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VOL. 16, ISSUE 8 • FEBRUARY 21, 2019

The Chattanooga That Will Be After surveying thousands, we can picture our hopes for our future CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


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FROM THE EDITOR VOLUME 16, ISSUE 8 • FEBRUARY 21, 2019

BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr. FOUNDED 2003 BY ZACHARY COOPER & MICHAEL KULL

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole gary@chattanoogapulse.com Assistant Editor Jenn Webster City Editor Alex Curry Music Editor Marc T. Michael Film Editor John DeVore Contributors Rob Brezsny Steven W. Disbrow Daniel Jackson Matt Jones Mike McJunkin Ernie Paik Rick Pimental-Habib Michael Thomas Julie Van Valkenburg Editorial Intern Jason Dale Cartoonists Jen Sorenson • Tom Tomorrow

ADVERTISING

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Director of Sales Mike Baskin mike@brewermediagroup.com Account Executives Rick Leavell • Cindee McBride Libby Phillips • John Rodriguez

CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Contents Copyright © 2019 by Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

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The Chattanooga That Will Be On February 7, the Chattanooga Chamber of Commerce, spearheading a collaboration between key organizations in the city, unveiled the results of Vision 2040 Community Vision, the survey that asked Chattanoogans what they wanted the city’s future to look like.

CHATTERY COMES OF AGE

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NAGGIN’ ON MY MIND

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Education is a prized jewel of modern society. The ability to seek expanded knowledge—to diversify our horizons with new skillsets, trades, methodologies, and philosophies—is perhaps the greatest achievement of humankind.

Say, have you heard of that hot new blues act, GA-20? No? That’s okay, neither had I until a day or so ago.

REALISM AND DREAMS

Chattanooga is home to a bevy of incredible figurative artists, one of whom is using his realism skills to create colorful visionary works, Reagan Schmissrauter.

FYRE FESTIVAL FAILURE

Riverbend was my first music festival. I was around 18 or 19 and I had travelled around to the various metro areas of Tennessee and seen quite a few of my favorite artists.

5 EDITOONS

16 MUSIC CALENDAR

19 JONESIN' CROSSWORD

7 JUST A THEORY

18 MUSIC REVIEWS

21 NEW IN THEATERS

19 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

22 SUSHI & BISCUITS

12 ARTS CALENDAR

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CITY LIFE · BETWEEN THE BRIDGES

Cons ider This w ith Dr. Rick

Chattery Comes Of Age The community education non-profit seeks a permanent home By Alex Curry Pulse City Editor

“My humanity is bound up in yours, for we can only be human together.” — Desmond Tutu Whenever we hear a truth, be it from modern or ancient times, it rings just as true no matter what moment in history we live. At this point in our American history, black inspirers from the past and present offer us muchneeded guidance and wisdom. “Never be limited by other people’s limited imaginations.” — Dr. Mae Jemison, first African-American female astronaut “I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality.” — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “Defining myself, as opposed to being defined by others, is one of the most difficult challenges I face.” — Carol Moseley-Braun “The cost of liberty is less than the price of repression.” — W.E.B. Du Bois “Have a vision.” — Colin Powell

The Chattery exists to build community. First and foremost, building it through education. Our tagline is to enhance the community through learning.”

— Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D.

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DUCATION IS A PRIZED JEWEL OF MODERN SOCIety. The ability to seek expanded knowledge—to diversify our horizons with new skillsets, trades, methodologies, and philosophies—is perhaps the greatest achievement of humankind. Yet often this ideology, which could be viewed as our most preeminent gift to ourselves, gets lost as a formality required of children until they are old enough to join the workforce. Thereafter, they are pushed into jobs which are meticulously orchestrated to fulfill the dreams of rich business moguls lustily eyeing new vacation homes. As a society, we have unfortunately devalued education. Rather than a cherished achievement, it has transformed into a basic necessity essential for job placement, which we hope will lead to monetary success. Where along the line have we lost our ability and desire to learn merely for the sake of learning? Thankfully, there are still people who embrace this communal value.

The Chattery started in 2014 with a class about creating a terrarium. In the past five years, they have grown from offering three classes a month into a full-fledged organization that hosts around 35 classes monthly. A simple mission statement summarizes the organization: “The Chattery exists to build community. First and foremost, building it through education. Our tagline is to enhance the community through learning.” “We exist to provide fun, affordable, and accessible education for adults,” says Jennifer Holder, the Operations Headmaster of the nonprofit. “We are for the community, by the community. Because of that, we provide classes that the community wants.”


EDITOONS

The educational project offers a wide variety of lectures. “We have done everything from flower arranging to embroidery, mastering Excel, personal marketing, creative ownership, meditation, practical skills development, and more,” says Shawanda Mason-Moore, the Creative Director of The Chattery. The two are a dynamic team and their immense passion for their work shines clearly. They seem to find joy in every step of their lives, and they are happy to share that jubilation and curiosity with Chattanooga’s community. In March, they will be celebrating The Chattery’s five-year anniversary. The carnival-themed party, which they joke will be “just an excuse to eat cotton candy and corn dogs” will act as a launch pad for a crowdsourcing fundraiser with the intent of finding a new and permanent home for The Chattery. “We’re in the process of figuring out where to move so we can do classes all in one space and not be so scattered,” says Jennifer. They will host the fundraiser on www.ifundwomen.com, a website specifically designed to raise money

for women-owned or involved businesses. The platform has never been used in Chattanooga, and the Chattery team is excited to be its premier intro into the city. Visit thechattery.org to take a look at upcoming classes, suggest a class, or apply to teach. A full-fledged interview is required in order to teach, a responsibility that isn’t taken lightly. If you have a valuable skill set to share with the community, this may be the spot for you. Embroidery teacher Sarah Olivo shares her passion: “The Chattery offers a chance to share passions and hobbies, something that becomes harder as we get older. Embroidery for me is very therapeutic and relaxing. Having the opportunity to share with others makes me feel like we are sharing methods of self-expression and self-care.” Information about the five-year anniversary party will be available on the webpage by the end of the week. When asked for closing thoughts, Shawanda perfectly mingles her passion with her humor. “Take a class, teach a class, give us money”—to which we all had a good laugh. CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • THE PULSE • 5


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COLUMN · JUST A THEORY

Au Revoir, Opportunity Fondly remembering the record-breaking Mars rover

O Steven W. Disbrow Pulse columnist

In the end, Opportunity’s 90-Sol mission lasted 5,352 Sols, which is just over 15 years here on Earth, or eight Martian years. That is one hell of an extended mission.”

Steven W. Disbrow is the proprietor of “Improv Chattanooga” on the South Side of town. He also creates e-commerce systems and reads comic books when he’s not on stage acting like a fool.

N JANUARY 25TH, 2004, I was sitting at the family computer (an eMac, remember those?) with my daughter, anxiously awaiting news from the surface of Mars as to the fate of a robotic lander named “Opportunity”. Even though Opportunity’s sister craft, “Spirit”, had landed successfully three weeks earlier, Mars landings are a tricky business and nothing was guaranteed. After waiting through the “7 Minutes of Terror” with NASA and the rest of the world, we were all relieved to hear that Opportunity had arrived safely and would be sending back pictures and other data in just days. “She better hurry,” my daughter (who was just under four years old at the time) said. “She’s only got 90 days!” For certain, Opportunity’s main mission was only supposed to last 90 Martian days (or “Sols” as NASA called them), each about 24 hours and 37 minutes long, and NASA had set an aggressive agenda to fill in those 90 Sols. Drilling into and analyzing rocks, “sniffing” soil samples and always, always looking for signs of ancient water. Over those 90 Sols, Opportunity sent back amazing pictures and spectacular data. We followed the mission as closely as we could, and dreaded the day it would end. But it didn’t end. Both Spirit and Opportunity kept right on rolling past their 90-day expiration dates, each getting one mission extension after the other. Spirit was the first to “die”. Having gotten stuck in some especially soft soil in 2009, it continued performing science in place until it became unresponsive in 2011. Opportunity carried on, roving across the surface of Mars, surviving one Martian day after the next, until, in June of 2018, it got enveloped by a nearly planet-wide Martian dust storm and stopped

responding to commands. The rover had survived smaller storms before, but this one was different. It (apparently) completely covered Opportunity’s solar panels, cutting off its source of power entirely. So, just last week on February 13th, after trying almost 1,000 times to contact Opportunity, NASA declared the rover officially “dead”, and ended the mission. In the end, Opportunity’s 90-Sol mission lasted 5,352 Sols, which is just over 15 years here on Earth, or eight Martian years. That is one hell of an extended mission. (My daughter, gladly, has also survived these last eight Martian years and is now off on her own extended mission studying biology in college.) So, what did Opportunity accomplish in that time? The list is a long one, so I’ll just hit the highlights: • Drove further than any other extraterrestrial vehicle. Even though the rover would only move a few meters at a time, over the years it travelled across more than 28 miles of the Martian landscape. • Found the first meteorite ever identified on another planet. This was an early discovery, as the meteorite was very close to where Opportunity landed. (It actually came across several meteorites during its mission.) • Analyzed more than 100 different Martian rocks (including many that it drilled into and analyzed the innards of). • Sent back more than 200,000 images, including many breathtaking panoramas that made Mars into a place we could visit one day, rather than just another point of light in the sky. • Found definitive proof that Mars was once wet with liquid water. The first

indication of this was when Opportunity came across dozens of tiny grey-ish rocks, nicknamed “blueberries”, near its landing site. These rocks were mainly hematite, which generally forms in the presence of liquid water. This was an early discovery, coming just weeks after landing. But, as Opportunity drove around Mars, it discovered more and more evidence for a Mars that was once warm and wet. Of course, it will take years to finish going through the data from the mission, so, it’s not really over just yet. Still, there have been a lot of stories in the press and memes on the internet expressing sadness at the loss of the rover itself. I dismissed those as silly at first, until I thought back to that day back in 2004 with my daughter on my lap, watching the feed from NASA, both of us waiting with that mix of dread and excitement that only comes from exploration. That was a moment I’ll cherish as a parent, and one that, I think, was greatly responsible for instilling a love of science into my daughter’s heart. In many ways, this mission was, if you’ll pardon the pun, the Opportunity of our lifetimes, and we’re not likely to see another like it any time soon.

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COVER STORY

The Chattanooga That Will Be After surveying thousands, we can picture our hopes for our future

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N FEBRUARY 7, THE CHATTANOOGA CHAMBER OF Commerce, spearheading a collaboration between key organizations in the city, unveiled the results of Vision 2040 Community Vision, the survey that asked Chattanoogans what they wanted the city’s future to look like. By Daniel Jackson Pulse contributor

This isn’t the first time that Chattanooga has done this. Indeed, when city leaders met in the ‘80s, gathered input from the community, and then set goals in a project they called Vision 2000, that’s what made the modern city of Chattanooga. Out of that, we got the Tennessee Aquarium. The Walnut Street Bridge was saved from destruction. Both have become symbols of Chattanooga. Gig City. The Scenic City that mixes southern charm with internet so fast it makes browsing YouTube reaaalllyyy convenient. And then a few days after the Vision

2040 survey dropped, Public Art Chattanooga unveiled its 2019 Public Art Strategic Plan, a proposal for what the art scene in Chattanooga will look like in 2030. Together, the surveys paint a picture of what people in Chattanooga want their city to look like and how they want it to work—with implications for government, transportation, and the arts. The key takeaway from the Velocity 2040 survey is that Chattanoogans believe the biggest challenge to a bright future is inequality. Respondents identified the biggest solutions, too: Schools need to get better, and education needs to be meted out for people to get better jobs. And the biggest danger, the report

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said, was doing nothing. “Imagine if we watch and wait…if we ride the current wave of momentum and let current challenges go unchecked,” the report said. “Our racial equity gaps will widen. Our housing prices will continue to increase and our traffic will worsen. We’ll lack vision to make large investments and eventually headlines will ask, ‘What happened to Chattanooga?’” So what’s the alternative? Based on survey responses, the Velocity 2040 report said there were five goals that most Chattanoogans wanted: They want Chattanooga to be the smartest city south of the Mason-Dixon line, every resident to thrive economically (a chicken in every pot, so to speak), and transportation around the city to be fast. Twenty-minutes-orless fast. The last two goals involved the leadership of the community. Community leaders in 2040, the report envisioned, should include a diversity of races, ages, and genders.

Furthermore, the way Chattanooga as a whole solves problems should change, adding more collaboration and respect to the problem-solving process. Futurist Rebecca Ryan, who spoke at the Vision 2040 press conference held at the Walker Theater, said that Chattanooga should forge a new Chattanooga way, one that involves a focus on collaboration. “The new way forward for great American cities will not be, ‘Okay, the chamber, you stay your lane and the city you stay in your lane. And African American communities, y’know, good luck and women, well, we got a women’s program for you,’ right?” Ryan said. “That’s not the way that cities of the future are getting work done.” The survey polled just over 4,800 residents. Each respondent spent about 10 minutes completing the survey, which was administered online. The authors of the survey were quick to tout the diversity of the respondents. The race of the participants tracked with what the U.S. Census Bureau finds is the makeup of Hamilton County. While 19.5 percent of Hamilton County is black according to the Bureau, 16 percent of the Velocity 2040 participants were black, for example. The survey was sponsored by a who’s-who of notable Chattanooga organizations, including the City of Chattanooga, the Benwood Foundation, the Chattanooga Chamber Foundation, and the Chattanooga Airport. According Ryan, envisioning and preparing for the future is a selfless act to better the lives of kids, who can’t vote on the future they are to inherit. “I don’t know how many of you have done the math of how old you


will be in 2040, but I certainly have,” Ryan said. “And if we want to leave a community worth inheriting to the people, younger and older, who are going to call this place home in the future, that means we've got to get down to work today.” When asked what three things should be done first to prepare for the future, the most frequent response, at 1,682 answers, was, “Make sure students have what they need to learn.” The second priority, coming in at 1,523 respondents, said that workforce training should be the priority. The next two priorities for participants were, “Make sure everyone in the community has a chance to earn enough money to live” (1,425 respondents) and creating jobs, nay careers, for people with fewer advantages (1,265). The next two priorities had concrete action points. “Improve roads, sidewalks, and bridges to meet the needs of the community,” said 1,206 participants. Behind that sat the priority of improving transportation. It might be intuitive to start a big new building project and call it preparing for the future. But if a city is a computer, Ryan said, Chattanooga should direct most of its focus on software. “You’ve got a software issue that we need to give as much time and attention to and that is how we work together,” Ryan said. “What is the new Chattanooga way? And what are you willing to do to contribute to the software of this community? Not just the hardware, the software of this community, so that the operating system for Hamilton County and Chattanooga is one where everyone can participate, everyone’s potential can be realized, and voices aren’t marginalized.” Christy Gillenwater, president of the Chattanooga Chamber, said improving collaboration could help enhance the city’s arts and culture. “We hope ultimately that ethos— we’re so well known for collaboration—well, let’s continue to take that to the next level so that all facets of the community are stronger,” she said.

If we want to leave a community worth inheriting to the people, younger and older, who are going to call this place home in the future, that means we've got to get down to work today.”

At the same time that Velocity 2040 debuted its study, Public Art Chattanooga, the public art program for Chattanooga, released a study of its own looking into the future of art in The Scenic City. Covered by The Pulse back in December, the study pulled from six focus groups and the responses of 222 people who took an online survey. Last week, Public Art Chattanooga introduced the plan before city council. The City Council of Chattanooga was scheduled to vote to adopt the resolution on Tuesday, Feb. 19. It is still a proposal, and every step that Public Art Chattanooga takes will need to be approved by the council down the road. The proposal lays out a vision of what public art could be in the city, and interestingly enough, it tracks closely with the conclusions of the Vision 2040 survey. Besides expressing a sense of place and connecting residents to a particular area of the city, public art can “encourage multi-disciplinary collaboration in the public and private sectors to create vibrant public spaces.” Furthermore, according to the study,

public art has the potential to “Celebrate our communities’ cultural assets, highlighting the unique character of our neighborhoods, honoring their histories and preserving quality of place.” There have been more than 150 outdoor art projects done for the public’s enjoyment in Chattanooga since the 1990s. And the study said Chattanoogans want more. “Chattanooga residents spoke loud and clear—they want more art in more places,” the report said. “They want Chattanooga to be known as a thriving arts center. Residents described public art as empowering, a reminder of their humanity, and as a conduit for dialogue. They regard public art as an important tool for telling Chattanooga’s story of transformation and renewal, as well as its painful past and imperfect present.” According to the plan, the city hopes to take on a greater mantle at facilitating public art. One of the plan’s recommendation is to “Develop a budget policy and capital improvement project (CIP) guidelines that allocate two percent of the City’s overall above-ground CIP

budget for integrated public art.” It’s a bold plan, as many cities allocate only one percent to public art. “If Chattanooga wants to be a destination for arts and culture, and wants to take things to the next level and really do some amazing things through public art, that’s the type of commitment we’d like to see to help sustain that,” said Katelyn Kirnie, director of Public Art Chattanooga. And right now, “it’s a little bit yearto-year,” Kirnie admits, as funding comes in fits and starts. She’s at least asking for a budget priority. Eventually she’d like to see that commitment solidified with an ordinance. According to the brief of the plan, the city wants to place more art in underserved communities, use regional artists for the art, and integrate art into the very planning stages of projects. For an artist, it’s a major career milestone to have a public art installation. Kirnie wants to increase transparency and look to local artists and hopefully bring racial equality in the public art sphere. “We have a lot of amazing local artists in this community and a lot of them do have experience creating works in the public realm,” Kirnie said. “But it’s a big professional leap and if you’ve never created art in the public space, your qualifications with the city’s competitive process, it’s gonna be tough to just jump into the field.” If the skyline with the Walnut Street Bridge and the Tennessee Aquarium has come to symbolize the Chattanooga renaissance, then what will come to symbolize the plans sketched by the residents who thought to ask: What does the future hold? Daniel Jackson is an independent journalist working in the Chattanooga area. He studied Communications at Bryan College and covered national events at the Washington Times before moving to Chattanooga several years ago.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Intersection Of Realism And Sacred Dreams Reagan Schmissrauter creates visionary work

Visiting Death Row At The CTC What impact does it have on a person— their soul, their life—to have freedom and self-respect stripped away and then seemingly returned years later after decades of incarceration? “The Exonerated”, a reader’s theatre production presented by the Chattanooga Theatre Centre on Sunday, attempts to answer this question through the words of six innocent men and women who, after years in prison, emerged from death row to try to reclaim what was left of their lives. Culled from interviews, letters, transcripts, case files, and the public record, “The Exonerated” tells the true stories of six wrongfully convicted survivors of death row, ultimately freed after serving varying years in prison, in their own words. It is performed as an anthology by 17 local actors seated behind music stands. This prize-winning play moves between first-person monologues and scenes set in courtrooms and prisons, with the six interwoven stories painting a picture of an American criminal justice system gone horribly wrong— and of six brave souls who persevered to survive it. All their stories were compiled and edited by Jessica Blank and Erik Jensen into a play that is both a riveting work of theatre and an exploration of the dark side of the criminal justice system. The performance begins at 3 p.m. Admission is $20. For tickets, call the Theatre Centre box office at (423) 267-8534 or visit TheatreCentre.com — Julie Van Valkenburg

By Tony Mraz Pulse contributor

From the very beginning of civilization, we created art. It is a creative way to express life and emotion; it is a way to capture the beauty of life.”

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HATTANOOGA IS HOME TO A BEVY OF INcredible figurative artists, one of whom is using his realism skills to create colorful visionary works. Though he has an extensive portfolio of traditional portrait and landscape work, Reagan Schmissrauter is best known for his imaginative illustrations. His work has been featured in several publications, and on the cover of Lauren Antrosiglio’s book “This Glorious Oblivion”. “Poetry, literature, music, and art have always been an intrinsic part of humanity,” he says by way of explaining the strong philosophical background to his art. “From the very beginning of civilization, we created art. It is a creative way to express life and emotion; it is a way to capture the beauty of life.”

Schmissrauter believes that art is about releasing this emotion, and feeling, into a physical piece of artwork. He makes art, he says, because he feels a need to create and leave a footprint behind on this planet. “To me, it is about healing the soul, creating something greater than ourselves,” he says. “It is related to language, religion, physics, math, biology, and many other subjects. Art is the glue that holds history together. It is basically a visual journal for


our lives, a reflection of creation—it’s about recording the things we love and want to express. It is a humanistic expression of life and passion—we create art because we are free in what we need to express to the world.” He was inspired at a young age by his brother, Mark Schmissrauter Jr., and his mother Virginia Schmissrauter. He started drawing when he was a toddler, and has been making art ever since. “Art is an expression of the soul. It is an act of creating something that means something to each of us. Art is an instinctual act—most people make it at an early age, with crayons and paper—at that age, everyone is an artist.” He focused on painting during high school at Baylor, under Laura Willet, before graduating from Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts. He was moved by the work of the master artists Michelangelo, da Vinci, Van Gogh, Mary Cassatt, Robert Henri, Edward Hopper, Renoir and Monet. After finishing school, he continued his education by apprenticing under master painter and sculptor Daud Akhriev for a year. He has since been deeply moved and inspired by artists in the local art community, including Jas Milam, Anne Meinert, Carol Lockrow, Melissa Hefferlin, Marguerite Anderson, Margaret Dyer, James Courtney, Timur Akhriev, Joy Thomas, and Elena Burykina. Schmissrauter works primarily with

Art is an expression of the soul. It is an act of creating something that means something to each of us.” oil, pastels, charcoal, and Conte crayons. He uses his hands and a pencil to measure his subjects, translating them proportionally onto the paper or canvas. His use of color is liberal, his palettes intense and highly saturated, which give his paintings a surreal, dreamlike quality. He paints with oil paints on luan, first drawing with the brush directly and developing patterns of light/dark and value. His subjects are things that he loves—family, pets, beautiful atmospheres and environments, all rendered with bright colors. He studies sacred geometry, and employs it in his work. “It is a building block for the natural world,” he explains. “Understanding it helps with my realistic paintings.” He works mostly from life, studying the human figure and selecting landscapes and subjects that move him. He enjoys painting from his imagination as well, and from poetry. Perhaps his best known painting is an interpretation of Lauren Antrosiglio’s poem “On Mill Avenue”, which was used as the cover for her book “This Glorious Oblivion”. An excerpt from the poem reads,

“This is the part of the desert where peyote grows The land of sacred visionaries and resurrected martyrs The night in my unconscious moves rapid and then soft and deliberate and I wake to incendiary day dreams miscolored visions that pollute my mind, It’s still early and I am following the bourbon to the end of the bottle gone and desperate jonesing for a good trip or a stale cigarette Silence penetrates the sting of the silver afternoon, evening coming round Somebody’s toilet’s clogged and I got nowhere to go but downtown” Schmissrauter is currently working on a 6x8-foot portrait honoring our local EMTs and firefighters. You can see more of his work on Facebook at “Schmissrauter Collection of Fine Art”. To commission a portrait, or to inquire about paintings, email him at rschmissrauter@gmail.com

THU2.21

FRI2.22

SAT2.23

“Fences”

“Poe’s Midnight Dreary”

“The Foreigner”

The story of a former Negro league baseball star and how his inability to go pro threatens to disrupt his entire life. 7 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. theatrecentre.com

What if Edgar Allan Poe's characters could speak with the writer himself? What would they say? 8 p.m. Covenant College 14049 Scenic Hwy. covenant.edu

"Froggy" LeSueur, a British demolitions expert, visits a fishing lodge in rural Georgia with a very shy young friend. 7:30 p.m. The Ringgold Playhouse 155 Depot St. cityofringgoldga.gov

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • THE PULSE • 11


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR THURSDAY2.21 Urban Farmers Market and Marketplace 3 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. millerparkmarket.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 5 p.m. Hutton & Smith Brewing Co. 431 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 760-3600 huttonandsmithbrewing.com BFA Graphic Design Show Gallery Opening 6 p.m. Southern Adventist University 4881 Taylor Cir. (800) 768-8437 southern.edu Antique Show & Sale Preview Party 7 p.m. Stratton Hall 3146 Broad St. (423) 667-4332 strattonhall.com “Fences” 7 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com “From the Streets to the Stage: The Journey of Fredrick Davis” 7 p.m. The Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com PSC Presents Barry Spruce 7 p.m. St. John’s United Methodist 3921 Murray Hills Dr. (423) 892-2257 stjohnumc.org John Harris Book Signing 7 p.m. Shuptrine’s Gallery 2613 Broad St. (423) 266-4453 shuptrinesgallery.com Casting The Canvas 4 7 p.m. The Hunter Museum of Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org

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“The Book of Mormon”

Dean Napolitano 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com “The Book of Mormon” 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com “The Foreigner” 7:30 p.m. The Ringgold Playhouse 155 Depot St. (706) 935-3061 cityofringgoldga.gov Alcoholics Not Anonymous Comedy Open Mic 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 chattanoogabarley.com Country Line Dancing Class 8 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. (423) 498-3069 westboundbar.com

FRIDAY2.22 Antique Show & Sale 6 p.m. Stratton Hall 3146 Broad St.

(423) 667-4332 strattonhall.com “Fireflies” 6:45 p.m. Signal Crest United Methodist 1005 Ridgeway Ave. (423) 886-2330 signalcrestumc.org “Free Solo” 7 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium IMAX 3D 201 Chestnut St. (423) 266-4629 tnaqua.org/imax Couple’s Massage 101 7:15 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Dean Napolitano 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com “The Book of Mormon” 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com “The Foreigner” 7:30 p.m. The Ringgold Playhouse 155 Depot St. (706) 935-3061 cityofringgoldga.gov Improv “Movie” Night:

Ugly Divorce Movie 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com “Fences” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com “Poe’s Midnight Dreary” 8 p.m. Covenant College 14049 Scenic Hwy. (706) 820-1560 covenant.edu Video Game Night 8 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com Ruby Falls Lantern Tours 8:30 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 rubyfalls.com Good, Old-Fashioned Improv Show 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SATURDAY2.23 Antique Show & Sale 10 a.m. Stratton Hall 3146 Broad St. (423) 667-4332 strattonhall.com Hot Glass Demo with Sherry Nickell 11 a.m. River Gallery 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033 river-gallery.com “The Book of Mormon” 2, 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com “Poe’s Midnight Dreary” 2:30 p.m.


Covenant College 14049 Scenic Hwy. (706) 820-1560 covenant.edu Winter in West Village 6 p.m. West Village 802 Pine St. westvillagechattanooga.com “Fireflies” 6:45 p.m. Signal Crest United Methodist 1005 Ridgeway Ave. (423) 886-2330 signalcrestumc.org “Free Solo” 7 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium IMAX 3D 201 Chestnut St. (423) 266-4629 tnaqua.org/imax “The Foreigner” 7:30 p.m. The Ringgold Playhouse 155 Depot St. (706) 935-3061 cityofringgoldga.gov Dean Napolitano 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Your Stories 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com “Fences” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Whose Line Chattanooga 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SUNDAY2.24 Antique Show & Sale Noon Stratton Hall 3146 Broad St. (423) 667-4332 strattonhall.com “The Book of Mormon”

English Country Dance for All!

Paths to Pints along the Riverwalk 6:30 p.m. The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. taphousechatt.com Chattanooga Symphony Orchestra Wind Quintet 7 p.m. Southern Adventist University 4881 Taylor Cir. (800) 768-8437 southern.edu English Country Dance for All! 7 p.m. Heritage House Arts Center 1428 Jenkins Rd. (423) 855-9474 chattanooga.gov

WEDNESDAY2.27 1:30, 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com “Fences” 2:30 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com “The Exonerated” 3 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Black History Celebration 5 p.m. Warren Chapel AME Church 503 N. Market St. (423) 267-4992 warrenchapelamechurch.org “A Portrait of Jason” 5 p.m. The Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com “Free Solo” 6 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium IMAX 3D 201 Chestnut St. (423) 266-4629 tnaqua.org/imax Dean Napolitano 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St.

(423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com

MONDAY2.25 Winter Belly Dance Session 5:45 p.m. Movement Arts Collective 3813 Dayton Blvd. (423) 401-8115 movementartscollective.com Joggers & Lagers 6 p.m. Chattanooga Brewing Co. 1804 Chestnut St. chattabrew.com

TUESDAY2.26 Wake Up & Run 6 a.m. Fleet Feet Sports 307 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 771-7996 fleetfeetchattanooga.com Chess K-night 5 p.m. Mad Priest Coffee Roasters 1900 Broad St. (423) 393-3834 madpriestcoffee.com Tuesday Night Chess Club 6 p.m. Downtown Library 1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattilibrary.com

Main Street Market 4 p.m. 522 W. Main St. mainstfarmersmarket.com Mixology 101: Whiskey 6 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com An Evening with Poet T K Lee 6:30 p.m. Star Line Books 1467 Market St. (423) 777-5629 starlinebooks.com Big Ed Caylor 7 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 7:30 p.m. The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com Open Mic Comedy 8 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • THE PULSE • 13


THE MUSIC SCENE

Naggin’ On My Mind New blues act brings old-school cool

Ukulele’s Very Own Maestro A talented and remarkable musician in his own right, Jake Shimabukuro arose to popularity through covering popular songs on YouTube. His most distinguished, a cover of The Beatles’ single “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”, has accumulated over 16 million views since it was first published 12 years ago. What attracted viewers to Shimabukuro’s rendition wasn’t his vocal ability or prior musical fame; it was the fact that he was playing the song on a ukulele. Shimabukuro has reworked songs of varying genres to fit the conventions of the ukulele. Besides “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”, he has performed ukulele variations of “Get Lucky”, “Hallelujah”, and even “Bohemian Rhapsody”. No matter the difficulty of transitioning a song’s composition of a variety of instruments to simply one, especially a ukulele, Shimabukuro somehow finds a way to successfully do so. His catalog isn’t limited to only covers, however. Shimabukuro has released 14 albums throughout his solo career, including last year’s The Greatest Day. His apparent talent and musical craft manifest that the ukulele isn’t a limited instrument if the one playing it is a master of his art. Jake Shimabukuro will be performing at Songbirds North this Tuesday at 7 p.m. For tickets and more information, visit events. songbirds.rocks — Jason Dale

By Marc T. Michael Pulse Music Editor

This young band has hot enough chops, soul, passion, and gravitas to immediately earn the admiration and respect of some of the biggest names in the industry.”

14 • THE PULSE • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

S

AY, HAVE YOU HEARD OF THAT HOT NEW blues act, GA-20? No? That’s okay, neither had I until a day or so ago.

That’s okay, too, because while I love music, and I try to write about it honestly and sincerely, I am not one of those people who can rattle off the stats of 6,000 different bands up to and including their special, limited edition releases and which ones have been arrested for criminally impersonating the clergy. My old friend Ray Dowdell (RIP) of Avatar Records could do that, but the man was a musical savant. Truth to tell, one of the great rewards of doing this for The Pulse is being exposed to a constant influx of bands and music I haven’t heard. At slightly more than a year old, GA20 is new to me. And unless you’re

passionately in tune with a particular genre of music, odds are they are new to you as well. I’ll tell you who has heard of them, though: Charlie Musselwhite and Luther Dickinson. If you have any love of the blues, you just sat up straight, because those are some big hitters. Both have enough appreciation for GA-20 to have appeared on their latest single, “Naggin’ on My Mind”. We’ll come back to them shortly. The point in name-dropping is to establish that this young band has hot enough chops, soul, passion, and gravitas to immediately earn the admiration and respect of some of the biggest names in the industry.


Pat Faherty and Matthew Stubbs are the friends who, through their mutual love of classic blues, R&B and early rock and roll, decided to get together and write their own page in music’s history book. Both are highly experienced guitar players whose dues were paid long before the formation of GA-20. Faherty has spent more than a decade playing guitar for the aforementioned Charlie Musselwhite, a genuine old-school blues harmonica legend who is said to be the inspiration for Dan Aykroyd’s “Elwood Blues” persona. Stubbs founded and continues to lead the instrumental psychedelic band, The Antiguas. Their devotion to and intense appreciation for the heavy electric blues of a bygone era led them to observe that there is a lack of this style in the current era of music, an error they mean to rectify through their own contributions. With the addition of Chris Anzalone on drums, the newly formed trio of guitar and percussion set out to make a

The raw energy of Faherty, Stubbs, and Anzalone is enough to transport you to a Deep South juke joint or the AM radio of an ancient Ford pick-up truck on a dusty Mississippi road.” name for themselves and in short order, they have. Nominally forming in fall of 2017, the band landed a deal with Karma Chief Records a year later. Three months later (now) their first single is out and is pure vintage blues gold. The raw energy of Faherty, Stubbs, and Anzalone is enough to transport you to a Deep South juke joint or the AM radio of an ancient Ford pick-up truck on a dusty Mississippi road. The special guest star addition of Musselwhite’s liquid fire blues harp and Dickinson’s (North Mississippi Allstars, Southern Soul Assembly, Black Crowes) screaming, crying guitar yanks you right out of the juke joint and sets

you down in the heart of early 20th century Chicago. The single is available now, and for a taste you can find it on YouTube or—along with several other tracks—on GA20’s webpage. Invest three minutes of your time and there’s no doubt you’ll come away with the realization that this band you hadn’t heard of is poised to be the biggest thing to hit the blues scene in a generation. If you’re a fan of vintage blues material, you’re already a fan GA-20 whether you know it or not. If the blues is new to you, you’ll scarcely find a better introduction to the granddaddy of rock and roll (and virtually everything musically that has followed since).

Stringer’s Ridge Band At OddStory Brewing

Stringer’s Ridge Band bridges the span between old world and new with their masterful blend of Celtic folk, old time music, and string band tunes. And this Friday you can hear them up close and personal at OddStory Brewing Company at 336 E. MLK. If you’re already a fan of these styles of music, you’ll find much to love in Stringer’s Ridge Band, but even if you’re unsure where you stand on the genres, it’s more than worth it to simply take this musical journey through history, following the jigs, reels, and ballads so many of our ancestors carried with them across the broad western ocean to plant new roots in Appalachia. The hills and valleys of the southeast proved fertile ground for planting the seeds of Scotland and Ireland’s music, where it quickly took hold and grew into something new and wholly American. Stringer’s Ridge runs the gamut of this history of Celtic sound. The show is from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. and the music will stir passions in your blood you scarcely knew were there. It’s the hottest show this side of St. Patrick’s Day and it happens Friday night at OddStory Brewing (where they also have some very fine beer). — MTM

THU2.21

FRI2.22

SAT2.23

WhiskerJam

Kindora

Radio Cult, Scarlet Love Conspiracy, and The Joel Beaver Band come together to raise money for the Humane Society. 7 p.m. The Chattanoogan Hotel 1201 Broad St. chattanooganhotel.com

Her music is indebted to early '90s R&B, but is infused with a modern pop sensibility and a great set of pipes. 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com

Magnificent Lions Album Release Party Nashville rockers Day Like This and hometown hero Daniel Nelson join the Lions for a big party! 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • THE PULSE • 15


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR THURSDAY2.21 Danimal & Friends 6 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Maya and Kyle 6 p.m. The Chattanoogan 1201 Broad St. chattanooganhotel.com Lew Card 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com WhiskerJam, feat. Radio Cult, Scarlet Love Conspiracy, and The Joel Beaver Band 7 p.m. The Chattanoogan Hotel 1201 Broad St. chattanooganhotel.com Tennessee Songwriter’s Week Open Mic Night 7 p.m. The Camp House 149 E. MLK Blvd. thecamphouse.com Toby Hewitt 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Webb Barringer 7 p.m. Edley’s Bar-B-Que 205 Manufacturers Rd. edleysbbq.com Uptown Big Band 7 p.m. The Honest Pint 35 Patten Pkwy. thehonestpint.com Double Cross 7:30 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Fuze Trio 7:30 p.m. UTC Cadek Hall 725 Oak St. utc.edu Keepin’ It Local 8 p.m. The Social 1110 Market St. publichousechattanooga.com Will Hoge Band

16 • THE PULSE • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

9 p.m. Songbirds South 35 Station St. events.songbirds.rocks Open Mic Night 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Airpark, Burning Giraffes, Lori Button 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

FRIDAY2.22 Flattop Boxers 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Megan Howard 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Tim Lewis 7 p.m. El Meson 248 Northgate Park elmesonchattanooga.com Stringer’s Ridge 7 p.m. Oddstory Brewing Company 336 E. MLK Blvd. oddstorybrewing.co

Joseph Decosimo & Luke Richardson 8 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Playing Possum Blues Band 8 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com OWEDA 8 p.m. Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Salsa On The Southside 8:30 p.m. Songbirds South 35 Station St. events.songbirds.rocks Matt Downer 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Amber Fults 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Barron Wilson 9 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Kindora 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s

LIVE MUSIC SPOTLIGHT

Take a journey back in time to the life and music of “The Man in Black” as performed by Cash Unchained. The band has toured all over the country bringing the sights and sounds of the

legendary Johnny Cash. Johnny Cash Birthday Bash Saturday, 9 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. events.songbirds.rocks

122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Thelma and the Sleeze, Ashley and the Xs, ET 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Graham Winchester & The Ammunition 9:30 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Rock Daddy 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SATURDAY2.23 Academy Honors Music Festival Concert 4 p.m. Collegedale Church of Seventh-day Adventists 4829 College Dr. E. collegedalechurch.com No Big Deal 6 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Jimmy Dormire 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jesse Jungkurth 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Shawn Galloway 7 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse 105 McBrien Rd. christunity.org Forever Bluegrass 7 p.m. Westbound Bar 24 Station St. westboundbar.com Tim Lewis 7 p.m. El Meson 248 Northgate Park elmesonchattanooga.com Jason Lyles and the Legitimizers


7 p.m. Virgola Wine Bar 608 Georgia Ave. chattanoogawinebar.com Kasey Chambers with Carly Burruss 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. events.songbirds.rocks Danny Sample 7:30 p.m. Jewish Cultural Center 5461 N. Terrace Rd. jewishchattanooga.com Magnificent Lions Album Release Party 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Aaron Carney Band 8 p.m. Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Wasted Riffs 8 p.m. Fireside Grille 3018 Cummings Hwy. firesidechattanooga.com The Dylan Kussman Band 8 p.m. Moccasin Bend Brewing Company 3210 Broad St. bendbrewingbeer.com John Scott 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Johnny Cash Birthday Bash with Cash Unchained & Outlaw 45 9 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. events.songbirds.rocks John Carroll 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Convertibull 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Drive Train 9 p.m. Trish’s Sports Bar

4762 Highway 58 (423) 269-8400 Super Happy Funtime Burlesque 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Red Necklace, DARE 10 p.m. Sluggo’s Vegetarian Cafe 505 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224 Rock Daddy 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SUNDAY2.24 Ellisa Sun 11 a.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Carl Pemberton 11 a.m. Westin Chattanooga 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com The Ugly Architect 1:30 p.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com The Other Brothers 2 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Monthly Jazz Jam 3 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Bluegrass Jam 4 p.m. Fiddlers Anonymous 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 Open Mic with Jeff Daniels 6 p.m. Long Haul Saloon 2536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 822-9775 The Molly Maguires 8 p.m. The Honest Pint 35 Patten Pkwy. thehonestpint.com

MONDAY2.25 Open Air with Jessica Nunn 6 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Pete Boubel 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m. The Coconut Room 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Very Open Mic with Shawnessey Cargile 8 p.m. The Well 1800 Rossville Blvd. #8 wellonthesouthside.com

TUESDAY2.26 Heatherly 6 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Company 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Dustin Concannon 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jake Shimabukuro 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. events.songbirds.rocks Danimal 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Space Jam Open Mic with Xll Olympians 7 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Chattanooga Symphony Orchestra Wind Quintet 7 p.m. Ackerman Auditorium 4881 Taylor Cir. southern.edu Live Jam Session with

Freddy Mc & Friends 8 p.m. Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Open Mic Night with Mike McDade 8 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band 8:30 p.m. Songbirds South 35 Station St. events.songbirds.rocks

WEDNESDAY2.27 Jonathan Wimpee 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jesse James Jungkurth 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Jazz In the Lounge 7 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org TNT 8 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Priscilla & Little Rickee 8 p.m. Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332 Andrea Colburn, Mud Mosley 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Zach Dallas 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com

Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • THE PULSE • 17


ERNIE PAIK’S RECORD REVIEWS

Theon Cross Fyah (Gearbox)

T

he general perception of the tuba is that it’s useful for comical sound effects—think of the brass tune that gets played on The Price Is Right after a contestant loses a game—or creating a soundtrack for parades of creatures of impressive girth. The truth is that the tuba is the often overlooked backbone of any brass or concert band, and in the right hands, it can be a more versatile and nimble instrument than one might think (the Canadian Brass’ impressive rendition of “Flight of the Bumblebee” comes to mind). This is certainly the case with the London-based jazz tubist Theon Cross, whose debut fulllength album Fyah isn’t merely a showcase for his instrument; it simultaneously looks back and looks forward, embracing both jazz traditions and more modern

synthetic treatments and rhythmic styles. The opening track “Activate” explodes with Moses Boyd’s booming, agitated drumming and a bass punch from Cross’ tuba, which sounds like it’s run through a harmonizer for a thicker sound; as a duo, it sounds like a panicking person flailing and trying to escape from a tar pit, and then Nubya Garcia on tenor saxophone hops around like a taunting boxer. On “Radiation”, Cross’ complicated and slightly distorted bass line provides a slippery groove as Boyd lays down a trippy funk rhythm, and Garcia and Cross nonchalantly slide into call-andresponse exchanges. Cross’ sound can be guttural and friendly at the same time, from a low grunt to a higher, almost delicate bubble-pop; sometimes there’s a muddy quality to it, as if trying to replicate a synthesizer’s tone, while at other times there’s a woody and lightly percussive quality, similar to a plucked contrabass. The album hardly lets up in its exhilarating second half, with the dance-oriented “Candace of Meroe” sporting extra percussion and wah-wah electric guitar flourishes, with a fast Fela Kuti afrobeat vibe to it. “Panda Village” is driven by its jittery, post-jungle drumming, generating a lot of sound and textures from the core tuba/sax/ drums trio, and its cool-down

ending offers a segue into the easy listening, smooth-jazz track “CIYA” that features an interesting guitar solo from Artie Zaitz that oddly sounds like a scampering electric piano. Fyah has many strengths—its bold, bass-heavy, subwoofer-testing sound, its unabashed spotlight on the tuba’s versatility, and Boyd’s inspired drumming, incorporating stimulating dance and funk patterns into the jazz realm.

Jessica Pavone In the Action (Relative Pitch)

N

YC violist Jessica Pavone has composed evocative chamber music, released several duo albums with guitarist Mary Halvorson and played in ensembles formed by avant-jazz heavyweights Anthony Braxton and Henry Threadgill, and she goes even further into music’s fringes in several bands, including the intense no-wave band Normal Love

and the disquieting duo Dark Tips. However, some of Pavone’s most intriguing work is found on her solo viola albums, on which a certain rawness is often balanced with (or pitted against) a more formal sonic experimentation. Pavone’s new solo instrumental viola album In the Action employs distinct approaches on each of its four tracks, and the opening note of the first track, “Oscillatory Salt Transport”, is the most familiar note in classical concert settings—an open A, used for tuning purposes before the orchestra begins its program; but here, it goes from the familiar to the unfamiliar relatively quickly. String harmonics are played roughly—not the delicate ring that harmonics typically have in classical music, but a shrill, harsh tone, and Pavone alternates between strings to play the same pitch with increasing speed, getting frenetic with violent sawing motions. The 10-minute piece unfurls methodically, as Pavone proceeds from wispy and uncertain gliding to generating a peculiar rhythm with a bow that dances and hops across the strings briskly. “and Maybe in the End” seems to be the result of tweaking effects pedals just right to generate a special formula for sound transformation. In this case, the original sounds are major-key pizzicato chords, sounding a bit like a ukulele, and the sound

processing involves heavy reverb and distortion; the manipulated sounds have enough separation from the source to create huge, menacing shadows that are their own entities. The inconsistent capitalization in the track name “Look Out Look Out - look Out” perhaps suggests ambiguity where one phrase (the words or the sounds) actually begins among a repeated pattern; to clarify, “look OUT!” (a warning) could be heard as “outlook” when repeated, or even the word “lookout”. Sonically, the track features thick, oppressive tones that have been treated to the point where they don’t sound like they originated from an acoustic string instrument; the sounds fold in on themselves with the loudness of aircraft, shape-shifting like a murmuration of starlings. “In the Action” oddly resembles elements of country music with chords based on an open string, and the repetition becomes more machine-like, like a robot fiddler. Eventually, a pulsating synthetic sound blob enters, offering a pulse that seems to pump alien blood, and Pavone violently slaps her bow against the strings, even getting percussive sounds with the wood of the bow, and tears away sharp, piercing notes with severe distortion, ending a fascinating album that concentrates less on melodic variation and more on interesting timbres and real-time sound manipulation.

Follow The Pulse on Facebook (we’re quite likeable) www.facebook.com/chattanoogapulse 18 • THE PULSE • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Cartographers of Old Europe sometimes drew pictures of strange beasts in the uncharted regions of their maps. These were warnings to travelers that such areas might harbor unknown risks, like dangerous animals. One famous map of the Indian Ocean shows an image of a sea monster lurking, as if waiting to prey on sailors traveling through its territory. If I were going to create a map of the frontier you’re now headed for, Pisces, I would fill it with mythic beasts of a more benevolent variety, like magic unicorns, good fairies, and wise centaurs. ARIES (March 21-April 19): In December 1915, the California city of San Diego was suffering from a draught. City officials hired a professional “moisture accelerator” named Charles Hatfield, who promised to make it rain. Soon Hatfield was shooting explosions of a secret blend of chemicals into the sky from the top of a tower. The results were quick. A deluge began in early January of 1916 and persisted for weeks. Thirty inches of rain fell, causing floods that damaged the local infrastructure. The moral of the story, as far as you’re concerned, Aries: when you ask for what you want and need, specify exactly how much you want and need. Don’t make an open-ended request that could bring you too much of a good thing. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Actors Beau Bridges and Jeff Bridges are brothers born to parents who were also actors. When they were growing up, they already had aspirations to follow in their mom’s and dad’s footsteps. From an early age, they summoned a resourceful approach to attracting an audience. Now and then they would start a pretend fight in a store’s parking lot. When a big enough crowd had gathered to observe their shenanigans, they would suddenly break off from their faux struggle, grab their guitars from their truck, and begin playing music. In the coming weeks, I hope you’ll be equally ingenious as you brainstorm about ways to expand your outreach. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): According to Edward Barnard’s book New York City Trees, a quarter of the city is shaded by its 5.2 million trees. In other words, one of the most densely populated, frantically active places on the planet has a rich collection of oxygen-generating greenery. There’s even a virgin forest at the upper tip of Manhattan, as well as five botanical gardens and the 843-acre Central Park. Let’s use all this bounty-amidst-thebustle as a symbol of what you should strive to foster in the coming weeks: refreshing lushness and grace interspersed throughout your busy, hustling rhythm.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): As a poet myself, I regard good poetry as highly useful. It can nudge us free of our habitual thoughts and provoke us to see the world in ways we’ve never imagined. On the other hand, it’s not useful in the same way that food and water and sleep are. Most people don’t get sick if they are deprived of poetry. But I want to bring your attention to a poem that is serving a very practical purpose in addition to its inspirational function. Simon Armitage’s poem “In Praise of Air” is on display in an outdoor plaza at Sheffield University. The material it’s printed on is designed to literally remove a potent pollutant from the atmosphere. And what does this have to do with you? I suspect that in the coming weeks you will have an extra capacity to generate blessings that are like Armitage’s poem: useful in both practical and inspirational ways.

astrological omens, I propose that we make da Volterra your antirole model for the coming weeks. Don’t be like him. Don’t engage in cover-ups, censorship, or camouflage. Instead, specialize in the opposite: revelations, unmaskings, and expositions.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1979, psychologist Dorothy Tennov published her book Love and Limerence: The Experience of Being in Love. She defined her newly coined word “limerence” as a state of adoration that may generate intense, euphoric, and obsessive feelings for another person. Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Leos are most likely to be visited by this disposition throughout 2019. And you’ll be especially prone to it in the coming weeks. Will that be a good thing or a disruptive thing? It all depends on how determined you are to regard it as a blessing, have fun with it, and enjoy it regardless of whether or not your feelings are reciprocated. I advise you to enjoy the hell out of it!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Michael Jackson’s 1982 song “Beat It” climbed to number three on the record-sales charts in Australia. On the other hand, “Weird Al” Yankovic’s 1984 parody of Jackson’s tune, “Eat It,” reached number one on the same charts. Let’s use this twist as a metaphor that’s a good fit for your life in the coming weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you may find that a stand-in or substitute or imitation will be more successful than the original. And that will be auspicious!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Based in Switzerland, Nestle is the largest food company in the world. Yet it pays just $200 per year to the state of Michigan for the right to suck up 400 million gallons of groundwater, which it bottles and sells at a profit. I nominate this vignette to be your cautionary tale in the coming weeks. How? 1. Make damn sure you are being fairly compensated for your offerings. 2. Don’t allow huge, impersonal forces to exploit your resources. 3. Be tough and discerning, not lax and naïve, as you negotiate deals. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Sixteenth-century Italian artist Daniele da Volterra wasn’t very famous for his own painting and sculpture. The work for which we remember him today is the alterations he made to Michelangelo’s giant fresco The Last Judgment, which spreads across an entire wall in the Sistine Chapel. After Michelangelo died, the Catholic Church hired da Volterra to “fix” the scandalous aspects of the people depicted in the master’s work. He painted clothes and leaves over the originals’ genitalia and derrieres. In accordance with

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): What is the quality of your access to life’s basic necessities? How well do you fulfill your need for good food and drink, effective exercise, deep sleep, thorough relaxation, mental stimulation, soulful intimacy, a sense of meaningfulness, nourishing beauty, and rich feelings? I bring these questions to your attention, Scorpio, because the rest of 2019 will be an excellent time for you to fine-tune and expand your relationships with these fundamental blessings. And now is an excellent time to intensify your efforts.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The Space Needle in Seattle, Washington is 605 feet high and 138 feet wide: a tall and narrow tower. Near the top is a round restaurant that makes one complete rotation every 47 minutes. Although this part of the structure weighs 125 tons, for many years its motion was propelled by a mere 1.5 horsepower motor. I think you will have a comparable power at your disposal in the coming weeks: an ability to cause major movement with a compact output of energy. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1941, the Ford automobile company created a “biological car.” Among its components were “bioplastics” composed of soybeans, hemp, flax, wood pulp, and cotton. It weighed a thousand pounds less than a comparable car made of metal. This breakthrough possibility never fully matured, however. It was overshadowed by newly abundant plastics made from petrochemicals. I suspect that you Aquarians are at a phase with a resemblance to the biological car. Your good idea is promising but unripe. I hope you’ll spend the coming weeks devoting practical energy to developing it. (P.S. There’s a difference between you and your personal equivalent of the biological car: little competition.)

“You’re All Out of Order”—it’s all about the position. ACROSS 1 Bodily pouches (and not something like what Santa carries, unfortunately) 5 Airline to Adelaide 11 Adversary 14 How some sit by 15 Lacking the resources 16 Hedwig, for one 17 Midday song by The Moody Blues, out of order? 19 Cup edge 20 Blissful 21 Jots down 23 Throat problem, briefly 24 “Forgot About ___” (2000 single) 26 Frigid 27 Oscar winner 29 Stylish, to some 32 “We try harder” rental company 35 “Forever Mine” singer Day 37 Ray of sunshine 38 “Good Will Hunting” campus 39 Comedian Black who was Anger

in “Inside Out” 40 GOP fundraising org. 41 It’s red, white, and blue for a bunch of countries 43 “Love Story” author Segal 44 “The Duchess of Alba” painter 45 Croquet need 47 “Far out!” 49 “Smallville” villain Luthor 50 “Moonrise Kingdom” director Anderson 51 Addis ___ (Ethiopia’s capital) 55 Breed of chicken once known as Indian Game 58 Vexation 59 Kimono sash 60 Punny Stephan Pastis comic strip, out of order? 63 Guitar master Paul 64 “Honor Thy Father” author Gay 65 River from Lake Victoria 66 Turn purple?

67 Like some tomatoes 68 Boat bottom DOWN 1 Building locations 2 Mature 3 Disperse 4 “All ___ go!” 5 College square 6 “... join in ___ reindeer games” 7 Photographer Goldin 8 Short loin cut 9 ___ gobi (Indian potato dish) 10 Mailed, as a contest entry, way back when 11 Temperature where the Fahrenheit and Celsius scales meet, out of order? 12 Boo-boo 13 They give shade 18 ___-Provera (birth control injection) 22 “But she’s calling ___” (“Mr. Brightside”) 24 Off-thehighway eatery 25 It pairs with steak 28 Parking person 29 Malia’s sister

30 Buffoonish 31 1970s song whose first two words denote the first two letters 32 Letters on a boom box 33 ‘80s “This Old House” host Bob 34 Persevere, out of order? 36 Some side dishes 42 Country singer Campbell 44 Fail to bring up a memory 46 Is 48 Cassette contents 50 During 52 Eagle’s perch 53 Disney “princess” fond of reading 54 Adams who photographed Yosemite 55 Target of some over-the-counter medicine 56 Toe the line 57 Go after flies 58 Went 40 in a 20 zone, e.g. 61 Mint-condition 62 Ending for Nepal

Copyright © 2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents perminute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 924 CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • THE PULSE • 19


FILM & TELEVISION

Fyre Festival Postmortem Documenting the music festival disaster

“Jason” Sees The Light Of Day On the night of December 2, 1966, Shirley Clarke and a tiny crew convened in her apartment at the Hotel Chelsea to make a film. There, for twelve straight hours they filmed the one-and-only Jason Holliday as he spun tales, sang, donned costumes, and reminisced about good times and bad behavior as a gay hustler, sometime houseboy and aspiring cabaret performer. The result is a mesmerizing portrait of a remarkable, charming and tortured man, who is by turns hilarious and heartbreaking. So when Milestone decided to re-release Portrait of Jason as part of its series of restored films by Shirley Clarke, co-founder Dennis Doros had his work cut out for him: the film’s original elements were untraceable and existing 35mm prints were worn and scratched. At times, the restoration of this seminal LGBT documentary looked like it might end up to be an extended wild goose chase. Thankfully, after a two-year search, and with the cooperation of archivists, researchers, and writers from around the world, Doros was finally able to identify mislabeled “outtakes” as the film’s original 16mm interpositive. Come see it in all its restored glory this Sunday at the Palace Theatre on Georgia Ave. beginning at 5 p.m., part of the ongoing “Sunday Slasher” film series. — Michael Thomas

By John DeVore Pulse Film Editor

Fyre Festival sounds like a festival for people like me. At least, people like me with a whole lot more money.”

20 • THE PULSE • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

R

IVERBEND WAS MY FIRST MUSIC FESTIVAL. I WAS around 18 or 19 and I had travelled around to the various metro areas of Tennessee and seen quite a few of my favorite artists in individual concerts, or occasionally touring with someone else I liked.

Riverbend cost about the same as those concerts, but had more performers, albeit performers who were a little beyond their prime. But there was a girl I liked in Chattanooga; I had a few friends in the area and plenty of spare time. And that’s how I ended up watching Collective Soul from what seemed like really far away, on a wet curb in the rain. It wasn’t the best, but the company wasn’t terrible.

I’ve been to a few other festivals since, others with better artists, but it’s always been a similar experience. Too many people, too far away, weather dependent. Bigger festivals sound even worse. To me, the idea of camping outside for days with smelly, intoxicated people surrounded by port-a-potties sounds about as enjoyable as a root canal, no matter how great the music is. Fyre Festival, as it was billed,


sounds like a festival for people like me. At least, people like me with a whole lot more money. It was meant to be a luxury music festival in the Bahamas, filled with white sands, supermodels, copious amounts of alcohol, and the hottest music on the planet. It didn’t end up that way, though. Fyre Festival was a scam in every sense of the word. There are two competing documentaries about the Fyre Festival—Fyre Fraud, which debuted on Hulu, and Fyre, which debuted on Netflix. Both came out around the same time and both are rated about the same. I’ve only watched Fyre, for no reason other than I had Netflix opened first. I’m sure Fyre Fraud has its own interesting take, but to be honest, the subject isn’t twodocumentary interesting. One is more than enough, unless you’re a person who really enjoys watching rich young people get taken for thousands of dollars. But we’re getting ahead of ourselves. The story begins with an upand-coming entrepreneur and promotor named Billy McFarland. McFarland created the festival in order to advertise for a new app, called Fyre, of course. The app was meant to provide users with a direct link to artists, allowing any-

In the end, the festival collapsed completely, leaving attendees stranded on a desert island, workers without pay, and criminal charges pending.” one to book anyone for any event, cutting out the middle men. If you have $100,000 and want Lil’ Wayne for your birthday party, the Fyre app could help with that. The app was given legitimacy (if such a thing is possible) by rapper and investor Ja Rule. At some point in the app’s development, Fyre Festival was conceived. As the documentary unfolds, the audience sees an unbelievable amount of hubris and wishful thinking combined with a complete lack of detail-oriented planning. Even before the fraud becomes glaringly obvious, it’s clear that the people in charge of the festival had no understanding of event planning. In the end, the festival collapsed completely, leaving attendees stranded on a desert island, workers without pay, and criminal charges pending. How does something like the Fyre Festival even happen? Simply put, scammers are gonna scam. There’s no limit to the number of red flags some people will ignore

when they’re excited about exclusivity. The Fyre Festival was wildly successful at marketing—they paid a variety of Instagram models and “influencers” exorbitant amounts of money to promote the festival on their accounts. They made giant promises about the accommodations, using stock photos and pretty pictures, and certain people ate it up. As it turns out, the amount of money a person has doesn’t have any bearing on their ability to be duped. At the very least, you’d hope that lessons were learned. The documentary suggests otherwise, though. The aftermath of the festival, particularly the fate of Billy McFarland, is probably the most shocking part of the entire documentary. Some people just can’t help themselves. This week, Ja Rule announced that Fyre Festival 2.0 is happening. Who is going to buy those tickets? The same people that bought tickets to the first festival, probably. We’ll meet back here next for the documentary sequel.

✴ NEW IN THEATERS ✴

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World When Hiccup discovers Toothless isn't the only Night Fury, he must seek "The Hidden World", a secret Dragon Utopia, before a hired tyrant named Grimmel finds it first. Director: Dean DeBlois Stars: Jay Baruchel, America Ferrera

Run the Race Against the backdrop of high school football and track, two brothers in a small Southern town face escalating problems with two different world views, straining—but ultimately strengthening—the bonds of brotherhood. Director: Chris Dowling Stars: Mykelti Williamson, Frances Fisher

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • THE PULSE • 21


FOOD & DRINK · SUSHI & BISCUITS

From Ukraine With Love: Borscht! The savory beet-based soup claims a true believer

“Y Mike McJunkin Pulse columnist

The flavor of the beets was balanced with the smokiness of the pork, the complex richness of a halfdozen other vegetables, and the creamy, nutty tang of the smetana.”

Mike McJunkin is a native Chattanoogan who has traveled abroad extensively, trained chefs, and owned and operated restaurants. Join him on Facebook at facebook.com/SushiAndBiscuits

OU NEVER TRY BORSCHT? Sit, sit, sit…I bring you borscht.” And so I sat. As I waited, I recounted the hours spent watching Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoons, Catskill comedians and dark WWII documentaries that had painted borscht as part food/part punitive pabulum to my young, impressionable mind. I imagined borscht to be a watery-thin soup that tasted like someone threw a bunch of unwashed beets into a bucket of tepid bathwater. But the aromas coming from the back of this tiny immigrant market were intensely enticing, familiar, and comforting. The bedsheet-cum-kitchen door pulled aside and this diminutive but sturdy Ukrainian woman set a bowl of distressingly bright red soup in front of me. BROTH • 2 lbs pork ribs • ½ lb pork trotters, split • Salt and pepper • 2 Tbsp vegetable oil • 8 oz onion, roughly diced • 8 oz carrot, roughly diced • 4 oz celery, roughly diced • 6 cloves garlic, crushed • 1 Tbsp tomato paste • 1 lb beef marrow bones • 1 lb smoked ham hock • 2 sprigs fresh dill • 1 bay leaf BORSCHT • 12 oz onion, diced small • 4 oz carrot, diced small • 2 oz celery diced small • 6 cloves garlic, minced • 6 oz celery root/celeriac, peeled and diced small • 6 oz parsnip, peeled and diced small • 2 lbs red beets, peeled and diced small • 8 oz cabbage, shredded • 1 14-oz can diced tomato

22 • THE PULSE • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

“This is my family’s recipe,” she proudly proclaimed. “Borscht is Ukrainian, but everyone thinks it’s Russian. Borscht,” she said, “is like bird—it does not know boundaries.” I lifted the spoon to my lips and was instantly baptized in smoky, meaty, sweet, and sour flavors that were astoundingly delicious. The flavor of the beets was balanced with the smokiness of the pork, the complex richness of a half-dozen other vegetables, and the creamy, nutty tang of the smetana (sour cream with caraway seeds). Every bite washed a few more years of borscht stereotypes away, and by the time the bowl was empty I was a fullthroated devotee of this ruby-red legend. There are as many types of borscht as there are cooks, so pick your recipe accordingly. There’s cold borscht, hot borscht; chicken, beef, fish, pork, and • 1 lb russet potatoes, diced small • ½ lb kielbasa, diced • Balsamic vinegar, to taste • 1 cup sour cream • 2 teaspoon caraway seeds, toasted and ground • Minced fresh dill, for garnish Make the broth: Season pork ribs and trotters liberally with salt and pepper. In a large, heavy-bottomed stockpot, heat oil over medium-high heat until shimmering and brown the pork ribs and trotters on all sides. Remove meat from pot and set aside. Add onion, carrot, celery, and garlic to pot and cook (scraping up any browned bits), until starting to brown. Stir in tomato paste and cook for two minutes before adding four quarts water, pork ribs, trotters, marrow bones, ham hock, dill, parsley, and bay leaf. Bring to a simmer over med-high heat, then lower heat to a gentle simmer and cook until meat is tender—about 3 hours. Strain the broth, reserving meats and bones; discard vegetables. You should have

even vegetarian borscht. It can be red, white, or green; sour or unctuous; thin or thick. There’s a borscht for every taste, every occasion, for every one of God’s own children. My favorite recipes are the smoky, meaty versions, like the traditional Ukrainian style recipe I’ve provided below. Go therefore and make disciples, baptizing them in borscht’s glorious, beety goodness. about 3 quarts of broth. (If needed, add water to bring it up to three quarts). Make the borscht: Pick meat from pork ribs and ham hocks, push marrow from bones and discard all bones. Cut the meats into a small dice and set aside. Skim rendered fat from surface of broth and reserve 1/4 cup. In a large, heavy-bottomed stockpot, heat the 1/4 cup reserved fat over medhigh heat, add onion, carrot, celery, and garlic and cook, stirring, until softened. Add three quarts meat broth and bring to a simmer. Add diced meats, celery root, parsnip, beets, cabbage, and tomatoes to broth, and cook until vegetables are tender—about 20 minutes. Add potatoes and kielbasa and cook until potatoes are tender—about 15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, then add vinegar a tablespoon at a time to achieve a balance between sweet and sour. Stir toasted caraway seeds into the sour cream and lightly season with salt. Serve soup hot with a dollop of caraway sour cream and minced fresh dill.


CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 21, 2019 • THE PULSE • 23


Profile for Brewer Media Group

The Pulse 16.08 » February 21, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative

The Pulse 16.08 » February 21, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative