Page 1


THEN & NOW


“ Imperfection is beauty, madness is genius and it’s better to be absolutely ridiculous than absolutely boring.” Marilyn Monroe


THERE’S A REASON WHY cigarettes went out of style.

Please don’t smoke. You are better off without it.


table of

CONTENTS

26 50 60

ART

Exhibitionist Creative Spaces A “Superstar” Recalls Her Factory Years Edie ‘Taxi’ Sedgwick

ENTERTAINMENT Electra Heart The Mystery of the Femme Fatale Donald & Roger, Peggy and Betty

FASHION

Jean Patchett Bouffant Queen Award-Winning Elegance

14 20 26 38

50 84 86

60 78 80


pivo

Contributers

1

Meet Kacie. “No one means all he says, and yet very few say all they mean, for words are slippery and thought is viscous.” Henry Adams

2

Meet Breanne. “In the long run, we shape our lives, and we shape ourselves. The process never ends until we die. And the choices we make are ultimately our own responsibility.” Eleanor Roosevelt

3

Meet Brenna. “You must be the person you have never had the courage to be. Gradually, you will discover that you are that person, but until you can see this clearly, you must pretend and invent.” Paulo Coelho


Breanne Fencl

2

1 e

ci

Ka rt

ha

er

Eb r

cto

ire

eD

tiv

ea

Cr

3

Brenna Paxton

We are here to document moments of our cultural history. APRIL 2013 | pivo

09


beauty & strength Your nail color can suggest a lot about you. So be sure to polish your nails with a color you can count on—a polish that wouldn’t dream of chipping or fading away. Choose from 200+ beautiful and long lasting shades at OPI.com Be yourself. Love yourself.


Revolutionary.


Das Auto.


Exhibitionist

Skye Sherwin and Robert Clark ÁRHSYX[LEX¸WLETTIRMRKMREVX around the United Kingdom.

1IXVSTSPMW6IÂIGXMSRW3R8LI1SHIVR'MX]&MVQMRKLEQ

It remains a curious fact that the amazing complexity of

portraits of disaffected suburban Paris youth. Such critical

modern cities has rarely been convincingly captured in art.

urban perspectives are balanced by a Grazia Toderi video

So this new collection with an urban theme is a welcome

in which the nocturnal cityscape is seen as a hallucinatory

contribution. Miao Xiaochun’s gigantic photographic panora-

dome of pleasurable visions.

ma of Beijing’s rush hour sits with Mohamed Bourouissa’s Birmingham Art Gallery, to 23 Jun

14

pivo

| APRIL 2013


ART pivo

;EPO3R0SRHSR The artists in this peripatetic show take the simple act of walking in unexpected directions. Some works are truly epic, as with Marina Abramovic and Ulay’s The Great Wall Walk. The duo began their 2,500km hike from opposite ends of China’s Great Wall, met in the middle and, in a grand symbolic gesture, finished their relationship as artistic collaborators and lovers. Others appear slightly more prosaic: Britain’s famed “walking artist” Richard Long takes lengthy rambles through the countryside, making ephemeral sculptures as he goes with stones he finds on the roadside. Perhaps the most intrepid journey is the one undertaken by an urban fox, let loose after dark to run through the National Portrait Gallery’s corridors, in Francis Alÿs’s The Nightwatch. PM Gallery And House, W5, to 5 May

Northern Art Prize, Leeds We’ll have to wait until 23 May to find out who gets the £16,500 prize money but in the meantime the work of the shortlisted contenders for the Northern Art Prize is here for all to argue over. Margaret Harrison’s feminist provocations are worth a bet, as are Rosalind Nashashibi’s video shorts. Emily Speed’s sculptures and performances will appeal to fans of more out-there art, while the collaborative duo Joanne Tatham & Tom O’Sullivan appear to question the operation of the art world itself with their work of vaudeville comedy and absurdist theatre. Leeds Art Gallery, to 16 Jun


pivo ART

6SFIVX*MPPMSY8LI-RWXMXYXI3J)RHPIWW4SWWMFMPMXMIW0IIHW There’s a playfulness to the late artist Robert Filliou’s work that one rarely finds in his more sober UK contemporaries; his maxim was that “art is what makes life more interesting than art”. Associated with fluxus, the 60s movement that rebelled against all fixed definitions of art, Filliou’s work existed in the space between the artist’s production and the audience’s response; his art being less about the object than its presentation and interpretation. Work here includes 16,000 dice, with all sides numbered one. Obviously, to engage with Filliou’s art, game-players have to be in a pretty enigmatic frame of mind. Henry Moore Institute, to 23 Jun

Fiona Mackay, Norwich At first, Fiona Mackay’s paintings hark back to mid-century US abstraction. On the one hand, her work recalls Barnett Newman’s stripes or Mark Rothko’s fuzzy planes; on the other, the slightly later generation of colour field artists, such as Morris Louis or Helen Frankenthaler, who applied pigment to absorbent canvas so there was no point at which the paint ended and its fabric base started. Mackay brings experiments in making paint and its support one and the same up to date, putting a new-agey, domestic twist on what’s often a male-dominated pursuit. Her paintings are created using batik dye and wax on very thin canvas. The results are unpredictable, giving a playfulness to Mackay’s creations.

Outpost Gallery, Tue 2 Apr to 21 Apr


Kenneth Anger: Icons, London

Among the many achievements of his 80-plus years, it’s

red and midnight-blue rooms. Largely focused on the Baby-

Kenneth Anger’s love-hate relationship with Tinseltown’s

lon era, his treasures include photos of Errol Flynn and Bette

gaudier side that Anger remains best known for. The kid

Davis; sheet music for DW Griffith’s The Fall Of Babylon; and

who learned to dance with Shirley Temple penned the hair-

the original programme for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the

raising account of debauchery from cinema’s golden age,

1935 movie adaptation in which Anger played one of the

Hollywood Babylon. Giving an intimate insight into his in-

forest fairies.

fluences and interests, Anger has here installed his movie memorabilia archive just as it is in his LA home, in velvet-

Sprüth Magers, W1, to 20 Apr

APRIL 2013 | pivo

17


Kenneth Anger’s Icons is on display at Spßth Magers, WI until April 20th.


pivo ART

creative spaces

Create an airy, cheerful space with white rooms punctuated by pops of color!


Carpe Art Print, $25 Society 6

Luxe Wooly Throw, $798 Anthropologie

VITA Panton Chair, $300 Mod Livin’

APRIL 2013 | pivo

21


pivo ART

Striped pillows and throw provide the white sofa with color, and a daring cobalt blue upholstered vintage armchair makes things homey.

22

pivo

| APRIL 2013


140 years of the finest in high quality tea blends.


Look forward to Friday nights in.


26

pivo

| APRIL 2013


andy & jane.

A “Superstar” Recalls Her Factory Years

jane holzer


Gerard Malanga, Ivy Nicholson, Jane Holzer, and others on the set at the Factory, c. 1965

28

pivo

| APRIL 2013


A

fter a very successful modeling career in the early ‘60s, Jane Holzer, nicknamed “’Baby Jane” by the press, became one of the fabulous Warhol “Superstars.” She appeared in many SJLMWYRHIVKVSYRHÁPQWMRXLEXTIVMSHMRGPYHMRK7SET3TIVE The Kiss, and Chelsea Girls, and was known for her Hollywood-

WX]PIFIEYX]ERHQEKRMÁGIRXQERISJLEMV,SP^IVEPWSETVIEVIHMR.SLR4EPQIV ERH(EZMH;IMWQER¸WÁPQ'MES1ERLEXXER[MXL)HMI7HK[MGO0EXIVSRWLI opened an ice cream shop, Sweet Baby Jane’s in Palm Beach, Florida. She Currently resides in New York and Palm Beach. When Andy filmed you for what he called the “screen tests,” he realized that they needed someone like you to fill the role of the charismatic, to be what he coined a “superstar.” Before then the Factory had

wasn’t like a photographic session. “Yeah,

Naomi Levine and others for their

you look great.” None of that, no, no, no.

underground films, but they needed

Would he have the newspaper up in

someone of your stature.

front of his face, reading while the

Really? I didn’t know that then.

camera was rolling?

So what was the screen test like to

I never saw him do that.

sit through?

How did you get into Andy War-

It was great. Andy would just turn on thecamera

hol’s underground films?

and walk away. And he’d tell you “Don’t blink.”

I was walking on the street with Nikki

That was his only “direction.” How, could you

Haslem, who at that point was editor of

not blink for three minutes? I would really try

Show magazine. I think Nikki might have

not to look too weird. It’s so unreal not to blink.

introduced us on the corner of 59th Street,

Where were the tests done?

right in front of Bloomingdale’s. Andy said,

At the factory.

“Oh, I’m making a movie called Soap Op-

So he actually walked away and just left the camera running? I don’t remember. He would start filming, and I don’t remember. Music was always playing. Sometimes Andy would be there, but it


Little Electric Chair, c. 1964-65. Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 22 x 28 in.

30

pivo

era. Would you want to be in it?” And I said

We wanted to ask you how you got

“Sure.” Ever since then, we were friends.

the moniker “Baby Jane.”

The next week or so, I had this amazing din-

Oh God. There was this columnist called Car-

ner at my father-in-law’s house where I lived

ol Bjorkman and Joan Crawford, Bette Da-

on Park Avenue.

vis film Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?

So Andy came, David Bailey, Mick Jagger,

had just been released. She hadn’t seen it, I

Keith Richards, Dacid McEwen, Nikki Has-

hadn’t seen it, but I guess she thought, We’ll

lem, and me. I considered it a perfect dinner.

just crown her Baby Jane. Then I went to see

That was a famous dinner.

Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? and I

Wow. So then Andy invited you to

wanted to die. But the name stuck.

be filmed at the factory?

What was Andy like in those days?

Yes, he did. The first thing I worked on – ac-

He was wonderful. But there was an edge

tually with Jerry Banjamin and Sam Green

to him. It was slightly different. After he was

– was called Soap Opera.

shot he came back as, I was convinced, half

He had some strange ideas.

angel or all angel. It’s also important to note

Maybe at the time it may have seemed like

that Andy ran a tab at Max’s Kansas City.

that. There were no scripts. You made the

He would pay for any artist or person that

stuff up as you went along. I haven’t seen

he thought needed to eat. But he wouldn’t

those films in a long time. I haven’t seen

give them cash – he gave them food. I think

them since the ‘60s.

he was worried that they could go get drugs.

| APRIL 2013

“Andy ran a tab at Max’s Kansas City. He would pay for any artist or person that he thought needed to eat.”


the Factory and the people who worked there? Yes. It was a great change for me because then I could go back there. All of the sickos were finally out of there. Before he was shot, Andy wasn’t doing drugs, but the people around him were.

What was he doing with his nonaction films like Empire? What Empire really was was a moving

So he was a caretaker.

Sam Peabody were spending the summer.

painting. That’s what we found out later.

He was amazing.

And Andy’s early star Naomi Levine was

What he was actually doing when he was

You know they’re making that

there. Ivy Nicholson was there, too.

filming Empire was painting.

movie, I Shot Andy Warhol. I was

And there were all of these wonderful prop-

telling a friend about it, and I said

Because it was a static image, and

er maids in uniforms waiting on people.

“Listen, I know the person who got

you could watch what happens to it

Naomi Levine wrapped herself in Saran

shot, it’s Andy, He’s the one who

as the light changed – even though

Wrap with nothing on underneath. Every-

suffered, he’s the one who, because

the camera didn’t move.

one was watchinf teh maids sort of move

Right. Later on Andy and John Palmer got

of the bullet wounds, wore the cor-

around ill-at-ease, pretending that Naomi

a shopping cart and that was Andy and

set until the day he passed away.”

was dressed. Judy and Sam were hysteri-

John’s roll-in and roll-out shot. They just

I’m not sure why they’re making

cal, I thought it was hysterically funny – it

strapped the camera to it.

that movie. Are they trying to sen-

was great.

sationalize the girl who shot him?

That sounds like a really out-to-

I didn’t think about those films as

Who knows? People are just going to do any-

lunch period. Were you comfortable

thing and everything to make money. Every-

with the Factory scene at that point?

body wants their fifteen minutes.

Then, yes. But later there was a period

It’s true, or their fifteen dollars.

than anything else. Tell us about

when I wanted out of there. I mean, it got

your appearance in 'EMS 1ER

Right, exactly.

a little bit sick, it just felt that the movies

Tell us about what happened after

hattan. How did Andy take to your

got a little bit too strange. People showed

you did the screen test. Wasn’t there

appearing in someone else’s film?

up at the Factory and I got a bad vibration

He didn’t show me he minded. We never

another film where you’re brush-

from them.

discussed it. He had Ingrid Superstar and

ing your teeth for nine minutes or

That was a few years before Andy

Viva and Isabelle.

something completely banal?

got shot, wasn’t it?

You’re the one that started that

I was eating a banana – that’s a really good

It definitely was before he was shot.

So did you see him after the shooting?

whole trend. The beautiful girl

one. Then there was The Kiss. Then there was a couple more “don’t blinks.” Then we

Sure, yes. I mean, he was in recovery for

year” in what year? Was it 1966?

filmed Dracula. That was hysterical. This

about a year.

No, I was before Edie. Edie was with this

limo came and picked us up and took us out

After the shooting, was there a

guy called Chuck Wein, and he had a bad

to the Marshall Field house where Judy and

big change in how he approached

vibe. Too many drugs.

paintings until you pointed it out, but that really is what they are. I think Andy was a painter more

trend. You were the “girl of the


What was it like working with Edie or Chuck in Ciao! Manhattan? Let me give you an example. One day we went up to this halfway house. And we were waiting for Edie to show up. We got there at probably 11 in the morning. At 5, Edie shows up. Can you imagine? She had just the right mix. She looked fabulous, she filmed perfectly because she was, you know, high and feeling great. But we were fit to be tired and uptight because we’d been waiting forever. What’s wrong with this picture?

She had the star syndrome? Yeah. She was amazing and beautiful.

My favorite Jane period is represented by a photo of you in your apartment wearing Giorgio Sant’Angelo gypsy clothes. That was before I met you. Really? In that picture, I was nine-and-a-half months pregnant. Take a good look.

Really? Well maybe all those multilayered skirts covered it. It was an amazing picture. I gained sixty pounds, and it was all under those skirts. My son was born in 1969.

So he’s twenty six now? I can’t imagine that. I still see him as a student. I can’t believe it either. He grew up and went to Harvard. I had to bribe him to go to Harvard, you know. He wanted to go to Brown.

What did you do? I had to buy him a horse, another horse. I did. I mean, listen, if the kid gets into Harvard, he has to go to Harvard. Come on.

So was there a long period of time during which you just stayed away from the Factory? Do you know what? I don’t remember how long it was now. It was between Edie’s arrival and when Andy got shot. Andy was shot in 1968.

34

pivo

| APRIL 2013

Andy Warhol with Viva, c. 1965.


“I think everybody should like everybody.” Andy Warhol You were with Andy through several decades. Did you see any changes through the decades? Well he had gotten everything he wanted, really. You know, he really had arrived. At the best parties, he was the first one invited. I remember it used to be so embarrassing in the ‘60s; he and ten people would show up and crash. By the ‘70s, he was the first one

36

pivo

It seems like Andy ended up asking

to be invited anywhere.

New ‘do. And Andy would already

everyone who was involved with

Would they always get in?

be working?

the Factory in one way or another

Yes. After all, it’s just a party.

He’d be around, yeah. Andy and maybe Gerard

to help him with his paintings or

That’s true; it’s supposed to be a cele-

and Billy in the background. As the Factory be-

some other project.

bration. I was going to ask you about

came more popular, you never knew who was

That’s normal. I was there when he was

that Broadway play you were in.

going to drop in. In the beginning, it was just

painting Flowers, and that was amazing. He

How did I get in it? I just read the part. I tried

us. We filmed sometimes with different people,

had all of these canvasses laid out on the

out. I begged, I pleaded, and I got it. Jerry

but it was very intimate. And then all the mov-

floor and all these silkscreen frames. And the

Brandt, Joe Eula, and Alan Finkelstein did this

ies changed, and a lot of people started com-

canvases I think were painted green with the

play called Gotta Go Disco. We were headed

ing. The Factory became like a party.

flower on them in different colors, and they’d

for Broadway with no director, it was brilliant.

Too out of control?

squeegee the leaves in black on top.

It was the story of Cinderella.

Yes, very much in that mid-‘60s. But as the

Those were big screens.

Irene Clara was in it.

years passed, things changed. Andy got into

Some of them were small. He was do-

Cinderella was black, she was my younger

working during those later years. He really

ing twenty-four-inch squares as well as

sister. Our mother was this red-haired actress,

ran a business, he became rich.

the bigger ones. “I went to Leo Castelli to

really funny – we rehearsed for three months

Had to pay the rent.

buy some because I thought, I have to buy

but we were open for two weeks; we opened

Yeah. Big time.

some.” And guess what? I just got a ten-

and closed basically. It would definitely open

I’ve never seen a gold portrait of

foot-by-ten-foot one last week. I just love

and close today, too, I’m afraid. But actually it

Jackie before like the one you have.

them. They’re all great.

was kind of goofy.

There are only four of them. Three like the one

So did you see much of Andy in the

Before the Factory got crazy, would

I have and then there was a tondo, the portrait

latter years, in the ‘80s?

you spend a whole day there?

plus a gold canvas. It was of Jackie actually

Yeah, a lot. I saw him everywhere. We’d go

No. I’d go to the hairdresser and get there

smiling with the President. I could have bought

to dinner, we hung out. You know, we were

about 3. I’d stop off at Kenneth and get my

it – I didn’t have the money at the moment –

really close.

hair done if I was going to be filmed.

but I should have. It’s a really great piece.

| APRIL 2013


Jane Holzer, Mick Jagger, Andy Warhol and others.


EDIE TAXI

SEDGWICK told by Andy Warhol


40

pivo

| APRIL 2013


A: Should we walk? It’s really beautiful out. B: No. A: Okay


Taxi could be anything you wanted her to be—a little girl, a woman, intelligent, dumb, rich, poor—anything. She was a wonderful, beautiful blank. The mystique to end all mystiques.


Taxi invented the mini-skirt. She was trying to prove to her family back in Charleston that she could live on nothing.

46

pivo

| APRIL 2013


MARINA AND THE DIAMONDS as

Electra Heart Marina Lambrini Diamandis—aka Marina and the Diamonds (“the Diamonds” refers to her fans, not her bandmates)—surged onto the music scene three years ago when she released her debut album, “The Family Jewels,” and snagged the runner up position on the BBC’s influential Sound of 2010 poll. Listeners were charmed by her slightly off-kilter, left-ofcenter pop songs like “I Am Not A Robot,” which were sonic relief from the endless buffet of dance pop and hip hop that dominates radio airplay.


To play the role of Electra Heart, Marina became a “bottle blonde.”


For her second album, “Electra Heart,” Marina threw fans

However, rather than writing “drunk in the club” lyrics, as she puts it, the per-

a curveballl and presented them with a collection of songs

sonal and slyly tongue-in-cheek album obsessively explores themes of sex,

draped in the very dance pop that she had eschewed on her

love, fame, betrayal and the complexities of what it means to be a woman at

first outing.

this particular moment in history. WE CAUGHT UP WITH MARINA A FEW DAYS BEFORE SHE PLAYED TWO SOLDOUT SHOWS AT NYC’S WEBSTER HALL TO CHAT ABOUT HOW “ELECTRA HEART” WAS PARTLY INSPIRED BY BRITNEY SPEARS’S VIRGIN/WHORE COMPLEX, WHY NO ARTIST WOULD EVER ADMIT TO BEING INFLUENCED BY LADY GAGA, AND MORE. IN THE SONG “HOLLYWOOD,” FROM YOUR FIRST ALBUM, YOU SING ABOUT


“It’s a tongue-in-cheek record but it also deals with the truth about love and commercialism and just being a young person, really.”

BEING “OBSESSED WITH THE MESS THAT’S AMERICA.” “ELECTRA HEART” SEEMS TO FOLLOW IN THE SONG’S FOOTSTEPS. WAS “HOLLYWOOD” THE JUMPING OFF POINT FOR YOU TO EXPLORE A CRITIQUE OF AMERICA ON THE NEW

obligation—probably because I

ALBUM?

[EWFVSYKLXYTF]Q]HEH[LSMW

I genuinely wouldn’t see it as a critique but it’s

quite conservative and strict—but

HIÁRMXIP] FIIR MRWTMVIH F] %QIVMGER GYPXYVI %RHXLEX¸W[L]MX¸WKSMRKXS[SVOSZIVLIVI-X¸W FIIRWSMRWXERXMRXLEX-¸ZIGSQISZIVLIVIERH WSPHSYXQ]XSYVERH-¸ZIRIZIVVIEPP]HSRIXLEX FIJSVI 4ISTPI EVI KIXXMRK XLI LYQSV -X¸W WYGL a relief to be here for six weeks because it feels IJJSVXPIWW -R XLI 9/ TISTPI XEOI MX WS WIVMSYWP] ;LIR - ÁVWX GLERKIH ?XLI HMVIGXMSR SJ Q] QYsic] people said, “She’s sold out” and they totally

SR XLI WIGSRH EPFYQ - WII Q]WIPJ EWEREZIVEKIGSRWYQIV[LSWSQIXMQIW FY]W KSWWMT QEKE^MRIW FY]W into the whole beauty schtick even XLSYKL-WIIREXYVEPFIEYX]EWFIWX So in that regard, as a songwriter ERHEREVXMWX-¸QNYWXERSFWIVZIV -X¸WQSVIPMOIWMKRSJXLIXMQIW´EVX VIÂIGXW [LEX¸W KSMRK SR MR WSGMIX]

HMHR¸X KIX XLI LYQSV 7S MX OMRH SJ MW XLEX ERH

EXXLIQSQIRX

µ,SPP][SSH¶[EWHIÁRMXIP]EWXEVXMRKTSMRXJSV

SO YOU’RE NOT PUSHING A PAR-

XLEX-XLMROEJXIVXLMWEPFYQ-¸QHSRI[MXLXLEX

TICULAR MESSAGE?

XLIQI;MXLXLMWWIGSRHEPFYQ-[ERXIHXSGSQTPIXIXLEXZMWMSRJVSQXLIÁVWXEPFYQ

2SXVIEPP]-¸QRSXMRXLITSWMXMSRXS TYWL E QIWWEKI [LIR -¸Q [VMXMRK

“ELECTRA HEART” IS HUMOROUS AND FILLED WITH

WSQIXLMRK PMOIµ&YFFPIKYQ &MXGL¶

TONGUE-IN-CHEEK MOMENTS, BUT YOU’RE ALSO TALKING

SVµ,SQI[VIGOIV¶[LIVI-¸QXS]-

ABOUT THESE ISSUES THAT ARE—

MRK [MXL TISTPI - HSR¸X XLMRO ]SY

6IEP

GERXLIRFIQSVEPEFSYXXLMRKWFI-

EXACTLY. OUR SOCIETY’S OBSESSION WITH BEAUTY AND

cause people would be like “What

GLAMOUR AND SEX ARE SUCH PREVALENT PARTS OF

MWWLIHSMRK#;LEXHSIWWLIQIER#¶

AMERICAN CULTURE AND ALSO BRITISH CULTURE—YOU

So, it’s a tongue-in-cheek record

GUYS LOVE YOUR TABLOIDS. SO I’M WONDERING HOW

but it also deals with the truth

YOUR OWN RELATIONSHIP WITH THOSE THEMES AFFECTED

EFSYXPSZIERHGSQQIVGMEPMWQERH

THE SONGWRITING.

NYWXFIMRKE]SYRKTIVWSRVIEPP]

-XLMROSRXLIÁVWXEPFYQ-JIPXXLMW[IMVHQSVEP

APRIL 2013 | pivo

53


innocence + darkness

54

pivo

| APRIL 2013

&VMXRI]7TIEVWMWEFMKMRÂYIRGI,YKI-XLMRO TISTPI XLSYKLX - [EW NSOMRK EFSYX XLEX JSV E PSRKXMQI&YX[LIR-[EWEXIIREKIVXLIVI[EWE genuine connection with this sweet girl who also had this very sexual side that people didn’t really

I FIND IT INTERESTING THAT YOU SELECTED

[ERXXSEGGITX

DANCE POP AS THE GENRE OF CHOICE FOR

TOTALLY. SHE CAME RIGHT OUT OF THE GATES WITH “...

THIS NEW RECORD AND AT THE SAME TIME

BABY ONE MORE TIME.”

YOU’RE EXAMINING THESE—AT LEAST ON

3L Q] +SH %RH MX [EW LIV MHIE8LMW MW XLI

THE SURFACE—SHALLOW THEMES, MANY

XLMRK´&VMXRI] MW VIEPP] WQEVX%RH MR XLI [E]

OF WHICH BELOVED FEMALE DANCE POP

that she inspired “Electra Heart,” if you step

ARTISTS LIKE BRITNEY SPEARS OR CHRIS-

FEGOJVSQEPPXLIG]RMGEPWXYJJMXEGXYEPP]JSGYWIW

TINA AGUILERA HAVE BEEN ACCUSED OF

SRXLIMHIESJMRRSGIRGIFIMRKQM\IH[MXLHEVO-

PROPAGATING OR INDULGING IN.

RIWW*SVWSQIVIEWSR-VIEPP]PMOIXLEXGSQFMRE-

3RXLIÁVWXEPFYQ-WIGVIXP][ERX-

XMSR-WYTTSWIFIGEYWI]SYHSR¸XVIEPP]GSRRIGX

IHXSFIETSTWXEVFYX-[EWR¸X8LI

MRRSGIRGI[MXLHEVORIWW

ÁVWX EPFYQ HMHR¸X XEOI QI XS XLEX

BUT THEY’RE OFTEN PLACED TOGETHER. IN “TEEN IDLE,”

PIZIP-GVMXMGM^IHXLI[LSPI%QIVM-

YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT VIRGINITY AND HOW LAUDED IT

can songwriting industry and the

IS BUT GIRLS ARE SUPPOSED TO BE SLUTS AT THE SAME

pop side of it and I was bitter about

TIME. AND BRITNEY EMBODIED BOTH OF THOSE THINGS.

MX%RH-WXITTIHFEGOERHXLSYKLX

-X¸WPMOIEJSVQYPEXLEXRSSRIGERVIJYWI-VI-

µ;L]EVI]SYFMXXIV#=SYGER¸XNYWX

QIQFIV WIIMRK ER MRXIVZMI[ [MXL 1EHSRRE MR

stand there like every other indie

the ‘80s and she was talking about how everyone

QYWMGMERERHGVMXMGM^IXLMWWSGEPPIH

MW WS EXXVEGXIH XS XLI [LSPI ZMVKMR[LSVI GSQ-

·KIRIVMG¸QYWMG[LIR]SY¸VIRSXHS-

TPI\ %RH XLEX MW I\EGXP] &VMXRI]´WLI QM\IH

MRKER]XLMRKXSGLEPPIRKIXLEX¶7S

XLSWIIPIQIRXWWSTIVJIGXP]

-[ERXIHXSYWIXLITSTQSHIPSVXLI

THAT BRINGS US TO FEMINISM. DO YOU CONSIDER YOUR-

TSTJSVQYPEXSFIGSQIXLIOMRHSJ

SELF A FEMINIST? IS THE ALBUM SUPPOSED TO BE TAKEN

artist that I wanted to be, but also

AS A FEMINIST STATEMENT?

XSQEOIEREPFYQXLEX[EWTSTFYX

8LIVI¸WSRIWSRKµ7I\=IEL¶[LMGL-XLMROMW

XLEX EPWS LEW WSQIXLMRK FILMRH MX

- [SYPH WE] XLEX XLI RI[ EPFYQ I\TPSVIW XLI

XLEX[EWQSVIXLERNYWXµHVYROMRE

JIQMRMRITW]GLIQSVIXLERXLIÁVWXEPFYQFYX-

club” lyrics—which I actually love

[SYPHR¸XWE]MX¸WEJIQMRMWXWXEXIQIRX-GSRWMHIV

FYX]SYGER¸XHVIWWXLEXYT?PEYKLWA

Q]WIPJEJIQMRMWXFIGEYWI-FIPMIZI[SQIRWLSYPH

DID YOU HAVE SPECIFIC WOMEN IN MIND

LEZIIUYEPVMKLXW-X¸WNYWXXLEXXLIXIVQJIQMRMWQ

WHEN YOU WROTE THE ALBUM?

GSRNYVIWYTSXLIVXLMRKWJSVTISTPI


HAS THERE BEEN ANY PUSH BACK ABOUT YOU BEING A

-PMOIQ]WIPJERH' NYWXFIGEYWI]SY¸VIFIEYXMJYP

BEAUTIFUL WOMAN SINGING THESE SONGS ABOUT HOW

HSIWR¸XQIERXLEXIZIV]XLMRKMWTIVJIGX&YXIZIR

HARD IT IS TO BE A BEAUTIFUL, SEXUALIZED WOMAN? OR

[LIR-WIIEFIEYXMJYP[SQER-XLMRO%[LIVPMJI

DO YOU THINK IT’D BE EVEN MORE DISINGENUOUS IF IT WAS

QYWX FI EQE^MRK )ZIV]SRI HSIW MX8LEX¸W LY-

AN UNATTRACTIVE WOMAN SINGING THESE SONGS?

QERREXYVIXSFIPMIZIXLEXFIEYX]MWIZIV]XLMRK

3RGI-[EWWTIEOMRK[MXLENSYVREPMWXEFSYXµXLI outsider” and they asked “How can you be an outsider, you’re beautiful?” I replied A) You don’t ORS[ [LEX - PSSO PMOI [MXLSYX EPP XLMW SR ?KIWXYVIWXSQEOIYTERHGPSXLIWA& ]SYHSR¸XORS[MJ

THEN YOU INFUSED SOME OF THAT INTO THE ALBUM.

- XLMRO TIVGITXMSR MW VIEPP] MQTSVXERX8LMW EPFYQMWEWYFZIVWMZIEPFYQMRXLIWIRWIXLEX-¸ZI XMGOIHIZIV]FS\MRXLITSTQSHIPXLEXQIERWMR SYVGYVVIRXHE]XLEX]SYEVIEWXEVSVTSTWXEV


“HEARTBREAK—

-HMH[ERXQ]LEMVFPSRHIER][E]

[LEXMRÂYIRGIHQI&YX-EQMRÂYIRGIHF]TST

but the blonde hair, the very pop

culture and she’s been a huge part of pop cul-

MQEKI XLI QYWMG MXWIPJ [SVOMRK

XYVI MR XLI TEWX XLVII SV JSYV ]IEVW 7S ER]SRI

[MXLTSTTVSHYGIVW-¸QWXMPPHSMRK

]SYQIIXSVWIISVXEOIERMRXIVIWXMRIWWIRXMEPP]

[LEX-MRXIRHIHFYXRS[-¸QSTIR-

MRÂYIRGIW]SY8LIQEMRPMRISVXLIQIMRXLIEP-

MRKQ]WIPJYTXSEPEVKIVEYHMIRGI

FYQMWPSZIERHLS[[IEGXERHVIEGXXSMX8LEX¸W

IT SEEMS LIKE NO ONE CAN TALK TO A

[LEXMRXIVIWXWQIQSWX

FEMALE ARTIST THESE DAYS WITHOUT

IT’S INTERESTING YOU SAY THAT BECAUSE THERE AREN’T

BRINGING UP LADY GAGA AND NOW I

VERY MANY INSTANCES—OR ANY?—OF A PURE LOVE

GUESS I’M GUILTY OF IT, TOO. BUT I WAS

SONG ON THE ALBUM.

THINKING ABOUT HER ALBUM “THE FAME”

?0EYKLWA-X¸WVIEPP]OMRHSJXVEKMG-HSR¸XXLMRO

AND COMPARING IT TO “ELECTRA HEART.”

-¸ZIIZIV[VMXXIREWMRKPISRI

ON “THE FAME” GAGA IS SAYING THAT

I GUESS YOU COULD MAYBE ARGUE “I AM NOT A ROBOT” IS

FAME IS GLAMOROUS AND DESIRABLE AND

A KIND OF LOVE SONG? BUT WHY HAVEN’T YOU WRITTEN

EVERYONE SHOULD TRY AND ACHIEVE IT IN

ONE BEFORE?

WHATEVER BIG OR SMALL WAYS THEY CAN.

)ZIR XLI REQI µ)PIGXVE ,IEVX¶ ´ [ERXIH XS

BUT “ELECTRA HEART” IS MORE SUSPI-

IQFSH] XLI MHIE SJ LIEVXFVIEO -R TST MX¸W XLI

CIOUS AND CRITICAL OF THOSE SUPPOSED

RYQFIVSRIXLIQIXS[VMXIEFSYX-X¸WXLIYRMZIV-

“IDEALS.” WERE YOU THINKING ABOUT HER

WEPXLIQI´IZIV]SRIGERVIPEXIXSMX&YX-LEZI

OR HER PERSONA WHEN YOU WERE WRIT-

never wanted to write about it before because I

ING THIS ALBUM?

JIPXIQFEVVEWWIHF]MX

1E]FI WYFGSRWGMSYWP] WLI MRÂY-

DO YOU HAVE A SECRET LOVE SONG HIDDEN AWAY

IRGIH QI 2S EVXMWX [SYPH RIZIV

SOMEWHERE THAT WE DON’T KNOW ABOUT?

EHQMXµ0EH]+EKEMRÂYIRGIHQI¶

?0EYKLWA2SXLMRK8LIWLIPJMWFEVI-¸QWYVI-¸PP

ERHMRQ]LIEVX-ORS[MXWXVYP]RSX

[VMXISRIWSQIHE]


—everyone can relate to it.”


IS IT FAIR TO READ THE ALBUM AS BEING

WAS THERE A PARTICULAR MOMENT OR CATALYST FOR YOU

A NARRATIVE OR A JOURNEY? “FEAR AND

TO BE ABLE TO SAY “FUCK IT”?

LOATHING,” THE LAST SONG ON “ELECTRA

-X[EWEKVEHYEPXLMRK8LIÁVWXWSRK-[VSXIJSV

HEART,” COMES AT THE END OF A LOT OF

XLMW TVSNIGX XLSYKL MX¸W RSX SR XLI 97 ZIVWMSR

BETRAYAL AND DISAPPOINTMENT AND

[EW µ0MZMRK (IEH¶ - [EW TVIXX] HITVIWWIH EX

FEELS LIKE A MOMENT OF HOPE.

XLI XMQI´- PMXIVEPP] JIPX PMOI - [EW HIEH MRWMHI

8LEX [EW MRXIRHIH -X KSIW HS[R XLVSYKL PE]IVW -X WXEVXW [MXL XLI WYVJEGI PE]IVW´XLSWI ÁVWX WSRKW haven’t gotten huge depth and are less cerebral and then it goes down deeper until you get to “Fear And

)\EGXP] =SY JIIP PMOI ]SY GER¸X HS [LEX ]SY WLSYPHSVFVMRKSYXXLIFIWXSJ]SY AND OUT OF THAT THE ALBUM WAS BORN. YOU DECIDED SOMETHING HAD TO CHANGE.

=IEL-[EWMRTYVIHITVIWWMSRJSVEPQSWXIMKLX

certain experiences to appreciate SXLIVXLMRKW SOMEWHAT LIKE A LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL MOMENT?

(IÁRMXIP] - WLIH E PSX SJ FEKgage—both artistically speaking ERHTIVWSREPP]-JIPXWSVIWXVMGXIHSR XLIÁVWXEPFYQ-[ERXIHXSTPIEWI TISTPI´PMOIQ]JEQMP]QIQFIVW´ and I never talk about it because I NYWXHSR¸XRIIHXS&YXMX¸W[IMVH´ if you don’t talk about it people don’t understand why you’ve done GIVXEMRXLMRKWSVQEHIGIVXEMRHIGMWMSRW 8LMW EPFYQ [EW HIÁRMXIP] PMFIVEXMRKJSVQI.YWXWSQIXLMRKEW WMQTPIEWH]MRKQ]LEMV[EWPMOIµ- NYWXHSR¸XKMZIEWLMX¶[LMGLEXMW TVIXX]PEXI?PEYKLWA&YX-RIZIVLEH XLEX XIIREKILSSH XS I\TIVMQIRX [MXLQ]MHIRXMX]ERHNYWXLEZIJYR

| APRIL 2013

ZOMBIE LIFE.

IWX WSRK SR XLI EPFYQ %RH MX MW WSQIXMQIW ]SY LEZI XS KS XLVSYKL

pivo

PMZMRKPMOIXLEXFYXPSXWSJTISTPIEVI

0SEXLMRK¶[LMGLMWQE]FIXLITYVLSTIJYP %RH MX¸W ZIV] SFZMSYW FYX

58

-[EWR¸XIRNS]MRKQ]PMJI-X¸WTVIXX]WEHMJ]SY¸VI

QSRXLW8LEX¸W RSX RSVQEP%RH MX EPWS GSPPMHIH [MXL XLMW KY] - QIX´FPEL FPEL FPEL´ERH MR *IFVYEV]-WEMHµ*YGOMX-¸QKSMRKXSH]I Q]LEMVFPSRHI¶ERHWM\QSRXLWPEXIV-FIKERXLI µ)PIGXVE,IEVX¶IVE


WAS THERE A NEGATIVE REACTION FROM ANYONE REGARDING YOUR CHANGE IN DIRECTION?

8LIMRHMITVIWWPMOI21)HSIWR¸X PMOIQIER]QSVI?PEYKLWA&YXJVSQ JERW -¸Q TVIXX] WYVI - LEZIR¸X VIEPP] PSWX JERW - XLMRO XLI] [IVI NYWX MRXIVIWXIH MR [L] - [EW HSMRK it because there are fans who are FMKEPXIVREXMZIQYWMGJERWWSµ4VMQEHSRRE¶MWPMOIXLIERXM'LVMWXJSV XLIQ?PEYKLWAFYX-KEMRIHWSQER] RI[SRIW AND WHAT ABOUT YOUR FAMILY?

-X¸W ÁRI RS[ 8LI EPFYQ OMRH SJ WIVZIHMXWTYVTSWIMRXLEXMX¸WEPQSWX weird that you kind of create this GLEVEGXIV XS FI WSQISRI IPWI FYX VIEPP]]SYFIGSQIQSVIXVYXLJYPXS ]SYVWIPJ8LIQSVIXLEX]SYFIGSQI [LEX]SY¸VIRSXXLIQSVI]SYVIEPM^I[LEX]SYEVI

“The more that you become what you’re not, the more you realize what you are.”


a young American Goddess of Paris Couture

Jean “An absolutely stunning creature with a signature beauty mark, Jean was a super model decades before the term ‘super model’ was coined, and, staggeringly, has had more covers than any fashion model in history. Jean Patchett was to Ford what Babe Ruth was to the Yankees.”


S

aid agency owner Jerry

Ford of Ford Models, who represented Jean in her heyday during the Fifties. Jean signed on with the Ford Models on May 10, 1948 according to Miss Patchett. In the Sunday News on March 18, 1951 a feature article titled: “There’s Nobody Like Patchett” author Jess Stearn wrote: “ No matter what’s wanted in a model, Jean seems to have it. Because she knows exactly what to do with her hands, head and feet, and takes the right attitude toward her work, Jean has earned the rating of super-model. Jean’s distinct features helped define the

do remember her,” Eileen Ford said. “You just had to take a

face of fashion for over a decade, the body

deep breath, even then. She had on a black tent coat that

of work she did is enormous, and the legacy she

her mother had made with black velvet at the shoulders

and fashion photographers created together is

and a black hat with veil and garnet earrings, bracelet and

monumental. Jean Patchett was prolific, her date

necklace. She really was a country girl. When she took

book documented numerous photo sessions each

off her hat and veil I saw that she had beautiful ‘doe eyes’

day in New York. The camera loved Jean and Jean

and a marvelous mole on her face, which she darkened

loved the camera.

with an eyebrow pencil. Jean was unique.” Impressed with

Jean worked in the same glamorous era

Jean, however Eileen told Miss Patchett: “Loose 20 pounds and

as cover girls Dorian Leigh, Suzy Parker

come back in a month; you’re as big as a house!” At that

and Lisa Fonssagrives. Jean Patchett signed

time Jean weighed 135 pounds. “Jean didn’t mind the weight

with the Ford Model Agency on April 10, 1948, and

part, but her hair was her glory,” Eileen continued. “We took

was the first star model for New York’s Ford Mod-

off just one inch, but you’d have thought we’d taken her

els, a new agency when Jean walked in the door

life’s blood!” Fortunately, she recovered. And when Jean Patchett

the spring of 1948. ”I’ll always remember

returned to start work for the Ford Agency she weighed 115 pounds

what our first great model Jean Patchett

and was 5 feet 9, and measured 34-23-35 inches. “Jean had made

went through when I told her she had to cut

more money than any other model in history – until Brooke Shields

her hair. I don’t remember everyone, but I

and Cheryl Tiegs came along. Brooke & Cheryl made more because

“There’s Nobody Like Patchett” 62

pivo

| APRIL 2013


Beauty Is Her Business: Jean Patchett is a model in a million.�


APRIL 2013 | pivo

65


“ Jean Patchett was to Ford what Babe Ruth was to the Yankees.”


’40s and ’50s my girls thought it was fabulous to earn $25,000 a year. Now (1982) it’s not uncommon to make over $100,000.” Eileen Ford said in a Good Housekeeping June 1982 in a feature titled, Eileen Ford:

“How I Find Those

Fabulous Faces…” by Phyllis Battelle. In her early career many readers of the slick magazines did not know her name

“ I guess that’s why I’m so busy playing hard to get.”

but they knew her face. Jean’s face was star-

me to work for them that I was being booked months in

tlingly and unconventionally beautiful, with bone

advance.” “That didn’t help, so I had my rate raised to

structure large slightly delineated chin. But her

$50. an hour, but that seemed to make them even more

features, delightful as they were, were not respon-

eager to have me because they all wanted to pay the high-

sible for making her the most sought after, the

est price.” “I guess that’s why I’m so busy playing hard to

busiest, and the most successful photographic

get.” Jean Patchett was born in Preston, a small town on the East-

model in New York. Jean Patchett was a highly

ern Shore of Maryland. After unhappy stints in secretarial school

paid models because of a blemish. Jean had a

and studying voice at Peabody Institute, then attending Goucher

mole next to her right eye which she darkened with

College, at 21 years of age, Jean set her sights on a modeling ca-

an eyebrow pencil to make it more prominent. For

reer in New York. She signed with Harry Conover’s agency in 1948,

the mole became her trademark. Manufacturers of

and moved into a Methodist rooming home for women for $13.50

every product from toothpaste to fashions, and

a week, as she told the writer Michael Gross for his book Model:

jewelry to luxury cars insisted on having the girl

The Ugly Business of Beautiful Women (Morrow, 1995). Jean was

with the mole in their advertisements.

unhappy with Harry Conover assignments as she was modeling rain

Jean refused to work before 10 am or

coats, and women’s fashions styled for much older women. It was

after 4:30 pm because she liked to cook

well know Conover never attempted to coordinate the model types

meals for herself and her banker husband.

with the fashions they wore in the sets. After a month, however, Jean

And she only worked 3 ½ days a week. In the early

left Conover for the new Ford modeling agency.

1950s Jean said: “I cut down my schedule,”

Eileen Ford spirited Jean away at The Barbizon Hotel for

“because so many photographers wanted

Women on the corner of 63rd and Lexington Avenue. Eileen Ford kept her beautiful pigeons in the safe haven of The Barbizon where they would meet other female residents like Grace Kelly, Barbara Bel Geddes, Peggy Cass, Ali MacGraw and Liza Minnelli. That September Jean had her first Vogue cover. In October she was on the cover of Glamour. In that same issue Glamour magazine reported that Jean spent her away-from- the-camera hours “just sunbathing and making her own clothes.” As her career sky rocketed, Vogue assignments with renowned photographers came her way. The March 1952 issue of Esquire featured Jean in the article “Beauty Is Her Business: Jean Patchett is a model in a million.” By the time she retired from full-time in

APRIL 2013 | pivo

69


1963 Jean Patchett had appeared on more than 40 magazine covers, according to Eileen Ford. At the peak of her career, Jean was earning $50,000 a year.

“ I’m Jean Patchett. You don’t darn it. You patch it.”

In a period when models could be deliciously snooty, Jean was more modest: not the girl-next-door type, but not as sophisticated as

came about spontaneously. These photos were for a photo-spread

Ms. Parker, either. She was punctual and polite,

article for Vogue “Flying down to Lima” a romantic travelogue

often saying ”yes, ma’am” and ”no, sir,”

as lived by the model. Jean was also photographed in a shoeshine

according to Eileen Ford of the Ford Agency.

stand with an admirer, and rubbing her tired feet; again in a real

When she introduced herself to an editor or a

life and spontaneous moment. In later sessions, Mr. Penn would

photographer, she said: ”I’m Jean Patchett.

give her the suggestion of a story — meeting a beau in a crowded

You don’t darn it. You patch it.”

theater, perhaps — and as Jean stretched her neck longer and lon-

In a photograph in profile by Erwin Blumenfeld for the famous Jan. 1, 1950, cover

ger in search of the imaginary boyfriend, he would click off image after image.

of Vogue, Jean Patchett’s immaculate red mouth,

She was ”a young American goddess in Paris couture,”

penciled left eye and natural beauty mark became

Mr. Penn said. Jean Patchett was among a handful of photographic

an icon for an entire decade. This cover showed

models who dominated that era, a sorority that included Dovima,

the beautiful detail of Jean’s face and helped cre-

Dorian Leigh, Suzy Parker, Evelyn Tripp and Lisa Fonssagrives,

ate the “Doe Eye” look.

who was married to photographer Irving Penn.

Although Jean worked frequently with

No other photograph has captured so much attention

the photographers Louise Dahl-Wolfe and

then and now, as Jean Patchett’s image in Irving Penn’s “Girl in

John Rawlings, Jean was most frequently as-

Black & White” and no other photographer ever worked harder

sociated with Irving Penn, especially after a 1949

to bring out the distinctive quality of each model than Irving Penn.

photograph he took of her chewing pensively on a

For the Vogue Magazine article “The Black and White Idea,” Penn’s

string of pearls as she sat in a cafe, a picture that

picture of Jean Patchett, was the first Black & White specifically commissioned to replace the color illustrations Vogue had used on its covers since 1909. The symmetry is broken only by Jean’s sidelong glance. To help get the contrasts Penn wanted, Jean used black lipstick, improvised from mascara. The results were stunning, creating an image that became part of fashion and photographic art history. In 2008 a signed, initialed, titled, dated in ink copy of the famous photograph by Irving Penn of Jean Patchett was auctioned


at Christie’s, New York for a fabulous sum of $266,500. With stunning use of light, the Horst P. Horst photograph could be seen as a painting. Jean wears a pale pink velveteen bathing suit with a high Empire waist and finished with romper pants. The room is infused with the blush hue, and the floor virtually absorbs its color. Horst P. Horst’s romantic photograph appeared in the December 2, 1955, Vogue. The photo by John Rawlings of Jean Patchett in an open top golden brown gown with multi-strand rhinestone necklace is one of the most romantic images of Jean. This photograph by John Rawlings is timeless as his use of soft hues of taupe and gray craft a dreamlike quality. Here Jean appears silent, as if in a meditative moment, with a gentle breeze blowing through her hair and gown. This John Rawlings photograph of Jean is a classic for all ages. When asked how Jean Patchett dressed in that period, Eileen Ford said, with pride, ”We all shopped at Loehmann’s.” Jean was a regular at the legendary Stork Club. “None of us had much money, but we managed to look the part,” Eileen Ford said. “God bless Loehmann’s. We’d go clear out to Brooklyn to shop there.”

R. Murrow’s show Person to Person on January

Jean Patchett was pursued by many men, many of them

28, 1955. In Mr. Murrow’s introduction he said:

wealthy. She was seen frequently at the Stork Club, and was a regu-

“Jean Patchett has been the most sought

lar at the Friday lunch that the club’s owner, Sherman Billingsley,

after model for nearly seven years now.”

gave for models.

Murrow, an Emmy Award winning journalist

When Mr. Louis Auer V, a banker who worked on Wall

whose show was in its 2nd season, interviewed

Street, first met Jean Patchett in 1948, he was living at the Yale

Jean in episode 22. Jean and husband Louis Auer

Club. Mr. Auer had graduated fromYaleUniversity just a year before

V were broadcast live from their home in the re-

in 1947. “A couple of models I knew who lived at theBar-

laxed style of Mr. Murrow’s TV journalism. The

bizon said, ‘We’ve got a girl for you,’ ” Mr. Auer recalled.

innately curious public got a firsthand peek inside

”We met at a luncheonette near the oldDuMont studios.”

the home and could hear and see Jean personally

Soon after they started going out, Mr. Auer gave Jean Patchett the

during conversations with Mr. Murrow. The dis-

nickname Pancho, which stuck. Jean Patchett and Louis Auer V

cussions were opened by Edward R. Murrow from

married in 1951. Jean & Louis Auer V lived and worked in New

his wingback chair in the studio, while several

York City on the East side where they raised their family; son Bart

television cameras at different locations allowed

and daughter Amy.

Jean and Louis to answer questions, and have

Jean Patchett was featured on CBS Television on Edward

conversations from various rooms in their home.

‘’Model: The Ugly Business of Beautiful Women’’ APRIL 2013 | pivo

71


When Edward R. Murrow asked Jean what color her eyes were? Jean replied: “Oh don’t you know?” “Why they’re brown; you’ll have to come in a little closer.” The camera moved in

“ And the worst part was that, Mr. Hemmingway smelled bad.”

close to Jean’s face and focused on her eyes. Jean also spoke about the “Doe Eye” craze and what high fashion was and why models posed with se-

headed model, played by Dovima. The photographer commandeers

rious expressions on their faces. She laughed and

a Greenwich Village bookstore for the photo session. While examin-

relaxed more for the camera as she then took a

ing the photos, he notices Jo, played by Audrey Hepburn, in the

tour to show a display of her Vogue Covers. She

background of a shot. Intrigued by her unique appearance, as is

also demonstrated for the camera how she applied

the editor of the fashion magazine, played by Kay Thompson, Jo is

make-up to her eyes and eye brow. The 15 minute

offered a modeling contract. She reluctantly accepts only because it

program with Jean Patchett was during the 6 year

includes a trip toParis. It is a whimsical love story centering on the

run of Mr. Murrow’s Person to Person.

fashion couture of New York and Paris. Several copies of the color

A close-up image of Jean Patchett’s face

photo of Jean Patchett appear in the editor’s office suite. In addition,

was used in the opening credits of the movie

Jean’s image is seen in a collage with other leading fifties models

Funny Face. The story is about a fashion pho-

in the “Think Pink” musical number. Suzy Parker, a colleague of

tographer Dick Avery, played by Fred Astaire,

Jean’s, has a credited role as a Specialty Dancer in the same musi-

in search for an intellectual backdrop for an air-

cal sequence. The music was scored by George and Ira Gershwin. Jean Patchett and Ernest Hemmingway engaged in discussion during a photo session in Mr. Hemmingway’s home for a Vogue Magazine article in 1950. Photographer Clifford Coffin captures this momentary pause in their conversation. Jean is holding one kitten as Mr. Hemmingway is petting a second kitten, while the large Doberman rests at his feet. The photograph is a unique juxtaposition between legendary author and game hunter, Ernest Hemmingway, dressed in just summer shorts while model Jean Patchett appears in a crisply pressed blouse, skirt and shoes. The engaging interview continued for hours, while Ernest Hemmingway kept Jean’s wine glass full. Being polite, Miss Patchett

72

pivo

| APRIL 2013


could not refuse the host’s generosity. According to Amy Auer, Jean later said, “By the time the session was over, I could barely walk and had a headache the next day. And the worst part was that, Mr. Hemmingway smelled bad.” It is often said that Jean Patchett made a mountain out of the mole to the right of her eye, which became her trademark years before Cindy Crawford was born. “We really made history,” Jean Patchett said of her work with Penn.”To have five pictures of you hanging in the Museum of Modern Art! I didn’t know that I was going to be doing that.” Irving Penn’s work with Jean Patchett helped bring fashion photography to a new level of art. Jean Patchett’s photographs are not only part of a collection in the Museum of Modern Art, New York but also the Boston Museum of Art, Boston MA., the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, IL, as well as other art museums and galleries. More recently Jean was represented in the “Model as Muse”: Embodying Fashion – Exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York with Irving Penn’s Photograph “Girl In Black and White” and on Vogue Covers displayed. Jean may not have known she would accomplish this as well, but indeed she did leave a legacy.

“ but indeed she did leave a legacy.” APRIL 2013 | pivo

75


pivo FASHION

Bouffant

Queen

Zooey Deschanel Zooey Deschanel professes she’s all “bangs and eyes” and “an outsider on the inside.” She also offers up her favorite hair and beauty products and reflects on some style missteps. First, let’s talk about that hair. Zooey maintains her fabulous mane of ultra-long locks with Oribe products. The luxury hair care line offers a range of cuttingedge formulations that the brand claims will deliver “the highest possible levels of performance and sophistication.” Zooey’s cut, featuring layers and heavy lash-grazing bangs, has become her signature look. To keep her complexion ultra-fresh and flawless, Zooey is committed to sunblock. She’s a devotee of oils and also uses John Masters Organics pomegranate facial nourishing oil and Laventine Olive Forte Water-soluable Facial Cleansing Oil. The velvety texture of oils have long been acknowledged to balance every skin type. When it comes to cosmetics, Zooey confessed she doesn’t wear a lot of makeup. She also mentioned, “I have contract. They have really good liquid eyeliner.” Makeup artist Pati Dubroff used a combination of luminescent peach and ivory shadows and a bit of black eye pencil along with a soft peachy-pink blush. However, she did incorporate a pop of vibrant red lipstick to complete the look.

/EVEX Oribe Smooth Syrim $22 John Masters Organics Facial Moisturizing Oil $15 Rimmel Liquid Eyeliner $8


1

2

3

4

Step by Step:

How to put your hair in a Bouffant

5

6 7 8

Above shows the finished look but if you want to be spunkier add a thin sparkly head band. You can find these headbands below at:

The Buckle for

under $10

APRIL 2013 | pivo

79


pivo FASHION

AWARD-WINNING

elegance

Anne Hathaway, whose Oscar for best supporting actress for “Les Miserables” is the surest bet at the Academy Awards, was also the most anticipated red carpet arrival of the ceremony. Hathaway chose Prada’s pale pink halter gown reminiscent of Audrey Hepburn. This high neckline elegance was sophisticated and a perfect choice by Hathaway.

/EVEX

2

GET THE LOOK 1. Coral Cocktails Dress $54.99 at Urban Outfitters 2. Style Remembered Earrings

1

3

$17.99 at ModCloth 3. Almond Joie de Vivre Wedge $82.99 at Anthropologie


We all know Marilyn Monroe’s iconic gold plunging neckline number. Classic and iconic. We can see the resemblance between Monroe’s and Jennifer Lopez’s sleek and sheer 2012 Oscar gown.

Frank Sinatra and Kanye West could not be further apart with their music choices, but their fashion sense seems to be in sync with these similar plaid tweed jackets.

Emma Watson’s high neckline and black and white color scheme allude to the iconic Grace Kelly and her timeless elegance.

APRIL 2013 | pivo

81


open happiness


UR BN

URBAN OUTFITTERS INC.


pivo ENTERTAINMENT

4

1

Iconic Heartbreakers

5

2 3

Sexy, alluring, dangerous, and seductive—

6

these women define the term femme fatale.

1.&EVFEVE7XER[]O as Phyllis Dietrichson in Double Indemnity 2.2MGSPI/MHQER as Suzanne Stone in To Die For 3./MQ2SZEO as Lona McLane in Pushover 4.7EVEL1MGLIPPI+IPPEV as Kathryn Merteuil in Cruel Intentions 5. Rita Hayworth as Gilda Mundson Farrell in Gilda 6./MQ&EWWMRKIV as Lynn Bracken in L.A. Confidentail

84

pivo

| APRIL 2013


THE MYSTERY OF THE FEMME FATALE

The women in film noir play a central and recurring theme

commitment—a woman who is equally motivated by desire

in the genre. Perhaps as a statement of the obsessions that

as a man. While wanting the company and closeness of a

move a man: money, liquor and women. The femme fatale

woman, he doesn’t really want the burdens of commitment.

(or “the deadly woman”) is an ancient and popular character

Thus, the femme fatale becomes the obvious choice. He

in western (and indeed world) texts. Generally, the femme

is drawn to mysteriously beautiful women at bars, who are

fatale is shown to be a woman who exploits the weaknesses

in themselves powerful characters. Always in control but

of men to her own advantage. Perhaps the interpretation

swayed by the moment.

that the construction of the femme fatale is ultimately a

There is something really attractive about a powerful woman

product of a patriarchal and largely inequitable society is

in film noir, but there’s still something more. It’s really the

itself an outdated interpretation. The femme fatale has be-

disarming aspect of beauty in a dark city. Though everything

come a movement of fashion and interest in modern society,

in your bones is telling you to stay away, you keep wan-

and is a symbol of class.

dering deeper and deeper into the allure of a femme. The

What is the appeal? As Frank Bigelow’s experience shows

mystery of the femme fatale reminds us that in a society of

in the 1950 film D.O.A., its the possibility for quick, dan-

disenchantment there is beauty, and dangerous beauty—no

gerous and self-destructive fun with no consequences of

matter how destructive—is still beauty nonetheless.

)HQSRH3¸&VMIRERH4EQIPE&VMXXSRWXEV MRXLIWÁPQRSMVGPEWWMG(3%


pivo ENTERTAINMENT

DONALD & ROGER

Peggy and Betty

Mad Men Don Draper’s Inferno; What Mad Men owes to Lost. Mad Men’s debt to The Sopranos is obvious— besides its compartmentalized, alienated characters and spooky dream sequences, the AMC drama is the brainchild of former Sopranos writer-producer Matthew Weiner. But watching the show’s two-hour season-six premiere (which airs April 7), one wonders if Mad Men owes just as much to Lost. The episode evokes the sci-fi drama’s setting, themes, and atmosphere and is full of the kind-of-sorta-clues and maybe-premonitions that made Lost the first show to take advantage of Internet-age obsessiveness. Don Draper (Jon Hamm) is on a client-paid vacation in Hawaii, gathering impressions for an ad campaign for a resort. He’s cut off from the show’s other characters, smoking pot and feasting on 86

pivo

| APRIL 2013

roast pig; between the forlorn palm fronds, crashing waves, and meditative close-ups of our hero lost in thought, there’d be a sense of purgatorial isolation even if he weren’t reading Dante’s Inferno. The book seems like a perverse choice for a beach read until you get to the end of this clever, at times tricky season opener. In Lost-like style, it strategically withholds key information that would help us make immediate sense of Don’s behavior, which by turns suggests a prisoner, a sleepwalker, and a ghost.


Take The Quiz Answer the questions below to find out with Mad Men Character you are! Your dream job has just opened up and you are determined to get it. What do you do?

A] Feign direct experience related to

the position and “accidentally” run into the hiring manager every chance you get

B] Plead your case directly to the manager, and highlight your professional accomplishments C] Buy an eye-catching new wardrobe D] Rely on your magnetic charm to see you through, once again

What is your drink of choice?

A] Old Fashioned B] Beer C] Gimlet D] Vodka

How would you describe your fashion style?

A] Powerful B] I don’t really care about clothes C] Polished D] Potent

What do you do if you find yourself in a tough situation?

A] Talk your way out of it B] Calmly and secretly figure it out without anyone realizing

How would describe your ideal career?

A] I fulfill all of my ambitions B] I get all the respect I have ever wanted or need

C] I would prefer not to work D] It keeps me busy but doesn’t get in the way of my social life

The truth is ...

A] Just a clever marketing idea B] Hard for most people to hear C] Important in a relationship D] Liberating if my reputation is not at stake

Describe your ideal partner

A] Someone good with kids B] Someone with a backbone C] Someone good with money D] Someone from a well-connected family

What is your idea of fun?

A] A no-fuss, booze-filed tryst B] An adventure that doesn’t involve my coworkers or my family

C] A well-executed dinner party whe I am given the proper amount of atwtention and popularity

D] Making a stealth grab for power

Results!

If you chose mostly A’s you are Don Draper. If you chose mostly B’s you are Peggy Olsen. If you chose mostly C’s you are Betty Francis. If you chose mostly D’s you are Roger Sterling.

Below you can find out more about the charter that is most like you!

Betty Francis Appearances matter and no one will tell you different. Perhaps this belief is why even though you’ve got lovely things, you still find it so hard to be fulfilled. Whatever could be the problem?

Don Draper Your steely resolve and artfully-orchestrated personal brand has propelled you to the top. You can be ruthless but rational, and although few know it, a romantic.

C] Suffer silently D] Wait for someone else to fix everything for you

Peggy Olsen You’re modest and on top of things, but also progressive and sharper than you get credit for. You also have a predilection for adventure, as long as it doesn’t get in the way of the steady ascent of your career.

Roger Sterling You really don’t have too many worries or much to prove so you try to have as much fun as possible. That’s why even the hint of drama can send you careening in the opposite direction, but, hey, you’re used to someone else doing the dirty work.


pivo t


AN ERA  ALWAYS

IN STYLE.


so pure you can sleep in it


e Sn ak Pe !

ak

Jennifer Lawrence Keeping Values and Morals in the Midst of Hollywood

Loletta Revealed How to Steal Twiggy’s Style Interview with Sofia Coppola Think Like an Eames ROTHKO

pivo May 2013


Pivot Magazine  
Pivot Magazine  
Advertisement