having mental health issues and is experiencing anxiety or depression. Parents should believe it is their fault or want to know why their child is experiencing mental health issues. This is understandable, but the most important thing you can do is comfort your child and not pass judgment on their emotions.There are a variety of ways to assist a struggling child, including: -

reassuring them that you care for them and are by their side If they don't feel comfortable talking in person, consider messaging or calling them. Be compassionate and approachable, even if their behaviour upsets you. Understand that their feelings are real and let them know it's okay for them to be truthful about how they feel. Think of safe ways to cope you might do together, such as yoga or breathing exercises. Particularly if they find it difficult to communicate at home.

Getting help with your child's mental health Childline https://www.childline.org.ukis an online, on the phone, anytime service. Dial 0800 1111 Alternatively, you can try your -

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Doctor, your child?s school, CAMHS (child and adolescent mental health services) a free NHS service for children and teenagers under the age of 18. Young people with severe mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, self-harm, panic attacks, or eating disorders may benefit from CAMHS. Young Minds have advice for parents about supporting children with a range of mental health problems.


Br it ish Baseball Feder at ion | Saf egu ar din g Policies an d Pr ocedu r es

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TRANSPORTINGCHILDRENINACARGUIDANCE Transporting children safely to and from their baseball events may be a problem for teams or clubs. Many baseball clubs will not be able to work without the support of volunteers and parents or assigned carers who ensure that children are driven to and from activities in a private vehicle. It is fair for clubs and activity organisers to put complete responsibility for ensuring that adequate transportation arrangements are made on the shoulders of parents. Parents and carers are responsible for their children's protection and the suitability of any travel arrangements when they transport their own children or make private arrangements with other parents and carers to deliver or collect their children. When an activity provider, group, or coach organisers transportation for its young members and requests or allows parents to transport other people's children on the club's behalf, the organiser has an obligation to take appropriate measures to protect the young people for whom they have a duty of care. Coaches and other volunteers are encouraged by the British Baseball Federation (BBF) not to drive children alone. The vast majority of coaches and volunteers are willing to help because they really want to see children or their sport develop. Unfortunately, we must accept the fact that certain people would join a baseball club in order to obtain access to children in order to hurt them. There have historically been several ways for those who seek to injure children to isolate a single child within the sporting community. While it is obviously best practice to avoid transporting a child alone, we understand that in some situations it is a required part of a child's preparation and competition participation. If all other options have been exhausted and an adult is required to transport children, the following safety precautions should be taken: -

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-

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Determine whether or not a driver is suitable. Parents/caregivers should be told about transportation plans, including who will transport their children, why they are being transported, and how long the journey will take. An individual other than the designated driver should speak with the child about the transportation arrangements to ensure that they are happy with the plans. Before transporting any passengers, organizations/clubs must ensure that drivers serving the club have valid car insurance, a MOT, and a valid driver 's license. If the individual/driver wants to use their car as part of their volunteer job, we suggest that they consult with their own insurance provider. Organizations/clubs should make every attempt to ensure that there are only a safe number of children (passengers) as suggested by the car manufacturer. That is, do not overload your vehicle. Coaches/volunteers can rotate which child is dropped off last while transporting children after a game or training session. In an ideal world, two children will be dropped off at a mutually agreed-upon location, such as one of their family members' homes. The person who returns the children to the agreed-upon location, such as the family home, should be rotated; this will minimise the likelihood of any one person being alone with a single child or community on a regular basis If the driver breaks down, they should have a point of contact and a cell phone. Ascertain that children are aware of their rights to protection and that they have someone to whom they can transform or report any concerns. If the club fosters a culture of protection, the child is more likely to confide in another person if they are unhappy with a situation. Late collections can cause particular problems for clubs and coaches. Guidelines explaining the problem and detailing their liability and the implications of late collections should be given to parents/carers. Parents/caregivers should be provided with contact numbers for clubs, as well as an alternate contact number if necessary. Parents/carers should have a contact number for the club/coach so that they can be reached in the case of an emergency or late selection. Seat belts should be worn at all times by children. The following is information about the seat-belt rule, which took effect in September 2006. For more information, go to https://www.gov.uk/seat-belts-law/overview. When traveling in a car or a commercial vehicle, children must wear an acceptable child restraint or seat belt. Under 12 years old or 135 cm tall, a booster chair or booster cushion must be used. An adult seat belt should be used for older children. Alternative modes of transportation: your organization/club uses taxis, there are no child restraints available; children can ride in the back seat. Adult seat belts are required for those over the age of three. Parents/caregivers can be asked to drive a minibus on behalf of an organization/club on occasion. Passengers on minibuses will be expected to wear seat belts if they are available, and the driver will be responsible for ensuring that children under the age of 14 do so. Passengers must use seat belts if they are included on a bus. The driver will be in charge of telling passengers that they must wear seat belts.

NOTE: Please refer to government guidelines for travel under Covid-19 lock-down. As a result some guidance above is subject to change.


Br it ish Baseball Feder at ion | CODE OF CONDUCT

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TRAVELFORMFORTRIPS Traveling (travel teams, National Teams, other) outside of the United Kingdom with children under the age of 18 who are not their own must receive permission or a minor travel consent letter from both minors' guardians. A child who travels abroad with only one birth parent, one guardian, grandparents, or other adults is also covered by the travel consent letter. Many countries, require this written and notarised (sometimes, you should check) permission to travel letter from all birth parents, same-sex couples, or legal guardians. IMPORTANT: The BBF insurance is for domestic cover primarily. You should get additional sports travel and medical insurance when you are traveling abroad.

Fu ll n am e of t r aveler M obile (opt ion al) Fu ll n am e of ch aper on (DBS ch eck ed) Clu b n am e or GB Baseball Nat ion al Team E-m ail M obile (opt ion al) Tr avel st ar t dat e Depar t f r om e.g., air por t , t r ain st at ion , et c. Tr avel en d dat e Ret u r n f r om e.g., air por t , t r ain st at ion , et c. Reason f or t r avel e.g., t ou r n am en t , et c

Nam e of visit in g ven u e Fu ll addr ess of visit in g ven u e

Ch eck t h e For eign an d Com m on w ealt h Of f ice f or t r avel aler t s by f ollow in g t h e lin k Ch eck w h et h er it is r equ ir ed t o get a t r avel visa f or t h e cou n t r y you ar e t r avelin g t oo. Ch eck all Covid-19 t r avel r est r ict ion s e.g., qu ar an t in e, vaccin e passpor t , et c. Ch eck you ar e car r yin g t h e appr opr iat e t r avel in su r an ce.

h t t ps:/ / w w w.gov.u k / f or eign -t r avel-advice


Br it ish Baseball Feder at ion | CODE OF CONDUCT

TRAVELFORMFORTRIPS(continued) Ch eck you r passpor t dat e is valid an d t h er e ar e n o r est r ict ion s as t o h ow m an y m on t h s bef or e it expir es. Ch eck you h ave in f or m ed you r ch aper on of an y m edical or m at er ial n eeds h e or sh e sh ou ld be aw ar e of bef or e you t r avel. Ch eck you com ply w it h all UK-AD An t i-Dopin g r equ ir em en t s. Do n ot t ak e an y f or eign dr u g (even it is over t h e cou n t er ) w h ich m ay be on t h e pr oh ibit ed list . Ch eck you ar e br in gin g all of t h e appr opr iat e clot h es an d equ ipm en t f or t h e t r ip. Ch eck you ar e br in gin g or h ave access t o t h e cor r ect cu r r en cy of m on ey t o pay f or t h in gs. In case of an emergency Fu ll n am e of t h e pr im ar y per son t o con t act M obile or ot h er n u m ber : E-m ail addr ess: Relat ion sh ip: par en t , gu ar dian , ot h er .

Fu ll n am e of t h e secon dar y per son t o con t act M obile or ot h er n u m ber : E-m ail addr ess: Relat ion sh ip: par en t , gu ar din g, ot h er .

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Br it ish Baseball Feder at ion | CODE OF CONDUCT

TRAVELFORMFORTRIPS(continued) Have you been br ief ed of accom m odat ion s, e.g., w h er e an d t h e sch edu le?

Ar e t h er e an y f est ivals, pu blic h olidays, or ot h er special even t s at t h e sit e you ar e t r avellin g t o t h at m ay alt er you r sch edu le? Ar e t h er e an y cu lt u r al aspect s of per son al ch ar act er ist ics t h at you m u st con sider e.g., gr eet in gs, beh aviou r , f or eign lan gu age, et c?

Wh at ar r an gem en t s ar e in place f or t r an spor t w h en you ar r ive?

Wh at ar e t h e k ey m eet in g poin t s on t h e day or du r in g you r t r ip?

Do you h ave an in ven t or y of it em s you ar e t ak in g an d im ages in case t h ey ar e lost or st olen ? If you ar e t r avelin g w it h an y m edicat ion it m u st f ir st be disclosed w it h in st r u ct ion s t o you r clu b, Nat ion al Team , or ch aper on r epr esen t at ives.

5151


Br it ish Baseball Feder at ion | CODE OF CONDUCT

5252

CHILDTRAVELCONSENTLETTERSAMPLE(primarilyfor international travel) On letterhead (optional)

Date here

Dear Sir or Madam, Re: Child travel consent letter I [Name of parent or legal guardian here], declare that I am the legal parent/guarding of: -

full name of child here, gender here, date of birth here, passport number, date of issue, date of expiration (check your country and host country traveling restrictions on how many months allowed before date of expiration), country passport issued.

My child [full name here] has my consent to travel to [name of final destination, city and country here], with [full name of responsible assigned adult here], [club name or GB Baseball] for reason here [travel team tournament or National Team competition u12 tournament]. [full name of responsible assigned adult here] is carrying my son/daughter 's passport [passport number and country it was issued here], on start travel date here, and scheduled to return date here. Any questions regarding this document may be addressed to me at: Mobile number here E-mail address here. Second parent or guardians details here (optional).

Thank you.

Faithfully yours, Signature Full name here


Br it ish Baseball Feder at ion | Saf egu ar din g Policies an d Pr ocedu r es

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RESOURCES -

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NSPCC | free helpline for adults worried about a child and needing help, advice and support tel. 0808 800 5000 | e-mail: help@nspcc.org.uk | website: www.nspcc.org.uk Ch ildlin e | free 24/7 service for children and young people | tel: 0800 1111 | website: www.childline.org.uk Nat ion al n u m ber f or em er gen cies: dial 999 Nat ion al n on -em er gen cy m edical n u m ber : dial 111 Em er gen cy n u m ber w h ich w ill w or k on an y m obile ph on e an yw h er e in t h e w or ld: dial 112 Non -em er gen cy n u m ber f or t h e police: dial 101

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Local cou n cil:u se t h e gover n m en t ?s on lin e t ool t o r epor t ch ild abu se t o you r local cou n cil.

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Ch ild Exploit at ion an d On lin e Pr ot ect ion Cen t er : t h e UK?s n at ion al police agen cy f or ch ild pr ot ect ion . You can also r epor t an y con cer n s on lin e. St op It Now :ch ild pr ot ect ion ch ar it y w it h a con f iden t ial h elplin e. Cit izen s Advice:pr ovides a gu ide t o r epor t in g su spect ed ch ild abu se an d get t in g su ppor t .

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NHS t est an d t r ace in f or m at ion . St . Joh n's Am bu lan ce Ser vice e.g., f ir st aid cou r ses an d et c.

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Kidscape (keeping safe, bullying and how to scope) dial 020 7 730 3300 www.kidscape.org.uk

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M en t al Healt h Fou n dat ion dial 020 7803 1100 w w w.m en t alh ealt h .or g An t i-bu llyin g Allian ce

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https://www.anti-bullyingalliance.org.uk/news-insight/3-signposting-advice-and-support

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British Baseball Federation Safeguarding Policies and Procedures effective 1st April 2021  

British Baseball Federation Safeguarding Policies and Procedures effective 1st April 2021  

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