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B XmagaNI NE zine

SUMMER 2015

10 spectacular

THE HEAT IS ON

HOT SAUCE FROM AROUND

THE GLOBE

BBQ  recipes

SUMMER TRAVEL TIPS

POWER TO THE PICNIC

meet Spinny! + MODERN SUMMER STYLE WITH JEFFREY JOHNSON

SEASONAL

S   IPS


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CREATE:

Macrame is BACK! Create fun new projects with these simple steps.

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TRADITION:

Lemonade Stand Get all you need for your own DIY stand and plenty of lemonade recipes.

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WANDER:

The Big Island

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Get ahold of the aloha spirit with our guide to the Big Island of Hawaii.

BOX NINE MAGAZINE


SUMMER

B X NINE

2015

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EDITOR IN CHIEF Coryanne Ettiene CREATIVE EDITOR Sam Henderson MEDIA RELATIONS Coryanne Ettiene ART DIRECTION Sam Henderson LEAD PHOTOGRAPHER Sam Henderson MUSE 1 Anthony Bourdain MUSE 2 Rachel Khoo RECIPE DEVELOPMENT Coryanne Ettiene Sam Henderson CONTRIBUTORS Katja Presnal Jeff Parker INTERNS Xander Ettiene Max Henderson THRIFTY FIFTY BARGIN SCOUT Margeaux Ettiene GUY AT THE LIQUOR STORE Jose

Hot Sauce

WITH MANY THANKS TO: Jeffrey Johnson

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GATHER:

Summer Sips

Fresh cocktails for festive summer nights.

NOSH:

Bring the heat this summer with hot sauce and salsas from around the globe.

MEDIA INQUIRIES EMAIL: Coryanne Ettiene

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PAST ISSUES VISIT: BOX NINE on ISSUU.COM

GURU: Grilling

Our grilling expert guides you through the basics for grilling at its finest.

ON THE COVER: Can you say ‘Chiweenie’? Spinny, our cover model, is a Chihuahua and dachshund mix. She enjoys medium rare steak, long walks in the park, and bike rides with the wind between her ears. Photo and cover design by Sam Henderson.

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BEHIND THE BOX Something about summer makes me giddy with anticipation. There is a certain energy that only comes from the sun that I soak up, and just the smell of summer makes me happy and drunk on love. I was married in the summer, and some of my best travel memories are summer scented. But there is always that one summer that lingers in your mind, that wraps you in warmth long after the tans have faded and that you benchmark all others upon. For me, that one summer was last summer when we loaded everyone into the car and drove cross country for 2 weeks high on togetherness and with visions of small town America dancing around in our heads. We arrived to what can only be described as the sort of sauna people pay good money to do yoga in, and met what are now some of our closest friends. That one summer took a band of wandering nomads longing to return to London and brought us “home” to our adopted south; sweat stained t-shirts and all. We learned to love iced tea, to bathe in mosquito repellent and live on the front porch; and if I am honest, let the occasional Y’all slip by without warning. Summer, no matter who you are, or where you are, always ends with good memories. When we sat down to draft up the summer issue of BOX NINE, it was with the mission to capture what we love most about summer, season it with personal memories and bundle it up with grill marks to make it sizzle. We wanted a hot issue because frankly, summer is about embracing the heat both outside, and on your plate. We wrote this issue for the Jack-of-all-trades and master of none, the inner summer guru who builds the ultimate lemonade stand, longs for a cocktail as fresh as it is strong, and wants to master a grill like a pro while decorative hanging lanterns adorn the night sky. May this be the summer that all others are compared to, and may you find something that brings that about within the pages of BOX NINE.

connect with Coryanne

e n n a y r co

Admittedly, summer really isn’t my thing. Dallas can be brutally hot and humid forcing me to spend most of the daylight hours between mid-May and mid-September tucked away in climate-controlled comfort. I didn’t always feel this way about summer though. Growing up in Michigan, summer was just about the best thing, EVER! We stayed outdoors from sunrise until the street lights came on playing baseball, making forts, and selling lemonade (you’ll see that tradition carried on later in these pages). Regardless of the heat, the area was rich with waterways and an opportunity to splash about was never more than a few minutes away. It’s impossible to put together seasonal publications like this one without being reminded of the personal ties to the content. From backyard barbecues to hiking the steep descent to the black sands of Pololu Beach with my boys, this issue is filled with personal memories that I am thrilled to share with you. Hopefully, it will stir up some memories for you, too. If nothing else, I hope you will discover my love for homemade limoncello. But it wasn’t all dusty memories. Over the past few months I had an opportunity to work with some wonderful new people and learn things I never knew. For example, I have never been to Finland, but after a little research and seeing Katja’s take on it, Finland has quickly moved up on my list of ‘must visit’ locations. When we began this sophomore attempt at BOX NINE I wasn’t really sure what to expect. I only knew that I wanted it to be better than the first issue. With the success of the holiday edition, we were facing a pretty big challenge. Whether we made it or not will ultimately be decided by you, based on the following pages. I hope you enjoy it. savour... fireflies

connect with Sam 3

sam BOX NINE MAGAZINE


WHAT IS BOX NINE?

Just the smell of summer makes me happy and drunk on love.

Growing up in Michigan, summer was just about the best thing... EVER! BOX NINE MAGAZINE

“We    like our drinks strong, our humor edgy, and our tables busy. We are BOX NINE.” 2

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GATHER If you have good company, you have everything. Â So gather together and soak up the dog days of summer creating memories that will keep you warm all winter long.


SCAVENGER HUNT Leave all the loot behind and host a scavenger hunt where the teams take the photos of the items on their list with a team member holding it. Or even go the extra mile by creating a scavenger hunt hashtag that allows everyone to see the hunt play out in real time. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

American flag BBQ picnic table with people  ice cream cone blue flip flops beach chair bicycle butterfly ant out of state license plate red bird pineapple drink with an umbrella in it hipster  aviator sunglasses cut off jean shorts mosquito repellant factor 50 sunscreen sign that says ‘summer’ something from the 80s. something with grill marks

TIPS FOR SUMMER FAMILY GATHERINGS

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• Create a scavenger hunt • Fill a large bucket with water ballons • Rent a bounce house • Set up games that children and adults can play together like croquet or badminton • Create party packs full of bubble bottles, magnifying glasses, crayons and other toy trinkets.

FIVE PARTY THEMES WE LOVE RIGHT NOW Wild West- Back yard BBQs make this an easy theme to build upon, so saddle up and give your guests a good time with a wild west theme by adding bandanas, cowboy hats and a good old-fashioned game of horse shoes to complement  a country and western soundtrack.   Peace, Love, and Brown Rice - Shibori and tie dye are on trend this summer, so put on those tie dyes, gather up the daisy chains and create a 1969 summer of love soundtrack that will give your guests a groovy time. Arabian Nights —  Toss a few blankets and over stuffed pillows on the lawn, light a few candles and embrace the bold colors and flavors that make Arabian nights so magical.  And go that extra mile and set up a movie theatre in your back yard to fully capture this romantic theme.   Barnyard - Hay bales, honky-tonk and gingham make this the perfect family theme.  Host a sack race, make a few lemonade stands, and embrace everything that is at the heart of this classic theme.   Surfs Up -What’s summer without a beach party.  Even if you are in the mid-west, you can easily capture this theme by something as sophisticated as vintage sea glass lanterns or going casual with loud Hawaiian shirts and the Beach Boys wafting over the speakers.


coryanne

Really? I’m taking away your license to grill.

I ran out of gas for the grill.

sam

Send out your support system for more... or fire up the charcoal... or take your grill party indoors with a grill pan... and NEVER do that again.

Trust me, if you can smell them, they can smell you. Time to turn your party into a pool party.

My guests did not wear enough deodorant.

You’re going to need some powerful fragrance to overcome that. This alone might be argument enough for #TeamCharcoal.

Rookie move, and also a sign that you are doing way too much. This is a summer party not a black tie event. Quickly fill a buck with ice, add a healthy portion of salt, top with water and stir before adding your drinks.

I forgot to chill the drinks.

What?! That might get your party license revoked. While the other drinks cool, start everyone off with a shaken beverage. Shake until jet cold and pour over ice. You’re safe... this time.

Isn’t that ironic. It depends on how drunk you are, either scoop it our or get another glass, the choice is yours.

There is a black fly in my Chardonnay.

Scoop ‘em out and keep going. I assume the alcohol killed any pathogens they might have been carrying.

That happens. That is why they call it the summer party season. All you can do is hold on, drink up and enjoy the ride.

Everyone got way too drunk way too fast.

At every summer bash there comes a time to restore order... less booze, more ice.

Oh, dear! Did you not invite them? Did you not bring over a bottle of champers when they declined your invitation? Are you rocking the hood well past midnight? Are you guests prank knocking on their doors? Are you playing Vanilla Ice too loud? If none of these, they simply don’t like you.

The neighbors are complaining.

Uh-oh. This problem needed to be addressed before the party started. They had to be invited or, at the very least, alerted to your party intentions. Now the best you can do is keep things under control.

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GATHER

WORST

CASE

SCENARIOS DRUNK ADVICE FROM THE EDITORS

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ADVERTORIAL

GET THE LOOK ! Simple clear glassware and understated cutlery are all you need for carefree summer entertaining.

Sand and shells in tall hurricanes provide an easy, beachy feel.

Go natural! Woven chargers add to the casual elegance.

Serve a course right from the avocado for a new experience and simple clean up.

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White makes an excellent backdrop. Use white plates and candles to keep the focus on the food.

Graphic, striped linens with a natural feel are refined, but not stuffy.

BOX NINE MAGAZINE


EFFORTLESS SUMMER STYLE from lifestyle expert Coryanne Ettiene

WATCH

how we put it all together in  our new video.

click to watch NOW! • • • • • • • • • •

Marquee letters are a great way to add impact and a personal touch. Go bold with vibrant colors, or keep it classic with an industrial tin. Marsala is Pantone’s color for 2015, dish it with table linens, or mix it up with a tart berry cocktail. Selfie booths are making a huge impact on weddings and small parties alike and make a great keepsake. Go retro with a Polaroid camera, or keep it modern by encouraging your guest to use a party hashtag to share the memories. Eco style never tires, and this summer reusable décor is everywhere. Reclaimed items or treasured heirloom pieces give your decor a charm that can’t be replicated by store bought items. Go bold and vibrant with Shibori and dip dyed textiles. They blend well with crisp white linens and add that pop of color that makes summer entertaining so festive. Capture the calligraphy trend in by using signs, foil stamped napkins, coasters, or cake toppers. Flowerless floral designs can add style and a personal touch. The use of paper flowers, in both floral walls and centerpieces offers a bold but soft accent to any party. Skip the silverware; finger foods remain very popular with guest and hosts alike – keep it stylish by adding accents with napkins and elegant serving elements. Get creative with Infused cocktails. Something as simple as a few sprigs of mint in your vodka can turn a simple cocktail into a popular one. Bring in an expert. Say goodbye to hiring a party planner and hire a party assistant – having an extra pair of hands to play greeter, server and cleaner will ensure that you enjoy the party as much as your guests do.

AVOCADOSFROMPERU.COM 10


BASIC MOJITO RECIPE INGREDIENTS: • 8-10 leaves of fresh mint • 1 lime, sliced • 1 tablespoon superfine sugar • 2 ounces white rum • ice • 2 ounces of sparkling water             INSTRUCTIONS: 1. In a shaker, add the mint leaves, 3 slices of lime and sugar, and gently muddle the ingredients together to release the flavor and juices. Do not over muddle. 2. Add the ice and pour in the rum, and shake it together to blend the flavors before pouring into a tall glass with ice.  Add the remaining lime and mint, and then top with sparking water. 

See those veins on your mint? They contain chlorophyll and if you over muddle your mint (mushy pile of soggy leaves) then your mojito will taste bitter.

summer sips

APPLE MOJITO INGREDIENTS: • 3 ounces club soda • ½ ounce lime juice • 10 mint leaves muddled with ¼ teaspoon sugar • 2½ ounces light rum • 2½ ounces apple juice reduction INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Make juice reduction by simmering 1½ cups of apple juice in a small saucepan until it has reduced to ½ cup. Set aside to cool. 2. Muddle mint with sugar in the bottom of a double highball glass. 3. Add juice reduction, rum, and lime juice. Stir. Add ice. 4. Add club soda and stir gently. Garnish with apple peel or slice, fresh mint, and a lime wedge.

GATHER MORE MOJITO MADNESS Watermelon Mojito Cranberry Mojito Grapefruit Mojito Cucumber Mojito Mango Mojito Frozen Classic Mojito Basil and Raspberry Mojito Pineapple Mojito Apple Mojito

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summer sips

STRAWBERRY DAIQUIRI This summer classic is a fresh and light way to enjoy sunny afternoons. Avoid watering down your drink with crushed ice. Instead, pick strawberries at their peak of freshness, cut them into slices or chunks, and freeze for at least 1 hour before making your cocktails.

INGREDIENTS: • 1 cup light rum • 2 cups frozen strawberries • ⅓ cup superfine sugar • ½ cup lime juice • ¼ cup triple sec INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Place strawberries in your blender. 2. Add sugar, rum, triple sec, and lime juice. 3. Add more strawberries if needed to obtain a smooth consistency. 4. Pour into chilled or frozen glasses.

Skip t he rum and freeze t h e m int o po psicle st icks.  W he n you are ready t o ser ve, add t he rum t o a tall glass and po p t he straw ber r y po psicle insid e.

BOX NINE MAGAZINE


summer sips

limoncello Along the Amalfi Coast of Italy, the people have enjoyed the bounty of lemons for over a hundred years in the form of limoncello (leemoan-chel-low). Made by extracting the oils from lemon zest in alcohol, it is a quintessential summer drink and often served ‘straight up’ in chilled ceramic glasses. Enjoy it on its own or use it to enhance your favorite summer cocktail. Cin cin! INGREDIENTS: • 10 lemons • 1 750-ml bottle vodka, 100 proof • 2½ cups sugar • 2½ cups water INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Peel the lemons with a vegetable peeler, removing as little of the pith as possible. Place the peels in a sealable jar and cover with vodka. Place the lid and store at room temperature out of direct sunlight for at least 4 days and up to a month. Longer periods will result in more lemon flavor although most of the extraction happens in the first few days. 2. Strain the vodka through a fine mesh strainer and discard the peels. 3. Make the simple syrup by adding the water and sugar to a small saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until sugar has dissolved and syrup just begins to boil. Allow to cool completely. 4. Use a funnel to add syrup and infused vodka to a sealable bottle and shake to mix well. 5. Place limoncello in the freezer for at least 4 hours before serving. It can be stored in the freezer for up to one year.

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THE PROBLEM WITH PICNICS • Avoid over packing, no one likes carrying a heavy Picnics are fabulous in theory. You end up packing too much, or basket. And most baskets can’t carry more than 5 lbs, not the right things, and if you’re lucky you arrive with your basket so pack well, pack light and leave all the heavy lifting and your back in one piece.  Your food is often luke warm or melted behind you.   and everything is dripping from the ice packs.  Then there are the • Pack a lined blanket to keep the damp off your picnic ants, the gnats, the flies, the wasps and the soggy breeches you spot. Yes they can be pricy but they are worth every get if you don’t plan well.  But we are here to make picnics magical penny. Don’t want to fuss about with a fancy blanket, again, to see rainbows beam from your basket and gumdrops fall then embrace your inner red neck and use trash bags from the sky with a few helpful tips that will ensure that the lovely to line the ground before you put your blanket down.   theory of picnics is evident in the actual picnic itself.   • Skip the cooler and use insulated bags. They keep your foods fresh and are lighter to carry.   • Create a picnic playlist and pack a portable speaker to keep the mood festive. • Plan your menu around foods that can be served at room temperature or slightly chilled, avoid anything that will wilt or perish in the heat. The most obvious reason being food poisoning but really, who wants luke warm cheese?   • Give your presentation an eco make over with bamboo plates and cutlery. • Pack a few zip lock bags and kitchen wipes for easy clean up.  Once you’ve wiped down your dirty dishes, seal them away in a bag to keep the mess and insects from creating unwanted drama. • Citronella candles create atmosphere and keep those pesky mosquitos from joining the party. • Bring along a few travel games to keep everyone entertained. • Sprinkle baby powder or corn starch a few inches from your picnic to ward off ants.

ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FIVE

SPECIES OF MOSQUITOS

30

THIS SUMMER

56 PEOPLE SIGNED THE

WILL EAT OVER

15 POUNDS

OF WATERMELON

THIS SUMMER

75˚

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

AVERAGE AMERICAN

PERFECT

POOL TEMPERATURE

GATHER

100

FOR FIREWORKS, THE AVERAGE AMERICAN SPENDS LESS THAN

DOLLARS

TO SUMMER PARTIES

WILL EAT

WHO ACTUALLY RSVP

NUMBER OF HOT DOGS AMERICANS

PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE

BILLION

7

THE US IS HOME TO

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of style

STORY AND PHOTOS BY SAM HENDERSON

T

Tucked neatly away in the Far North area of Dallas, Jeffrey Johnson has created a modern home that is exciting and serene at once. From the curb, the unassuming facade masks the bold, colorful interior with nods to the Far East. Johnson has found the delicate balance of color, pattern, and texture, filling each room with just enough to take you to the edge, but not over. The gate opens to an enclosed front garden with a paver path that leads you to the door by way of a larger than life buddha. There is little else, suggesting the importance of the piece and alerting you to something special ahead. Just inside, the door opens to an open formal living area with twostory walls. The far wall is clad in textured panels that benefit from the light thrown by the bank of perpendicular windows. That alone is a showstopper, but the homeowners have also installed a colorful LED strip at the base of the wall that adds a subtle glow of color when desired.

A textured wall sets the stage for modern design and bold color in the home of designer Jeffrey Johnson.


“STAY TRUE TO YOUR COLORS AND YOUR LIFESTYLE WILL SHINE YOUR SOUL OF COLORS.”

- Jeffrey Johnson

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Adjacent to the living space is the color rich office where Johnson conducts his business as a Dallas designer and Chief of Design for Roomored.com. There is a second desk for chef husband, Stephen, and plenty of soft yet durable surface for their adorable chocolate lab, Bentley. The kitchen, appropriately, is designed with culinary adventure in mind. The open U shape is perfect for easy access to materials and entertaining around the seating peninsula. Colorful glass tile boasts shades of blues and greys and LED strips light up the bottom of the cabinets to add to the ambience. Another, less formal, seating area and dining room lead way to the patio where summer color begs for company. Blues and bright apple green play off of the rich dark neutrals of the furnishings. On the second level a guest room makes the best of bold meets soothing. The artwork here, like much of it throughout the home, is deep in color and hand-painted by the home owners. The lush bedding, en suite bathroom, and window seat make this space the ideal guest getaway. The master bedroom is rich and coccoon-like, simple and elegant. Hard surfaces play off of soft, velvety fabrics. The walls are covered in a stunning matte v. gloss graphic wallpaper in ‘almost black’. With a second floor balcony on one side and a serene bathroom oasis on the other, it is a perfect place for respite at the end of a long day. As with any great design, the details are what makes this home so special. Contrasting materials compose a backdrop for unique accessories, lush fabrics, and plenty of color. If there is one constant throughout the space, it is color. “Colors have been around for centuries”, says Johnson. “Stay true to your colors and your lifestyle will shine through your soul of colors.” Clockwise from facing page: Buddha head adds Asian influence, details of living room accessories including cushioned ottoman and tray, white ceramic taxedermy against modern tiled fireplace, bold color and graphic pattern for the office seating area, details from office seating area and stairwell, guest bedroom retreat, bright and beautiful patio, whimsy in the kitchen with ‘bacon’ quotes and another Asian touch, the kitchen comes alive with light and plenty of space, tulips add life and color to the kitchen space, Bentley makes himself at home

Homeowner, principal of Jeffrey Design LLC, and Chief of Design at Roomored.com, Jeffrey Johnson.

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GURU The true summer hero carries tongs, battles flames and turns ordinary ingredients into extraordinary bites. The backyard BBQ Guru may look good in an apron, but it’s what he does in the apron that really gets people talking. Embrace your flaming personality because everyone loves a BBQ Guru. Â


LET’S

GET TO

by Jeff Parker

Grilling no longer means hauling out the grill for summer holidays or when it is just too hot in the house to cook. Over the past decade, America’s enthusiasm for all things related to food and cooking has spilled outdoors. It is not unusual these days for a household to have more than one grill – a gas grill for convenience and a charcoal grill for weekend cookouts – let alone a smoker, pizza oven or even a full outdoor kitchen. I come from a family that loves to cook outdoors. It doesn’t matter what the occasion is - anything from dinner to backyard cookouts, from camping to throwing a grate on a fire pit at the beach, if it’s not raining (pretty much a sure bet in California) we fire up the grill. I even used to keep a hibachi and a bag of charcoal in the trunk of my car because you just never know! Having grown up in Southern California and living for a number of years in Texas, I have picked up a few grilling tips and tricks along the way. The most important being that grilling and cooking outdoors is, above all, a good time. It’s a chance to hang out with friends and family, grab a beer and share some laughs. Don’t get hung up on the details!

GURU

This is an easy to prepare and healthy recipe suitable for weeknights and perfect for a dinner party. Prep the fish and make the salsa verde ahead of time and then grill the fish just before serving. All-in time, including prep, is under 30-minutes! Branzino is a mild-flavored fish that goes by many names – Mediterranean seabass, European seabass, Branzini, Loup de mer (there are a few more) – and is native to the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean seas. It ranges in size from about 1 to 3 pounds and its firm white flesh is favored in Italian, Spanish and Greek cuisines. It is extremely versatile and is perfect fish for grilling, roasting, steaming and braising whole. As an added bonus, Branzino is deemed a “Best Choice” fish by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch list.

CRISPY SKIN SEA BASS WITH SALSA VERDE serves 4

INGREDIENTS: For the fish: • 4 branzino (about 1-pound each), heads and tails removed • sea salt and ground pepper • 8 springs parsley • 4 sprigs thyme • 8 lemon slices, plus wedges for serving • olive oil For the salsa verde: • ½ cup parsley leaves, packed • 2 tablespoon capers, rinsed • 2 anchovy fillets (optional) • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard • ½ teaspoon minced garlic • ½ teaspoon kosher salt • a few grinds of black pepper • ⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil

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Extras: Kitchen twine or toothpicks Method: Direct heat grilling INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Rinse fish inside and out and pat dry with paper towels. Season the cavity with salt and pepper and place 2 sprigs parsley, a sprig of thyme, and 2 slices of lemon in each. Secure the stuffing by tying a couple pieces of kitchen string around each fish or secure the cavity closed with toothpicks. Set aside in the refrigerator until ready to grill. 2. For the salsa verde: add all ingredients, except the oil, to the bowl of a food processor and pulse until all the ingredients are finally chopped. With the motor running, slowly pour in the olive oil. Transfer to a bowl and store in the refrigerator until ready to serve. 3. Set up grill for direct heat cooking over high heat. Brush and oil the grates very well to prevent the fish from sticking to the grates. Remove the fish from the refrigerator and rub each with a little olive oil. Sprinkle the both sides of the fish with salt to aid in crisping the skin.

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SAM & CORYANNE’S BBQ DILEMMAS SORTED

SPICED COFFEE CRUSTED TRI TIP

der w o p e il h c o h c n A , e e Gr ound c of f INGREDIENTS: juicy is h t e iv • 2½ to 3½ pound tri tip roast g ly on ot n and spices but also For the rub: , or v la f g in z a m a • 2 tablespoons coffee tr i t ip • 2 tablespoons Ancho chile powder ust t hat r c k r a d y ll u f r e • 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar d on aw • 1 tablespoon kosher salt t he h it w y ll u if t u a e • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper b s c ontrast • 1½ teaspoons ground ginger • 1½ teaspoons ground allspice br ight pink center. serves 6-10

Extras: Instant read thermometer Drip pan Method: Direct and indirect cooking INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Mix together dry rub spices until combined. Rub with dry rub mixture completely coating the roast. Let set at room temperature for an hour (or two) until ready to grill or loosely cover with plastic wrap to cure in the refrigerator overnight. 2. Set up grill for both direct grilling over medium-high heat and also a zone for indirect heat with a drip pan below the grate. Sear meat fat side up until well-marked and a little charred. Turn and repeat on the other side. Move to the indirect area, cover grill and and cook until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part registers 130°F, about 30 minutes. Tri tip is best served rare to medium rare… medium should be your upper most limit of doneness; overcooking can dry out the meat, leaving it tough and unappetizing. 3. Transfer meat to a cutting board and let rest 15 minutes before slicing. Thinly slice on the bias and across the grain. Serve immediately as is or make some amazing sandwiches!

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1. Check the heat. Not everything needs to be cooked on the highest flame. If you are cooking a welldone burger, turn the heat down; slower cooking allows for the meat to cook without creating an over charred burger crust.  2. Good vs Bad flare ups. Grilling anything with a fat cap or marbeling will cause the fat to drip and create a “good flare up” that results in a great tastiing cut of meat.  On the contrary, drips from BBQ sauce, oily or sugary marinades will cause “bad flare ups” and spoil the taste of the foods.  3. Check your gas.  If you are hosting a big party, buy an extra tank of propane, there is nothing worse that getting halfway through the grilling to find that your gas has run out. 4. Know your temperatures.  Serving under cooked meat can only lead to disaster.  Invest in a cooking themomoter and check the temperature before you serve to avoid food poisoning.  5. Serve it fresh.  Keep hot foods hot by placiing them on the cooler side of the grill until you are ready to serve them, and cold foods on ice or in the fridge until you are ready to serve them. 

SEE MORE GREAT BBQ RECIPES ON PG 60

RED CHIMICHURRI GRILLED PORK CHOPS BLACKENED SHRIMP WITH CAJUN GARLIC BUTTER GRILLED FLAT IRON STEAK AND MUSHROOMS 22


VANESSA STUMP

THE SID BALSAMIC GLAZED VEGETABLES

RED EYE GRILLIN’ BEANS

INGREDIENTS: • 2 small zucchini, cut in quarters lengthwise • 1 small yellow squash, cut in quarters lengthwise • 1 green bell pepper, seeded and deveined, cut in quarters lengthwise • 1 red bell pepper, seeded and deveined, cut in quarters lengthwise • 1 red onion, cut into eighths, root end intact • 6 thin carrots, cut in half lengthwise • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil • 2 teaspoons granulated garlic • ½ teaspoon kosher salt • 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

INGREDIENTS: • 8 ounces applewood smoked bacon, chopped • 1 medium red onion, chopped • 1 Anaheim chile or medium green bell pepper, seeded and chopped • 1 cup strong coffee • 2 cans (28 oz.) pork and beans • ½ cup ketchup • ¼ cup Worcestershire sauce • 2 tablespoons yellow mustard • 5 tablespoons dark brown sugar • 1 jalapeño pepper

For the balsamic glaze: • 1½ cups balsamic vinegar • 1 bay leaf • 2 tablespoons brown sugar

Method: Direct/indirect heat

makes 4 to 6 servings

makes 10 servings

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Place the prepared vegetables in a large zip-top bag. Add the olive oil, garlic, salt and pepper. Seal and shake to combine and coat the vegetables. Marinate in the refrigerator for 1 hour. 2. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan combine the balsamic vinegar, bay leaf and brown sugar. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and reduce by half; about 15 minutes, stirring often. 23

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Cook the bacon in a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium-high direct heat long enough to the render fat from the bacon, but not crispy. With a slotted spoon, remove bacon to large mixing bowl. Add the diced onion and Anaheim chile to the skillet and sauté in bacon grease until soft. Add the coffee to the pan and scrape up any browned bits. Transfer to the mixing bowl with the bacon and stir to combine with the remaining ingredients, except the jalapeño. Transfer back into the skillet. 2. Leaving the stem intact, slice the jalapeño in fourths (so it stays

recipes continued on page 61

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DE DISH VANESSA STUMP

by Jeff Parker

PERFECTLY GRILLED CORN-ON-THE-COB WITH COMPOUND BUTTER INGREDIENTS: • corn on the cob, shucked and cleaned • compound butter (recipes follow) • sea salt INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Set up grill for direct cooking over medium-high heat. Place corn on the grill and cook for 4 minutes per side (there are four sides).  Use the grates to keep them from rolling around.  Remove and slather with one of the following compound butters (or just plain butter) and a little sprinkle of sea salt. INGREDIENTS: HERB GARLIC BUTTER • 2 sticks unsalted butter, room temperature • 2 cloves garlic, creamed or pressed through garlic press • ¼ cup mixed herbs, such as flat-leaf parsley, chervil, tarragon, and chives, chopped • ¼ teaspoon sea salt • freshly ground black pepper HARISSA BUTTER • 2 sticks unsalted butter, room temperature • ¼ cup chopped fresh mint • 5 tablespoons harissa paste SEE PAGE 38 BOX NINE MAGAZINE

SUMMER CORN SALAD WITH POBLANO CHILE AND COTIJA CHEESE serves 6-8

INGREDIENTS: • 4 ears fresh corn, shucked and cleaned • olive oil • kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper • 1 poblano chile • 1 medium red bell pepper • ½ cup diced red onion • ½ cup crumbled Cotija cheese (or feta) • 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil • ½ teaspoon ground cumin • ½ teaspoon Mexican oregano, crumbled • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper • ¼ cup cilantro leaves, lightly packed Method: Direct INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Turn on grill to medium-high heat. Rub the corn with the olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Place on grill and cook for 4 to 5 minutes per side until some light charring occurs. Remove and set aside to cool.   2. Turn the heat to high. Grill the Poblano and the red bell pepper, turning often, until the skin is charred all over (about 5

recipes continued on page 61

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VANESSA STUMP

GURU TOOLBOX by Jeff Parker

Owning all kinds of grilling accessories won’t make you a better cook, but they can make cooking with live fire easier—and sometimes more fun… boys and their toys! Below are some essential accessories that every griller should have, as well as tools that are simply cool to have and use.

ESSENTIAL TOOLS I ALWAYS HAVE ON HAND: • Long Handled Tongs – (preferably two pair; one for raw foods, one for cooked) the absolute, most important tool next to the grill itself.  Use them for arranging hot coals, lifting hot grates, and of course – moving and turning food on the grill.  Use tongs instead of a fork for moving and turning the food – every time a piece of meat is stabbed with a fork, the juices run out from the nice sear that you just put on your meat. • Long Handled Slotted Spatula – how else are you going to turn those juicy burgers and tasty fish?  The slots help reduce the drag under whatever it is you’re flipping. • Stiff Wire Grill Brush – the key to grilling happiness is a clean grill grate – the cleaner the grate, the less food will stick to it.  A lot of wire brushes also come with a scraping tool. Use the brush and scraper to get rid of all the left behind burnt on goodness. • Mitts – better to cook the food and not your hands and forearms. Make sure they are flame retardant/resistant. • Instant Read Thermometer – to let you know when you have reached grilling perfection, rather than over-cooked shoe leather. For roasts and larger cuts of meat, consider a remote digital probe thermometer that can be left in with the grill lid closed.  The more you open the lid to check how it’s doing, the more heat escapes and the longer it will take to finish. • Foil Pans – cheap and disposable and should always be on hand.  Essential drip pan for indirect heat cooking and perfect for transporting raw and cooked food – two pans equal no washing and no cross-contamination. PROBABLY SHOULD HAVE: • Squirt bottle for stopping flare-ups • Bamboo and/or metal skewers • Natural or silicone bristle brushes for basting • Paper towels • Timer • Resealable plastic bags

GURU 25

NOT ESSENTIAL, BUT AWESOME TO HAVE: • Smoker box • Pizza stone and peel • Rib rack • Grilling grids or trays for small items • Flexible wire baskets for delicate or hardto-flip items • Hinged fish basket • Beer can chicken roaster • Grill mat if grilling on concrete or a wood deck • Portable light for night grilling • Flavor-injection syringe BOX NINE MAGAZINE


G

' N I L L I R

TIPS & TRICKS by Jeff Parker

• Plan ahead. While grilling isn’t as time consuming as the low and slow method of barbequing, it does take some planning. • Keep it clean. As grease builds up on the inside of your grill the chances increase for a grease fire. It is a good idea to clean the inside of your grill every ten times cooking on it. If you are cooking greasy foods you may need to clean the inside of your grill every other use. Be sure to use a stiff wire brush to scrape away any food residue on the grates. You probably won’t enjoy yesterday’s fish on tonight’s steak! Line your drip tray with aluminum foil to catch the grease. Depending on the type of food you are cooking, you may need to replace it after every meal you cook.

• Be sure to preheat the grill for 15 minutes on high. This will make it easier to brush and clean, plus it sterilizes the grates. And if it’s not hot, the food won’t cook properly. • Oil the grate to prevent food from sticking. After you have cleaned the grill, fold up a couple paper towels and dip them in a small bowl of vegetable oil. Hold the oiled towel with tongs and quickly run along the grates. • Don’t get caught without extra fuel. Keep an extra propane tank or bag of charcoal on hand because nothing is worse than low heat or no heat when your food is partially cooked. • Take the chill off. Let foods sit at room temperature for 30 to 40 minutes to help them cook more evenly. • Burgers are the exception. Keep them cold until they hit the grill.

• Use a thermometer. The best way to tell when your food is done is with a thermometer. Invest in a good instant-read thermometer. A digital oven thermometer for it a great tool for indirect cooking larger cuts because you can keep the lid closed and the heat in. • Grill marks like the pros. First, the grill has to be HOT. And the food needs to be dry, otherwise it will steam. Pat your food dry with a paper towel. Lay your food down on the grill at a 45 degree angle to the grate (10 o’clock). Let it sear for 3 minutes—don’t touch!—and then lift and turn it 90 degrees (2 o’clock) with a pair of tongs (never a fork!!). Let it finish cooking that side. When it’s ready to flip, use tongs and repeat the process on the other side. • Sugar burns quickly. If you want to baste your food with a sauce that contains sugar, do so in the last few minutes of cooking as the sugar will burn and produce a hard black crust.

• Let it rest. Resting, or reposing, meat and poultry before serving or carving will allow the juices to evenly redistribute resulting in juicier, tastier food. Additionally, removing food five degrees short of your ideal temperature gives the carryover heat a chance to bring it to the proper temperature as it rests. • Learn your grill. As you cook food on your grill, time yourself. Look at where your knobs are positioned in relationship to your thermometer reading. This will help you relax in future grilling. • Maintenance is key. Following the maintenance schedule and care instructions for your grill will add years of enjoyment and protect your investment.

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GURU GRILLER’S PANTRY KEY ITEMS TO INCLUDE: THE BASES Ketchup Chili sauce Mustards Hoisin sauce White, red, malt, cider, rice vinegars THE SPICES Peppercorns Kosher salt Paprika Cumin Chili powder Ground chipotle and ancho chilies Allspice Cinnamon Dry mustard Red pepper flakes

y v a e h o o t g in t et g ot n The tr ick here is e h t of or v la f e h t nt a handed. Y ou st il l w ; and wit h t o pmeat t o shine t hr ough ay need is some m ou y ll a s t a e m y t li a u q s n a e m ll a y b , t u B   . r e p p e p salt and e r u t a n ig s n w o r ou y g in t a e r play wit h c a e r a e r e H   ! s e c u a s d n a s mar inades, rub o t ou y or f s e in r a m e it or c ouple of our fav . n w o r ou y or f t p a d a d n use a

THE SWEET STUFF Brown sugar Molasses Honey Turbinado sugar Jams and preserves THE KICKERS Canned adobo peppers Tabasco Prepared horseradish Worcestershire sauce Coarse ground coffee Soy sauce Asian fish sauce Beer & wine Whisky, bourbon, tequila & rum

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Jeff Parker is a freelance culinary TV producer, food stylist, cookbook author, chef, and owner of Food Crew Culinary Media Services (www.FoodCrew.com). Hobbies include cycling, hiking, yoga and all things to do with outdoor living. Jeff is the Culinary Director and spokesperson for Bull Outdoor Products. More of his grilling recipes can be found at www.GrillingOutdoorRecipes.com

CONNECT WITH JEFF

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BEYOND THE BURGER Parker by Jeff

• Broccolini - Brocco… what? Absolutely, my go-to green vegetable for grilling, broccolini looks similar to broccoli and is often mistaken for young broccoli. In fact, it is a hybrid of broccoli and kai-lan which is a form of Chinese kale. It has long thin stems and makes a great alternative to asparagus and is just as easy to prepare. • Skirt Steak – This steak packs some serious beefy punch and just happens to be super lean. Throw it in a marinade (the loose graining makes it especially great for marinating) or with a rub overnight and just as long as it take to get a good sear on both sides, the meat is cooked! Here’s a great tip – always slice skirt steak across the grain of the meat for maximum tenderness. • Pork Chops – Pork is a blank slate and what I mean by that is anything that you do to it will probably be delicious. Pork chops are just as easy to grill as a burger or steak and is a great place to try out sauces. My preference is always bone-in chops - try to get them a minimum of 1-inch thick, although 1½-inches is better. Save the sauce until the last few minutes of cooking because if there is sugar in the sauce, it will burn. • Pork Tenderloin –Absolutely one of my favorite cuts of meat to grill for a lot of the same reasons as chops – you can do anything to it. Plus you can stand at the grill and really look like you know what you’re doing! Medium-high heat + 5 minutes per side (four sides) = Done and Delicious! • Chicken Thighs – So much better than chicken breasts – which, by the way, are not easy to grill. I love the thighs because they are far less likely to dry out and have WAY more flavor. Trim away all of the excess fat to cut down on flare-ups and grill them over medium heat. Easy peasy! • Chicken Wings – Forget the deep fried hot wings! Soak them overnight in buttermilk stir in as much Tabasco as it takes to make the buttermilk pink, grill ‘em up seasoned with salt and pepper and then break out the celery and blue cheese dressing!

• Shrimp –We have all had that rubbery grilled shrimp kebab before which makes you think that maybe it’s not a great idea. Here’s the secret to plump and juicy grilled shrimp: dissolve 1/3 cup of kosher salt in 2 quarts of water and brine the peeled or unpeeled shrimp in the refrigerator for an hour or two before grilling. Thread only the shrimp on double-pronged skewers for easy maneuvering (vegetables on different skewers) and grill them over medium-high heat just until the tails turn pink. • Corn on the Cob - There are all kinds of ways proffered up on the interwebs as to the best way to grill corn-on-thecob such as blanching, soaking and tying up the husks, etc. All good and delicious, but the easiest way for sweet and crisp grilled corn with the right amount of char is to just shuck it and toss it on the grill for 5 minutes per side over medium-high heat. Slather it right off the grill with plain ol’ butter or some delicious compound butter.

• Porterhouse Steak – the Big Kahuna of the steakhouse is not as daunting as you would think. These steaks are big enough for a couple people (or one really hungry person), plus it’s two-steaks-in-one! A nice big piece of tenderloin (a.k.a. filet mignon) on one side of the T-bone and delicious New York Strip on the other. Buy good quality meat and all you’ll need is a little salt, freshly ground pepper and olive oil to impress your friends! • Pineapple - There is something magical that happens when you grill pineapple. Grilling the pineapple sweetens and intensifies the flavor of the fruit as the juices condense and the sugars start to caramelize, plus it gives the fruit a slightly smoky flavor. For a crowd pleaser, top grilled pineapple rings with coconut sorbet, your favorite chocolate sauce and some toasted flaked coconut. You’re welcome.

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s is the warmth s e n i of pp a H t he

sum

m er

su n a n d t h e ress of a c e tl a n e ligh  g  tb re

e. ez

CREATE The beauty of creativity is not in what you make, but how you feel when you are creating it. But let’s be honest, no one likes to make crap.  So make it useful, and make it beautiful. 


PINWHEEL PRIMER CREATE YOU WILL NEED: • CARDSTOCK • SCISSORS • PENCIL • RULER • HOLE PUNCH • DOWEL • UPHOLSTERY TACK

FIND THE PRINTABLE TEMPLATE ON PAGE 62

Great summer craft f or t he kids !

31


1. CUT

Print the template provided. If you are using paper that is patterned on one side only, be sure to print the template on the back side of the paper. Cut out the template carefully.

2. POKE

Use a small hole punch or paper craft hole cutter to make a hole in the very center and at each ‘corner’ or the points as indicated. Poke a long upholstery tack through each corner over lapping them as you turn counterclockwise. Finally, push the pin through the center and into a wooden dowel.

MACRA -MADE REVIVE THE ANCIENT ART AND CREATE SOME WOW THIS SUMMER.

3. SPIN

Give your pinwheel a spin by blowing on one side. If it gets stuck, consider a small circle of paper (1 inch diamter) between the pinwheel and the dowel.

KEEP   UP WITH BOX   NINE.

C   HECK OUT #BOX9MAG

TO JOIN THE

CONVERSATION.

BOX NINE MAGAZINE

The 70s are back this summer and if you think this boho chic revival is just about flares you’re wrong. This year there is a huge trend in adding texture to your decor, everything from benches to hanging lanterns are getting a knotted make over, so grab your cordage and spend the afternoon in knots. What we love about this trend is that you can embrace your inner hippy by using natural ropes, or go bold by using colored cordage.

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´ MACRAME UNTANGLED From easy simple knots to complicated macramé knots, anyone can make a hanging planter. The trick is to start out with one knot, learn it inside and out until you master it before starting on your macramé hanger.  The best way to learn is to take your lengths of string and tape them to a  flat surface so you can repeat the steps until they are second nature. Once you have the hang of the knot, repeat this with a new set of strings tied to a door handle, repeating until you have mastered how to tie them while they hang.  Once you know what you are doing, advance to making your own macramé hanger.

CREATE TOOL BOX YOU WILL NEED: • Hemp Rope or cotton macramé string • Beads • Spray paint if you want to color your beads • Fabric dye if you want to color your cotton macramé string • Hook • Pot • Plant

ore t s r u o y e v Gi s n r e t n a l t h boug e d a m d n a h a make over

A COUPLE OF KNOTS TO GET YOU STARTED JOSEPHINE KNOT

33

C or yanne’s fav or ite ! PEA KNOT

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TOW ROPE TO THE RESCUE NOT IN TO KNOTS?

Never fear, this rope covered bench will have you crafting in no time. The tow rope is super durable and its bright orange color adds a modern glow to any corner. SUPPLIES: • Bench or chair • Rope • Needle nose pliers • Hammer • Staple Gun • Staples • Lighter INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Clean up chair frame, remove staples and/or nails as necessary.

2. The first rope lengths will go from back to front and be fairly close together. 3. Begin by putting one rope on either end and one in the very center. Secure with at least two staples on the under side of the chair and wrap around the frame. Stretch it as tightly as possible with your hands to the other side. 4. While holding it tightly in position staple it in place. 5. Tap with a hammer to sink staples even further. Cut rope ½ inch to 1 inch above staples. 6. Place the next pieces halfway between the ropes on the ends and the center rope. You should have 5 ropes attached now. 7. Continue placing ropes halfway between each segment until you have filled the space as much as possible. The purpose of this method is to get them evenly spaced. It is fine if there is a little space between each as long as it is consistent. 8. When you have finished in this direction, start working from side to side. 9. To begin, place the first length of rope as close to the front of the chair as possible. Secure it on the under side and wrap around the frame just as you did the back to front ropes. 10. Weave the rope over and under each of the ropes and attach on the underside of the opposite side of the chair by stapling and tapping with a hammer to secure. 11. Continue weaving the ropes through and attaching alternating over and under the ropes to create a basket weave effect. Use your fingertips to push the weave together as tightly as possible before securing. 12. Go one more time around the entire underside of the chair with the hammer to make sure all of the ropes are secured. 13. Turn the chair on its side and use a lighter to melt the ends of the rope to prevent fraying.

An old cast off bench gets new life with some simple weaving and bright orange tow rope from the hardware section.

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NOSH One should take the time to really enjoy every bite, but in the real world, when something is so moorish and heavenly, you can’t help but tuck in enthusiastically and nosh your way into satisfaction. And when summer sizzles outside, it is your plate that will be heating up. So slather on that sauce. After all, they invented napkins so you could eat like no one is looking.


KOSHERI HOT SAUCE - EGYPT INGREDIENTS: • 4 tablespoons of olive oil • 3 garlic cloves • 3 fresh hot red chiles, seeded and finely chopped • 8 ripe tomatoes, chopped • 1½ cups of water • 4 tablespoons of cider vinegar • 2 teaspoons of ground cumin • handful of fresh cilantro leaves • juice of half a lemon • pinch of salt INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Toss the garlic in the olive oil and simmer until golden before adding the chiles. Simmer for 1 minute before adding the tomatoes, water, vinegar, salt and cumin. 2. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce and simmer with the lid off for 20 minutes.   3. Remove from the heat, stir in the cilantro and allow to steep for 30 minutes.   4. Once room temperature, store in an airtight jar for up to 7 days.  

NOSH NOTES FROM CORYANNE: The first time I had Koshari, I was 23 years old in Cairo wandering the streets looking more like a wide-eyed deer than an experienced globetrotter.  Everything about the city captivated me because it was in stark contrast to any other city in the Middle East I had visited. The noise was invasive, the color explosive, and the smell of sweet perfume and browning onions mixed together to create an aroma unlike any other.  I remember holding a cup of Koshari in my hands and diving into this amazing melody of North African delights….  like the city, it grabbed hold of me and quickly became a dish I would never forget.

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GLOBAL WARMING

Take your tastebuds on a spicy, culinary journey with these 5 hot sauce recipes from around the world.

TOMATILLO SALSA - MEXICO

AJI PEPPER HOT SAUCE - PERU

INGREDIENTS: • 1½ pounds fresh tomatillos, husks removed • 4 fresh serrano chiles • 4 garlic cloves, unpeeled • ½ cup fresh cilantro • 1 large Spanish onion, coarsely chopped • 2 teaspoons coarse salt • lime, juiced INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Rinse the tomatillos under warm water to remove stickiness and dry them. 2. Broil the tomatillos, chiles, and garlic for around 10 minutes, turning once, until tomatillos are softened and slightly charred.  3. Remove from the oven and allow them to cool before peeling garlic and pulling off tops of chiles. Purée all ingredients in a blender and store in an airtight container for up to 7 days. 

INGREDIENTS: • 4 dried Aji peppers • ¼ cup boiling water • 1 tablespoon lemon juice • 1 clove garlic, grated • ½ teaspoon salt

JERK SAUCE - JAMAICA

HARISSA PASTE - MOROCCO

NGREDIENTS • 2 Scotch bonnet peppers • 8 allspice berries, smashed • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns • ¼ cup vegetable oil • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme • 1 cup chopped scallions • 1inch piece fresh ginger, minced • 4 garlic cloves, peeled • 1 tablespoon ground nutmeg • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon • 2 tablespoons soy sauce • 2 tablespoons ketchup • ¼ cup dark brown sugar • juice of 2 limes

INGREDIENTS: • 8 dried guajillo chiles • 8 dried hatch chiles • ½ teaspoon caraway seeds • ¼ teaspoon coriander seeds • ½ teaspoon cumin seeds • 1 teaspoon dried mint leaves • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil • 2 teaspoons kosher salt • 4 cloves garlic • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Remove the stem, seeds, and ribs from the peppers. 2. Grind the allspice and peppercorns in a pestle and mortar. 3. Add the peppers, spices, and remaining ingredients to a food processor. Blitz until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust as necessary. BOX NINE MAGAZINE

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Place peppers in a skillet which has been heated over medium-high heat. Toast the peppers slightly on all sides for 20-30 seconds being careful not to burn. Set aside until cool enough to handle. 2. Remove the stem, ribs and seeds and discard. Wear disposable gloves for protection. 3. Place the peppers in a food processor or blender. Add boiling water and steep the peppers for at least 15 minutes. 4. Add the remaining ingredients and blitz, scraping down the sides as necessary. Add more water in very small amounts to get the desired, almost paste, consistency. 5. Taste a small amount to determine if more salt is necessary.

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Place stemmed and seeded chiles in a bowl and cover them with boiling water. Allow them to steep for at least 15 minutes or more until softened. 2. Toast seeds in a dry skillet until fragrant, 3-4 minutes. 3. Add toasted seeds and mint to a pestle and mortar and grind to a smooth powder. Set aside. 4. Add drained chiles to a food processor with remaining ingredients and blitz until smooth, scraping down the sides as necessary. 5. Place in a sealable jar and cover with additional ½ inch of olive oil. Replace olive oil as paste is used. 38


FISH TACO TRIUMPH Lighten up summer meals with simple fish tacos. A few simple steps will have you on the way to fresh family meals (you might even sneak in a vegetable or two). • • • • • • • 39

lightly batter or bread some white fish such as cod, haddock, or tilapia. grill tortillas for just a few seconds on each side for color, textrure, and a little caramelized flavor. add shredded lettuce and purple cabbage. finely sliver some onion for heat and crunch. smooth things out with creamy avocado. top with torn cilantro leaves... and don’t forget a lime wedge for squeezing just before eating. drizzle with a bit of sour cream, if desired, or just pour on the salsa... red or green. BOX NINE MAGAZINE


NOSH

Don’t just slat her it on t o p, let it ooze fr om wit hin.

BOX NINE MAGAZINE

NINE WAYS WITH SALSA • Add it your favorite cocktail for a kick of heat • Spice up store bought BBQ sauce with it • Add it to oil for a quick marinade • Add it to mayonnaise for a spicy aioli • Season your summer soup with it • Fold it into scrambled eggs • Melt with butter and use it to give your popcorn a boost • Make a wing sauce • Add it to rice for a boost of flavor

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+

Most po pular hot sauce in G uatemala.

CH ICKEN SLO W C O O KER TH IS AWESOME SAUCE Wash it down with a nice rum.

+

Dude! ! T O H s ’ t Tha

st ore bought salsa never tasted SO good!

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Sam’s GO-T O for just about everything.. Coryanne’s fave! especially scrambled eggs.

Finding r oc ot o peppers in t he US is not t hat easy. Fort unately, t his st uf f exists.

NOSH

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WANDER It tugs at your heart, gnaws at your soul and like a temptress calls your name. For some, there is no escaping the need to travel. To do as ‘they do”, to eat as ‘they do” and to see as ‘they do”.


BIG ISLAND ADVENTURE STORY AND PHOTOS BY SAM HENDERSON

zip lines to brave. From there, the drive to the capital town of Hilo might be the best 45 minutes you spend in the car. In Hilo, you will find great seaside shops, farmers markets and plenty of restaurants.

pololu Kohala lookout

hamakua waikoloa village

akaka falls mauna kea

Kona

botanical gardens

hilo kilauea crater

mauna loa

puna

Pu'uhonua o Honaunau

ka'u

There is a great deal to learn on your visit. One week hardly seems like enough to soak in all that the Big Island has to offer. The Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and Hawaiian Botanical Gardens provide insight into the natural wonder of this destination. Even at the height of tourist season, these attractions are easy to enjoy in a relaxed way. Culture plays a big part of the Big Island experience. As with nearly every island destination I have visited, there is a laid back ‘island life’ feel here. Nothing seems to be taken too seriously and nobody seems to be in a hurry. The Hawaiian story is part of the fabric of the island and one the people embrace. Your trip must include a visit to Pu’uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Park (Place of Refuge). It is a true lesson in Hawaiian history and the setting is amazing. However, if you really want to soak up the feel of Hawaii, ask a local. Find out their story, their family’s story. You will learn more from shop owners and crafts people than you will ever get on a tour.

THE BIG ISLAND

WANDER

T

The Big Island of Hawaii is a natural gem, a pearl in the Pacific. From the hustle and bustle of mainland life, this place seems like true paradise. Within minutes, you are swept from some of the top rated beaches in the world through seas of hardened lava and almost moonscape terrain to lush rain forest settings. The natural beauty alone may be reason enough to visit. The island is vast and car rental is required if you plan to do any exploring, but every minute in the car is filled with amazing views. Beginning on the western coast, Kona and Waikoloa offer glorious beaches and water activities. Snorkeling, dolphin and whale watching, and boat tours are requisite. And, of course, no trip to Kona would be complete without a visit to a coffee plantation. A 30 minute (breathtaking) drive to the other side of North Kohala gives you an opportunity to visit one of the black sand beaches at Pololu Valley. The Pololu Valley Lookout is spectacular, but if you dare trek down the very steep path (that’s the easy part) you will be rewarded with a stunning beach. Mind you, the black sand gets quite hot in the sun, but there is a shady grove just steps away to cool off. Many consider this the best part of their Big Island visit. Another day trip might include a tour of the eastern part of the island. At Akaka Falls, you will find lush surroundings and photo opportunities everywhere. The largest waterfall falls 422 feet and is a wonder to see. If you are so inclined, there are helicopter tours and 45

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Pacific blue waters crash against one of the black sand beaches of the island of Hawaii.

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“ONE WEEK

HARDLY SEEMS LIKE ENOUGH TO REALLY SOAK IN ALL THAT THE BIG ISLAND HAS TO OFFER.”

(right) A shady grove at the black sand beach of Pololu invites you to linger and play on its natural playground. (far right) Tiki torches dot the coastline and light up the night for luaus.

Fresh pineapples are plentiful on the island. Find them at farmers markets or at roadside stands on your travels.

EAT

FRESH PINEAPPLE GILL’S LANAI, NORTH KOHALA MALASADAS CAFE 100, HILO SCANDANAVIAN SHAVE ICE, KONA

Enjoy the many waterfalls on the island of Hawaii, including those found in the Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden.

SEE

HAWAII VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK HAWAIIAN BOTANICAL GARDEN PLACE OF REFUGE AT HONAUNAU AKAKA FALLS

A hike from Pololu Lookout to the black sand beach below will seem daunting, but it is easier than you would expect and worth every second.

DO

ATTEND A LUAU EXPLORE THURSTON LAVA TUBE HIKE TO POLOLU BEACH SPLASH AT HAPUNA BEACH SOAK UP WAIPI’O VALLEY

BOARDING PASS:

AIRPORTS (2): Kona International Airport (KOA) and Hilo International (ITO) CAPITAL CITY: Hilo POPULATION: 175,784 TIME ZONE: Hawaiian Standard Time (GMT-10hours) no daylight savings time CLIMATE: Average temp. 75˚-85˚F TECH ACCESS: Internet and cell phone access are readily available DRESS CODE: Casual to semi-casual. Light jackets for cool nights and higher elevations. 47

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THE OPEN ROAD WITH CORYANNE Family road trips are a thing of the past, no longer do we pile everyone into a car, stack the trunk with suitcases and take to the road in search of the oddities that are hidden off the highways across America with the soundtrack of 99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall echoing through an over stuffed family car. But we did. Truth be told the frst few hours were filled with doubt that we would make it through the 2 week trip with everyone still accounted for, but once you get throughout the initial stages of counting the miles and struggling with togetherness, something clicks and suddenly you wouldn’t want to be anywhere but where you are with the people you are with. The journey turns the speechless into story tellers, the anxious into the relaxed and the bored into adventure seekers. If there is one rule of road tripping, it is to never be too rigid with your plans because you never know where the road will take you.

WANDER TOOL BOX Taking it to the open road this summer? BOX NINE has you covered.

ROAD TRIP CHECKIST • • • • • • • • •

2 1 3

• • •

4

5

7

6 8

1. SPOKANE, WASHINGTON - World’s largest radio flyer wagon. 2. WALLACE, IDAHO - Every downtown building is on the National Register of Historic Places 3. BANNACK STATE PARK, MONTANA - Registered historic landmark and stunning Montana ghost town. 4. MOAB, UTAH - Experience it under canvas... glamping as it should be. 5. MONUMENT VALLEY, UTAH - See it before nature erases it. 6. MONTEZUMA’S CASTLE, ARIZONA Hidden treasure off the beaten path. 7. SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO - Market shopping at its finest. 8. AMARILLO, TEXAS - Home of the 72 ounce steak.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

First Aid Kit Lip Balm Sunglasses Blanket(s) Travel Pillow(s) Cash and credit cards Keys Watch Reading material or audio books Umbrellas Pocket knife Cereal container for a small, no spill trash can Memory cards Camera/Video Camera All appropriate chargers Laptop Emergency car kit Music playlists Car outlet adapter Maps and/or GPS Tissues Hand sanitizer Paper towels Gum Bottled water Cooler Snacks Toys/Games for kids Dryer sheets to keep the car smelling fresh Cash for tolls Roadtrippers App for off the beaten path fun Foodspotting App for best restaurant suggestions.

SEE PHOTOS FROM THIS ROAD TRIP ON INSTAGRAM. #EttieneRoadTrip BOX NINE MAGAZINE

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TRAVELOGUE with Katja Presnal

hes Four wis

ions: t a n i t s e rd r summe

fo

t he sea y b s t e & suns es t s a o C ent ur v d a y r - C ulina nat ure views ’t been! n g e n v i a z h a s - Am friend y m e r e h - Somew

Words and photos by travel expert Katja Presnal, owner of SkimbacoLifestyle.com and co-founder of GlobalMappin.com.

THINGS ARE HEATING UP ALL OVER THE GLOBE, but travel expert, Katja Presnal, has the solution. Her list of top, temperate, travel destinations are a great start for planning your next adventure. Is it possible for a spot to be ‘hot’ and ‘cool’ ? We’ll leave that up to you.

r e h t o y n a n a h t e fe f o c e r o m s k n i r d d e h Fin lan t n o p u c a y o nj E . ld r o w e h t n i y c ountr . s e k a l 8 8 ,8 7 8 1 s it shores of one of 68˚ FINLAND AVERAGE SUMMER TEMPERATURE - 68˚F The nightless summer nights of Finland are an experience of a lifetime. Combine this with any of the two hundred thousand lakes or enjoy the Turku archipelago of thousands of islands. Finland is a quirky mixture of unspoiled nature and minimalistic, modern design... and it will not disappoint your wanderlust.

WANDER 49

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NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA AVERAGE SUMMER TEMPERATURE - 71˚F Visit the lobster capital of the world, Shediac, to fulfill all of your lobster dreams. Head for a whale-watching cruise, and don’t forget to leave one day just to experience the most majestic tideways in the world in Hopewell Rocks in the Bay of Fundy.

71˚

MADEIRA ISLAND, PORTUGAL

72˚

AVERAGE SUMMER TEMPERATURE - 72˚F Walk along the irrigation system called levada, 1500 miles long mini-canals spiraling in between the fields, and enjoy the mountain views. Discover culinary delights like the local seafood and sweet mini-bananas. Leave time for beach!

Don’t leave Port ugal wit hout tr ying a glass of wor ld class port wine or t he best gr il led sardines on t he planet.

SRI LANKA AVERAGE SUMMER TEMPERATURE - 82˚F Sri Lanka is exotic, but very easy to travel in, as everyone speaks good English. Visit tea plantations, see wild elephant gathering in Kadulla National Park and to find serenity in historic temples. And of course, enjoy beaches at Beruwala or Galle.

82˚

KEEP UP WITH KATJA. FOLLOW AT BOX NINE MAGAZINE

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TRADITION As American as apple pie, you can’t have summer without a lemonade stand.  So squeeze those lemons, simmer that simple syrup and gather those quarters because summer is here and people are thirsty for a sip of tradition.


“It’s traditions like this that make childhood a treasure, and memories lemon scented.”

TRADITION

t e g r o f t ’ n o D ign ! t he s

A

Arguably there is no catchier, kitschier symbol of the American spirit than a lemonade stand. For over a 130 years, this American tradition has been offering capitalism and leisure, refreshment and resourcefulness, enterprise and summer skies all squeezed together and offered by a gap toothed youngster eager to make a quick buck during the summer holidays. As a child my lemonade stands were pitiful establishments that barely generated $5, but I loved the process... the menu planning, the building and the anticipation of all the money I would make, and then the spending of that hard earned cash.   My children are much better entrepreneurs than I ever was as a child.  They dream up creative menus, knock on doors with ‘home delivery’ and stand out there until dark. They grin wildly when someone comes to the stall, they work together, they take turns, they are the Rockwell image of perfect children. And I stand there and ooze motherly pride, perhaps a bit too much if I’m honest.   They smell of lemons for days and create a soundtrack of endless giggles while they brainstorm ways to spend their earned $15 like it is some kind of endless pile of money.  It’s traditions like this that make childhood a treasure, and memories lemon scented.  To have summer without a lemonade stand parked on your front yard is like having a sundae without a cherry, one simply cannot be without the other.

SUMMER

STORY BY CORYANNE ETTIENE | PHOT

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R SQUEEZE

TOS AND ARTWORK BY SAM HENDERSON

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MAKE OUR STAND YOUR STAND ADDITIONAL SUPPLIES: • 12 inches of rope • spray paint for canvas decor • cut out letters or paint for sign • saw • drill and bit for sign • clamps or hook and loop tape for skirt • rubber mallet 10 EASY STEPS: 1. Cut all of the PVC pieces with a hand saw or table saw. Set aside. 2. Attach all of the pieces as shown in the diagram. Tap into place securely with a rubber mallet. 3. Cut notches in wood panel with hand saw (tip: drill holes at corners for easy cutting) 4. Place panel on PVC frame with notches around uprights. 5. Cut ‘flag’ border 10 inches deep on one long edge of the canvas. 6. Paint skirt with stripes or other pattern as desired. Flip over and paint just the ‘flag’ border with coordinating color. 7. Wrap skirt around PVC frame with ‘flags’ folded over. Secure with A clamps or hook and loop tape on the back side of the frame. 8. Drill holes in the sign board. 9. Add cut out letters with glue or paint signage. 10. Tie sign to the top of the PVC frame with rope. BOX NINE MAGAZINE

THE MAN MAKES A STAND Building your lemonade stand is half the fun. There are so many ways to make a lemonade stand. The old cardboard box is a favorite classic, but it’s sometimes hard to find. Hunting for the perfect box frequently put our plans on hold, which is why we took the box dilemma out of the equation and started looking for a stand design that we can use over and over again, because let’s face it, you’re likely to have more than one sale this summer if your children have anything to say about it.  Lucky for us, Sam had just finished doing a shoot for HGTV and had a ‘spare” lying around.  When I say lucky, I mean LUCKY because if I am honest, the thought of using PVC pipes would never have crossed my mind.  Now when the children want something made they say, “Let’s call Sam, he might have one lying around”…  Sam is the man.  

TRADITION

CONSTRUCTION NOTES FROM SAM • Measure twice, cut once. • If you’re going to keep it assembled, use PVC cement on the ends of the pieces before tapping into place with the rubber mallet. If not, several taps with the mallet on a firm surface will hold it together temporarily. • If disassembling, lay the canvas flat and place the pieces in the center. Fold over the canvas and roll up like a burrito. Wrap and tie a piece of rope around the canvas and tuck away until the next use. TIP: Be sure to toss in a copy of the diagram for assmebly instructions. • We chose to spray paint our canvas with stripes, but decorate it to suit your style. Consider polka dots, handdrawn lemons, or dye it with fabric dye. • A couple of milk crates stack underneath make the perfect place for a cash box, a cooler, and extra lemonade supplies. 56


TRADITIONAL LEMONADE 10 lemons, juiced 1 cup of superfine sugar 2 cups of water

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VANILLA

watermelon

BERRIES

MINT

limoncell

BASIL

MANGO

PIMP YOUR LEMONADE

GRAPEFRUIT

lavender

coconut

LIME

geranium Ser ve t hem fr ozen f or a c oo l summer treat !

TRADITION

CITRUS-AIDE makes 1 quart

• • • • • •

5 lemons, juiced 3 oranges, juiced 1 grapefruit, juiced 2 limes, juiced 1 cup of superfine sugar 2 cups of water

WATERMELON LEMONADE makes 1 quart

• 10 lemons, juiced • 2 cups of fresh chopped watermelon • 2 cups of water • 1 cup of superfine sugar

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striped table linens

drop cloth

$10

$14 bar sign

$5

THRIFTY

 FIFTY

vases

$4 berry crate

What do you get for $50 when you go summer thrifting with BOX NINE? The whole Americana theme sourced from thrift stores, garage sales, dollar stores, clearance bins and hand me downs from grandma.  It started with a conversation, what would Ralph Lauren do with $50?  The answer was simple to us:  Cranberry tones, warm natural accents, vintage silver and hints of classic blue that were reminiscent of days when bold was not en vogue.  When we shared our love of drop cloth on Instagram, we quickly discovered that we are not alone…  great minds think alike!

free

spreaders

$4

vintage books

$2 dried hydrangeas

free

cranberry glass

free

serving utensils

$8

cake stand

$3

The award for most awesome find goes to the clearance bin table runner and napkins. Once over $50, it appears that this unwanted gem was returned without packaging and not a mark on it. Yes, we did a happy dance in the store all the way to the check out.

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22

RED CHIMICHURRI GRILLED PORK CHOPS makes4 servings

INGREDIENTS: Four 1-inch thick pork loin chops For the chimichurri: 2 cups Italian parsley, packed 2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano leaves 3 cloves garlic, chopped 6 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 tablespoon double-concentrated tomato paste (the kind in the tube, not the can) 2½ tablespoon sweet paprika and/or smoked paprika (I used half of each) 1½ teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon ground black pepper ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper ¾ cup extra virgin olive oil Method: Two-zone direct heat INGREDIENTS: 1. Place chops in a shallow baking dish just big enough to hold the chops in a single layer or in a resealable plastic bag. 2. Place all of the ingredients for the chimichurri, except the olive oil, in a food processor and pulse until finely chopped; scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. With the motor running, add oil in a steady stream. Measure out 1/2 cup of sauce, cover and refrigerate until ready to serve with the grilled chops. (The chimichurri will keep in the refrigerator for three to four days.) Pour the remaining sauce over the chops and make sure that all sides are well-coated. Cover and marinate in the refrigerator for 4 hours or as long as overnight. 3. Remove the chops from the marinade and scrape away excess marinade from the chops. Let the chops sit at room temperature for 30 to 45 minutes to take the chill off the meat. 4. Set up grill for direct heat grilling with two zones: high heat and medium heat. For charcoal grills, this means fewer coals on the lower heat side. Brush and oil the grates before cooking. 5. Season the chops generously with salt and pepper and place on the high heat side for two minutes to sear the meat, flip and sear the other side for two minutes. Move chops to the medium heat; rotate 90 degrees for crosshatch marks. Cook for another 3 to 4 minutes per side or until the internal temperature reaches 140°F for medium (medium is 145°F; the temperature will rise another 5 degrees with carryover heat). 6. Allow the chops to rest 5 to 10 minutes before serving with reserved red chimichurri sauce.

GRILLED FLAT IRON STEAK AND MUSHROOMS serves 4-6

INGREDIENTS: • two 1-pound flatiron steaks or 2-pound tri-tip • 20 white or cremini mushrooms, about 2-inches in diameter For the marinade: • ½ cup vegetable oil • ¼ cup red wine vinegar • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice • 1 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 2 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for grilling • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more for grilling Extras: Four double prong skewers or eight bamboo skewers soaked in water for an hour Instant read thermometer preferably a digital probe that can be read outside the grill Method: Direct and indirect heat INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Place the steaks in a container just large enough to fit; set aside. Remove or trim the stems of the mushrooms so that they are flush with the bottom of the caps. Place mushrooms in a resealable plastic bag and set aside. 2. Place all of the marinade ingredients in a blender and blitz for a minute to emulsify the ingredients. Pour half of the marinade over the steaks and the rest into the bag with the mushrooms. Flip the steaks a couple times to coat, cover and marinate in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours and for as long as

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3.

4.

5.

6.

overnight. Massage the bag of mushrooms to make sure they are coated. Squeeze out the excess air from the bag and seal. Place in the refrigerator to marinate with the steaks. The mushrooms will be fine if left to marinate overnight. Set up grill for two-zone direct and indirect grilling over high heat. Place a drip pan below the grates on the indirect side. Remove the steaks from the marinade and blot dry with paper towels. Season liberally with kosher salt and pepper. Skewer 5 mushrooms onto each double-prong skewer. Sear the steaks at a 45 degree angle for 2 minutes and then rotate 90 degrees and sear for 3 minutes more. Flip and repeat. Move steaks to the indirect, close the grill cover and cook until they reach the desired temperature (130ºF for medium rare). Remove the steaks and loosely tent with foil. Let rest tented with foil while you grill the mushrooms. Turn the direct heat down to medium and lay the skewered mushrooms, cap-side down, on the grill. Cook for 3 to 5 minutes per side or until golden and well marked. Transfer to cutting board or serving platter. I like to remove the mushrooms from the skewers and quarter them to serve over the steak. Slice the steak across the grain of the meat and serve with the grilled mushrooms on the side or over the top.

BLACKENED SHRIMP WITH CAJUN GARLIC BUTTER serves6-8

INGREDIENTS: For the shrimp: • 8 cups very cold water • ⅓ cup kosher salt • 1 lemon • 2 pounds larger peeled shrimp with tails (16/20’s or 20/25’s will work best) • 3 tablespoons Blackening Spice (recipe follows) • lemon wedges for serving (optional) • fresh thyme springs for garnish (optional) For the Cajun garlic butter: • 1 stick (½ cup) unsalted butter • 4 cloves garlic, minced • 1 teaspoon finely chopped grated lemon zest • 1 to 2 teaspoons Blackening Spice • 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh oregano • 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme • splash Worcestershire sauce Extras: Grilling grid or skewers Method: Direct medium high heat INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Add the water to a large mixing bowl and stir in the salt until it has dissolved. Use a Microplane or fine grater to remove the zest from the lemon; reserve the zest for the butter. Squeeze the lemon juice into the bowl and add the shrimp. Let the shrimp marinate in the brine for 1 to 3 hours. Drain and rinse the shrimp and then pat dry.  Sprinkle with the blackening spice and toss to coat the shrimp.  Let sit another 10 minutes or until you are ready to grill. 2. For the Cajun garlic butter: simply toss everything into a small saucepan over low heat and let it melt, stirring occasionally.  Keep warm until ready to serve. 3. Preheat grill (and grid, if using) to direct medium-high heat.  If using skewers, thread the shrimp on them now.  Make sure your grill grates (and grid) are brushed clean and well-oiled.  Place shrimp on grill and cook for 2 to 3 minutes per side (depending on the size) or until the shrimp are opaque. 4. Toss with fresh thyme leaves and serve hot or at room temperature with lemon wedges and Cajun garlic butter on the side. Blackening Spice • 1 tablespoon paprika • 2 teaspoons cayenne pepper • 2 teaspoons ground white pepper • 2 teaspoons finely ground black pepper • 2 teaspoons garlic powder • 2 teaspoons onion powder • 2 teaspoons dried basil • 1½ teaspoons dried thyme • 1½ teaspoons dried oregano • 1 teaspoon ground fennel seeds (optional) Combine and store in an air-tight container for up to 3 months.

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23 BALSAMIC GLAZED VEGETABLES CONT.

Remove sauce from heat, discard the bay leaf, and reserve for glazing. 3. Remove the vegetables from the bag and thread the asparagus onto double prong skewers to keep them from twirling and cooking unevenly. Place the rest of the vegetables on an oiled grilling grid. 4. Set up grill for direct cooking over medium heat. Brush and oil the grate when ready to start cooking. 5. Place on the grill and brush the vegetables with balsamic glaze. Turn the vegetables frequently and brush with additional glaze if necessary. When the skin begins to blister and the vegetables feel soft, remove them from the heat, about 10-12 minutes. Depending on the vegetables you choose and their ripeness, the grilling could take anywhere from 5 to 20 minutes.

SUMMER CORN SALAD WITH POBLANO CHILE AND COTIJA CHEESE CONT.

minutes). Remove from the grill and place in a paper bag or a sealed container until they are cool enough to touch. Once cooled, peel away the skin, remove the stem and seeds, and then chop; set aside. 3. Cut the corn from the cobs and place the kernels in a large mixing bowl. Add the cooled and chopped peppers, onion and Cotija cheese. Whisk together the lime juice, olive oil, cumin, oregano and cayenne, and then drizzle over the salad and give it a good toss; taste for seasoning. Just before serving, toss in the cilantro leaves.

PHOTO FINISH

RED EYE GRILLIN’ BEANS CONT.

together) and push it down into the beans. Place the skillet back over the heat and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Slide the skillet over to the indirect side of the grill, close the grill cover and cook for 30 to 40 minutes or until the beans have somewhat thickened. Remove from heat and serve hot or at room temperature.

PERFECTLY GRILLED CORN ON THE COB CONT.

• ¼ teaspoon sea salt ROASTED GARLIC BUTTER • 2 sticks unsalted butter, room temperature • 2 heads roasted cloves • ¼ teaspoon sea salt • Freshly ground black pepper • Blue Cheese and Chive Butter • 2 sticks unsalted butter, room temperature • 4 tablespoons blue cheese (more or less depending on how strong the cheese is) • 2 tablespoons freshly chopped chives • Pinch of salt (only if necessary) BACON AND BROWN SUGAR BUTTER • 2 sticks unsalted butter, room temperature • 2 slices smoked bacon, cooked and minced • 1 tablespoon reserved bacon grease, cooled • 1 tablespoon brown sugar • Pinch of sea salt (if necessary) CHILE LIME BUTTER • 2 sticks unsalted butter, room temperature • 2 Fresno or red jalapeno chilies, seeded and minced • Zest and juice from 1 lime • 2 teaspoon finely chopped cilantro

BANANA SPLIT ICE CREAM CAKE INGREDIENTS: • 1 yellow cake • 1 chocolate cake or devil’s food cake • 1.5 quarts vanilla ice cream • 1.5 quarts chocolate ice cream • 1 20oz. can crushed pineapple • 3 medium bananas, sliced • 10-15 medium strawberries, sliced • whipped cream • chocolate sauce • chopped walnuts • maraschino cherries

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Add all ingredients to a large mixing bowl. Beat together with an electric hand mixer until well-blended (may also use a fork). 2. Transfer butter mixture to a sheet of parchment paper, wax paper, or plastic wrap. Fold paper over and roll into a cylinder; twist the ends tightly to form a log. Wrap in foil and chill until firm. Slice and serve as needed. Butter will keep refrigerated for up to 2 weeks or frozen for up to 3 INSTRUCTIONS NEXT PAGE months. 61

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PINWHEEL TEMPLATE FROM PAGE 31

BANANA SPLIT ICE CREAM CAKE CONTINUED INSTRUCTIONS: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Mix cake as directed but bake in baking sheets (rolled edge biscuit pans 13x18). Bake for considerably less time. Our cakes only baked for about 15 minutes. When cake is completely cool, cut layer out using the bottom of a medium size postal box as your guide. Do this for both cake flavors. Remove ice cream from freezer and remove the lid to allow it to thaw slightly. Line the shipping box with parchment paper. Be sure to cut to fit and run one sheet in each direction of the box so that the entire box is lined. Lay the chocolate layer of cake in the box first. Make a layer of banana slices next by placing them as close as possible to each other without overlapping. Spread on the chocolate ice cream evenly. Lay the yellow cake layer on next. Drain off the liquid from the pineapple and spread the pineapple over the yellow cake layer evenly. Spread on the vanilla ice cream evenly. Make a layer of sliced strawberries by placing in straight lines and overlapping slightly. Close up the top of the box and store in the freezer for at least 3 hours or until completely frozen. Before serving, let cake sit at room temperature to soften up just a bit. Top with chocolate sauce, whipped cream, chopped walnuts, and a cherry.

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IN THE NEXT ISSUE THE POWER OF PIE THE UNEXPECTED PUMPKIN CHEERS TO BEERS

BOX NINE Summer '15  

Summer edition of food, lifestyle, and travel magazine from editors Coryanne Ettiene and Sam Henderson. Info on entertaining, recipes, DIY,...

BOX NINE Summer '15  

Summer edition of food, lifestyle, and travel magazine from editors Coryanne Ettiene and Sam Henderson. Info on entertaining, recipes, DIY,...

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