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Last year, we organized the largest Pride Weekend in our history; many times larger than anything OKC Pride has ever achieved. This year will be even greater! We recognize our successes were not achieved individually or all at once. We stand on the shoulders of giants. LGBT leaders in Oklahoma City stood down the KKK at the first Pride Parade in 1988, not knowing whether or not they’d even survive. We’re humbled by the bravery and leadership of these early equality activists who began this long, impassioned march toward acceptance and inclusion. As OKC Pride enters our 25th year, we find our community proud, strong and united. As LGBT awareness and acceptance spreads across the country, so does our impact on our community. The Oklahoma City Council added sexual orientation as a protected class as it relates to our city’s employment policy. Since Pride Weekend 2011, the states of New York, Washington and Maryland all passed marriage equality laws. Our LGBT community should take pride in these advances as it empowers our strong march toward equality. As the dust and glitter settled from last year’s Pride celebration, we realized one weekend couldn’t contain all we wanted to do. First and foremost, we chose to expand our celebration from one weekend to a full week (and them some). Also, OKC Pride chose to shift the Parade and Festival from late June to May, as OKC Pride is nothing if not cool and accessible. Additionally, we chose to expand our community outreach. This year, our Festival will be held Saturday, May 19, along Film Row in downtown OKC. This convenient venue change provides a centralized city location for festival-goers. We anticipate even greater crowds as the cooler weather is far more ideal than the triple-digit temperatures we’ve battled recently. While some events have changed, others remain the same. Our Pride Parade will continue to be on a Sunday evening, May 20. Also, we’ve maintained the traditional and extremely popular Parade route, running from Memorial Park and ending along The Strip. We’re thrilled to be working with like-minded community partners who are playing an important role in Pride Week. One of many is OGRA, who will be hosting its annual gay rodeo Memorial Day weekend. We have lots of events scheduled, so we encourage you to check out our calendar at www.okcpride.org and hope you’ll attend our many, exciting Pride Week events. Also, we’re celebrating President Obama’s proclamation to make June LGBT month by hosting a Candlelight Vigil on June 23 on The Strip. The vigil will bring light to the past 25 years of OKC Pride and our community. This event will remember those lost to HIV/AIDS. We’ll also use this opportunity to speak out against hate, bigotry and bullying and empower our work for tolerance and inclusion. We hope you’ll join us as we celebrate our 25th year!! Pridefully, John Gibbons President, OKC Pride OFFICE PO Box 12240 Oklahoma City OK 73157-2240 PHONE 405-466-LGBT EMAIL info@okcpride.org WEB www.okcpride.org SOCIAL facebook.com/okcpridefan twitter.com/okcpride youtube.com/okcpride


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Proud. Strong. United. Perseverance is awakening state leaders

  Last year, thousands of people from around Oklahoma and the surrounding region joined OKC Pride in celebrating the singlelargest LGBT event in Oklahoma history. This awakened many of our civic leaders and public officials. We are now witnessing an LGBT movement in this state like we’ve never seen before. This is possible because for 25 years we have all stood together. Proud.   The evening of Friday, June 24, 2011, was a defining moment for this community. I’ll never forget seeing and hearing the Pointer Sisters announce to more than 30,000 people that marriage equality had passed in New York. The reaction was breathtaking. There was a sense of perseverance, passion and hope in the air. We were able to appreciate this defining moment in history because for 25 years we have all stood together. Strong.   Moving forward, our dreams and visions for a better tomorrow have expanded. While our event scope from last year is different, our mission is still the same. OKC Pride will soon be announcing its partnership with a major health organization and our plans to build a health center. We have participated in health conferences, summits, academic research and have been instrumental in offer-

ing awareness to the public on issues that impact our community. We’re more than a party organization. We are a formidable force against our oppressors, and we’ll continue our fight for our community. We are able to do this because for 25 years we have all stood together. United.   We are Proud. We are Strong. We are United.

-Joshua Sauer Vice President, OKC Pride

Save the date... The Oklahoma City Pride Board has announced the official dates for the 2013 OKC Pride will be May 17-26. Visit OKCPride.org over the coming months for more information about festivities or to learn how you can get involved.


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Residents take note...

Oklahoma City is moving forward

  One of the exciting things for me as a newcomer to Oklahoma City is the amount of progress currently underway. The cranes from the Devon tower have recently been cleared to reveal the sleek structure we’ve seen slowly rise from the plains. The new I-40 has now opened up blocks of new territory for downtown to develop in its Core-to-Shore program.   OKC Pride is thrilled to play a role in this progress.   More than just structures, the cityscape is changing as well. Older areas of town are experiencing a renaissance, becoming new centers of growth and local flavor. The Film Row district, where this year’s Festival is being held, is a prime example of how visionary leaders and dedicated activists can generate commerce in revitalized neighborhoods. Other areas like the Plaza District, Automobile Alley and Midtown,

to name but a few, are popular places for food and entertainment, bringing back an urban flair to the heart of the city.   Coinciding with the Pride Festival is the 1st Better Block OKC, which is setting up a temporary exhibit at NW 7 and Hudson on Friday and Saturday, May 1819, to showcase the cool and creative possibilities of urban renewal – well worth the brief trek if you’re at the festival on Saturday!   In conjunction with all of this renewal is also social progress. Last November, the Oklahoma City Council voted 7-2 to add “sexual orientation” to the City’s list of protected equal employment opportunity classes. OKC Pride applauds the city administration for their professionalism, openness and support during our many months of planning.   This year, the 25th anniversary of the

OKC Pride Parade, is also a first in that the Festival will be moving downtown in an effort to reach a broader audience and gain visibility in our city. We are thrilled to welcome our many exhibitors, community partners and countless patrons and participants to our OKC Pride Week festivities.   Things are changing for the better. We still have a long way to go, but you already have plenty to be excited about considering all that’s been achieved and is in the works. The 2012 theme for OKC Pride Week is “Proud. Strong. United.” Let us all work together to build a more open and tolerant community and continue the exciting transformations happening here in Oklahoma City.

-Jeremy Crites Festival Co-Chair, OKC Pride


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State House District 88

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Marchers carry a banner in the 2011 Parade announcing the dates of this year’s festivities.

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Photo by Taylor H. Brunwald

Days of festivities planned OKC Pride partnering with several organizations   “Proud. Strong. United.” That’s the theme for this year’s OKC Pride Week celebration. It’s also the platform on which OKC Pride has organized its events to provide 10 full days of activities for the community.   OKC Pride has established partnerships with the Oklahoma Gay Rodeo Association (OGRA), Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays of Norman (PFLAG of Norman), Cimarron Alliance, Expressions and Church of the Open Arms. Each organization will play a role in one or more of the activities available during Pride Week, which is officially May 18-27.   “We believe in strength through unity. We realize OKC Pride has several like-minded organizations right here in the metro. While the specific mission from group to group may vary somewhat, the ultimate goal of providing service to the LGBT community is true for all of our partner organizations involved in Pride Week,” said Matt Harney, OKC Pride board member.   The OKC Pride Festival will take place on Saturday, May 19, from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. in downtown OKC’s Film Exchange District (a.k.a. Film Row). Film Row is located between Dewey and Shartel on Sheridan and is just two blocks west of the new Devon tower.   Festival Co-Chair Jeremy Crites said, “The Pride Festival is mov-

ing to downtown Oklahoma City to increase our visibility. Twentyfive years ago, we were fighting for the right to gather on our own turf without harassment or police raids. This year, we’ll be in the heart of the city because, as American citizens, we deserve and demand full equality everywhere and in every way. We hope that having a downtown venue in addition to our traditional parade venue on the Strip will draw a broader audience and let us better fulfill our mission of raising awareness for both the gay and straight community.”   The family-friendly Festival will feature a variety of local musicians and entertainers throughout the day. OKC Pride volunteer & entertainment organizer Patsy Gillispie said, “Our goal was to recruit bands strategically so we could offer a little something for everyone. We achieved that goal, hands down.” An entire entertainment line-up is finalized and available at OKCPride.org.   Festival-goers can browse the exhibits of nonprofit groups for information and resources as well as purchase an assortment of food, beverages and merchandise. Pride officials are encouraging everyone to bring lawn chairs to enjoy the entertainment. As with any major event, no ice chests or large stowing devices will be al(Please see “Festivities” on Page 21)


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Local remembers first Pride By Thomas McDonald   Twenty-five years ago a group of courageous members of the gay and lesbian community of Oklahoma City met and determined that the community should have a Parade. The members of that unique group consisted of Tom Mc, Jay M., Bill, Rea M., Geri and Andy S.* I know that I have forgotten many of those who gave of their time and talents to make the first gay and lesbian Pride Parade happen in OKC. Yet I still have to recognize a beloved attorney by the name of Rex Friend who was willing to provide his legal services to get a permit from the city for that first Parade.   We met for several months and realized that our sponsors would have to be the bars located on the Strip. We pitched the idea to the bars, and they were reluctant at first because for many years we already had

Zoom Beach and “The Block Party,” which happened on the backside of the buildings where The Park and the Wreck Room are located.   We presented the idea to the bars, and yes, they were reluctant to be a part of this until we showed them that this could be the big finale to the GL Pride week. At that time GL Pride started on Father’s Day with what we called Zoom Beach, a big gay and lesbian lake party. Throughout the week there would be lectures, films, etc., to accentuate Gay Pride. On the Sunday following, we had the infamous Block Party.   The bar owners realized that this could be done in conjunction with the Block Party and felt that this could be a major money maker.   In the early days we didn’t have the luxury of big name sponsors like Bud Light, Coors, etc. We only had the bars and the members of the gay and lesbian community

to raise funds to put this on. During the first year, we did many drag shows and other types of fundraisers.   As the group met and talked about when we would have the Parade, it was finally decided to hold the Parade on the Sunday following Father’s Day since it was the closest to the date that the Stonewall Riots had occurred in New York City.   Once we decided on a date and time, we started contacting other gay and lesbian organizations for their support. Many were receptive of what we were doing, others not so much.   We contacted the Oklahoma Gay Rodeo Association to provide a group of guys on horseback to carry the U.S. and Oklahoma flags. At first they wouldn’t do it, but later there were three guys on horseback that carried the flags. (Please see “McDonald” on Page 21)


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FAQs with V.P. Joshua Sauer How did last year’s festivities impact the LGBT community?

Why did we move the Festival? Is the Parade route changing?

  Great question! Well as most know, we’re making efforts to build an LGBT health center here in the community. Last year was the single-largest gathering for an LGBT cause in the history of Oklahoma. We proved that we exist, that we’re not going anywhere and that there is a strong need for an LGBT health center. We are prouder, stronger and more united than ever before.

  Our Parade will continue to be on a Sunday. This year, it’s May 20. We’re also continuing with the traditional and popular Parade route, running from Memorial Park to The Strip. The Parade starts at 6 p.m.   This year’s Festival will take place on Film Row in downtown Oklahoma City. Due to logistical issues and our hope to expand our community outreach, OKC Pride felt compelled to find a new location for the Festival. We hope a new audience will supplement our already strong base of festival attendees. We feel that Film Row and downtown OKC will be a great location for future years. Film Row organizers and Oklahoma City officials have been extremely helpful and welcoming. More information about the Parade and Festival can be found online at OKCPride.org.

What is the true mission of OKC Pride?   The mission of OKC Pride is very clear. We want to provide leadership to meet the needs of Oklahoma City’s LGBT community. We do this by raising awareness and offering educational and health services. We engage in many activities all year that support the community. For instance, this year the Oklahoma City Council voted to add sexual orientation as a protected class as it relates to employment policy for city employees. Further, President Obama signed into law a repeal of DADT. OKC Pride played a valuable role in communicating its support of these valuable advances. Also, OKC Pride is involved in other awareness efforts like HIV testing, local food drives, charitable events besides our own and other healthrelated ventures.

OKC Pride is in May? Isn’t June the official “Pride month?”   Due to multiple incidents of heat exposure in past years and recommendations from community officials, we came to the conclusion that temperatures are simply too dangerous in June. However, OKC Pride will commemorate the Stonewall Riots by having a candlelight vigil on June 23 called “Oklahoma Remembers.” More information on this event is available at OKCPride.org.

Is this year free?   Yes. It was free last year, the year before and hopefully it will be free in future years thanks to our generous sponsors.

Who makes up the OKC Pride board and organizational committees?   OKC Pride is a 100-percent volunteer organization, including the Board of Directors. We all have full-time jobs, but we all care a great deal for this community. Anyone can join and participate in this organization. You can become a member at OKCPride.org.

What’s so special about this year’s Pride events?   For our 25th anniversary we feel it’s important to show the community that we are Proud. Strong. United. This year we’re having a Pride Week that consists of 10 full days of Pride activities. In the past, we only had a weekend. This year, we’ve focused our resources on our community, as all of our performers are from the local area. We’ve also asked our brothers and sisters in other LGBT organizations around Oklahoma to host mission-driven events during our Pride Week.   I saved the best for last! This year – to recognize and celebrate the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell – OKC Pride is inviting current LGBT service members to march in the Parade and be recognized collectively as the Parade Grand Marshal. All of this information is available at OKCPride.org.

OKC Pride Parade set for May 20 The annual Parade kicks off at 6 p.m. May 20 following its traditional route, beginning at NW 36 and Classen Boulevard and concluding at NW 39 and Barnes Avenue. Events and food/beverage vendors will be centered around the Angles Club parking lot at NW 39 and Pennsylvania Avenue.


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Festivities (Continued from page 15) lowed.   The Parade will be on Sunday, May 20, with lineup at 4 p.m., judging at 5 p.m. and step-off at 6 p.m. Like last year, the Parade route begins at NW 36 and Classen Boulevard, goes north to NW 39 and then west past Pennsylvania Avenue to Barnes.   This year, to recognize and celebrate the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, OKC Pride is inviting current LGBT service members to march in the Parade and be recognized collectively as the Parade Grand Marshal. Those interested can sign up at OKCPride.org.   On Friday, May 18, at 8:30 p.m., OKC Pride will officially kick off Pride Week 2012 with an outdoor movie on Film Row (parking lot at 614 W Sheridan Ave.) Producer/director Tim Wolff will be presenting his documentary, “The Sons of Tennessee Williams,” which gives a visually rich depiction of the all-gay Mardi Gras krewes of New Orleans and their extravagant costumed balls with plenty of humor to keep the audience laughing. With refined Southern charm, these early gay activists defied the norm and fought against police stings and persecution many years prior to New York’s Stonewall Riots. Special guest will be Albert Carey, one of the original activists from the early days of the gay movement in New Orleans.

McDonald (Continued from page 17)   The first Parade, which started at Memorial Park on Classen Boulevard, had its own measurable amount of controversy.   We had heard there would be a group of folks associated with the Ku Klux Klan at some point in the Parade. They decided to hang out in the parking lot of what was then Safeway at NW 39 and Pennsylvania (now Homeland), and well let me tell you, that when the 100-plus folks came up and over the hill on NW 39 just east of Pennsylvania Avenue, the four or five members of the KKK who were in that parking lot quickly got in their cars and left. They thought that there would only be about 10 to 20 folks in this Parade. Also, a dear friend of the community by the name of Granny Johnnie was it that Parade. As we started to cross Pennsylvania on NW 39, someone yelled out, “What are you doing out there with all those fags old lady?” Granny immediately responded, “You should look this great when you are my age, bitch.” Many of us laughed and kept the march going.   The Parade has grown every year since that time. Not only in participants but also in spectators. There are many great GLBT Pride Parades held throughout the year. I would encourage you to visit the OKC GLBT Pride Parade among your travels this year. *Names were shortened to protect the identity of those who wish to be kept confidential.

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See Parade Map on Page 33

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A new beginning...

Festival moves downtown   Many have asked why OKC Pride relocated the Festival from its traditional venue at Memorial Park. Besides logistical considerations like a parking shortage and permit limitations in public parks, the move downtown was also symbolic.   When the first Pride demonstration was organized 25 years ago, these courageous freedom fighters set a precedent, establishing a safe zone centered around “The Strip” on NW 39, which today is still a bustling enclave of gay-friendly establishments. Since 1988, the LGBT community has won more acceptance and legal protections than ever before, but we are still shy of equality. As American citizens, we deserve and demand equal rights to those enjoyed by the rest of society. It is time that we take our place as part of mainstream culture in Oklahoma City and beyond as an integral thread in society’s fabric. By moving downtown, we have greater opportunity to reach a wider audience – and to change more minds and hearts.   The Film Exchange District has faced a tumultuous history as well. Once a thriving hub of film and theater supply for the entire

region from the 1920s to 1960s, the local industry and neighborhood withered with changing times. After decades of neglect, a group of committed citizens joined together to save this unique section of the city with a venerable history. Buildings were gutted and lovingly restored, and creative renovation of the artistic streetscape on Sheridan Avenue has recently been completed. With art and design offices, an eatery and other businesses already in place, the Film Exchange District is set to become a new pocket of growth and renewal in downtown OKC.   Certain parallels may be drawn between the Film Exchange District and the gay rights movement. In the face of adversity and against all odds, a community that works together with dedication to a cause can achieve great results. Just as with this historic district of town, may we all work together and keep up the momentum to make our world a brighter, safer and more equitable place for the benefit of all. We hope you enjoy yourselves at the 2012 Pride Festival and the 25th anniversary of the OKC Pride Parade and take home with you this year’s theme: Proud. Strong. United.

The “reel” story of Film Row By Bradley Wynn Film Exchange Historian   Oklahoma City’s newest addition to its variety of downtown business districts is the Film Exchange, located in the southwest portion of downtown. The new and historic district is comprised of nearly 42 square blocks and incorporates buildings built and formerly occupied by film studios like Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros., MGM, and many more, as early as 1926. The majority of these preserved structures are located on a two-block portion of Sheridan Avenue affectionately named (Please see “Reel History” on Page 27)

Employees from Paramount Pictures stand in front of their studio, which was located in the OKC Film Row district in the early 1900s. Photo provided by Bradley Wynn


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Local Pride activities announced   The following activities will take place during the month of May:

  Other Options Fashion Show from 7 to 9 p.m., 722 N Broadway, $50 admission.

THURSDAY, MAY 17

SUNDAY, MAY 20

  Eat a burger at any S&B Burger Joint. 10 percent of all total-day sales benefit OKC Pride.   7:30 p.m. Screening of LGBT film, “Wish Me Away,” at Oklahoma City Museum of Art.

FRIDAY, MAY 18

  Outdoor Movie on Film Row: “The Sons of Tennessee Williams” at 8:30 p.m. in the parking lot at 614 W Sheridan Ave. Presented by producer/director Tim Wolff and special guest Albert Carey. Check OKCPride.org for additional information.

SATURDAY, MAY 19

  Festival, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Film Row in Downtown OKC (Sheridan and Lee).

  Parade, 6 p.m. step-off, traditional route. Grandstand near NW 39 and Pennsylvania Avenue.

MONDAY, MAY 21

  Wear Purple Day. Bring awareness to the bullying of youth.

TUESDAY, MAY 22

  Expressions Church - “Family DriveIn Movie Night” - “Grease” Sing-a-long, 8:30 p.m.  

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23

  PFLAG of Norman/Church of the Open Arms/Cimarron Alliance Film Night. A free viewing of “Fish Can’t Fly” at Church of the Open Arms. 7 p.m. Free admission and light snacks provided.

THURSDAY, MAY 24

  “Turning Drag on its Wig” presented by Cimarron Alliance. A night of the most unlikely drag queens you never thought you’d see. Check OKCPride.org for detailed event information.

FRIDAY, MAY 25

  Various club events on The Strip at NW 39 and Pennsylvania Avenue. And, “Wear Pink Day” - from the original rainbow flag; “Remembering where it all began; a symbol of Gay Pride”

SATURDAY, MAY 26 & SUNDAY, MAY 27

  Great Plains Rodeo presented by the Oklahoma Gay Rodeo Association at the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds.   Visit OKCPride.org for the latest updates and to learn how to get involved with the organization.


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“Reel” History (Continued from page 23) Film Row, where efforts to transform and revitalize the entire district started.   Much of the planned streetscaping is complete and incorporates never-beforeused concrete and paving methods, highlighting the area’s rich legacy, methods quickly adopted by downtown’s Project 180. Crosswalks resemble large, art decostyled film strips, while pedestrian ramps emulate Hollywood-styled, crossed spotlights, illuminating future growth and the city’s first bike lanes.   New property acquisitions and buildouts continue as businesses look to relocate to the Film Exchange. The International Photography Hall of Fame and many others will move into the area sometime between 2012 and 2013, bringing hundreds of new employees to the district. Numerous businesses have relocated to Film Row since 2009, adding to the few already steadfast and bold contributors. Among them are architects, screen

Studio officials pose outside the Universal Pictures building in this undated Film Row photo. Photo provided by Bradley Wynn printers, photography studios, production companies, and of course, Joey’s Pizzeria, and the list for new move-in requests is quickly growing.   To learn more about this amazing area and its story, complete with nearly two hun-

dred images, ask any of the wait staff for an autographed copy of Bradley Wynn’s book: “Oklahoma City Film Row” inside Joey’s Pizzeria. For information on relocating to the area, you can also contact the author via e-mail: bradley@scriptfolio.net.

Paid for by Nick Singer for Oklahoma 2012


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We’d like to acknowledge our sponsors for making this year’s Pride a success!

Bob Lemon

Josh Powell Beans and Leaves - Cricket Communications Historic Film Row - Joey’s Pizzeria - S&B Burger Joint (As of 4/23/12)


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Celebrating the end of DADT Soldiers selected as Grand Marshals of Pride Parade By Robin Dorner Editor, The Gayly   On Dec. 22, 2010, President Obama signed into law a repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT), bringing to an end a discriminatory policy that forced some great American servicemen and servicewomen to serve under a cloud of anxiety and isolation.   DADT stands in stark contrast to the values of unity and equality. However, today, gay and lesbian service members can serve the country they love without hiding who they love. Both our military and country are stronger for it.   To commemorate this historic event of 2010, OKC Pride is honoring LGBT service members, reflecting the long journey toward repeal and what it was like to watch President Obama sign the repeal act into law.   “When I first saw that OKC Pride wanted to put military folks as the Grand Marshals of the Parade, I was uber excited,” said Captain William Henning of the United States Air Force (USAF). “I’ve never been to a Pride event before; I was always too afraid that I’d get caught. And when it was advertised that I could bring someone with me, I got even more excited to have my boyfriend of almost three years march next to me!” Captain William Henning   Captain Henning has been in the USAF for nearly six years and is a meteorologist and a flight commander. He is 29 and currently ment and came home to find my boyfriend waiting for me at the stationed at Vance AFB in Enid. airport. At that point, I didn’t care it if it was in effect or not, I still   “Before the repeal, I was always worried that I’d get ‘caught’ ran into his arms and gave him the biggest hug I could.” being myself. You know how nervous I was the very first time I   Captain Henning also said he is so happy that he can live his life went to a gay bar? Always worried that maybe someone would with his boyfriend without the fear of getting “caught.” see me going in, or a civilian would be in there and notice me.   “I don’t have to live in secret, and we don’t have to live in After moving to Enid, it was even more so. Being on a small base, secret together. I can’t help but thank all those who stepped up in a small town, I knew that if someone caught me being myself, before DADT, who risked their careers so that folks like me don’t word would spread fast. I made a lot of trips down Route 81 [from have to worry about it anymore,” he added. Enid] to get to Oklahoma City, and away from my current job/em  According to the Military Times Poll, in 2011, 59 percent of ployment in order to avoid being found out. active-duty respondents said they did not believe they would be   “When President Obama signed the repeal, I was deployed overaffected by the repeal. When service members were asked this seas. Despite the signing, it still would not take affect for 60 days, year how they were affected after the repeal, 69 percent said they so still I had to remain hidhad felt no impact. den; not to mention I was   Although units where in a country whose views someone disclosed they For we are not a nation that says, “Don’t ask, don’t on homosexuality are are gay, lesbian or bisexual tell.” We are a nation that says, “Out of many, we are not very fond. But still, after repeal felt more of a one.” We are a nation that welcomes the service of evI was really excited and change, 59 percent still ery patriot. We are a nation that believes that all men remember e-mailing civilsaid the repeal had no noand women are created equal. Those are the ideals that ian friends back home all ticeable effect. about it. But I knew that I   “It takes a lot of strength generations have fought for. Those are the ideals that still had to remain hidden to stand up for who you are we uphold today. And now, it is my honor to sign this for just a little bit longer and what is right,” added bill into law. before it was finally over - President Barack Obama, Dec. 22, 2010 (Please see “DADT” with. During this time, I on Page 33) finished up my deploy-


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DADT (Continued from page 31) Captain Henning. “The AF has three core values: integrity first, service before self and excellence in all we do. This can easily be paralleled to, ‘Proud. Strong. United,’ [the 2012 OKC Pride theme]. In order to have integrity, you have to have strength to stick up for what’s right, even when no one is looking. The prouder you are of something, the more effort you’d be willing to put in to it.”   Henning concluded by saying, “Never in my wildest dreams would I have ever thought that I’d be a part of a Pride event as big as this, especially with the man that I truly love. He’s been more of a trooper during all this DADT stuff than I think I ever was.”   Although the historic bill passed the U.S. Senate with more than two-thirds support of the vote (65-31), U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.), a senior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC), made the following statement to the press on Dec. 18, 2010:   “I am very disappointed with this vote to repeal DADT. For the past 17 years, DADT has proven to work providing good

World War II veterans ride in the 2011 Parade. order and discipline to our nation’s military. To repeal a policy that has been successful to our military’s troop unity and effectiveness is frankly absurd and thoughtless of Congressional Democrats. As the old adage goes, why fix something that isn’t broken? To appease the far left, we will negatively impact up to 60 percent of

Photo by Taylor H. Brunwald

our combat forces for what is estimated to be less than 2 percent of the military population.”   Perhaps that which “isn’t broken,” is in the eye of the beholder in this case, huh Senator? Dorner, author of this piece, is editor of The Gayly. Read more local gay news online at www.gayly.com


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A bull rider at last year’s Great Plains Rodeo takes a tumble.

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Photo © CowboyFrank.net

OGRA set for 27th annual rodeo Organization partnering this year with OKC Pride   The Oklahoma Gay Rodeo Association is hosting the 27th annual Great Plains Rodeo May 26 and 27 at Oklahoma State Fair Park as the conclusion of Pride Week, hosted by OKC Pride.   OGRA has hosted the Great Plains Rodeo since 1986 at Oklahoma State Fair Park since becoming a member of the International Gay Rodeo Association in 1985.   “OGRA is proud of our history as part of the LGBT community in Oklahoma City. For 27 years we have produced one of the premier events of the gay rodeo circuit,” said OGRA President Justin VanNest.   The Great Plains Rodeo consists of 12 events: Roping on Foot, Team Roping, Break-away Roping, Barrel Racing, Flag Racing, Pole Bending, Chute Dogging, Junior Bulls, Bull Riding, Goat Dressing, Steer Decorating and Wild Drag. These are all amateur events and are intended for anyone who wants to participate to be able to do so.   The Grand Marshals for the 27th Great Plains Rodeo are Sonja Martinez and Dee Goodwin. Martinez has been raising money for AIDS-related charities for more than 20 years. Goodwin was the

second Ms. IGRA and has been a longtime supporter of the Rodeo Association. OGRA also plans to recognize Fritz Capone, who passed away last year and was the first Miss IGRA.   “Sonja and Dee have been wonderful supporters of the community and we could not think of two more deserving people to receive this honor,” said VanNest, “And Fritz gave so much to not only OGRA but all of the rodeos he was involved in over the years. His contributions will be missed by many people, and we felt he needed to be honored since his passing.”   This year’s events include The Stick Horse Rodeo, The Rodeo Show and the Texas Tea Party hosted by the Texas Gay Rodeo Association.   In addition this year, OGRA is partnering with OKC Pride to host Pride Week, 10 days of events starting with the Pride Festival on Saturday, May 19, and the Pride Parade on Sunday, May 20, and concluding the next weekend with the Great Plains Rodeo.   The Great Plains Rodeo is the primary fundraiser for OGRA. (Please see “Rodeo” on Page 38)


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Rodeo (Continued from page 37) Money raised from the event is given to the charity partners of the OGRA, which include Other Options, Be The Change and Expressions Community Center.   “We are looking forward to helping out our charity partners this year. They all do great work in the community, and we are more than happy to support them,” said VanNest.   Registration for the Great Plains Rodeo will be on Friday, May 25, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Oklahoma State Fair Park in Barn 6. The Rodeo will be held on Saturday, May 26, and Sunday, May 27, starting at 8:30 a.m. in Barns 6 and 7.   Anyone wanting more information about volunteering, sponsoring or becoming a member of OGRA should send an e-mail to president@ogra.net.   More information about the Oklahoma Gay Rodeo Association and the Great Plains Rodeo is available at www.ogra.net.

A participant in the 2011 Great Plains Rodeo.

Photo © CowboyFrank.net


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Paper examines gay history   A local man spent countless hours compiling hundreds of his  Bachhofer used a variety of primary materials, including newstorical records and interviewing dozens of residents to assemble paper articles, sodomy court records, personal interviews and U.S. a doctoral dissertation on the history of the gay community in Census records, to reconstruct the social and sexual lives of the Oklahoma City. city’s gay and bisexual residents. Further, he compared Oklahoma   Aaron Lee Bachhofer II submitted “The Emergence and EvoluCity’s queer subculture to those found in larger metropolitan areas tion of the Gay and Bisexual Male Subculto test the validity of assumptions regarding ture in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma” for his the roles played by geography, urbanization, dissertation at Oklahoma State University in World War II and Civil Rights-era protests. 2006. The complete 410-page document is   In his findings, research indicated that available online at OKCPride.org. a diverse gay and bisexual world existed Visit www.okcpride.org/history   The paper sheds light on numerous topics, in Oklahoma City with roots that extended to review the complete 410-page dating as far back as 1889. The 10-chapter back before World War II. That subculture dissertation written by Aaron dissertation details the historiography of included well-known spots for sex and soLee Bachhofer II. American LGBT sexuality and Oklahoma cialization, openly gay residents, and it opCity’s place in the debate as well as takes a erated rather openly until the late 1950s. At look into sodomy in the city from 1889 to that juncture, a sundry of factors -- the end 1940. Bachhofer includes an appendix of felony charges faced up of state-mandated prohibition, public outcries over vice and the to the year 1969. election of a homophobic county attorney -- allowed authorities to   The dissertation also highlights the rise of female impersonpursue vice more fervently, and it forced many gay and bisexual ation, AIDS and memories of some of the first gay bars in Oklamen back into the closet. homa City. Readers may be surprised to learn that much of the   Although Oklahoma City did not have a “Stonewall” moearly-day gay socialization took place in bars that were then lo(Please see “Dissertation” on Page 43) cated in downtown Oklahoma City.

Online:

IT’S TIME FOR CHANGE OUR TIME IS NOW! MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT Oklahoma GLBT Political Action Committee

JOIN US IN ACHIEVING EQUALITY FOR ALL! Help us elect representatives that will stand up for our rights. Look for our booth at Pride and Great Plains Rodeo Sign up for our announcements of Candidate Forums, Voter Registration events and to receive our Voter Guides. OGP P.O. Box 700267 Oklahoma City, OK 73107

www.okglbtpac.org info@okglbtpac.org Facebook and Twitter


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Dissertation (Continued from page 41) ment, political activism was not absent in the 1970s and 1980s, he wrote. Serious grass-root politicization occurred in response to an Oklahoma legislator’s attempt to deny homosexuals the right to teach in public schools, to combat police brutality and to fight AIDS. Yet, recent events, such as Oklahoma’s prohibition against same-sex mariage, adoptions and any antidiscrimination measures that local governments might enact, overshadowed that tradition of activism. This represents a fundamental weakness in the gay and bisexual Oklahoma City community -- an unwillingness to meet macro-issues affecting homosexuals across the United states -- and it stems from the openness that subculture enjoyed into the 1950s.   One appendix in Bachhofer’s paper details nearly 50 gay bars that have operated over the years. Among those were The Jungle Pit, opened in 1960 by Roger Pritchard near NW 12 and May Avenue; The Inferno Inn, in operation from 1958 to 1962 at 9200 S Shields; The Beer House, opened in 1960 at NW 16 and Linwood; Bishop’s Tap Room, opened from 1938 to 1969 at 110 NW 1; The Jug, 411 W Sheridan Ave., operated by Roy Ray Mastin and raided Feb. 14, 1969; Sweet Leona’s Lounge, 231 W Grand Blvd., operated until about the late 1960s by Leona Pierce; and The Continental Club, operated by Arnold Lee, which was raided and closed on Nov. 28, 1966.

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Candlelight Vigil set for June 23   A Candlelight Vigil will be held in the Gayborhood next month to remember those lost to HIV/AIDS in the Oklahoma City community.   The Vigil is planned for 8 to 10 p.m. June 23 in the area around Angles, at NW 39 and Pennsylvania Avenue.   The event, named “Oklahoma Remembers,” will feature several guest speakers. It is part of OKC Pride’s mission of awareness, health and education.   According to Pride, the event will serve as a remembrance of the community’s 25 years of history and those who passed from HIV/AIDS. In addition, the Vigil will bring to light those currently and historically affected by hate, bigotry and bullying.   All ages are welcome at the event. Candles will be available for $1, or attendees may bring their own for the Vigil.   For more information about the Candlelight Vigil, visit www. OKCPride.org.

Get the latest OKC Pride news! Download the mobile app for your iPhone or Android.


May 2012

Official OKC Gay Pride Guide

Pride Festival performers set   OKC Pride has selected a variety of performers to entertain at this year’s Festival on Saturday, May 19. The Festival will be held along Film Row in downtown Oklahoma City (between Dewey and Shartel on Sheridan).   Among those set to perform are comedians Spencer Hicks and Brad Porter and DDNT, an indie band. Also slated to make an appearance are MoonSue, a Latin/American group; Randy Rodgers, a country artist; and Beth Isbell, an indie rock/blues rock performer. Additionally, Red Dirt group Burlap Tuxedo, acoustic group Local Honey and blues/folk/jazz artist Mont Lyons will perform.   Lawn chairs are allowed at the performance venue, though no ice chests or large stowing devices will be permitted in the Festival.   A complete Festival performance schedule is available online at www.OKCPride.org. Or, also available this year is a mobile app, downloadable for your iPhone or Android.

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Commentary:

Ed Shadid: It is getting better By Edward Shadid, M.D. Ward 2 OKC Councilman   This year saw the OKC Council passage of the addition of sexual orientation to the City’s anti-discrimination policy, which represents substantial progress and is indicative of the movement towards LGBT equality seen across the country. While slower than we may like, and with continued setbacks, the United States, including Oklahoma and Oklahoma City, is witnessing sizeable, tangible movement towards acceptance of the LGBT community.   It is a statistical certainty that gay marriage will be favored by an ever-growing majority of Americans in the very near future. As we celebrate Pride Week, let us rejoice not just about all we have to be grateful for today, but remember those before us and celebrate that all predictive indicators would suggest that members of the LGBT community will enjoy freedoms and acceptance in the immediate decades to come that would be unimaginable only a few short years ago.   Although there are significant differences, I look at the history of treatment of left-handed peoples of the world as both a guidemap toward eventual acceptance of the LGBT community as well as helping to understand some of the biologic determinative factors of sexual orientation and sexual identity.   For thousands of years left-handed peoples suffered prejudice and discrimination across all cultures throughout the planet. Virtually every criticism and adverse behavior leveled against the LGBT community has, over the millennia, been previously used against left-handed peoples. Over the centuries, left-handers have been accused of criminality and dealings with the devil, and children have been subjected to re-education. Prejudice is the reason that the word “right” in the English language also means “correct” or “proper” and also stands for authority and justice, while in Chinese culture, the adjective “left” sometimes means “improper” or “out of accord.”

  The theories of Cesare Lombroso, the ple experience little or no sense of choice infamous 19th-century physician, were about their sexual orientation.” Heterowidely followed and contended that sexuals can ask themselves when they left-handedness was evidence of pathol“chose” to become heterosexual in order ogy, primitivism, criminality and insanity. to help them empathize with homosexuCruel attempts at converting left-handers, als. such as tying an arm behind their back and   I believe that it is the inevitable scienhitting their hands with rulers, were unitific breakthroughs which will confirm versally unsuccessful. this model, namely that the presence of a   It is becoming increasingly clear that gene(s) combined with hormonal and/or a complex interplay of genetics plus exchemical exposures during the 9-month posure to hormones in the uterus detergestation in the uterus or some other envimines handedness (handeness clearly runs ronmental trigger, combines to determine in families, and when a particular gene is a human trait and this realization will represent, men who were exposed prenatally sult in society’s attitudes towards homoto a synthetic estrogen found in fertility sexuals equilibrating with those towards drugs are more likely to be left-handed). left-handedness over the ensuing decades.   This research,   Apparent homocombined with the sexual individuals availability of data are known from hunto help us understand dreds of species of that left-handedness animals. Rememberis universal and the ing that all of us start clear evidence that out as females and See Page 49 for an accompanyconversion does not then some of us coning graphic indicating same-sex work, has led to the vert to males, the mamarriage support in each state. elimination of stigma ternal immune theory regarding handedness of sexual orientation (among other things, holds that, just as exfour of our last seven presidents -- Ford, posure to certain hormones plays a role the elder Bush, Clinton and Obama -- have in fetal sex differentiation, such exposure been left-handed). also influences the sexual orientation that   Similarities between the LGBT commuemerges later in the adult. Gay men have nity and handedness histories are inescapmore older brothers on average, a pheable. Like handedness, sexual orientation nomenon known as the fraternal birth orand identity cannot be changed. No major der effect. The mother is assumed to grow mental health professional organization more immune to male antigens with each has sanctioned efforts to change sexual pregnancy, and thus produce a greater orientation, and virtually all of them have number of antibodies which in some way adopted policy statements cautioning the affects sexual orientation. profession and the public about the harm   What has become fascinating over the which can result from treatments that purlast several years is the emergence of five port to change sexual orientation. These studies establishing correlations and relainclude the American Psychiatric Assotionships between handedness and sexual ciation, American Psychological Associaorientation. Blanchard et al 2006 argued tion, American Counseling Association, that the fraternal birth order effect appears National Association of Social Workers in to be limited to right-handed men. Lippa the USA, the Royal College of Psychiaet al 2003 looking at a sample of more trists, and the Australian Psychological than 2,000 subjects found that homosexSociety.   The APA has also stated that “most peo(Please see “Shadid” on Page 48)

By the numbers...


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Shadid (Continued from page 47) ual individuals were 50 percent more likely to be left-handed than heterosexuals. Mustanski et al. 2002 found homosexual women were almost twice as likely to be left-handed than heterosexual women.   Multiple, superiorly designed studies with larger sample sizes are underway, and we are closing fast on understanding the causality of sexual orientation/identity. My hope is that as such information continues to become available, that those who have advocated against the homosexual community will break free of entrenched positions and reach out to this segment of the populace with a loving response.   While scripture is frequently cited as an argument against homosexuality, it is clear that Jesus, who spoke extensively about sexual behaviors, avoided the topic of homosexuality entirely and the minimal references in the New Testament are highly controversial in terms of the translation

from the original language of the text. Let us equilibrate the amount of time we spend arguing about the morality of homosexuality with the amount of time Jesus spent discussing it: none.   It is clear that each successive generation of Americans, in every single state, is becomingly increasingly tolerant and loving towards the LGBT community. In terms of gay marriage, seven states cross the 50 percent mark overall. The generational gap is enormous. If policy were set by state-by-state majorities of those 65 or older, none would allow same-sex marriage. If policy were set by those under 30, only 12 states would not allow same-sex marriages.   A study published in the New York Times states that it is a statistical certainty that a majority of Americans in every state will approve of same-sex marriage and estimates passage of same-sex marriage laws

in Oklahoma in 2021.   Shame is a violation of what one perceives to be a violation of society’s values and is among the most destructive of human emotions. Shame can lead to social instability when one looks to unhealthy behaviors to try and change the way they feel to suppress the shame, however temporarily.   For a subset of the population the need to change the way they feel will become a compulsion or addiction. It is at that point that the behavior itself can cause additional shame and perpetuate and intensify the cycle.   If we can truly adopt the biblical adage to love thy neighbor as thyself, and can eliminate LGBT prejudice, discrimination, stigma and shame, we will, as a society, see substantial secondary benefits in terms of social instability and public health.


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Tulsa Pride set for early June   OKC Pride encourages visitors to head up the turnpike in June to visit the Tulsa Pride festivities. By Matthew DeCamp Tulsa Pride Communications Coordinator   Oklahomans for Equality announces details about Tulsa Pride 2012, which will be produced as a Street Festival and Parade at the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center at 621 E 4 in Tulsa.   On June 1, the Tulsa Pride weekend begins with the Pride Pool Party at the downtown Holiday Inn City Center pool from 3 to 9 p.m. Then we kick up the celebration on Saturday, June 2, with a Parade and Street Festival, hosted by Pandora Boxx, with performances from Oklahoma’s finest drag queens and kings, musical guests, a wonderful comedian and special guest DJs. Tulsa Shock will be hosting a special area at Pride that will provide VIP parade viewing and treatment.   During the month of May, enjoy many events preceding the Tulsa Pride weekend at local venues promoting Pride Night where patrons can enter to win VIP passes for two. Check out our website at www. TulsaPride.org and click on Events for a schedule of Pride Night events, Equality Day at the Zoo, Pride Night with Tulsa Shock, MoreColor Art Show, PFLAG Spaghetti Dinner and many more events.   Our non-stop entertainment for Tulsa Pride 2012 is unique and offers entertainment for a diverse crowd. Pandora Boxx will be headlining the Street Festival and Parade June 2. Boxx is best known for appearances on “Rupaul’s Drag Race” and “Drag U.” Boxx’s humorous and campy style has been recognized in the media as having the potential of being “America’s next drag Superstar.”   Joining Boxx on stage for individual

A large crowd enjoys activities at the 2011 Tulsa Pride. performances will be Big Bad Gina, a “fun and funky Goddess-folk-fusion band from Fayetteville, Ark. with a soulful, jazzy flair.”   Tulsa’s very own jazzy soul celebrity, Rebecca Ungerman, will be giving us a timeless performance. In August of 2009 her fans voted her Urban Tulsa Weekly Magazine’s Absolute Best Female Vocalist.   Eric Himan will take the stage and rock the Street Festival. Himan’s music has recently been featured on Sirius/ XM’s Coffeehouse radio station with his song, “Save The Afternoon” and version of the Simply Red classic, “Holding Back the Years.”   Also performining is Gary Robert Strickland, a singer/ songwriter based in the Midwest. He has appeared with a group and solo at many events, including Tulsa Mayfest, Tulsa Pride, OKC Pride and many more.   Cheril Vendetti will be Tulsa Pride’s

very first stand-up comedian. She recently appeared in Ozzy Osbourne’s new variety show, the CW morning show “The Daily Buzz” and the new TV pilot, “The Bogey Boys.”   Our weekend of Pride will conclude on June 3 with a Pride in the Park picnic. This picnic will be a throwback to the beginning of Pride in Tulsa, 30 years ago in 1982.   “Bring your own food, ice chests, kids and, of course, your pets to enjoy a great day at the park,” said Tulsa Pride Director Patrick French.   This event will purely be a picnic and will not provide any food vendors or refreshments for purchase. Be part of these exciting events by signing up on our Web site as a volunteer to receive a free special Volunteer T-Shirt.   The Tulsa Pride Committee 2012 is represented by Pride Director Patrick French, Business Operations Coordinator Noah Spiegel, Communication Coordinator Matthew DeCamp, Marketing Coordinator Jennifer Van Burkleo, Logisics Coordinator Angela Sivadon and Parade Coordinator Ms. George Romero. For more information about Tulsa Pride, full list of sponsors or to sign up to volunteer, visit our Web site, www.TulsaPride.org.


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Meet your OKC Pride Board John Gibbons - President

  John Gibbons has more than two decades of experience in the commercial and residential lending industry. John currently serves as Oklahoma Division President of GSB Mortgage, Inc.   John also co-owns a local restaurant and club. This is his fourth year as a member of OKC Pride and his third year on the board.

Joshua Sauer - Vice President

  Joshua has an extensive background in marketing, public relations, advertising, and broadcast journalism. He holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism and mass communication from the University of Oklahoma.   He is a member of Business Professionals of America, University of Oklahoma’s LGBT Journalist Association, Oklahoma Gay Rodeo Association and the Sooner State Softball Association. This is his second year as a member of OKC Pride and his first year to serve on the board.   Joshua enjoys watching and playing sports, spending time with his friends and loved ones, serving the community and long walks on the beautiful beaches of Lake Thunderbird.

Charleen Scheffe - Treasurer

  Charleen Scheffe has an extensive background in banking

and accounting. Charleen worked for Liberty National Bank & Founders Bank in Oklahoma City and with First Interstate Bank of California before getting into the spa industry.   Charleen was Operations Manager at Spa Gregorie’s in Newport Beach for eight years before returning to OKC in 2006. She is currently the General Manager at Eden Salon & Spa where she oversees the daily operations of the business.   Charleen loves to bowl and has been a member of the local gay bowling league, The Tuesday Twisters, where she served as Vice President for two years. Charleen loves her OU Sooners, Oklahoma City Thunder and Anaheim Angels! This is her second year on the board and to serve as both Treasurer and the Finance Committee chair.

Mitchell Todd - Secretary

  Mitchell is currently a student at the University of Central Oklahoma. He is majoring in Business Finance with a minor in Leadership. He is a member of UCO’s SAFE (Student Alliance for Equality) and is currently the Social Media Leader at Social Slake Advertising. This is his first year as a member of OKC Pride and his first year to serve on the board. (Please see “Pride Board” on Page 53)


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Pride Board cation from the University of Oklahoma and currently is pursuing a doctorate in educational foundations. This year he is serving his first term as a board member of OKC Pride.

(Continued from page 52) Kirk Martin - Board member (Immediate Past President)

  Kirk Martin has worked for the Oklahoma Department of Commerce for more than 20 years in a variety of challenging roles in marketing, research, information technology, economic development, workforce development and community development. Kirk previously worked for both Lieutenant Governor Robert S. Kerr III and Governor David Walters. He joined OKC Pride in 2009. This is his fourth year as a member of OKC Pride and his third year to serve on the board. He previously served two years as President.

Matt Harney - Board member

  Matt is the founder and co-owner of Harney & Associates, a political and business consulting firm. Harney & Associates provides fundraising, direct mail, strategy and management and Web site development consulting. Before launching his company, Matt served as Executive Director for a statewide political action committee.   Matt is a member of Sierra Club, Stonewall Democrats, Marianne Vannatta Race with the Stars Committee and the Mesta Park Social Committee. Matt received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Oklahoma City University. This is his second year to serve on OKC Pride’s board.

Brenton Wimmer - Board member

  Brenton has extensive experience in the areas of education and community engagement. Brenton is a founder of a local non-profit organization serving the Oklahoma City community, and he also serves on the University of Oklahoma’s LGBT Programming Board. In addition to this, he holds a master’s degree in adult edu-

Hunter Sanders - Board member

  Hunter Sanders grew up in Bartlesville. He studied film and video studies at the University of Oklahoma and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in 2003. Hunter currently works and lives in Oklahoma City with his better half, John D. He also serves as the Event Chair for the Dell OKC Pride Employee Resource Group.

David Heath Holt - Board member

  David Heath Holt has extensive experience in the area of mental health and addiction. Heath worked for NorthCare as a clinician serving the homeless population and co-founded a local non-profit organization serving LGBT youth in Oklahoma City. Currently, Heath works for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services doing advocacy work and serves as the Diversity Council chair.   Heath received an undergraduate degree from the University of Central Oklahoma in psychology, a graduate degree in human relations, and a women’s and gender studies graduate certificate from the University of Oklahoma. In addition, Heath is a published author, a Center for Social Justice Research Fellow and enjoys spending time with friends and family. This year is his first term serving as a board member of OKC Pride.

Jeremy Crites - Board member

  A native of Arkansas, Jeremy Crites graduated from Hendrix College with degrees in German and international relations. True to his wanderlust nature, he spent seven years in Germany and Austria working in the fields of education and linguistics. New to both Oklahoma and to the OKC Pride board, he looks forward to joining and serving the local community.

OKC Pride presents...

“Oklahoma Remembers” Saturday, June 23, 8 to 10 p.m.

NW 39 and Pennsylvania Avenue, Gather at Angles To bring light to our 25 years of history. Remember those lost to HIV/AIDS in our community, as well as those currently and historically affected by hate, bigotry and bullying.

All ages welcome. Candles available for $1, or bring your own. More info at: www.OKCPride.org


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Pride Shout Outs

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Photo by Luke Wright

The Survivor Tree welcomes visitors to the Oklahoma City National Memorial.

Oklahoma City Visitor’s Guide What to see and do during your visit to the area for Gay Pride festivities OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL

BRICKTOWN

OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART

PASEO ARTS DISTRICT

The site of the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building downtown is now home to this touching memorial dedicated to those who were killed, those who survived, and those who were changed forever on April 19. Visitors can see the beautiful outdoor grounds anytime day or night and the indoor museum (620 N Harvey Ave.) is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Adult admission is $10. For more information visit www.oklahomacitynationalmemorial.org or call (405) 235-3313. Located in downtown’s Arts District, the Oklahoma City Museum of Art (415 Couch Drive) is home to an extensive permanent collection, a café, a theatre showing classic and art films and the world’s most comprehensive collection of Dale Chihuly glass sculpture. For more information, visit www.okcmoa.com or call (405) 236-3100.

The Bricktown Entertainment District just east of downtown is a popular nightlife spot but also offers many restaurants, some shopping and other destinations. This area, once a bustling warehouse district, is now anchored by the mile-long Bricktown Canal linking the district together. The Bricktown Water Taxi is a fun way to see the sites from a different perspective, and each boat has a knowledgeable captain who shares the history of the area. For more information and a list of bars and restaurants, visit www. welcometobricktown.com The Paseo is an historic artists community tucked in near NW 30 and Dewey Avenue not far from the gay district and is home to more than 60 artists and 17 galleries. The Paseo is also home to several restaurants, bars and unique shops. For more information, visit www.thepaseo.com (Please see “Visitor’s Guide” on Page 57)


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Visitor’s Guide (Continued from page 56) OKLAHOMA HISTORY CENTER

STOCKYARDS CITY

NATIONAL COWBOY & WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM

FILM EXCHANGE DISTRICT

Those interested in Oklahoma’s unique history will enjoy visiting this museum, which features Smithsonian-quality displays of everything from the relocation of Native Americans to the history of the Sonic Drive-In chain. www.okhistorycenter.org

This museum, founded in 1955 as the National Cowboy Hall of Fame (1700 NE 63), is one of America’s premier institutions for the preservation of western culture and art. The icon of the museum is James Earle Fraser’s massive statue “The End of the Trail,” depicting a weary Native American on horseback as he arrives in his new home in what would become Oklahoma at the end of the Trail of Tears. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

PLAZA DISTRICT

NW 16 between Classen Boulevard and Pennsylvania Avenue is the location of one of OKC’s newest hotspots. Anchored by the Plaza Theatre, newly renovated and reopened by Lyric Theatre as their fall/spring venue, this hip strip is filled with unique shops and little cafes. More information at: www.plazadistrict.org

If you’re looking for OKC’s historic western culture, see it first hand in this cowboy-friendly district southwest of downtown. The area is home to the Oklahoma Rodeo Opry, western gear shops like Langston’s and Oklahoma City’s oldest and most famous restaurant, Cattlemen’s Steakhouse. Home to the OKC Pride Festival this year is the Film Exchange District, known to many as “Film Row.” Located downtown near Sheridan and Lee, this district boasts several shops, Joey’s Pizzeria, screen printers, photography studios and, of course, production companies. In the coming months, the International Photography Hall of Fame will find its rightful place in this area that was once home to such giants as Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros. and MGM.

MIDTOWN & AUTOMOBILE ALLEY

  Looking for a unique restaurant or shopping experience? The Midtown and Automobile Alley districts, just north of downtown, offer a plethora of dining options, including Iguana Mexican Grill, McNellie’s, Hideaway Pizza, Ludivine and Pachinko Parlor.


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- Parting Shot -

A participant in the 2011 Parade proudly carries the rainbow flag down NW 39.

Photo by Taylor H. Brunwald


Official 2012 OKC Pride Guide  

A 60-page magazine detailing OKC Pride festivities

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