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Established 1950

2015 Season

Brandywine Polo Club


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Brandywine Polo Club


Contents

Player of the Future: Alejandro, son of players Molly and Jesus Ontiveros, helping get “Chica” ready for Ericka Fuchsloch. COVER AND TOP PHOTO: JIM GRAHAM BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO: ERICKA FUCHSLOCH

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  4 Message from the Board   5 2015 Polo Sponsors   7 Polo Gear   9 “The Voice” of Brandywine Polo 11 Understanding the Team 13 Brandywine Polo School 15 2015 Season Schedule 16 Tailgate Recipes 17 BPC Archives 21 2014 Through the Lens 26 Polo Glossary 27 Polo Rules Simplified 32 The Trophies of Brandywine 35 Tournaments 38 2015 Club Members

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Board of Directors Message

Dear friends of Brandywine Polo -Welcome to the 2015 season. We are very excited to be able to provide another fantastic year of polo to the Brandywine Valley. As always, we are working hard to improve the facilities, the level of competition, the entertainment and the safety of the matches. We thank you all for your continued support of this beautiful venue. Brandywine Polo Club is one of the oldest polo clubs on the East Coast and this year marks our 65th season of polo. Founded in 1950, the club has been supported through the years by many notable polo enthusiasts, including James F. McHugh, George “Frolic” Weymouth, Richard Jones, Alfred Fortugno, and Dixon Stroud. We’ve also boasted our share of top playing polo managers, including Ray Harrington, Jr., Bob Connors, and New Zealander Graham Thomas. This year we continue with Mexico’s Juan Martinez Baez. We’d like to welcome back Belinda Brody as our polo school manager. Belinda and her team will continue their focus on increasing participation in the polo school. Belinda has just returned from Wellington, Florida where she spent the winter season teaching and playing. While in Florida, she was also spreading the word about Brandywine Polo, so we expect to see several new visiting players and teams this season. We’ve added several new sponsors and we also have an interesting opportunity to use drone technology for team tactics, practice/instruction and streaming match videos on the website. As always, the playing and social members continue to be the lifeblood of our club along with an increasing number of polo spectators. We thank you for your support and we thank you for helping us to spread the word about Brandywine Polo. Lastly, we would like to thank all the members of Brandywine Polo who work behind the scenes to make each season a success. We continue to be a volunteer-driven organization and we appreciate the energy, enthusiasm and efforts that each one of our volunteers brings. Cheers to another great season­—Brandywine Polo Club Board of Directors

PHOTO CREDITS: TOP LEFT, LISA SCOTT; TOP RIGHT, BOTTOM, SHIRLEY ZWICKER

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Brandywine Polo Club


2015 Brandywine Polo Sponsors We would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of our 65th season of polo: Title Sponsor Landhope Farms

Match Sponsors 1313 Innovation Center, Chester County Hospital, Koncordia Group, Malvern Federal Savings Bank, The Jones Family

Advertising & Banner Sponsors Oxford Feed and Lumber, Houppette Cosmetics & Accessories, That’s Hats, The National Bank of Malvern, Brushwood Stable, Fig® Magazine, Pour Guy And A Grill, Holly Peters Oriental Rugs & Home, B&D Builders, Meadow Springs Farm – Hicks Brothers, Eastern Horticultural Services, M.H. Eby Trailers E.C. Trethewey Building Contractors, Cardinham Killigrew, McLaren Philadelphia

Supporting Members Andrew Phillips, Budd Hallberg, Cel and Greg Brant, Cheryl Lamoreux, Elizabeth & Philip Gottshall, Elizabeth T. Mehl, Jacob Brumback & Tracey McShane, Jessica and Bill Cotreau, Kimberly Zellers & Ericka Fuchsloch, Lisa Scott & Brian Griffin, Leslie White, Mary Alice Malone, Rachel Roman, Richard Bickel, Sandra & Chris Selzer, Sara Doheny, William H. Todt

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Polo Gear

The Polo Helmet is required equipment most commonly made of reinforced, padded plastic with a cloth covering. They are modeled after the pith helmets the British wore in 19th-century India. Modern helmets are designed to fend off flying balls and to protect the head if the player should fall off.

The Mallet

The Team Jersey

is made of root manau cane. It can bend quite a bit, giving it a fair amount of “whip” during a hard swing. The head is made of tipa, a very hard wood. Both sides of the head are used to strike the ball.

sports the color of the team and the number of the player’s position (from 1 to 4).

The Bit Knee Pads provide protection from flying balls and rough ride-offs.

controls the horse. Polo players use many different kinds of bits. This one is called a “Gag.”

The Breast Plate fastens to the girth and keeps the saddle from slipping backwards.

The Martingale The Ball is made of hard plastic that dents a bit each time it is hit.

is the leather strap that runs from the noseband to the girth, and keeps the horse from raising its head too high.

Polo Plates

Leg Wraps

are special lightweight horseshoes made of iron. Polo plates have an inner rim and an outer rim, with the inner rim slightly higher than the outer rim, making it easier for the hoof to pivot in all directions.

provide support to tendons and ligaments as well as protection from flying balls and stray mallets. PHOTO BY JIM GRAHAM JIMGRAHAMPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


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n d Oper Roun Yea

Always pleasant, personal service Custom millinery available Brandywine Polo Club Program

2015 Season Large selection of Men’s & Women's Hats from designer to everyday On Route 202 at PA / DE state line

Board of Directors Ian Bunch, Lory Eighme Nicholas Place, W.B. Dixon Stroud Jr.

(610) 358-5995

Advertising & Sponsorship Sales Ericka Fuchsloch, Lisa Scott

105 Wilmington–W. Chester Pike Chadds Ford, PA 19317 www.thatshats.com

Program Coordinator Ricardo Barros Program Design Koncordia Group

Mention this ad for 10% OFF at our Rt. 202 location!

Contributing Photographers Ricardo Barros, Jim Graham, Elaine J. Kucharski, Alex Pacheco, John Plecenik, Shirley Zwicker, Tisa Della-Volpe For information about this program, please contact the polo office or info@brandywinepolo.com.

Brandywine Polo Club 232 Polo Road Toughkenamon, PA 19374 Mail: PO Box 568 Unionville, PA 19375 Main Office: 610-268-8692 info@brandywinepolo.com www.facebook.com/BrandywinePolo www.brandywinepolo.com All product and company names are trademarked or copyrighted by their respective owners. All rights reserved. www.brandywinepolo.com Established 1950

Proud Member Since 1951 8

Brandywine Polo Club


Photographic challenges accepted.

Ricardo Barros.com

“The Voice” of Brandywine Polo This year marks the 8th season having Bradley Hendrix as our announcer. His endless energy, knowledge of the sport, upbeat personality and unique announcing style have endeared Bradley to casual fans and seasoned players alike. “I am honored to be announcing polo again and look forward to providing another year of fun and excitement.”

ELAINE J. KUCHARSKI

“I try every match to give an overview of the rules and basic play so that even first-time guests can understand and appreciate the game.” Bradley is a local dj and hosts several quizzo/trivia games at area venues and also dj’s weddings, benefits, special events, etc. Feel free to stop by the announcer stand and say hello!

www.brandywinepolo.com

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Brandywine Polo Club


PHOTO BY RICARDO BARROS

Understanding the Team A team consists of four mounted players, which can be mixed teams of both men and women. Each number assigned to a player has certain responsibilities:

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is the most offenseoriented position on the field. This position generally covers the opposing team’s Number Four.

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has an important role in offense, either running through and scoring themselves, or passing to the Number One and getting in behind them. Defensively, they will cover the opposing team’s Number Three, generally the other team’s best player. Given the difficulty of this, it’s not uncommon for the best player on the team to play Number Two so long as another strong player is available to play Three.

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is the tactical leader and must be a long powerful hitter to feed balls to Number Two and Number One as well as maintaining a solid defense. The best player on the team is usually the Number Three player, usually wielding the highest handicap.

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is the primary defense player. They can move anywhere on the field, but they usually try to prevent scoring. The emphasis on defense by the Number Four allows the Number Three to attempt more offensive plays, since they know that they will be covered if they lose the ball.

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Brandywine Polo School An Interview with Belinda Brody, Brandywine Polo School Manager Do you need horse riding experience before learning how to play polo? B: Not necessarily. We have all kinds of riders that come to Brandywine. Some who’ve horse showed, fox hunted and evented and others who’ve never sat on a horse. It may give you a slight advantage if you’ve ridden, but polo is mainly about your timing, your swing and your awareness of others while playing. It’s very much like soccer and field hockey. Lots of people learn to ride as they learn to play polo. How can I try polo? B: We have a few options. You can sign up for private lessons, you can join our “Orientation to Polo” program offered over a series of Saturdays, or you can join a 3-day weekend clinic. We’ve even customized a lesson program for a group of people. I think one of my favorite things is when we hold sessions for corporate groups. You can really learn a lot about the people that you work with!

“—horses, speed, strategy and action. Polo’s got it all!” How did you get started in polo? B: I grew up in Brooklyn, New York. I started riding at a local trail riding barn and an old friend and riding instructor took us to a polo club on Long Island. The instant I tried the sport, I was hooked! It’s a really fun sport that can be very addicting—horses, speed, strategy and action. Polo’s got it all!

on the tournament circuit. We’ve ridden and won many tournaments together. I also adore the fact that she is an appaloosa. I love any horse with some color.

The Brandywine Polo Club is pleased to have Belinda Brody back this season as our Polo School Manager. Belinda brings a wealth of experience teaching and playing polo that include: •  2010 Team USPA •  3 Years Varsity Polo at University of Connecticut •  Polo School Manager at Southampton Polo Club 2011- 2013 •  Mentoring by high goal polo players Adam Snow and Owen Rinehart, and playing 14 goal polo as part of the 2012 Team USPA program in Aiken. •  20 goal polo with the Equilius polo team in 2012, including winning the 8 goal Southampton Cup. •  Played in La Aguada Polo Femenina ladies tournament in Open Door, Argentina •  Playing and winning the upper bracket of the WCT finals in 2011. Other players in the tournament included Sunny Hale, Maureen Brennan, and Christy Outhier. •  Belinda plays and trains under the watchful eye of Federico Cendoya, at El Venado, in Argentina. •  2015 Winner Tabebuia WCT Qualifier •  2015 WCT finals for Koncordia Group

Do you have a favorite horse? B: Hmmm, that’s a tough one. I’ve had so many nice horses, but I have to say that “Feather” here in the polo school is pretty much my rock star. She has taught so many to ride and she’s been an excellent partner for me

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1. BELINDA IN ACTION. 2. B  ELINDA AND HER HARD ROCK HOTEL TEAM AT EL REY POLO COUNTRY CLUB, CANCUN, MEXICO. 3. B  ELINDA COACHING BPC PLAYER LISA SCOTT AT THE 2015 WCT FINALS AT GRAND CHAMPIONS POLO CLUB, WELLINGTON, FLORIDA. PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX PACHECO. 4. BELINDA  AND HER PRECIOUS “FEATHER” BEING AWARDED 2015 WCT FINALS BEST PLAYING PONY. PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX PACHECO.

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Brandywine Polo Club


2015 Season Schedule All Friday matches start at 5:30 unless specified otherwise. All Sunday matches start at 3:00 unless specified otherwise. Schedule subject to change. Visit www.BrandywinePolo.com or call 610-268-8692 for updates.

Opening Day Match: Memorial Day, Monday, May 25, 3PM Friday Night Polo

Sunday Polo

May 29

Grass Polo

May 31

Grass Polo

June 5

Grass Polo

June 7

Grass Polo

June 12

Arena Prelims

June 13—Saturday - Circuit Arena Final, 3-6 Goals June 14

Tournament: Chester County Hospital Cup

June 19

Grass Polo

June 21

Grass Polo New Garden Airport Balloon Festival

June 26

Grass Polo

June 28

Grass Polo

July 3

Grass Polo

July 5

Tournament: McHugh Tournament Final, 2-4 Goals

July 10

Grass Polo

July 12

Grass Polo

July 17

Grass Polo

July 19

Grass Polo

July 24

Grass Polo

July 26

Tournament: USPA Landhope Farms Challenge Cup Final, 4 Goals

July 31

Grass Polo

Aug 2

Tournament: USPA/WCT (Women’s) Final

Aug 7

Grass Polo

Aug 8—Saturday - Arena Delegates Cup Final, 6-9 Goals Aug 9

Grass Polo

Aug 14

Grass Polo

Aug 16

Grass Polo

Aug 21

Grass Polo

Aug 23

Grass Polo New Garden Air Show

Aug 28

Grass Polo

Aug 30

Tournament: USPA Polo Ponies Memorial Final, 6-8 Goals

Sept 4

Grass Polo

Sept 6

Tournament: USPA Gerald Balding Final, 6-8 Goals

Sept 11

Grass Polo

Sept 13

UK Combined Services Team Match

Sept 18

Grass Polo

Sept 20

Grass Polo

Sept 25

Grass Polo

Sept 27

Richie Jones Memorial Match

Tournaments and Special Events Circuit Arena Tournament, 3-6 Goals, June 12 and June 13 Chester County Hospital Cup, June 14 McHugh Tournament, 2-4 Goals, July 5 USPA Landhope Farms Challenge Cup, 4 Goals, July 26 New Garden Airport Balloon Festival, June 21

USPA/WCT (Women’s) Final, August 2 Arena Delegates Cup, 6-9 Goals, August 8 USPA Polo Ponies Memorial, 6-8 Goals, August 30

New Garden Air Show August 23

USPA Gerald Balding Cup, 6-8 Goals, Sept 6 UK Combined Services Team Match, Sept 13 Richie Jones Memorial Match, Sept 27 PHOTO: JOHN PLECENIK

www.brandywinepolo.com

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Tailgate Recipes Crab Dip

Checkerboard Cheese Sandwiches

Yield: 6 cups

Yield: Makes 80 mini sandwiches

Ingredients

Ingredients

2 (8 oz.) packages cream cheese, softened

1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

1 (10 oz.) block extra-sharp cheddar cheese, grated

1 (4.5 oz.) can chopped green chilies, drained

1 teaspoon hot sauce

1 (10 oz.) block Swiss cheese, grated

1 cup seeded and chopped tomato 1 small clove garlic, minced ¼ to ½ cup whipping cream 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

¼ teaspoon ground red pepper ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper 1 lb. fresh jumbo lump crab meat, drained Garnish: chopped fresh parsley

Preparation Combine first 11 ingredients in a large nonstick skillet; place over low heat, and cook, stirring constantly, until mixture is smooth and bubbly. Gently fold in crab meat. Spoon into serving bowl, and garnish, if desired. Serve with French bread slices with Casino Butter.

1 ¼ cups light or regular mayonnaise 1 (4 oz.) jar diced pimiento, drained

1 teaspoon dried onion flakes ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper 20 thin white bread slices 20 thin wheat bread slices Garnishes: grape tomatoes & black olives, secured with wooden picks

Preparation: Stir together first 6 ingredients. Spread half of mixture evenly on half of white bread slices; top with remaining half of white bread slices. Spread remaining half of mixture evenly on half of white bread slices; top with remaining half of wheat bread slices. Remove crusts with a serrated knife; cut each sandwich into 4 squares. Arrange, stacked in pairs, on a serving plate in a checkerboard pattern, alternating white and wheat. Garnish, if desired.

Mini Bacon, Tomato, & Basil Sandwiches Yield: Makes 12 appetizer servings Ingredients 9 slices ready-to-serve bacon, halved ½ cup shredded Parmesan cheese 1/3 cup mayonnaise

1 garlic clove, minced 9 slices extra-thin white bread slices 3 plum tomatoes, sliced 12 fresh basil leaves

Preparation Heat bacon according to package directions until crisp. Stir together cheese, mayonnaise, and garlic. Spread mayonnaise mixture evenly onto 1 side of each bread slice. Layer 3 bread slices, mayonnaise sides up, with 3 bacon slices each. Top bacon evenly with 1 bread slice, tomato slices, and basil. Top each with remaining bread slices, mayonnaise sides down. Cut each sandwich into quarters. 16

Frozen Lemonade Slushy Preparation Combine one thinly sliced lemon and 1-2/3 cups superfine sugar in a bowl; mash with a spoon. Add 3 cups cold water and 1-1/4 cups lemon juice; let stand for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Strain. Puree half of lemon juice mixture and 4 cups ice in a blender until smooth. Pour into 4 chilled glasses; repeat. Serves 8.

Brandywine Polo Club


BPC Archives

1972 PROGRAM COVER ILLUSTRATIONS BY FROLIC WEYMOUTH

A salute to past Club President Frolic Weymouth over the years. He began riding horses as a boy and went on to train and ride show horses, hunters, racehorses, and polo ponies. As varsity polo captain at Yale University, Frolic and his squad won 11 out of the 12 matches they played during one summer alone. A longtime supporter and member of our own Brandywine Polo Club, he was a guiding influence when he took over the presidency from its founder, James F. McHugh, in 1956. He was just 18 years old.

An artist, a conservationist, an avid horseman, and a philanthropist. George A. Weymouth, better known as Frolic, is arguably one of Chester County’s greatest treasures, whichever hat he happens to be wearing. Renamed as a newborn by his young brother after the family’s lost dog, Frolic has since built a life that, by all accounts, has lived up to that name. While a dog may have been the inspiration for his moniker, it’s horses that have left their lasting impression www.brandywinepolo.com

REPRINTED FROM THE 1972 BRANDYWINE POLO PROGRAM

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He remains active in the horse community, with a permanently retired trophy at the Devon Horse Show. Following the Winterthur Point-to-Point in Delaware, he hosts an annual celebration at Big Bend, the 250-acre estate in Chadds Ford where he’s lived since 1961.

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The same year, Frolic began collecting antique carriages, once telling Town & Country that he didn’t want to see a car in front of the 1755 stone farmhouse he had just purchased. So he bought a carriage and his collection quickly grew from there. His exquisite carriage collection is a point of pride for him, at one time numbering 100, one of which originally was owned by President Buchanan. Rivaling his interest in horses is his passion for conservation and art. He worked with fellow residents to begin the Brandywine Conservancy, saving the endangered land from developers. An accomplished artist himself, he also founded Brandywine River Museum of Art to showcase the work of the Wyeth family—N.C., Frolic’s close friend Andrew, and Jamie—among other American artists. “I don’t know anything but painting pictures and being on a horse,” he once said. He certainly knows them well.

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1. JULY 1970. FROLIC DURING A RIDE OFF. PHOTO CREDIT: RON DUBICK 2. P  HOTO FROM 1975 CLUB PROGRAM. FROLIC’S EXPLANATION ON THE FOUNDING OF THE GERALD BALDING TOURNAMENT 3. JULY 1970. FROLIC EYEING UP A BACK SHOT. PHOTO CREDIT: RON DUBICK

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Brandywine Polo Club


1968 BRANDYWINE POLO PROGRAM COVER BY FROLIC WEYMOUTH

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2014 Through the Lens

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOHN PLECENIK, SHIRLEY ZWICKER, LISA SCOTT, CLAIRE BAILEY, TISA DELLA-VOLPE, AND ELAINE KUCHARSKI


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Line of the Ball

Polo Glossary

The Line of the Ball, or “Line,” is the straight path traveled by the ball at any instant, extended forward and backwards from the ball. A player’s claim to hit the ball, or to address an opponent, is affected by the player’s position relative to the Line. A new Line is formed with every deflection of the ball. This constantly changing reference requires players to make complex, split-second decisions throughout the course of play.

Backshot or Backhand

Mallet

Describes a shot in which the ball is hit in the opposite direction from how the horse is traveling. A backhand can be taken on either the offside or nearside and may be “tailed” or “cut away.”

The mallet is used to hit the ball. A mallet is generally between 49 and 54 inches long. The cane is traditionally made from root manau cane, although some players, especially arena players, may use canes of a fiberglass composite.

Chukker A period in a polo game, similar to innings or quarters in other sports. Typically, there are six chukkers in a game, although it is common to see four chukker games at lower handicaps and in the arena. In outdoor polo, a regulation chukker can be as long as seven minutes and thirty seconds. At the 7-minute mark, a 30-second warning horn is sounded indicating 30 seconds remain. Play stops when the ball is hit out of bounds, touches the sideboards or the 30 seconds expires, whichever occurs first. The clock stops running for penalties, making the actual time that elapses during a chukker longer than the seven and a half minutes on the clock.

Cut Shot A shot or swing in which the ball is hit at an angle away from the horse. Typically a cut shot refers to a forehand while a backhand is more often referred to as away.

Foul A foul is an infraction of the rules. The most common types of fouls are right-of-way infractions, walking the ball, turning the ball, dangerous riding, rough or abusive play, improper use of the mallet and unsportsmanlike conduct.

Hook To use your mallet to impede the swing of an opponent. To execute a proper and legal hook outdoors, the opponent’s mallet must be below his shoulder when hooked. Otherwise, a foul is called for a “high hook.” In both outdoors and the arena, the player hooking must be on the same side of the opponent’s horse as the ball or directly behind. You cannot reach over, under or across an opponent’s horse to execute a hook. If you do so, a foul will be called for a “cross hook.”

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Marking a Man To have an opponent under your control to prevent him or her from making a play against your team.

Nearside A shot in which the ball is hit on the left side of the horse. A nearside shot may be either a forehand or backhand. A nearside forehand may be hit straight or at an angle under the horse’s neck, called a “neck shot” or away from the horse, also called a “cut shot.”

Neck Shot Describes a shot in which the ball is hit on either side of the horse, at an angle, under the horse’s neck.

Ride Off This is a maneuver in which two players, traveling parallel and at the same speed, come together at the horses’ shoulders to attempt to move the other to gain or keep possession of the ball.

Right of Way The Right of Way is a zone of safe passage. Players on the Right of Way are entitled to proceed without risk of collision. Other players can only enter or cross the Right of Way when it is safe to do so. Who is entitled to the Right of Way is initially determined by each player’s position relative to the Line. Once a player assumes the Right of Way, he or she is automatically entitled to a safe exit from the Right of Way. This may mean that a second player up field, who has just deflected the ball and created a new Line, must wait for first player to pass and clear the old Right of Way before pursuing the ball he or she just deflected. The Right of Way is not to be confused with the Line of the Ball. Brandywine Polo Club


Po l

d S p ec By Ricardo Barros Illustrations by Ricardo Barros

RICARDO BARROS

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S s i e m l u p


1 A grass polo field is 300 yards long by 160 yards wide. Goals are scored when the ball passes between the goal posts at either end. Whenever goals are scored, the teams switch ends and attack in the opposite direction.

Game Watcher Tips • A match consists of six chukkers, each 7.5 minutes long. At the 7-minute mark, a bell or horn sounds to indicate only 30 seconds remain in the chukker. The chukker ends when the 30 seconds elapse, when the ball hits a sideboard or goes out of bounds, or when a goal is scored. • Each team consists of four mounted players. There is no goalie in polo. • Polo ponies are actually horses, but they are referred to as “ponies.” Each player rides several ponies during a match, changing them frequently to give every pony a rest. Generally speaking, any one pony plays a maximum of two chukkers in a match. Some players play eight to twelve ponies in a single match. • All polo players must hit the ball with the mallet in their right hand, including left-handed players. A stroke on the player’s right side is known as an “off side” stroke. A stroke on the player’s left side is known as a “near side” stroke. The ball is hit with the side of the mallet, not the mallet’s point, as in croquet. • The rules of polo are written to promote safety of both player and pony in a fast, exciting and competitive environment. Towards this end, the two principal concepts governing the game are the Line of the Ball (LOB) and the Right of Way (ROW). • With certain restrictions, it is permissible to hook an opponent’s mallet as he or she strokes at the ball. It is never permissible to strike any pony or other player with a mallet. • Rule infractions incur penalties, and these may range from a free hit at the ball to a direct shot at an open goal. An egregious foul may warrant the ejection of a player. • Two mounted umpires control the match on-field, and a “third man” referee off-field resolves the call should the two umpires disagree.

ELAINE J. KUCHARSKI

• The governing body for this sport is the United States Polo Association. The complete set of rules is available at: www.uspolo.org.

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Brandywine Polo Club


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The LOB changes whenever the ball’s course changes, such as when the ball is hit by another player or bounces off of a pony.

The ROW is a zone of safe passage. If a player is in the ROW, he or she has a right to proceed straight ahead without the risk of collision. It is a foul to impede the progress of a player entitled to the ROW. Other players in front of an advancing player in the ROW must yield their position if there is the slightest risk of a collision. In polo, a foul is called when the umpire perceives the risk of collision, regardless of whether physical contact is actually made. Other players can only enter or cross the ROW when it is safe to do so.

The LOB is the line traveled by the ball projected forward and backward at any moment.

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The ROW is not to be confused with the LOB and does not depend on who last hit the ball.

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6 Generally speaking, a player following the exact line of the ball and carrying the ball on his or her off side will almost always have the ROW.

When two players are approaching the ball from opposite sides and both are on the line of the ball, both players are required to stroke on their off side, such that the LOB lies between them and there is no risk of collision. In this case, both players have ROW.

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7 Generally speaking, when two players are approaching the ball from opposite directions, the ROW belongs to the player who is following the ball.

9 When two players are following the ball, the ROW belongs to the player with the least angle to the LOB.

Brandywine Polo Club


11 10 The LOB is constantly changing in a game. The zig-zagging ball creates a new LOB and the opportunity for a new ROW with every deflection. When the ball is deflected to create a new LOB, the old ROW doesn’t just disappear. Players on the old ROW must be given the opportunity to safely clear the old ROW before another player asserts his or her right to claim the new ROW.

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Under certain circumstances, it is permissible to ride off an opponent. Safety concerns dictate that contact must be made with the horses shoulder to shoulder, with the ponies moving at comparable speeds, at a narrow angle appropriate to the speed at which contact is made, and neither pony may be knocked off balance. It is an egregious foul to make a pony stumble or to knock a player to the ground.

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The Trophies of Brandywine By Nicholas Place Brandywine Polo Club has a rich tradition of high-quality polo. We hold many matches and tournaments throughout the year, culminating with two historic tournaments in late August and early September. These are the Gerald Balding and the Polo Ponies Memorial tournaments. We schedule these events consecutively, allowing Northeast teams to spend a couple of weeks at Brandywine on their way to Aiken and Florida for the winter season.

The Gerald Balding Trophy The Gerald Balding Tournament is eponymously named for a great English player of early 20th century. Born in 1909, Gerald Balding was the last 10-goal British player to date. Gerald and his two brothers, Ivor and Barney, played in the United States throughout

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the golden age of polo in the 1920s and 30s, mostly at the famous Meadowbrook Polo Club on Long Island. Gerald Balding went on to captain the British national polo team in 1936 and 1938. The Gerald Balding Tournament, first played in 1958, has traditionally been our most competitive trophy. Names of past winners are affixed to the wooden, custom-made trophy case. These nameplates make for interesting reading, as they include a large number of the great players and teams not only from Brandywine but also from the entire East Coast.

The Polo Ponies Memorial This tournament grew out of an unfortunate event. Play in the tournament represents a gesture of respect and remembrance. On a hot afternoon in 1966, lightning struck the Brandywine clubhouse and set it ablaze. The fire quickly spread to two nearby stables. Bob Connors, the club manager, braved smoke and flames to safely extract nine horses. Another seven horses were seriously burned and required treatment at the nearby New Bolton Center. This heroic effort not withstanding, 18 horses perished in the disaster. The community banded together in support of the Brandywine Polo Club and, on July 17, 1966, over 5,000 people came to watch a “Polo Ponies Memorial� match. Cars lined up, bumper to bumper on the entrance drive. Proceeds from this polo match helped our club rebuild the two barns, this time using fire-resistant, concrete cinder block. With our spirits rekindled by community support, we formally launched the Polo Ponies Memorial Tournament. The current trophy for the Polo Ponies Memorial Tournament, a painting by Genevieve Snyder, was first presented in 2007.

Brandywine Polo Club


This tournament is an important part of the Brandywine tradition. Now as we approach our 49th annual contest, we look back with bittersweet pride at all the teams from up and down the East Coast who have played in the ponies’ honor.

Richie Jones Memorial Another of our trophies is awarded to winners of the Richie Jones Memorial Match. Richie Jones, an avid horseman throughout his life, was involved in all facets of the local community, both through his law practice and his philanthropic efforts. Although fox hunting and thoroughbred racing occupied much of his time, polo was his true passion. A past president of Brandywine Polo, Richie began his polo career at Yale, a career which spanned over 35 years. Richie won the Gerald Balding Tournament on at least two occasions, playing with his sons on the Doe Run team. This team also participated in numerous tournaments at Myopia, Saratoga, Millbrook and Maryland polo clubs, among others, during the 1980s and 1990s. Richie Jones was best known for his defense as “The No. 4 player that never missed a back shot.”

PHOTOS: FACING PAGE AND BOTTOM LEFT, RICARDO BARROS; THIS PAGE, TOP, NICHOLAS PLACE.

www.brandywinepolo.com

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Brandywine Polo Club


Tournaments

PHOTO: TISA DELLA-VOLPE

www.brandywinepolo.com

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USPA Sherman Memorial Circuit Arena Tournament

Left to Right: Joe Manheim Kareem Rosser Brandon Reese June 15, 2014 PHOTO: RICARDO BARROS

Work to Ride / JCB USPA Challenge Cup

Left to Right: Max Hempt Tom Huber Thomas Huber George Hempt July 27, 2014 PHOTO: RICARDO BARROS

Dovecote 36

Brandywine Polo Club


WCT/USPA Brandywine Women’s Tournament Dollar Shave Club Left to Right: Posey Obrecht Jessica Dubin Marissa Wells Kelly Wells August 3, 2014 PHOTO: JOHN PLECENIK

USPA Polo Ponies Memorial Tournament Koncordia Group Left to Right: Segundo Caimi Brian Griffin Juan Martinez-Baez Mario Maldonado August 24, 2014 PHOTO: LISA SCOTT

USPA Gerald Balding Tournament Taylor Hill Farm Left to Right: Marcos Onetto Sarah Runnells Martin C.J. Martin Will Tankard August 31, 2014 PHOTO: SHIRLEY ZWICKER

www.brandywinepolo.com

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2015

Club Members 5

6

16

PHOTO: PLECENIK

17

7

8

18

PHOTO: TISA DELLA-VOLPE

9

19

PHOTO: TISA DELLA-VOLPE

10

20

Top Left to Bottom Right 1.

Claire Bailey

13.

Brian Griffin *

2.

Ricardo Barros

14.

Melissa Harrington *

3.

Belinda Brody *

15.

Louis Hering

4.

Ian Bunch *

16.

Kirk Hoffman

5.

Devin Cox

17.

Carlos Martinez-Baez *

6.

Jessica Dubin

18.

Juan Martinez-Baez *

7.

Nicolle DuHamell

19.

Joel McKeever *

8.

Lory Eighme *

20.

Denis O’Flynn O’Brien *

25.

Pat Sertich *

30.

Brian Sweeney

9.

Elle Elliman

21.

Jessica Oehler

26.

Molly Smith

31.

Ellen Tracey

10.

Kathleen Fowser *

22.

Jesus Ontiveros*

27.

Allan Shaffer

32.

Johanna Walters

11.

Ericka Fuchsloch

23.

Nicholas Place *

28.

Matthew Spear

12.

Martin Garzaron

24.

Lisa Scott *

29.

Dixon Stroud *

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26

27

Brandywine Polo Club


1

2

3

4

11

12

13

14

15

21

22

23

24

25

28

29

30

31

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Not Pictured Robert Roach

Abigail Butler

Caroline Hardie *

Thomas Utter

Shivraj Mundy

Joseph Pancoast Manheim

Louis Micolucci

* Denotes Full Member. www.brandywinepolo.com

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Brandywine Polo Club


H i s t o r i c P r e s e r va t i o n | C u s t o m H o m e B u i l d i n g | A d d i t i o n s | R e n o va t i o n | K i t c h e n s & B a t h s

B U I LDI NG W I T H P A S S ION. Downingtown,

www.brandywinepolo.com

Pennsylvania

484.593.0334

• www.ectbuilDers.com

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Brandywine Polo Club

Learn to play

POLO!

o A safe but exciting introduction o o o o

for the beginner. Affordable. Convenient. Professional instruction. Horses with an understanding temperament provided.

Brandywine Polo Club

Orientation to Polo • During this fun introductory course we will lead you in a group lesson with other new players through a graduated program covering the rules, tactics, polo swing and riding skills on a polo pony geared to your level of riding experience - from the occasional rider to the experienced rider of all ages. • You will be introduced to proper mallet strokes on our wooden horse! You’ll practice your malletwork under the careful watch of our qualified instructor. • You will be mounted on quiet, safe horses matched to your abilities. First you’ll focus on polo riding, then on hitting the ball. A fter successfully moving, stopping and turning your pony, you’ll ‘stick and ball’ at your own pace in our arena. End with a tournament! • Join us, have fun! 42

FORMAT: 4 sessions plus a tournament OR 3-day weekend clinic. Class size limited to 10; first come, first served. REQUIREMENTS: Riding helmet, boots (tall boots or paddock boots,) and gloves (golf, baseball or polo gloves). Mallets will be provided. AFFORDABLE: $350 CONTACT: Belinda Brody, Polo School Manager Tel: 610-268-8692 Email: info@brandywinepolo.com 232 Polo Road Toughkenamon, PA 19374 www.brandywinepolo.com PRIVATE LESSONS AVAILABLE Brandywine Polo Club


• Exemplary Maintenance • Dedicated Horticulturists • Unwavering Commitment • Experience, Education and Enthusiasm

L eave the GardeninG to Us

And never M iss

A

Chukker

Call today for a consultation: 610.268.5240 340 Cream St. • Kennett Square, PA 19348 Our professional staff has trained at Longwood Gardens.

www.e Asternhs.CoM www.brandywinepolo.com

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www.brandywinepolo.com

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BPC Program 2015  

Brandywine Polo Club 2015 Program

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