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SCI-arc 2014 Portfolio

Bowen Wu


Table Of Contents Ch 05

Ch 01

Tyranny Of The Core ......

10

Generic Diagram of towers

Ch 02

Oblique Coliseum

......

26

New Museum

......

38

Design a new museum in New York

Ch 04

Piano Museum

Objects In Objects ......

76

Architectyre Ontology

Ch 07

Silhouettecity

......

82

An urban design Strategy

......

Design a museum bridge interior and exterior

Table Of Contents 8

64

Anti- parametric

Ch 06

Design a new stadium within a exsiting coliseum

Ch 03

Constructing Surface ......

58

Ch 08

Construction Document ...... Residential Excercise

82


Ch 09

Smart Sustainable

......

102

Green Design

Ch 10

The Cube

......

108

......

116

......

122

Drawing things together

Ch 11

Critical Study Metabolism Architecture

Ch 12

History III Reseach Paper

Table Of Contents 9


Ch 01

Studio 5B

This thesis challenges the core that has in the past 50 years resulted in a generic paradigm of high-rise buildings. Centralize core, infinitive floor plates and glazing faรงade has been a diagram for high rise building. By reexamining and reconfiguring the components of the core, new structural and organizational strategies emerge. In particular the project focuses on new modes of movement for the mixed-use tower.

10


Tyranny Of The Core Location: Course: Proffessor: Student: Year:

425 Park Ave. New York 5B Devyn Weiser Bo W Wu 2014 Spring 11


Ch 01 Tyranny Of The Core _ Generic

Twin Tower

Freedom Tower

Empire State

Sears Tower

Burj Dubai

Shanghai World Finance

Jing Mao

Taipei 101

Two Int Finance

Kuala Lumpur

12


Ch 01 Tyranny Of The Core _ Generic

Tyranny Of The Core

High-rise buildings have become necessary in cities today. In order to have a high-rise building function properly, providing service and circulation to every floor is critical, and a functional core has become “the� solution over years, It always treated as a mass and organize on the center of the plan. Tyranny of the core has significantly impacted high-rise buildings; they are extremely similar to each other. The high-rise building design today has fall in a trap, and architecture for high-rise building design has trapped in a generic paradigm. The core is a combination of many components, and these components all work and function differently, so they should locate and size differently in a building. Some architects have tried to reconfigure the core, using devices like Skip top elevators. The skip stop elevator turns the core into an intermittent circulation, which forces users to experience the building in a different way. As with, Richard Rogers redefined core as fragments in the Lloyd’s building of London. The core became an assembly of prefabricated pieces. This thesis would start with understanding the components of a core as individual, and then reconfigure the components in a different way. By reconfiguring the core, it would significantly impact the structure, organization and circulation of a highrise building, which could create great opportunity to explore architecture.

13


Ch 01 Tyranny Of The Core _ Site

14


Ch 01 Tyranny Of The Core _ Site

425 Park Ave, Manhattan, NYC

15


Ch 01 Tyranny Of The Core _ Site

16


Ch 01 Tyranny Of The Core _ Diagram

Circulation Diagram

Facade Diagram

Elevator Circulation Walking Circulation Exterior Gathering Office Individual Room Residential

17


Ch 01 Tyranny Of The Core _ Plans

Ground Floor

3/64’ = 1’ - 0”

18

Floor 31

3/64’ = 1’ - 0”


Ch 01 Tyranny Of The Core _ Section

19


Ch 01 Tyranny Of The Core _ Organization

Roof Level +765’

Bridge

The split of the core has lead to a unique in-between space with in the tower, where has great opportunity to locate public programs, such as conference room and public park.

Facade

The facade is embedded with structure system, and it is unevenly define pattern suggest the programs of the tower.

Divided Core Diagonal Elevators

It splits the core and provide separate accessibility to two programs.

Mid-Air Lobby +300’

Mid-Air Lobby

Exterior gathering space located at the split of the core, which is also act as the transfer zone.

Ground Level +0’

20

In this project, the core splits to two branches, and they provide separate accessibility to different programs. At the same time, the core is no longer treated as a hidden component in the building. It is being expresses and celebrates along the circulation of users. By deforming the core, circulation, envelops and organization would change, which lead high-rise building architecture toward a new design diagram.


Ch 01 Tyranny Of The Core _ Organization

Facade

The facade is embedded with structure system, and it is unevenly define pattern suggest the programs of the tower.

Diagonal Elevators

It splits the core and provide separate accessibility to two programs.

Mid-Air Lobby +300’

Mid-Air Lobby

Exterior gathering space located at the split of the core, which is also act as the transfer zone.

21


22


23


24


25


Ch 02

Studio 3A

This project is to design a new stadium in USC coliseum while the existing facade is remaining for historical purpose. The exploration of the relationship between new and old becomes critical for this project. For the new stadium, we exam the possibility of continues surface and how it serves the need of structure, programs and circulation.

26


Oblique Coliseum Location: Course: Proffessor: Student:

Year:

USC Coliseum 3A Volkan Alkanoglu Bo w Wu Shane R.R Lee Chan 2011 Fall 27


28


Ch 02 Oblique Coliseum _ Circulation Study

Morphology

The existing facade of the coliseum will remain for historical purpose. By keeping the existing facade, we create a boundary for the project. The architecture problem is to create the relationship between new and old, and how to subdivide the space within the boundary. We purpose a new system which is a continue surface, linking programs together. The surface spins to create three tiers of seating, and it delineate to create press for support programs.

Press Box

Vedio Screen

Press Box Landscape Luxury Suites VIP Seating

The new stadium redesigns as continues surface, linking the programs together.

Entrances Event Circulation Non-Event Circulation Event Space Non-Event Space

Entrance Event Circulation Non-Event Circulation Event Space Non-Event Space 29


Ch 02 Oblique Coliseum _ Structure

Truss

Major Beam

Truss Truss

Major Beams Major Beam Exsiting Column Exsiting Column

The roof will constructs in truss system, and integrated with the seating as a continue system.

Structure Diagram

30


Ch 02 Oblique Coliseum _ Exploded Perspective

The Canopy is composed of 1,500 pieces of tubular steel, supported by a triangular truss system above its primary surface. In between the grid pattern are polycarbonate sheets, each with their own LED light. These sheets will provide shade during a day game, and emit low-energy light during the nighttime. Main Structural Tube The Press Box is integrated into the surrounding forms (floor plate, seating). This shape provides minimal constriction of circulation, while providing an angled view of the events for the casters.

+177’

+111’

+31’

0’

Entrance Points

Landscape Bridge

The Video Screen’s shape is integrated into the overall spiral of the coliseum interior. It displays information of LED lights on both sides of its long face, one side facing the interior, the other facing those entering from the Peristyle.

Existing Peristyle Existing Structure

31


32


Ch 02 Oblique Coliseum _ Section

Delineation and Rotation

The seats and roof are linked by one surface. The press box and luxury suits are hidden under the seating as part of structure that supports the seating tier.

Section AA 01. Luxury suites 02. Lounge 03. Press box 04. VIP seatings 05. Regular seatings

HOME 12:46 GUEST 00 00 DOWN

00

TOGO

00

BALL ON

00

QTR

00

1

2 4

33


Ch 02 Oblique Coliseum _ Plan A

Rotation

The new stadium rotates to avoid players and audience directly faces sun light. The rotation of the new stadium organizes space inside the existing facade. The entrance of the stadium becomes a public park, allowing people to BBQ and wait for the game to start.

3

2

5

B

B

6

+177’

+111’

+31’

0’

N

7

Stadium Plan 1. Rest room 2. Lounge 3. Press box 4. Food stand 5. VIP seatings 6. Regular seatings 7. Peristyle 8. Exsiting coliseum 9. Service

4

1

9

8

N

Stadium Plan 1/32” = 1’-0” 1. Rest room 2. Lounge 3. Press box 4. Food stand 5. VIP seatings 6. Regular seatings 7. Peristyle 8. Exsiting coliseum 9. Service

A

34


Ch 02 Oblique Coliseum _ Section

+177’

+111’

5 +31’

5 2 1

-29’-6”

Section BB 1 32” 1’- ” 1 2 3 5

Major tension structure Major tension structure Steel

Secondary brace beams Secondary brace beams Steel

Truss

Transition

Connection zones happens frequently alone the divide line between new and old. It connects the lower and upper level, as well as the new stadium and the old facade.

Steel

Truss

Major beams Major beams Steel

Exsiting Column Exsiting Column Concrete

3

Exsiting Second Floor Entrance Exsiting Second Floor Entrance Concrete

1

Exsiting First Floor Entrance

Exsiting First Floor Entrance Concrete

The existing wall and columns are kept as a historical symbol, and the existing entrance are still occupiable.

Connection Zone This zone allows circulation flow by connecting the first and second floor. It is also a transmission zone that transforms old to new.

This is a zone filled with food stands. Audience would buy foods here before they reach their seat.

Stadium Programs This zone locates programs for the stadium, such as luxury suits and press box. 35


Ch 02 Oblique Coliseum _ Exploded Render

Secondary Beams

Truss

Shading Layer

Major Beams

New Coliseum

Exsiting Coliseum

36


Ch 02 Oblique Coliseum _ Photo

37


Ch 03

Studio 3B

Studio 3B is a comprehensive design studio, focusing on architecture interest as well as structure, mechanical and sustainable system. Student would start with studying precedent architecture building with critical structure system and embed the system to the design. In design stage, the project should experience relationship between interior and exterior, creating connection in urban scale. Also, New York culture should consider as one of the most important motivation on design.

38


New Museum Location: Course: Proffessor: Student: Year:

235 Bowery, NY 3B Russell Thomsen Bo W Wu Kevin Nugyen 2012 Spring

39


40


Ch 03 New Museum _ Double Skin

Double Facade

The new museum started with urban interest to connect uptown and downtown, however, uptown and downtown are different, and the new museum will have different expression on north face and south face.

Organization

Offices, technical room, media lounge and theater are defined as support programs, locating at top and bottom of the museum. Interior galleries are defined as public programs, locating in the middle of the museum where most interacts with the void. The exterior gallery locates on roof level, allowing visitor to enjoy arts as well as city view.

Programs

s

Interior Gallery Exterior Gallery Media Lounge Learning Center Theater Office/Tech ech Cafe Core

41


Ch 03 New Museum _ Morphology

Morphology

The new museum started with an urban influence, connecting uptown and downtown which located at the north and south side of the site. The new museum will allow visitor to see uptown and downtown through the building by creating a bridge of north and south face of the building. The bridge will extend itself to a corner and emphasize an entrance. The bridge designed to be a transparent void that connecting floor plates and it allows natural lights to the building. The void within the building would construct with steel frame and would primary supporting the building.

Egress Circulation 42


Ch 03 New Museum _ Morphology

1. Set up a box with maximum height and width as constraint box

2. Bridging two surfaces to create exterior space inside the box, and connect uptown and downtown in urban scale

3. Connect the bridge and the corner of two surfaces to create an entrance

4. The "T" shade connection become an exterior void inside the building

5. Pulling one side of the surface to create an irregular surface

43


This physical model is constructed with powder 3D print, laser cut, and different materials such as styrene and wood. We use this model to explore 3D composition of a surface, and its relationship on void and solid. 44


45


46


47


N

Site Plan

48

Site Plan

1/32”=1’ - 0”


Ch 03 New Museum _ Perspective Drawing

Facade

The facade is facing west side, the pattern control amount of sunlight get into the building

Glaze Structure

The structure is space frame system that holds up the cladding panel

Glazing

Steel Frame Truss

This is a proposal to construct the surface

Underground

This is where the technical room and theater lacated

49


There is a transition zone between the museum and the street, because the entrance is push inside the building. The entrance is the beginning of the void, creating a visual connection between the street and building. 50


Ch 03 New Museum _ Section

07

06

ale g Center

+133’

l Room

Gallery

+116’

ounge Center +103’

Gallery

Fifth Floor Plan

Connection 05

01 04

03

02

Basement Plan

06

Second Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

06

The floor plates mostly offset from the steel frame, and the “I” beam structure extends and connects to the steel frame. The floor plate has a clean edge and it connect to irregular steel frame system. The space between two systems creates an interesting gap, allowing visitor to look up and down.

+83’

+67’

+50’

+33’

+17’

Third Floor Plan +00’

-12’

Long Section

1/4”=1’ - 0”

51


The floor plate has a clean edge and it connects to an irregular steel frame system. The space between two systems creates an interesting space, creating a visual connection between floor plates. 52


Ch 03 New Museum _ Plans

Sixth Floor Plan

06

Seventh Floor Plan

08

06

Eighth Floor Plan

10 09

11

11

Ninth Floor Plan

Roof Floor Plan

53


Ch 03 Design Development _ 3D Chunk APPLIED STUDIES 3040 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT SPRING 2012

APPLIED STUDIES 3040 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT SPRING 2012

INSTRUCTORS: SCOTT URIU PAVEL GETOV

INSTRUCTORS: SCOTT URIU PAVEL GETOV

J.A.J.B

J.A.J.B

ARIEL IP ALLEN TSAY JIE YANG BO WU

ARIEL IP ALLEN TSAY JIE YANG BO WU

ADDRESS: 960 E 3RD ST LOS ANGELES, CA 90013

ADDRESS: 960 E 3RD ST LOS ANGELES, CA 90013

ASSOCIATEDS

ASSOCIATEDS





235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ARTS



235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ARTS





DRAWING REVISIONS: NO.

DESCRIPTION

DRAWING REVISIONS:

DATE

NO.

DESCRIPTION



 TITLE:

TITLE:

3D CHUNK

3D STRUCTURE



SCALE:

3/32”=1’-0” 3/16”=1’-0”

DRAWN BY:

BOWEN WU

 

DATE:

12.02.12

DATE PRINTED:

12.02.12

SHEET NUMBER:

A.3.1

54

SCALE:





DRAWN BY:

BOWEN WU

DATE:

12.02.12

DATE PRINTED:

12.02.12

SHEET NUMBER:

A.3.2

DATE


Ch 03 Design Development _ 3D Detail APPLIED STUDIES 3040 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT SPRING 2012

APPLIED STUDIES 3040 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT SPRING 2012

INSTRUCTORS: SCOTT URIU PAVEL GETOV

INSTRUCTORS: SCOTT URIU PAVEL GETOV

J.A.J.B

J.A.J.B

ARIEL IP ALLEN TSAY JIE YANG BO WU

ARIEL IP ALLEN TSAY JIE YANG BO WU

ADDRESS: 960 E 3RD ST LOS ANGELES, CA 90013

ADDRESS: 960 E 3RD ST LOS ANGELES, CA 90013





 ��� 

DRAWING REVISIONS: NO.

DESCRIPTION

235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ARTS



ASSOCIATEDS

235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ARTS

ASSOCIATEDS

DRAWING REVISIONS: DATE

NO.

DESCRIPTION

DATE

  





TITLE:



TITLE:

3D CHUNK / 2D WALL SECTION



3D CHUNK / 2D WALL SECTION

SCALE:

SCALE:

1/2”=1’-0”

1/2”=1’-0”

DRAWN BY:

DRAWN BY:

BOWEN WU

BOWEN WU

DATE:

DATE:

12.02.12

 

12.02.12

 

DATE PRINTED:

DATE PRINTED:



12.02.12

12.02.12

SHEET NUMBER:

SHEET NUMBER:

A.3.3



A.3.4

APPLIED STUDIES 3040 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT SPRING 2012

APPLIED STUDIES 3040 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT SPRING 2012

INSTRUCTORS: SCOTT URIU PAVEL GETOV

INSTRUCTORS: SCOTT URIU PAVEL GETOV

J.A.J.B

J.A.J.B

ASSOCIATEDS



ASSOCIATEDS

ARIEL IP ALLEN TSAY JIE YANG BO WU

ARIEL IP ALLEN TSAY JIE YANG BO WU

         

ADDRESS: 960 E 3RD ST LOS ANGELES, CA 90013

ADDRESS: 960 E 3RD ST LOS ANGELES, CA 90013



   

  

  



 

DRAWING REVISIONS: NO.



DESCRIPTION

235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ARTS



235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002



NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ARTS



DRAWING REVISIONS: DATE

NO.

DESCRIPTION

DATE

TITLE:

TITLE:

PRELIMINARY OPINION OF PROBABLE COST

3D CHUNK / 2D WALL SECTION

SCALE:

SCALE:

1”=1’-0”

  



DRAWN BY:

   

DRAWN BY:

BOWEN WU

BOWEN WU



DATE:

12.02.12

 DATE PRINTED:

12.02.12

SHEET NUMBER:

A.3.5

 



 



 

DATE:

12.02.12



 

DATE PRINTED:

12.02.12

SHEET NUMBER:

A.3.6

55


56


57


Ch 04

Summer Studio 2B

This project's goal is to design a museum to celebrate pianos, and the best way to celebrate is to have more interaction between visitors and pianos. In order to achieve this goal, the museum would be open and expose, and allow performance and exhibition happen in public. This project interests in open floor plan and releases programs from wall and enclosure, as well as transformation from exterior to interior.

58


Piano Museum Location: Course: Proffessor: Student: Year:

N Roberson Blvd. & Beverly Ave. Summer 2B Heather Flood Bo w Wu 2011 Summer

59


60

60


C

L

-1 ’

1

L

L

- ’

A

Programs

A

L

There is no clear division to define programs in this project, and the whole building is an exhibition space for pianos. The gallery space flows along with the circulation and share space with other programs, and a thick wall embedded with music sheet library.

1’

C

PLAN01 @ 18’ - 0” SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

Plan01 18’

Plan01 18’

Plan02 3’

Plan02 3’

Plan03 -10’

Section C

Plan03 -10’

Section B 61

N


Ch 04 Piano Museum _ Section

Form

The project has organic form, responding to site condition. The form of the building enhances a free-flow circulation and the peels off geometry on roof lead in natural light.

Plan01 13’

Plan02 3’

Plan03 -10’

62


Ch 04 Piano Museum _ Plans

C

B

B

A

A

C

C

B

B

A

A

C

63


Ch 05

Studio 5A

This project interests in constructing a surface with a unify system. It is a flexible system that transforms itself according to different situation such as connection, rotation and termination. Learning from the physical model, it bends, twists, and shifts in order to complete the system filed. However, when a geometry become too complex, a unify system no longer support itself structurally, a secondary system would emerges. The conjunction of multiple systems is complex and interesting, and it generates great opportunity to develop architecture with the system f that embeds structure in its own form.

64


Constructing Surface Beyond Parametric Location: Course: Proffessor: Student: Year:

Ibaraki International Airport 5A Nanako Umemoto Bo W Wu 2013 Fall

65


Ch 05 Constructing Surface Beyond Parametric _Model

66


Ch 05 Constructing Surface Beyond Parametric _Model

Material Transformation

The model demonstrates how physical material response in a complex surface. In order to represent the complex surface, It transforms a singular geometrical pattern to a complex system “field�. A diagonal system and tension cables partially emerge for structural purpose.

67


Ch 05 Constructing Surface Beyond Parametric _Render

68


Ch 05 Constructing Surface Beyond Parametric _Organization

Aperature Field

200 ‘

Above Ground

-20’

Under Ground

Diagonal Field

Arrival/Departure

N

69


Ch 05 Constructing Surface Beyond Parametric _Longtitude Section

Departure

Airline

70

Airlin


ne

Ch 05 Constructing Surface Beyond Parametric _Longtitude Section

Airline

71


72


73


Ch 05 Constructing Surface Beyond Parametric _Render

74


Ch 05 Constructing Surface Beyond Parametric _Shortitude Section

75


Ch 06

Studio 4B

The studio explores in a technic of generating architecture. I interest in aggregation of objects, and create architectural space through aggregating objects. Aggregation of primary shapes would lead to predictable form. In order to explore a unique form, I started with an object with strong characteristic and seek the opportunity to transform it to a conceptual building. Exploring the objects with a basic idea of positive and negative space, objects aggregates without order. A sack, which is an envelope for objects, become necessary and would define order. With a sack and aggregated objects, the form potentially defines interior, exterior and circulation. With this technic, architecture could be generates in a different way.

76


Onject on Object in Object Location: Course: Proffessor: Student: Year:

Staple Center, LA 4B Tom Wsicombe Bo W Wu 2013 Spring

77


Ch 06 Objects in Objects on Objects _ Progress Diangram

Objects

Design objects with strong geometry, and aggregate them in a three dimensional composition.

Exterior Objects

Two more objects jam into the sack and liner, deform them from exterior.

78

Liner

Sack

A liner is a soft geometry squish between objects.

A sack is an soft envelope, and stretch along objects.

Objects In Objects

Sack and liner deformed by objects simultaneously from outside and inside.


Ch 06 Objects in Objects on Objects _ Axon

Enclosure of Exposure

In this aggregation, the sack, which is the envelope, no longer define order and enclose space. It is incomplete and expose, and it blurs the definition of enclosure.

79


Ch 06 Objects in Objects on Objects _ Section

Liner Space

A liner is a negative space amount objects, and objects remain independent and deform the liner to establish a loose relationship within the aggregation.

80


Liner in a broken Sack, reacting loosely

Exterior Exposure Object

Loose reaction between the Sack and Liner

81


Ch 07 http://www.bowenwu90.wix.com/4amap Studio 4A

Architecture never limit itself to a building typology, it could shape a city into a different form. In this studio, we interest in urban design, and how a city could benefit from architecture. As we move on to 21st century, the needs and considerations for a city are no longer remaining same as before. Started with this idea, I purposed a new form of city, and explored it in Downtown LA. LA is known for a driver’s city, in order to improve it for modern city development, it needs to be denser and better regulated. I purposed a wall-building dividing it to different zones, and allowing the wall-building acts as the core to regulate movement, programs, and occupancy. The proposal scheme responded to the LA’s condition precisely through the data I collected, such as light condition, parking hour, and traffic regulation. The scheme would generate from a digital tool, grasshopper, and able to change its form as different data inputted. This project exams the possibility of interoperate the works in a digital platform. I design a website to present the work in a different way. The animated diagram and drawing allow us to see the work in a different aspect. Please see animated version in my website. http://www.bowenwu90.wix.com/4amap

82


Silhouettecity Location: Course: Proffessor: Student: Year:

Downtown LA 4A Alexis Rochas Bo W Wu 2012 Fall

83


Civ

Fin His

Civic Center South Civic Center Bunker Hill Financial Core Historic Downtown South Park City Markets Central Industrial

84

Cit Ce


Ch 07 Silhouettecity _ Site Plan

Divided City

Downtown LA is mostly divided into commercial zone and industry zone. The commercial zone of downtown LA has higher density of traffic and larger need of parking spaces. A need of division for the city becomes necessary, because these two zones should treat differently. The commercial zone is denser and should limit the automobile travel.

vic Center South

nancial Core storic Downtown

ty Markets entral Industrial

85


Ch 07 Silhouettecity _ Joint

The wall divided the city to two parts, and regulates the city differently. There would be a portion designed for automobile, and the other designed for pedestrian.

86


Ch 07 Silhouettecity _ Section

87


Ch 07 Silhouettecity _ Research

Order 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101

88

-118.2365 -118.240333 -118.240667 -118.241333 -118.242333 -118.242667 -118.243167 -118.243 -118.245333 -118.259667 -118.264167 -118.266833 -118.264333 -118.264167 -118.263333 -118.263167 -118.2625 -118.262 -118.262 -118.261833 -118.2615 -118.261667 -118.262 -118.264833 -118.263667 -118.263467 -118.263367 -118.263167 -118.259833 -118.258833 -118.258333 -118.258033 -118.257833 -118.257667 -118.257667 -118.2575 -118.257333 -118.2585 -118.2585 -118.2555 -118.254167 -118.252667 -118.252167 -118.251833 -118.251333 -118.246333 -118.245167 -118.2445 -118.244167 -118.243967 -118.243833 -118.243833 -118.244 -118.2405 -118.2329 -118.2327 -118.2325 -118.232167 -118.231833 -118.231533 -118.2275 -118.231 -118.2315 -118.2315 -118.231667 -118.231967 -118.231667 -118.231667 -118.2325 -118.2325 -118.232667 -118.219 -118.223667 -118.233 -118.238167 -118.238833 -118.239833 -118.239833 -118.239833 -118.239833 -118.239433 -118.236333 -118.24 -118.239833 -118.24 -118.239833 -118.239833 -118.2395 -118.239833 -118.240033 -118.239833 -118.239833 -118.239667 -118.238667 -118.239333 -118.239667 -118.239333 -118.2405 -118.239333 -118.239167 -118.239167

34.0445 34.0465 34.046667 34.047 34.047333 34.0475 34.047667 34.047333 34.0485 34.048 34.044833 34.039833 34.031333 34.0345 34.034 34.034 34.0335 34.033333 34.033167 34.033167 34.0335 34.034 34.034 34.035 34.0355 34.0355 34.0355 34.0355 34.0355 34.036833 34.0375 34.0375 34.0375 34.0375 34.037667 34.038167 34.038333 34.039 34.0392 34.039833 34.040833 34.041667 34.042 34.042167 34.042667 34.047167 34.048 34.048667 34.048833 34.048833 34.048867 34.048967 34.049333 34.053833 34.052667 34.052667 34.052667 34.052667 34.052667 34.052667 34.0525 34.051333 34.051333 34.051167 34.051167 34.051167 34.0519 34.0514 34.049 34.048833 34.047833 34.035667 34.0345 34.038333 34.038167 34.038333 34.0395 34.039833 34.04 34.040167 34.040167 34.04 34.0415 34.0415 34.042 34.044 34.044 34.044333 34.0445 34.0445 34.0446 34.044667 34.045 34.0455 34.045333 34.045333 34.049167 34.046833 34.048 34.048167 34.048167

79 82 81 81 106 80 82 106 95 92 90 91 75 70 62 65 73 67 63 64 133 112 151 65 65 65 133 63 94 90 98 92 89 89 89 86 85 87 89 102 89 84 82 81 82 84 79 81 80 89 89 89 82 90 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 80 80 78 79 78 78 79 80 80 79 77 74 76 75 77 75 80 81 83 84 84 83 86 93 95 98 89 90 90 90 89 89 89 73 87 98 98 93 94 94

24 Hours Parking Price Max Park Hour 1 1 10 2 0 1.5 0 1.5 2 0 1.5 2 0 1.5 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 0 2 2 0 4 4 0 3 4 0 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 1 0.5 2 0 0.5 2 0 0.5 2 0 0.5 2 0 1 2 1 1 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 1 3 2 0 4 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 2 0 1.5 4 0 1.5 4 0 1.5 4 0 1.5 4 0 1.5 4 0 1.5 4 0 1.5 4 0 1.5 4 0 1.5 4 0 1.5 4 0 1.5 4 0 1.5 4 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 1 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 2

The data is visualized in 3D diagram, and seek for opportunities to transform into a city.


Ch 07 Silhouettecity _ Research

City Generator

This is not an attempt to present an urban design proposal for Downtown LA, but a flexible urban system that could apply to any city and response to the city condition. This is an example of how this system would response to Downtown LA. The Project started with 100 data collected in Downtown LA, in this case, street meter prince, time, and availability. These data allow us to have a basic understanding the traffic condition and the relationship between traffic and its existing planning. With the data input, the project would develop into a three dimensional diagram of the existing urban condition, and generate a new schematic design.

89


Ch 07 Silhouettecity _ Unfold Data

This is an unfolded elevation of the line, showing different percentage of enclosure within the wall city in section.

73% Positive 27% Negative

32% Positive 68% Negative


Ch 07 Silhouettecity _ Module

The wall city is constructed with a module, and the modules are transformed based on the data. The combination of modules would possibility form an infinitive wall city.

54% Positive 46% Negative


Ch 08

Construction Document This course introduces construction document. In this course, I designed a residential housing, which based on construction codes and prepared a set of drawings which communicate clearly to others professions in field, such engineer, architect, or contractor.

92


Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

No.

Description

Date

Residential Exercise 2

3D Exploded

Course: Proffessor: Student: Year:

Construction Document Jay Vanos/Pavel Getov Housing Residential Bo w Wu Exercise 2012 Spring 3D Drawing Project number Date Drawn by Checked by

93

A6.1 Scale

Project Numb Issue Da Auth Check


Ch 08 Construction Document _ Site

Sci A Sci Arch

2

A1.5

1 2

A3.1 A3.2 A4.2

F

E

B

D

C

A

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

A

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

1 C 14' - 6"

A

Living Room

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

2 18' - 4"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

3 6' - 11"

6' - 0"

5' - 2"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

2 3 4

A3.1 A3.2

Parking Space

- / --- / ---

- / ---

10' - 7"

130' - 0"

1

129 ' - 0" ' - 0" 129

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

129 '0"

No.

Description

Date

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Date Drawn by Checked by

A0.2

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

Scale

4/8/2013 4:21:31 PM

0"

Project number

Site 1" = 10'-0"

1

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Residential Housing Exercise Site PlanD

'-

- 0"

- 0"

- 0"

128

126'

5' 12

' - 0" 124

127'

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Sci Arch

No.

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Descript

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Description

Date

Residential Housing Exercise Cover Page Project number

1

3D Axon

Date Drawn by Checked by

A0.3

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

Scale

Residentia Exer Cover

4/25/2013 12:13:50 AM

No.

94 Project number Date Drawn by Checked by


Ch 08 Construction Document _ Wall type

Sci Arch

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

1 LAYER MIN 1/2" GYP. BD. EACH SIDE

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

1 LAYER MIN 1/2" GYP. BD. EACH SIDE

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

WOOD STRUCTURAL SHEAR PANEL WHERE OCCURS

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

MIN. 2 x 4 WOOD FRAMING AT 16" O.C.

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

1 LAYER 5/8" TYPE 'X' GYP. BD. EACH SIDE

3 1/2" BATT INSULATION

3 1/2" BATT INSULATION

2 x 4 STAGGERED STUDS AT 16" O.C. ON 2 x 6 PLATE

2 x 4 STAGGERED STUDS AT 16" O.C. ON 2 x 6 PLATE

ONE HOUR RATING PER UL DESIGN No. U309; SEE ALSO IBC TABLE 720.1(2), ITEM 14-1.3 No.

A

Exterior Shear Wall 3" = 1' - 0"

Date

STC 53 PER CALIFORNIA OFFICE OF NOISE CONTROL ASSEMBLY No. 1.2.3.5.4.3

B

Exterior Wall 3" = 1' - 0"

C

Interior Wall 3" = 1' - 0"

Residential Housing Exercise Wall Type Project number Date Drawn by Checked by

A0.4 Scale

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

6" = 1'-0"

4/25/2013 12:13:57 AM

STC 53 PER CALIFORNIA OFFICE OF NOISE CONTROL ASSEMBLY No. 1.2.3.5.4.3

Description

95


Ch 08 Construction Document _ Major Plans

Sci Arch A. Exterior Shear Wall B. Exterior Wall C. Interior Wall 1. Door 2. Lighting Fixture 3. Build In Funiture

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

2 3 4 A3.1 A3.2

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

2

18' - 4"

14' - 6"

A3.1 18' - 4"

14' - 6"

F

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

F 5 A1.5

6 A1.5

2

DN

A1.5

DN

A1.5

E

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Study

2

E A

A 1

DN

1

D

D

C

1

C

6' - 0"

1 2

Balcony

Bedroom

---

1

C

Bedroom

No.

2

2

A3.1

B

6' - 11"

6' - 11"

A 2

3

1

2

2

3

Residential Housing Exercise FloorPlan03&04

Level 4 1/4" = 1'-0"

Project number Date Drawn by Checked by

A1.2 Scale

96

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

1/4" = 1'-0"

4/25/2013 12:14:13 AM

1

Level 3 1/4" = 1'-0"

Date

B

A

1

Description

6' - 0"

C

5' - 2"

5' - 2"

C

10' - 7"

10' - 7"

1

A

A3.1 A3.2

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Bedroom

2


Ch 08 Construction Document _ Plans Sci Arch

Sci Arch A. Exterior Shear Wall B. Exterior Wall C. Interior Wall 1. Door 2. Lighting Fixture 3. Build In Funiture

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

A3.1 A3.2 18' - 4"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

F

2 3 4

2

DN

A1.5

2

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Kitchen

E

A1.5

E Parking Space

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

3

10' - 7"

A

10' - 7"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

10' - 7"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

F 4 A1.5

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

E

18' - 4"

14' - 6"

18' - 4"

F

2 A1.5

UP

C

A

D

1

D

D

5' - 2"

2 A1.5

A3.1 A3.2

A3.1 A3.2 14' - 6"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

2 3 4

2

Date

2

Living Room

1 2

A3.1 A3.2 A4.2

6' - 0"

1 2

A3.1 A3.2

6' - 0"

1 2

A3.1 A3.2

No.

C

C

C

6' - 11"

6' - 11"

A

A 1

A 1

3

2

Residential Housing Exercise Roof Project number Date Drawn by Checked by

A1.3

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

1/4" = 1'-0"

Scale

1

1

3

2

2

Level 1 1/4" = 1'-0"

3

2

Residential Housing Exercise FloorPLan01&02

Level 2 1/4" = 1'-0"

Project number Date Drawn by 4/25/2013 12:14:19 AM

Roof 1/4" = 1'-0"

Checked by

A1.1

Sci Arch

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

2 3 4

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

2

E

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

F

F

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

A3.1 A3.2

A3.1 A3.2

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

A1.5

2 3 4

2 3 4

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

F

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

1/4" = 1'-0"

Scale

Sci Arch

A3.1 A3.2

Date

B

B

B

2

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

2

A1.5

A1.5

E

E

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

D

C

D

D

C

C

1 2 A3.1 A3.2

No.

Description

Date

B

1 2

1 2

A3.1 A3.2 A4.2

A3.1 A3.2

B

No.

Description

Date

B

A 2

3

A

A 1

1

Level 4 1/4" = 1'-0"

Residential Housing Exercise Reflect Ceiling Plan 02 Project number Date Drawn by Checked by

A2.2 Scale

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

1/4" = 1'-0"

1

Level 1 1/4" = 1'-0"

2

3

1

2

2

3

Residential Housing Exercise Reflect Ceiling Plan

Level 3 1/4" = 1'-0"

Project number Date Drawn by Checked by

A2.1 Scale

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

1/4" = 1'-0"

4/25/2013 12:14:39 AM

1

4/25/2013 12:14:52 AM

1

Description

6' - 0"

1 2 A3.1 A3.2

Description

5' - 2"

5' - 2"

A

No.

4/25/2013 12:14:05 AM

2 3 4 2 3 A3.1 A3.2

14' - 6"

97


Ch 08 Construction Document _ Circulation

6' - 5"

3' - 0"

Sci Arch

F

3' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

0' - 3"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail 2 4

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

A3.1 A3.2

2 A1.5

1

Roof2 35' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

11' - 9"

E

1

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

2

Stair 3/4" = 1'-0"

18' - 9"

2 4 A3.2

Level 4 24' - 0"

No.

2

2

A1.5

11' - 10"

E

1

2

1

Stair of Level 1 3 1/4" = 1'-0"

2

4

4 A3.2

F

A3.2

Level 2 10' - 0"

9' - 7"

Stair of Level 2 4 1/4" = 1'-0"

F

Level 1 0' - 0"

Residential Housing Exercise Stair

2 A1.5

2

E

A1.5

E

Earth -6' - 0"

Project number Date Drawn by Checked by

5

Stiar of Level 3 1/4" = 1'-0"

1

1

2 6

98 4 A3.2

Date

Level 3 14' - 0"

A1.5

E

Description

12' - 0"

F

Stiar of Level 4 1/4" = 1'-0"

2 2

Section 3 1/4" = 1'-0"

A1.5 Scale

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

As indicated

4/25/2013 12:14:22 AM

F


Ch 08 Construction Document _ Restroom

Sci Arch

1. Door 2. Toilet 3. Sink 4. Bathtube

2

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

6' - 10"

E

Level 2 10' - 0"

4' - 2"

3' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

3' - 0"

10' - 1"

1' - 10"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

3

2' - 5"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

3' - 0"

6' - 3"

10' - 7"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Level 1 0' - 0"

D

1

Bathroom of Level 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

4

2

Section 3 Of Level1 Restroom 1/2" = 1'-0"

No.

E D

Description

Date

D

2

Level 2 10' - 0"

Level 2 10' - 0"

1

3

2

Level 1 0' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Project number Date Drawn by Checked by

3

Section 2 Of Level1 Restroom 1/2" = 1'-0"

5

Section 4 Of Level1 Restroom 1/2" = 1'-0"

2

A1.6

Section 1 Of Level1 Restroom 1/2" = 1'-0" Scale

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

1/2" = 1'-0"

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Residential Housing Exercise Restroom

2

99


Ch 08 Construction Document _ Building Section

Sci Arch

2 3 4 A3.1 A3.2

5 A3.3 1 A3.2

1

6 A3.3

2

2 A3.2

3 A3.2

3

A

1

2

A3.1 A3.2

A1.5

B

C

E

D

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

F

4 A3.2

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Roof2 35' - 0"

Roof2 35' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Level 4 24' - 0"

Level 4 24' - 0"

Level 3 14' - 0"

Level 3 14' - 0"

Level 2 10' - 0"

Level 2 10' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

4 A3.3

1 A3.3

No.

Description

Date

2 A3.3 2 A4.2

14' - 6"

1

Section 1 1/4" = 1'-0"

18' - 4"

6' - 11"

2

6' - 0"

5' - 2"

Residential Housing Exercise Section01&02

10' - 7"

Section 2 1/4" = 1'-0"

Project number Date Drawn by Checked by

A3.1 Scale

100

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

1/4" = 1'-0"

4/25/2013 12:15:07 AM

3 A3.3


Ch 08 Construction Document _ Wall Section

1

3

5 A3.3

A

6 A3.3

Sci Arch

F

B

5 A3.4

1 A3.4

Roof2 35' - 0"

Roof2 35' - 0"

Roof2 35' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Level 4 24' - 0"

Level 4 24' - 0"

Level 4 24' - 0"

2 A3.4

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Consultant Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Level 3 14' - 0"

Level 3 14' - 0"

Level 3 14' - 0"

Level 3 14' - 0" 3 A3.4

No.

Description

Date

Level 2 10' - 0"

Level 2 10' - 0"

Level 2 10' - 0"

6 A3.4

2 A3.3

1 A3.3 7 A3.4

3 A3.3

Level 1 0' - 0"

4 A3.4

Level 1 0' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Project number Date Drawn by Checked by

1

Wall Section 1 of Section 1 3/8" = 1'-0"

2

Wall Section 2 of Section 1 3/8" = 1'-0"

3

Wall Section 1 of Section 2 3/8" = 1'-0"

4

A3.2

Wall Section 2 of Section 2 3/8" = 1'-0" Scale

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

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Residential Housing Exercise Wall Section

101


Ch 09

Environment II

The students are assigned to redesign a portion of Sci-arc and achieve a better environmental building. The proposal should improve the temperature, lighting and ventilation through a systematic scheme.

102


Such a nice place to have lunch, and it diffuse direct sun light to studio!

M

New Sci-Arc Environment I Course: Proffessor: Jay Vanos Bo w Wu Student:

Year:

Allen Xu Jie Yang Kaige Yang 2011 Fall

103


Ch 09 Environment II _ Sustainable Diagram SOLAR PANEL SYSTEM

SUNLIGHT DIAGRAM The facade is made out of 1 thick concrete, and has bigger opening on the front, smaller opeings on the back. The angle of the openings are ad ested to block westside summer sunlight, and let winter sunlight into the space.

200 WATT SOLAR PANELS 252 cells

WINTER

WEST 19

SUMMER

Shaded

Shaded

12 AM M

12 PM

12 AM M

12 PM

.6

5 .5

-5

20 0 (Source

http

www .altestore.com store Solar-Panels)

1

1

LOW-E-GLASS ROCK THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM

This glass provides an excellent option to increase comfort and save energy year round the year. It filters long-wave radiation from the sun. It reduces solar heat gained from the sun in the summer and keeps the space cool. It protects the curtains form efficient long rays. It lets warm solar rays into the space retaining the heat into the space.

Rock thermal storage system mainly is used to cool the hallway space, partially the studio space. It dramatically improves the hot hallway condition, which is caused by the direct sunlight. THERMAL STORAGE DAILY SCHEDULE 12AM-6AM

6AM-12PM

12PM-6PM

6PM-12AM

INDOOR GATE OUTDOOR GATE TIME OF OPEN

DAY TIME MODE At 9am in the morning, the security will open the indoor opening and close the outdoor opening of the rock thermal system. At this condition, the cold energy which has already fully stored in the rock can be released into the studio to cool the space down. TEMPERATURE (fahrenheit)

70

All operable windows closed

60

50

7AM

12

6PM

TIME, HOUR

Closed

Open

Open

Closed

DAY TIME ROCK TEMPERATURE

NIGHT TIME MODE

TEMPERATURE (fahrenheit)

At 10pm in the evening, the security who is patroling will close the indoor opening, and open the outdoor opening. In this case, the rock can store enough cold energy for day time using. 70

60

50

6PM

12

Open

7AM

TIME, HOUR

NIGHT TIME ROCK TEMPERATURE

Closed

FACADE COMPONENT DIAGRAM

(Source

http

www .stylepark.com en architecture fuse-sunlight) dif

LINIT PROFILED GLASS "Linit" brand profiled glass from the glass manufacturers Lamberts is glass which, on account of its U-shape is extremely resilient. Given the diffuse refraction of the sunlight pouring in, the glass plays a pivotal role in the atmosphere created inside the building. The double-glass cavities of the lenses gather sun-heated air in winter or exhaust it in summer.

OUTSIDE Double layer of low iron U-profile glass units with translucent insulation INSIDE Single layer laminated glass wall system

104


Ch 09 Environment II _ Light Shelf

TRANSFORMABLE LIGHT SHELF It is an integral, adjustable light shelf to control the entry of light into a room through a window. The blind may be a roller blind or anyother suitable blind and controls rntry of light through a lower portion of the window. The light shelfcontrols entry of light through an upper portion of the window and may be adjusted to reflect incident sunlight onto the ceiling of the room to provide indirect sunlight onto the ceiling of the room to provide indirect lighting to the room. The light shelf may be adjusted to substantially or partially exclude light from the room.

The light shelf is

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106


Ch 09 Environment II _ Aperture

96’ INSIDE FACADE 15% Opening

24’

OUTSIDE FACADE 70% Opening There are 300,000 bls concrete in total for the facade. HEAT CAPACITY OF CONCRETE: 300,000 lbs X 0.2 BTU/lb/degree = 60,000 BTU/degree 107


Ch 10

Drawing Things Together This course explores a way to draw things together. Students started with a complex geometry design and capture the geometry in different condition, such as lighting or motion. Students required casting a three dimension model, and documenting how the geometry reacts in different condition.

108


The Cubes Drawing Things Together Course: Proffessor: Marcelyn Gow Bo w Wu Student:

Year:

Jie Yang Amada Xu 2013 Spring

109


Ch 10 Drawing Things Together _ Cubes

Cube Within Cube

In this project, our group decided to cast two cubes in different sizes, one within another one. These two cubes contain similar geometry, the outer cube has spiky faces and the inner cube is a pixelated version of the outer cube. By doing so, we could start to experience how these two geometry react differently to pigment and light.

110


Ch 10 Drawing Things Together _ Drawing

111


Ch 10 Drawing Things Together _ Model Photo

The inner cube reveals itself through the outer cube. The expression is settle and slight.

112


113


Ch 10 Drawing Things Together _ Cubes

The outer geometry is a deformed cube. It has spiky feature on each face.

The inner cube is pixelated, however, it remind the same geometry as the outer cube.

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Ch 10 Drawing Things Together _ Spiky

The outer cube responses to lighting more aggressively than inner cube. The spiky feature creates a glowing effect on the outer cube which significantly different from the pixelated cube.

115


Ch 11

Critical Study

The course introduces architecture history. It trains the student to look building in an architectural way, knowing the architecture purpose and background. The student also needs to research on an architect and study his work in final essay. The essay should study how culture, technology or concept could affect architecture based on the student's interest.

116


Metabolism Research Course: Proffessor: Student: Year:

History 3 Dora Epstein Jones Bo w Wu 2013 Spring

117


Ch 11 Critical Study _ Metabolism

Urban Metabolism A place to live is always important to every creature on earth. A better place to live could directly relate to the continuity of a species. In nature, we discover animals will gather around water resource or build shelter in instinct to better protect themselves. Human being does the same thing and develops this idea to a more comprehensive way. In ancient time human being would live in a range away from water resource, which avoided danger from other animals, and allowed them to have a stable water supply. At the same time, they could hunt the animals around the water resource for food supply. Later, as human being recognized the benefits of living as a group, they develop an urban society for the first time. Despite human being benefited from living in urban society, there are many side effects follows as urban society growth, because the urban development was not reposing as quickly as our demand increased. According to the “2008 United Nation Population Division” released on Jan 31, 2008 from United Nations Secretariat, there is 50% of the population in world live in urban area, and in 2050, there will be 70% of the population in the world will live in urban area. As more percentage of the population lives in urban area, we have higher expectation to urban development. However, urban development were much slower than our expectation to it, the development no longer satisfies our need, and it became crowed and decreases the environment quality. The construction of innovation of urban development should boosts to better serve the society today. One of the first and primary issues followed from urban development was the hyper density construction. According to “Slums of London, Engraving”, by Gustave Dore, 1850, it clearly documented the lacking of light and air in the city. After we step into industrial period, agriculture was no longer the primary life style. More and more people move to city and employed in industrial position. Land became more valuable as urban population growth. Buildings were built next to each other, and residents were not able to access natural sun light and air directly. In 1920, Le Corbusier started to adjust this problem in “Plan for Three Millions”.

118


Ch 11 Critical Study _ Metabolism

According to “Finding Lost Space: Theories of Urban Design”, “There were three important principles behind Corbusier’s influence on modern urban space……The opening up of urban space to allow for free flowing landscape, sun, and light.” In Plan for Three Millions, Corbusier created a cross shape high density sky scraper, which allowed natural sun light directly access interior space and it observed the programs around it and open up more urban space for landscaping. “Le Corbusier’s landscape of the modern city has resulted in buildings as isolated objects floating freely on useless plazas and unattractive parking lots. At the edge of the city, too, massive housing projects have been built with the same ideals of liberation through open space and the results have generally been inhuman and alienating”, according to “Finding Lost Space: Theories of Urban Design”. Despite Le Corbusier put in great effort to resolve the hyper density issue, his proposal was not widely accepted, because it is “Inhuman and alienating.” However, Corbusier’s sky scraper city is appreciated as a solution for the hyper density development. CIAM, which is a group of young architects influenced by Corbusier in 1940, developed a new urban typology named Matt building. They developed a new scenario for urban planning, carried an idea of scaling and responded to critique given to Corbusier. They were described as “someone who could organize the ‘mutual relation of parts’ involved in urbanism of focusing on the design of any individual parts,” according to “Urban Design” by Alex Krieger and William S. Saunders. They developed a systematic scheme, which constructed by a flexible geometry. The Geometry module would scale in different sizes and join together to manipulate a horizontal urban-like building. Carrying the same idea as Corbusier, the new urban typology building developed around the principle of healthy environment. The horizontal systematic scheme is able to improve natural ventilation and lighting, however, it appeared to be too simple for a complex urban community. The Matt design strategy most examinant in building and the idea was to have the building fully provide service as city. In 1960, architects in Japan further interpreted this idea in “Metabolism”. According to “Kenzo Tange and the Metabolism Movement: Urban Utopians of Modern Japan”, it “……raised fundamental questions concerning the relationship between the collective and the individual in postindustrial society”, and “…… discusses a series of urban concepts centered on fundamental notion of the city as an organic process, which constituted Metabolism’s primary contribution to the world of utopian planning.” 119


Ch 11 Critical Study _ Metabolism

After World War II, Japanese architects were looking for a different urban design strategy, designed with intension to create a “siteless” city. Japanese architects started an idea of a floating city, because Japan has limit land and high number of population. Kenzo Tange purposed a mega structure city in “Tokyo Bay Plan” in 1960. It is a bridge-like city, allowing automobile cross Tokyo bay. Residential and commercial programs were attached with the bridge. The plan purposed an organic city, and the city could growth and expanded on water as the population growth. Metabolism didn’t stop after The “Tokyo Bay Plan,” Arata Isozaki presented his interpretation of Metabolism in “Joint Core System,” which was also a modulated city. The city was floating bars with truss, and supported with two giant columns. Joint Core System also presented a flexible city that could expand over the water and possibly wrapped around the world. Understanding the innovating of Urbanism, and comparing the modern city development and the conceptual development in history, there is a gap between what had been build and what had been purposed. Architects never stop the development of urban planning. However, the construction of urban development is way behind the conceptual development. Our demand and expectation to urban development is dynamically increasing, but the urban construction response slowly. Now is the time we should boost the construction, otherwise, the development of urban area will no longer benefit our society, instead, would decreases our life quality.

120


Ch 11 Critical Study _ Metabolism

Citations • United Nations Secretariat. "2008 United Nation Population Division." UNITED NATIONS EXPERT GROUP MEETING ON POPULATION DISTRIBUTION, URBANIZATION, INTERNAL MIGRATION AND DEVELOPMENT. (2008): 2. Web.<http://www.un.org/esa/population/meetings/EGM_PopDist/P01_UNPopDiv.pdf> • Gustave, Dore. Slums of London, Engraving. 1850. Print. • Trancik, Roger. Finding Lost Space: Theories of Urban Design.Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1986. Print. • Krieger, Alex and William S. Saunders. Urban Design.University of Minnesota Press, 2009. •

Lin, Zhongjie. Kenzo Tange and the Metabolist Movement: Urban Utopias of Modern Japan. Routledge, 2010. Print.

121


Ch 12

History 3

The course introduces architecture history. It trains the student to look building in an architectural way, knowing the architecture purpose and background. The student also needs to research on an architect and study his work in final essay. The essay should study how culture, technology or concept could affect architecture based on the student's interest.

122


History Research Course: Proffessor: Student: Year:

History 3 Stephen Phillips Bo w Wu 2012 Spring

123


Ch 12 History 3 _ Research

Post Industry Architecture

Culture is always an important part of human being. Our culture witnesses what we had been through and provides evidence of who we are. Human being has existed over thousands of years, starting from a point that we can’t trace. Human being is different from other animals because we think and we build up our culture. Human being has an intention to reveal the essence of an object, and start to have it work for human being. At the beginning of human culture, architecture started as a shelter to protect human being from danger like other animal kinds. Architecture was the same for human being and other animals, but as human being started to seek for faith, architecture delineated. Architecture became a symbol that represented the authority given by god. Faith and religious was first appearing as a drawing in the cave, as human being builds up their culture, buildings were constructed to represent faith. Later on, human being started mass producing goods in order for everyone to live more convenient, which led to industrial century in history. In this period of time, efficiency became architecture’s design criteria. At the point when human being can purchase what they want instead of making it, they start to focus on ideas and service, which leads to postindustrial period. Post industry generates a culture perceiving concept and service more valuable than producing. At this moment in history, what does architecture take its place? “[Architecture] begins as an experimental language or an investigatory language or a language that expresses a kind of dissatisfaction with the way architecture is done becomes in fact another formula of practicing architecture.” Eric Owen Moss, a pioneer architect who rebuilds Culver City, answers this question in his conversation with IA&B. Architecture should not be limited to shape, form and materials, and form and materials could be embed with culture and social meaning. Architecture still exists because we are not satisfied with what have been done; therefore, we should rethink what have been done and what we could innovate. For example, human being first express their faith as a drawing in the cave, however, they were not satisfy with it. As their technology and culture grew, church and temple were constructed. At the period of post industry, Moss is not satisfied with the industrial warehouses, so he builds on top of the existing, creating a contexture with culture. He exposes and expresses materials, which

124


Ch 12 History 3 _ Research

should be designed to celebrate culture. He emphasizes the conflict and connection between industrial and postindustrial period. Eric Owen Moss expresses this architecture idea in Hayden tract, Culver City. Samitaur Smiths is the developer of Culver City. Samitaur has an idea to create a district, allowing people to have art and hope. Samitaur can’t find anyone else except Eric Owen Moss to understand his idea. Culver City was an industrial zone, yet as post industry arrives, the warehouses are abandoned, and the city is declined. In order to insert life in the city, the warehouses need to transform to something more attractive. Instead of tearing down the warehouses and making everything new, Moss finds a way to reuse the warehouses and keep the culture of Culver City. In many of Moss’s design in Hayden tract, “the box” is one of the buildings that reuse the existing warehouse and express the industrial culture. “The box” is a cut-open box on top of a warehouse. The box has a simple, strong and sharp geometry, which reminds people of efficiency of the factory. However, there are sliced, shifted and missing parts in the box to create a complex geometry. The transformation of the box doesn’t seem to be intentional, but it seems the pieces are falling apart from the box. It creates a sense of deconstruction, and the deconstructive box creates a feeling of a declining industrial culture. The box’s overall image feels like a torn down industrial factory falling on to the warehouse. The connection between the box and the warehouse appears unstable because the box stands in a degree. It seems to symbolize the conflict between industry and post industry, and it is the way Moss gains the contexture from the site and culture. The conflict between industry and post industry is expressed in the building

125


Ch 12 History 3 _ Research

architecturally. The unstable connection point could represent the turning moment from industry to post industry, when people focus on concepts and services production instead of goods production. The connection between “the box” and the warehouse is a steel truss. Comparing to the box, the steel truss is fairly small. Steel is one of the representations of industrial period. It is a hard and strong material, allowing construction more stable with lesser supports. In “the box”, Eric Owen Moss uses merely one steel truss to lift the massive concrete box. It is an exaggeration of the use of steel, reminding people of industrial period. The basic material for “the box” is concrete. The concrete is rough and intentionally not covered with fine finish layer. Moss keeps his honesty with the material -- the concrete has no distinction between inside and outside, and it is generally used in factory during industrial period. The material’s roughness with no decoration is referring to industrial culture’s efficiency. The building is mostly designed in rough material, but it still has a fine and clean material. Comparing to the rough massive concrete, the glass corner at the miss-part of the concrete is extremely contrasting. The glass corner is clean, pure and obvious. However, it is roughly screw in the concrete, and it overlaps with the concrete. The glass corner seems like a perfect square following the overall box geometry which is unparalleled to the earth, and the miss-part of the box is also a perfect square but it is parallel to the earth. This is another conflict in this project. However, it doesn’t seem awkward because the overlap area between the glass and the concrete transmit these two geometry. In postindustrial period, Eric Owen Moss builds his architecture by gaining contexture from culture. Architecture is no longer limited to pure geometry, form and materials. Moss is not satisfied with what had been done in industrial period, and he perceives culture as the most important motivation -- his design in Hayden tract is embeds with culture and social meaning. His design, for example “the box”, is constructed with the material from industrial period, but it serves for other purpose. Industrial culture was declined but “the box” is reborn for other culture – post industry.

126


Ch 12 History 3 _ Research

Footnotes: -Culver City Renaissance, Metropolis Magazine, Jan 2002 -Interview with IA&B, Investigation through Space and Time, IA&B, Oct 2011 -Tastemakers Frederick + Laurie Samitaur-Smith, LA Times Magazine, July 2002

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Bowen Wu Architecture Portfolio