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ALBERT WATSON IN AFRICA GOING UNDERGROUND New project from a photo icon

Location lighting 50 feet down

LS NA IO SS FE O PR

’s K .1 U No

The ultimate go-anywhere DSLR?

R FO

CANON EOS 6D IN THE FIELD

ISSUE 77 MARCH 2013 £4.50

TIPS FROM THE TOP

Best ever wedding images! Multi award-winner Jerry Ghionis shares his secrets

DEVELOP

YOUR BRAND

Unmissable tips every photographer must know!

LIGHTING ON AN INDUSTRIAL SCALE CREATE A SLIDE SHOW IN ADOBE LIGHTROOM LIGHTWEIGHT TRIPODS AND HEADS TESTED 10 PHOTO BOOKS YOUR CLIENTS WILL LOVE

BE THE NEXT BIG NAME IN

FASHION Lara Jade reveals the secrets of how to break into this stylish sector

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CONTENTS ISSUE 77 MARCH 2013

Subscriptions & back issues:

Regulars

006 INBOX

News from the Societies’ Convention, a selection of the latest products to hit the professional market and the wildest photos on the planet.

014 PORTFOLIO: JERRY GHIONIS

COVER If anyone’s capable of getting married while also doing their own wedding photography, it’s multi awardwinning pro and renowned trainer Jerry.

020 PROJECT: ALBERT WATSON

COVER Documenting life in Benin on film and digital required 12-hour shoots for 17 days back-to-back – no challenge for iconic photographer Albert. Watson. 020

062

Insider tips for getting on in fashion. Pro Academy

028 LIGHTING MASTERCLASS

COVER Andrew Molyneux followed his dad into the commercial photography business, inheriting top-class skills and a family tree of international clients.

036 CREATE A SLIDE SHOW IN ADOBE LIGHTROOM

COVER This pro-friendly software makes it simple to send a set of shots to clients for approval: here’s our guide.

042 GOING UNDERGROUND

COVER Not convinced by a compact system camera? The award-winning Damian McGillicuddy has welcomed the super-light Olympus OM-D system with open arms.

Business Matters

Gear

049 BUSINESS MATTERS

080 CANON EOS 6D

052 SHOULD YOU USE A SECOND SHOOTER?

088 TRAVEL LIGHT: TRIPODS

Ideas, solutions and the latest ways to make your business the best.

COVER Is this the ultimate go-anywhere DSLR? We take a look at the affordable full-frame newcomer from Canon.

COVER Do you work well with backup, or are you best as a sole trader?

COVER Compact tripods might be convenient, but do they offer the support a pro needs? Five models undergo our tests.

COVER Get an insider’s insight into this challenging and creative market and find out who you need on your team.

094 BUYERS’ GUIDE: PHOTO BOOKS FOR THE PRO

062 BE IN FASHION

070 BUILD YOUR OWN BRAND

COVER How do you want clients to feel about working with you? Kat’s got advice from those in the know.

COVER Firm favourites as presentation options, photo books come in all shapes, sizes and finishes. We check out ten providers’ offerings.

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www.photopromagazine.com, call 01371 851876 or see p76 for our special offer…

Photography & retouching Lara Jade Model Elin Ledskog at Elite New York Make-up by Anthea King using Mark @ See management Hair by Bradley Irion for Artists by Timothy Priano Styling by Rebecca Malinsky Manicure by Julie Kandalec for Artists by Timothy Riano

028

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Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJ Telephone 01223 499450 enquiries@bright-publishing.com www.photopromagazine.com editorial Editor Terry Hope 01959 563007 terryhope@bright-publishing.com Technical Writer Ian Fyfe 01223 499456 ianfyfe@bright-publishing.com Sub Editors Lisa Clatworthy 01223 499450 Hannah Bealey 01223 499450 Editorial Director Roger Payne 01223 499460 rogerpayne@bright-publishing.com Design Director Dean Usher Design & Production Manager Grant Gillard advertising Sales Director Matt Snow 01223 499453 mattsnow@bright-publishing.com Key Accounts Maria Francis 01223 499457 mariafrancis@bright-publishing.com Mike Elliott 01223 499458 mikeelliott@bright-publishing.com Business Development Director Dave Stone 01223 499462 davestone@bright-publishing.com All advertising copy to: pproads@bright-publishing.com publishing Publishing Directors Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck Head of Circulation Chris Haslum Photo Professional is published on the first Thursday of every month by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge, CB22 3HJ. No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Photo Professional is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Photo Professional that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. Can’t find a copy? Finding your nearest Photo Professional magazine stockist couldn’t be easier. Simply contact: COMAG, Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex, UB7 7QE Alternatively call 01895 433600.

When you have finished with this magazine, please recycle it MARCH 2013 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 005

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PORTFOLIO | JERRY GHIONIS

KING OF WEDDINGS PORTFOLIO | JERRY GHIONIS

Although he’s now diversified into other areas and spends much of his time teaching, Jerry Ghionis is still the acknowledged master of wedding photography. Last year he even managed to cover his own nuptials WORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES JERRY GHIONIS

T

hink of outstanding wedding imagery, and inevitably the name of Jerry Ghionis will spring to mind. With his fresh fashion-based approach, his eye for colour and detail and his innovative use of all kinds of lighting, natural and otherwise, Jerry was one of the revolutionaries who shook up this sector a decade or more ago. His influence allowed others to see, perhaps for the first time, that there was a chance now to satisfy their own creative desires alongside the usual wedding day mix of group shots and cake cutting. Never one to stand still, Jerry moved easily into the world of teaching and workshops – and there has always been a ready and willing audience – where he talks for hours, shares his ideas and skills and generously gives away his secrets. Inevitably the associated globetrotting has meant his focus on wedding photography has shifted, and he’s now taking on between 20 and 25 weddings a year, as opposed to the 80 or 100 that were once the norm. He also got married himself and now splits his time between Melbourne and Beverley Hills. Despite all these distractions, however, weddings remain close to his heart, and he’s still pushing the boundaries and making sure that, in true Ghionis style, his work is continuing to evolve and remain innovative and exciting.

“I decided to cut down on the number of weddings I took on because, quite simply, I wanted a life,” he says. “Ironically, we spend our lives as photographers immortalising moments for other families, but we’re often so busy that we aren’t making moments for ourselves. I wanted the time to enjoy my wife and my family as well. “Many people have the impression that we only take on high-end weddings, but my definition of what this entails has actually changed over the last few years. The perception is that high-end means big, lavish weddings involving couples that spend a lot of money on every little detail, including the wedding photography. Apart from the handful of RIGHT Cutting down the number of weddings he shoots to between 20 and 25 means Jerry Ghionis can spend more time with his family and teaching around the world.

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PORTFOLIO | JERRY GHIONIS

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PRO ACADEMY LIGHTING MASTERCLASS

KEEPING IT IN

THE FAMILY

Andrew Molyneux always wanted to follow in his father’s footsteps and become a professional photographer. He’s now enjoyed a 25-year career in the business and has a host of international clients WORDS CHRISTIAN HOUGH PICTURES ANDREW MOLYNEUX

s a child growing up, Andrew Molyneux was surrounded by a photographic environment, thanks to the influence of his father Colin, who was an award-winning landscape photographer. After a brief diversion studying biological sciences, Andrew came back to his first love and switched back to photography, taking on a role as Colin’s full-time assistant. As Colin gradually made the transition into corporate photography he quickly picked up major clients such as Esso, Raytheon and Taylor Woodrow, and it was during a Raytheon commission that Andrew met an American photographer who persuaded him to stay in the USA to assist him in Boston for a couple of years. Eventually Andrew returned to the UK to set up a partnership with his father, and now has over 25 years of experience under his belt, and in that time has assembled a broad range of international clients.

A

Assisting your father is something

CH that must be both fortunate and

rather unusual. AM Yes, I guess it is! Being my father’s assistant had some major advantages and really aided my development as a photographer. A normal assistant would never have been allowed to handle the camera or take a shot during a shoot, whereas I was positively mentored and encouraged to do so. If the shots were good enough, then my father would pass them on to the clients and tell them that they were my images. This helped me develop a good portfolio of images very early on, that had all been shot for major clients. When my father wasn’t available, the client was normally happy for me to stand in.

Is this how your business started?

CH AM After assisting in Boston, I was

ready to return home. Starting a family partnership was a natural progression as we could now take on more clients and make use of the contacts we had already attracted. It all worked out really well. The shots here are all very

CH different. Tell me more about them. AM The image of the wind tunnel was shot for QinetiQ, who many will know as the defence technology and security company. I have been working with them for a couple of years and it all started with a commission from QinetiQ’s corporate communications director to shoot the portraits of the Board of Directors. This led onto other projects, including the likes of military robots and flight simulators. For this commission, they wanted me to capture images of their wind tunnel, which just happens to be the largest in Europe. The difficulty with shooting something like this is finding a narrow window of opportunity when it isn’t in use. Were you tied to a date and time?

CH AM Pretty much so. I had to work

around the client as any downtime of the tunnel works out to huge sums of money, so shutting it down clearly wasn’t an option. They basically provided me with a complete schedule for the day that included portraits of employees, shoots of anechoic and microwave test chambers and a maximum of three hours allocated for the wind tunnel. How did you go about shooting the

CH tunnel?

AM I hadn’t actually seen the wind tunnel before I shot it, so I didn’t have the

Being my father’s assistant really aided my development as a photographer and helped me produce a good portfolio of images early on

usual opportunity to recce the location. Fortunately, QinetiQ provided me with a few snaps, which gave me a vague idea of how I would go about shooting it. We couldn’t really pre-plan any lighting, so our only recourse was to plan for every eventuality and to take along as much equipment as possible. We knew that the client wanted to accentuate the sense of scale, plus they wanted a couple of portraits of the key personnel within the tunnel. How did you decide on the lighting?

CH AM When we arrived, we were given

a guided tour and I felt the dramatic light cast by the industrial fluorescent lighting behind the veins at the other opening of the tunnel really worked well and made the shoot a lot easier and quicker. If you look down any cylindrical object, it’s light from the far end that makes it look longer and draws the eye down the cylinder. It was the same approach but on a larger scale. We did, however, decide to manoeuvre the fluorescent lighting so that it created a semi-spiral lighting pattern on the inside of the tunnel. This adds to the perspective and draws out the shape of the tunnel. Did you light the subjects?

CH AM No, we basically made the most of available light, but had they not had torches the shot would have looked pretty flat and the subjects would have been lost. The key thing was to get the right exposure of the tunnel before we included the subjects, as this saves them time and takes the pressure off. It was fairly dark, which required a tripod-mounted camera and a three-second exposure and, as each subject needed to remain as still as possible, it was easier to fine-tune everything before we introduced the people. As for the positioning, we began by using several people in different locations and positions before eventually deciding on using two employees in the position you see here. For the final touch we added a couple of MARCH 2013 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 029

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SECOND SHOOTERS

DYNAMIC

DUOS

Eliza Claire

Second shooters are common these days, but are they useful backup or more trouble than they’re worth? WORDS TERRY HOPE PICTURES VARIOUS

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BUSINESS MATTERS F I R S T S T E P S I N FA S H I O N

BUILDING A

FASHION TEAM Lara Jade’s new book, Fashion Photography 101, is packed full of tips and information to help photographers break into the highly demanding fashion sector. Here she reveals what you need to know when preparing for a shoot WORDS & PICTURES LARA JADE

reaking into the fashion photography industry might seem like an impossible dream, but with time, investment, passion, determination and skill, achieving that goal is not as impossible as you might think. I’ve created my new book, Fashion Photography 101, to give photographers an insight into the fashion photography industry as I know it. I’ve packed it full of set assignments, hints and tips to help people develop their own style and to find out more about this business and give them the inspiration they need to launch their career. One of the most fundamental things to learn early on is how much you have to rely on others as a fashion photographer, and this can be difficult to come to terms with when you’re just starting out. You need to understand that on any fashion photoshoot having a talented creative team behind you is just as important as anything you might contribute as a photographer.

B

Casting your model If you’re just starting out as a photographer it will be harder to find a professional model to work with immediately. I would recommend building a portfolio of ideas with friends or models that are just starting out before approaching modelling agencies. Model agencies will only let their models test with you if they are convinced that you will shoot beautiful pictures of them. Your evidence of this will be your portfolio; they are looking for clear, representative photos that will help sell their models’ images. RIGHT The casting meant both models had very similarly coloured hair, which chimed perfectly with the pastels of the image and provided a unifying, rather than a distracting, element. Canon EOS 5D MkII: ISO 160, 1/3200 at f/3.5 Anna and Georgie for Material Girl magazine. Models: Anna and Georgie @ Profile Models, London Make-up: Leah Mabe Hair: Craig Marsden @ Carol Hayes Management Styling: Claudia Behnke Photography Assistance: Oscar May

A typical creative team consists of: Stylist A stylist’s job is to assess the creative brief, whether from the photographer, a magazine editor, or art director, and pull (select) clothes accordingly. The clothes are sourced from a variety of places, either from a designer’s collection or from brand stores. The stylist must then ensure that the clothes arrive ready to be photographed on or before the morning of the shoot. On the day of the shoot itself, the stylist is responsible for dressing the models and making sure that the clothes look good. He or she will also source appropriate accessories.

Make-up artist Responsible for applying make-up to the models so they are ready to be photographed. Make-up style should complement the brief, and may vary from the very simple through to avant-garde. A good make-up artist will instantly know what works for a particular model or client.

Hair stylist The hair stylist works alongside the makeup artist and has similar responsibilities, ensuring that the model/client is looking his or her best for the camera and, if necessary, styling hair so that it follows a specific creative brief.

Manicurist Depending on the photoshoot, sometimes a manicurist is required to enhance the appearance of the nails on the hands and feet of your model(s).

Art director Large clothing and store brands, as well as fashion magazines, will have an art director who will attend photoshoots. It’s

the art director’s responsibility to plan and create the overall theme of the shoot and to control the creative direction on the day of the shoot itself. In some cases the art director is also the stylist or even the editor of a magazine. If this is this case, as the photographer you work under their direction toward the planned theme. It’s important that you take direction from art directors as it’s their theme and they’re the client’s representative.

Personal assistant A personal assistant (PA) is vital on any photoshoot – to handle all the jobs a photographer cannot do on the day and to keep things running smoothly behind the scenes. Photoshoots are complex and have numerous elements that cannot always be the responsibility of the photographer alone. Common PA tasks include general assistance on the day, administration, tidying, cleaning, working alongside the photographer on-set, collecting/taking parcels, and organising catering and transportation.

Digital assistant A digital assistant is vital on larger photoshoots, particularly when you’re working with the camera tethered to a computer. Working this way, so that shots can be reviewed immediately on screen by the photographer, art director, and client, often requires a complex set-up. Other digital assistant jobs include preparing the images after the shoot and most other computer-related tasks. In many ways digital assistants are like personal assistants, but are more up to speed on technical matters, and often have to be very experienced in order to work quickly and to understand new techniques.

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BUSINESS MATTERS

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GEAR CANON EOS 6D

TEST DRIVE 1

Affordable full frame The Canon EOS 6D is being presented as a model with appeal to those who want a lightweight full-frame DSLR at a more affordable price. Adam Duckworth checks out its performance and delivers his verdict WORDS & PICTURES ADAM DUCKWORTH

anon really has taken its time getting an enthusiast level, full-frame camera to market. Despite first-mover advantage with the legendary Canon EOS-1DS, the only full-frame camera on the market for several years, launches since then have been slow despite enthusiasts begging for a camera with a bigger sensor. The flagship EOS-1DS has been revamped three times, and was then joined by the semi-pro level 5D, which is also now in its third generation. But for those unable to face the stiff price and weight of those two cameras, there has been nothing. Until now. Enter the Canon EOS 6D, a top-level enthusiast camera that’s significantly smaller and cheaper than its full-frame big brothers. With built-in Wi-Fi and GPS, it features some of the latest technology and a 20.2-megapixel sensor with a huge ISO range. You’d think the camera-buying world would be going wild with enthusiasm. But largely, they’re not. The problem is that Nikon launched its own enthusiast level, full-frame DSLR a few months ago, which is now slightly cheaper than the Canon. Then came Sony with its swivel-screen A99. And worse still, the Nikon D600 has a far more pro-level spec pretty much right across the board. More megapixels, far more advanced autofocus, faster 5.5 frames-per-second shooting rate, twin card slots, 100 per cent viewfinder coverage, 3.2in LCD screen and a more professional video spec, such as clean HDMI output and a headphone socket. There’s even a pop-up flash, and these are all features that the EOS 6D doesn’t have. It would be easy to write off the EOS 6D, especially when you consider the excellent results the D600 has been getting. But to do that would be to miss the little Canon’s charms and great results, plus the unique benefits of built-in Wi-Fi and GPS.

C

Travelling light Of course, most pro photographers are wedded to a camera system already, and have an armoury of lenses. If you’re a die-hard Canon shooter, then adding a 6D to your kit could make sense. It’s an ideal top-quality travel camera, offering a smaller body than a 5D with big results and the benefit of being able to add location info to every picture. And its near-silent shutter could be a boost to travellers, too. If you’re using a Canon crop-sensor camera and looking to make the step up to full frame relatively affordably, then the 6D could be your next camera, as long as you don’t mind buying a new set of full-frame lenses. Either way, the 6D offers the very tangible benefits of full-frame cameras – better image quality and lower noise, especially at higher ISOs. The viewfinder

is far larger, too, plus it’s much easier to achieve shallow depth-of-field as the lenses required are longer focal lengths than those used for smaller sensor cameras to get the same angle of view. A 50mm lens on a crop-sensor camera, for example, is roughly equivalent to an 85mm on a full-frame body, and at the same aperture and distance the longer lens will have a shallower depth-of-field. The heart of the 6D is its 20.2-megapixel sensor, which offers a very impressive ISO range of 100 right up to 25,600. This can be expanded to as low as 50 and as high as 102,800. Simply put, the results are very impressive. The image quality in terms of fine detail and tonal gradation is excellent, while the noise is very well controlled at high ISOs, making it genuinely useful as a low-light camera.

RIGHT Ergonomically, Canon users will feel at home with the thumb wheel and the top-plate finger dial, but the lack of a dedicated WB button, the squeezed-in AF-ON button and the rear pad spell fiddly.

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GEAR CANON EOS 6D

The heart of the 6D is its 20.2-megapixel sensor, which offers a very impressive ISO range of 100 to 25,600 MARCH 2013 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 081

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GEAR

BUYERS’ GUIDE: Photo books Photo books are a strong way to present images to a wide range of clients, and there’s a huge selection on offer these days from a variety of suppliers. Here’s a look at some of the latest products to hit the market WORDS IAN FYFE

Graphistudio Graphistudio’s Wedding Book combines handmade binding with advanced digital technology, and a number of options allow it to be customised according to the needs of your client. The paper type, layout and cover design – including the material, colour and personalisation – can be selected to create a unique book, and Graphistudio’s new Material Swatch Book helps you give your clients what they want. All available options are included in this one book, allowing clients to see and feel the leathers, metal covers, varnish finishes, and different paper types – in total, more than 70 cover materials, 15 paper choices and three paper thicknesses are featured. The Material Swatch Book alone costs £99, but it’s also available as a Travel Kit, including a suitcase, or a Studio Kit with a sleeve, for £117 and £159 respectively.

qwww.graphistudio.com

Bespoke Photobooks Bespoke Photobooks is a family-run business that prides itself on individuality, quality and creativity. The company’s books are handmade to your specific requirements, and while there are a number of set options they also welcome special commissions. Books are offered in six standard sizes, from A6 up to Maxi at 39.9x29cm. These can be portrait, landscape or square format. Cover options include Photo Wrap, Debossing and Plain, and they come in a choice of materials: leather, faux leather, faux suede, buckram, canvas and acrylic. For the pages, you can select lustre, pearl, gloss or fine art finishes, and the binding allows them to lay flat with an almost invisible crease. The finished book comes in a handmade presentation box. Along with main books, smaller parent and pocket books can be ordered at the same time or later. These are exact copies of the main book and come in their own protective bag.

qwww.bespokephotobooks.com

Sim Imaging Sim Imaging offers a number of photo book options, from full Digital Albums to Coffee Table, Portrait and Fine Art books. The company’s Digital Albums come in four different sizes, from A4 to A3, with a choice of matte, gloss or metallic papers, and cover materials include leather, suede, metal and acrylic. They open flat with full double-page edge-to-edge panoramic printing, and are presented in a drawstring bag and gift box. Sim Imaging’s Coffee Table Books are handmade and printed on a choice of papers: 200gsm Press Printed Paper, 250gsm Lay-Flat Paper

or heavier lustre Photographic Paper. There are three available sizes of A4, 14x10in or 12x12in, and you can design the front, back and spine of the hardback cover. Alternatively, the Portrait Book range contains up 20 extra-thick pages for a quality feel at a lower starting price than Coffee Table Books or, if you want a fine art feel, then the Fine Art Book uses giclée paper inside, with a genuine leather cover.

qwww.simimaging.co.uk

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GEAR Asuka Books The Book Bound range from Asuka Books is great as an affordable option for weddings and is also said to be ideal for studio photographers. There are a number of options for the finish of the cover, from genuine or faux leather to a slip jacket or customised hard or soft covers. Sizes start at just 5x5in, and go up to 12x12in with many options in between. As few as ten pages are available, but up to 100 can be accommodated. Pages can have a laminate glossy, laminate matte or a varnish finish. Recent tweaks to the Book Bound range include the option of a matte cover, offering a classier finish. At the end of January, Asuka Books also adjusted the design to remove the barcode that appeared on the last inside page, cover and dust jacket, addressing what was a major gripe for many professional photographers.

qwww.asukabook.co.uk

Blurb Blurb is an on-demand publishing platform that you can use to create what are claimed to be ‘bookstore-quality’ books. A plug-in for Adobe InDesign and integration with Adobe Lightroom 4 allows you to create books in the software that you already use, and when you’ve made a print book you can also transform it into an e-book using the company’s e-book editor. Print and e-book editions can be sold through the Blurb bookstore, and for e-books there’s also the iBookstore. Blurb’s new ProLine options give more choice for customisation on any book below 240 pages. Two new professional-grade papers add Pearl Photo and Uncoated finishes to the existing Standard and Premium Matte and Lustre options. ProLine also gives you a choice of four alternative colours for end sheets to the Standard Mid-Grey: White, Light Grey, Charcoal and Black. For hard linen covers, Charcoal and Oatmeal linens are additional options to black. Blurb says that the current ProLine options are ‘just the beginning’ and that further expansion of the range will see more end sheet and professional-grade paper options.

qwww.blurb.co.uk

Colorworld Imaging Colorworld offers two types of photo book, both of which are ideal for weddings, portraits, fashion, portfolios and yearbooks. These are traditional Coffee Table Books and Layflat Books. Both are printed on 170gsm silk-coated traditional paper, and have hardback covers that are photographically printed, gloss laminated and professionally wrapped around the front, back and spine of the book. The Coffee Table Books are available in a range of sizes from 6x6in up to 16x12in, and can contain up to 80 double-page spreads. Additional copies of the same Coffee Table Book also receive a 50 per cent discount. The Layflat Books have a more limited range of sizes, from 10x8in to 12x12in, and can only contain up to 30 double-page spreads, but when open the pages lie flat across the middle. For both types of book you have control over the design by using the company’s free software, Colorworld Designer Pro.

qwww.colorworldimaging.com MARCH 2013 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 095

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Photo Professional - March Issue Sampler