The 13th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference

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Doctoral College

The 13th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference Wednesday 1 December 2021

www.bournemouth.ac.uk/pg-conference


Welcome

TO THE 13TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH CONFERENCE 2021 This annual event shines a spotlight the range of postgraduate research taking place at Bournemouth University across our four faculties, through a variety of platforms. There are oral presentations being delivered via Zoom and a virtual poster exhibition on the conference webpage. We also have an on campus hub with opportunities to network with fellow PGRs, the Doctoral College and wider colleagues. The conference will start with opening remarks from the Heads of the Doctoral College Dr Fiona Knight and Dr Julia Taylor. This year we have the pleasure of being joined by recent BU PhD graduate Dr Samreen Ashraf as our conference keynote speaker, who shares her insights into juggling multiple identities successfully. You can read her biography and keynote abstract on page 3.

I would like to thank those who have contributed to the co-ordinating and delivery of the conference this year, to all of our presenters and poster exhibitors, and of course to you for attending and showing your support to our postgraduate research community, helping nurture a positive and encouraging postgraduate research culture here at Bournemouth University. I hope you find the conference interesting, engaging and inspiring. I look forward to sharing the day with you. Natalie Stewart (Research Skills & Development Officer) @NatStewartBU Doctoral College Conference Organiser

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME & ABSTRACTS On page 4 you will discover the conference programme, followed by headline details of each oral presentation presenter and their abstracts. On pages 16 - 27 you can see the posters being exhibited on the website, followed by their full poster abstracts. To view full abstracts for oral presentation and posters and oral presentations visit our dedicated conference webpage.

bournemouth.ac.uk/pg-conference

Twitter Share conference highlights on twitter using the hashtags #BUPGRConf21 | #BUDoctoralCollege Event feedback Each year we open an anonymous feedback form following the conference. This year to receive a richer picture of how the conference is being received this feedback form will be open throughout the day. To provide feedback on what you are enjoying or what you think could be improved please submit your feedback via www.bournemouth.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/BUPGRConf21


KEYNOTE BIOGRAPHY & ABSTRACT

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Dr Samreen Ashraf, Principal Academic in Marketing Bournemouth University Business School Dr Samreen Ashraf is a Principal Academic in Marketing, at the Bournemouth University Business School. She has secured her PhD in Consumer Identity and has an MBA with a specialisation in Marketing and Financial services. Samreen has presented her research at renowned national and international conferences and has published her work in peer reviewed journals. Samreen has also been invited as a guest speaker at the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) seminar series, Chartered Institute of Insurance, Institute of Directors and various Universities to present her research. She has also been on the guest editorial panel for Journal of Financial Services Marketing. Samreen is a Senior Fellow of Higher Education Academy. She is the first Pakistani to have won the Sir Jane K. Fenyo Award for best research paper at the Academy of Marketing Science Conference, Vancouver, Canada. Samreen has also been interviewed by SAGE publishers for their distinguished educators/researchers theme. Recently, Samreen was on the judging panel of 2020 Stevie® Awards for Women in Business. You can view Samreen’s full academic profile on the BU Staff Profile pages.

Juggling Multiple Identities Successfully ‘I need to conduct my research’, ‘Let me prepare for my teaching’, ‘I need some me time’, ‘Family time is the most precious for me’, ‘Where to start my job search/my next promotion’. We go through these and many such similar thoughts on daily basis in an effort to juggle all areas of our life successfully. These sentiments hint towards various labels we attach to ourselves and thus feel the need to act upon them in the best possible manner. However, they also raise various questions. For example, do we know who we are, how would we describe ourselves and what determines our behaviour in certain situations? This talk will enable you to assess yourself and find ways to navigate through these multiple identities in your daily lives which sometimes could be conflicting in nature. Drawing upon from my research on ‘multiple identities’ and my PhD journey, I will share the benefits of having multiple identities and the ways to utilise them in our best interest.

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CONFERENCE PROGRAMME 09:30

Opening remarks Dr Fiona Knight and Dr Julia Taylor Heads of the Doctoral College

09:45 – 10:45

Session 1 oral presentations

09:45 – 10:00

Bronwyn Sherriff Perceived influence of contextual factors for chronic low back pain: Is there consensus?

10:00 – 10:15

Herschel Pandit Consumer perceptions on luxury products: An exploratory study of Indian millennials

10:15 – 10:30

Maria Abdel Karim Empowering Arab women: Female voices in Lebanese cinema

10:30 – 10:45

Selin Gurgun Combatting misinformation through social media design

10:45 – 11:00

Break

11:00 – 12:00

Session 2 oral presentations

11:00 – 11:15

Adam Witt Determinants of the gold price

11:15 – 11:30

Tanya Andrewes Registered nurses’ experiences of using open education resources as continuing professional development for revalidation with the Nursing and Midwifery Council

11:30 – 11:45

Joseph McMullen Particulate matter: Regulating an invisible killer

11:45 – 12:00

Selin Sonmez Writing the wrongs: On the role and effectiveness of apology as a remedy for international crimes and historical injustices.

12:00 – 13:00

Break and Campus Hub


5 13:00 – 14:00

Keynote Dr Samreen Ashraf, Principal Academic Juggling Multiple Identities Successfully.

14:00 – 15:00

Session 3 oral presentations

14:00 – 14:15

Aziean Binti Jamin Are we there yet? A perspective for people without disabilities to support disability inclusion practices in a workplace

14:15 – 14:30

Harriet Sams Archaeotherapy: Utilising heritage for healing

14:30 – 14:45

Rutherford The self as auteur: An interpretative phenomenological investigation of self-reflective photography

14:45 – 15:00

Debora Almeida A change in infant CPR training to maximise skill retention

15:00 – 15:15

Break

15:15 – 16:15

Session 4 oral presentations

15:15 – 15:30

Imran Khan Digital poetry and restorative experience

15:30 – 15:45

Louise Mew YOUNG HIP: An exploration into the young patients’ (<50 years) expectations following primary total hip replacement (THR): What outcomes are important to them?

15:45 – 16:00

Kevin Davidson The lived experience of gaming and gambling: Guiding practitioners’ understanding for supporting children and young people

16:00 – 16:15

Claire Hannah-Russell Understanding Stormbreak: Building a programme theory of a teacher-led whole school approach to promoting mentally healthy movement amongst children

16:15

Closing remarks

16:15

Campus Hub networking

Visit www.bournemouth.ac.uk/pg-conference to view posters


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ORAL PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS

Adam Witt (PhD, BUBS) Determinants of the gold price My thesis is on the determinants of the gold price. There are three main factors which influence the gold price. These are inflation hedging, speculation and macroeconomic determinants. This thesis also includes determinants of the silver price, a more niche area of research which forms the research gap. I model for volatility and correlation between gold and silver prices over regime periods. No paper has used the modelling specification within this thesis to estimate volatility and correlation between gold and silver price. The results are compared to similar models. Overall, this entire thesis links to a greater worldwide macroeconomic setting to discover whether fiat currency worldwide since 1971 which severed the link between gold and currency has meant that the worlds reserve currency (US Dollar) has been successful given the 100% failure rate of all fiat currencies used throughout history. Traditionally, gold and silver are seen as safe havens.

Aziean Binti Jamin (PhD, BUBS) Are we there yet? A perspective from people without disabilities to support disability inclusion practices in a workplace This research addresses a gap in the literature on inclusion practises for people with disabilities in service sectors. To date, existing HRM research has concentrated on policies and organisational practices from managerial and employer levels. To strengthen inclusive practises, further investigations into employee attitudes and the elimination of discriminatory behaviour is obligated. Therefore, the research question investigates how people without disabilities positively improve the inclusion of people with disabilities in the organisation. The research methodology is interpretivism in nature, focusing on semi-structured interviews to elicit information about treatment towards people with disabilities in the workplace. A case study approach will frame conversations with co-workers and supervisors. The findings have significant implications for understanding individuals and groups behaviour within an organisation, particularly with regards to creating an inclusive work environment for this marginalised group. The study will contribute to social and attitude changes, strengthens employee relationships, and increases productivity.

Bronwyn Sherriff (PhD, FHSS) Perceived influence of contextual factors for chronic low back pain: Is there consensus? Placebo mediated analgesia is a reduction in pain arising from elements within the clinical context, including patient’s and practitioner’s characteristics/beliefs, the patient-practitioner relationship, treatment characteristics, and the healthcare environment. This study aimed to explore the perceived influence, validity, and self-reported usage of these contextual factors (CFs) by UK-based private-practice manual/physical therapists during routine care for patients with chronic low back pain. A two-round online Delphi-consensus survey was employed to generate expert ideas, evaluate identified approaches, and subsequently rate agreement levels. All five main types of CFs were perceived as valid approaches capable of influencing patient’s outcomes, but there were varied opinions, and no overall agreement regarding four sub-categories (i.e., practitioner expertise/credibility, appointment features, visual/verbal feedback, décor). Furthermore, low levels of confidence were reported for specific techniques (e.g., cognitive-behavioural approach) particularly in the absence of supplementary training. These findings have notable implications for higher education, continuous professional development, and translational research.

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Claire Hannah-Russell (PhD, BUBS) Understanding Stormbreak: Building a programme theory of a teacher-led whole school approach to promoting mentally healthy movement amongst children Whole school approaches to address children’s mental health and wellbeing, including physical activity or movement approaches, can exert greater influence by explaining their programme theory. This is the theoretical underpinning that explains what works, for whom a programme works, under what circumstances it works, and why (Pawson, 2006). The ‘issue’, ‘intervention’, and ‘outcomes’ are often reported as causal sequences, which leaves the potential connections and conditions around ‘change’ amongst children’s mental health and wellbeing, unexplained. Using mixed methods and Q methodology, this presentation explores the blending of scientific realism and social constructionism to address the gap in programme theory through implementing a realist approach to the evaluation of Stormbreak – an intervention that mobilises social influence to promote mentally healthy movement amongst children. The research theoretically explains how teachers and children can lead and powerfully transform culture change through embedding and exemplifying positive group interests, to foster mental health and wellbeing.

Debora Almeida (PhD, FHSS) A change in infant CPR training to maximise skill retention Infant cardiac arrest is a significant public health problem as survival is extremely low. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a key aspect to save the patient’s life, but the quality is consistently poor due to skill decay after one to six months post-training. The aim of this quantitative, prospective, observational study was to investigate whether an individualised, outcome-based approach to infant CPR (iCPR) retraining could result in skill retention over a 10-month period. We enrolled 118 participants who completed the initial iCPR training followed by a 2-minute assessment on a manikin. The outcome of this assessment defined the trajectory of retraining/re-assessment of each participant throughout the study to achieve competence. The results suggested that when iCPR competence was achieved, high percentage of skill retention was possible up to 10 months. Our tailored approach to iCPR retraining based on individual performance, can maximise iCPR quality and potentially save more lives.

Harriet Sams (PhD, FST) Archaeotherapy: Utilising heritage for healing Archaeotherapy is an emerging discipline which merges cultural heritage therapy, human ecology, psychology, and ecotherapy. It has potential therapeutic applications for wellbeing practitioners and mental health professionals, as well as assist in developing concepts of public value for archaeology, heritage management, community and social cohesion, ecology and landscape management. The research will explore people’s current experience of relationship and connection that may be viewed as therapeutic at sites of various nature: ancient healing sites as well as sites that are more challenging, such as open cast coal mines, rubbish dumps, clear cut forests and polluted rivers. This is an inductive phenomenological study of a limited number of participants’ lived experiences.

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Herschel Pandit (PhD, BUBS) Consumer perceptions on luxury products: An exploratory study of Indian millennials What are the key drivers under functional, societal and individual value which influences Indian millennials to purchase luxury goods? To understand which dimension of functional, individual or societal value is perceived more strongly within the Indian luxury market. The methodology of this research project will be mixed methods. Stage 1 will consist of in-depth interviews of Indian millennials (aged 22-38); stage 2 will use questionnaires. The reason for using mixed methods is because it provides more rich comprehensive data as opposed to a singular method of research. Mixed methods also provide methodological flexibility because you can create adaptable study designs such as exploratory in this case.The original contribution of my research project aims to signify aspects such as perceived brand authenticity continuity, cultural collectivism, innovativeness and the bestowing of luxury goods whereby no structured theoretical basis has been acknowledged yet.

Imran Khan (PhD, FMC) Digital poetry and restorative experience This is a diachronic research project that diverges from standard literary-aesthetic discussions of poetry and instead adopts a sociological approach to digital poetry. The primary research question is, what is the scope of digital poetry as an avenue for mental health advice and emotional support? One central sub-question concerns how the infrastructures and conventions of social media platforms shape the communities that form on them. The study has thus far established that individuals are turning to digital poetry as a form of bibliotherapy, and using the communities linked to the poetry to communicate thoughts that would have traditionally been directed to a healthcare professional. However, there is an ambiguity to digital poetry whereby, whilst it can be used as a means to address particular emotional traumas, digital poetry is only a part-solution because it brings with it a number of limitations and exclusions.

Joseph McMullen (PhD, FST) Particulate matter: Regulating an invisible killer. Research indicates that exposure to atmospheric pollutants diminishes immune responses and increases viral penetration and replication. Specifically, particulate matter – microscopic solids and liquids suspended in air represents an unseen and unregulated threat to global human life and welfare. There is no evidence of a safe level of exposure, and particulate matter is linked to respiratory, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, neurological, and paediatric developmental issues. In spite of this, domestic ambient particulate concentrations are unregulated. This work utilises particulate sampling in order to suggest the creation of a proactive regulatory framework informed by science and integrating post-hoc monitoring. Punitive action is suggested for noncompliance with the proposed legal obligations in addition to punitive measures beyond financial penalties.

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Kevin Davidson (MRes, FST)The lived experience of gaming and gambling: Guiding practitioners’ understanding for supporting children and young people Recent innovations in gaming technology have raised concerns about gambling-type harms for children and young people (CYP) who play video games. Whereas alcohol and drug addiction are known to be associated with health risks, there is less awareness of the potential risks of gambling-like behaviour within video games, and the support services available to young people and their parents. Four focus groups were conducted with practitioners and people with previous lived experience of gaming and gambling harm in the UK. The results highlighted that specific aspects of game design may increase risks of harm, particularly for vulnerable groups of CYP. These findings carry implications for practitioners seeking to support CYP and also for policy makers and regulators who are seeking to address this issue, including a range of recommendations within a whole-systems public health approach to safeguarding CYP from the risks of gaming and gambling-related harm.

Louise Mew (PhD, FHSS) YOUNG HIP: An exploration into the young patients’ (<50 years) expectations following primary total hip replacement (THR): What outcomes are important to them? The incidence of younger patients undergoing THR is rapidly increasing. However, the current care and knowledge is almost exclusively based on the needs of older patients (>65), and there is scarce attention or research examining potential differing requirements of the growing younger population. An initial Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) survey was undertaken to identify if this was an area requiring more research. The response to this survey was overwhelmingly large and confirmed that the priorities and expectations of the young patient undergoing THR required exploring. The YOUNG HIP Study has recruited 9 participants at a single hospital. Using an Interpretative Phenomenological Approach (IPA) qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted at 3 timepoints in the patient journey; pre-operative, 6-weeks post-surgery and 6-months post-surgery. The study findings will be published in an orthopaedic journal to highlight any areas in which care can be improved and outcomes optimised for this patient population.

Maria Abdel Karim (PhD, FMC) Empowering Arab women: Female voices in Lebanese cinema How do women filmmakers in Lebanon enable a ‘female voice’ through their films and what issues do they explore? This thesis explores the representations of women in Lebanese films directed by women with respect to socio-political and cultural changes within Lebanese society during the period between 1980 - 2020. By utilising textual and comparative film analysis and conducting semi-structured interviews with the directors, this research will focus on exploring the themes that emerge from women’s fiction films in Lebanon such as women’s sexuality, desires, forced/arranged marriages, activism, freedom, and empowerment. Films will be analysed in conjunction with theoretical framework of feminist film theories which enables evaluating if the films fall under the notion of feminist cinema or not. The relationship between feminism and Lebanese cinema has not been adequately explored, thus this thesis will address this gap and present an original contribution to the field of film studies in Lebanon.

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Rutherford (PhD, FMC) The Self as Auteur: An interpretative phenomenological investigation of self-reflective photography In addition to snapshots of friends and family, holidays and special events, many of us also photograph things – but without understanding why it attracted our attention. We might photograph two children playing in a park, an old house, or a bicycle in the grass – but we don’t know those children, or the people who lived in that house, and that’s not our bicycle. This project takes the position that, when our attention is intuitively attracted to a scene with which we have no conscious, personal connection, it may be that we have recognised a symbolic description of something below the horizon of our conscious awareness to which our mind is trying to bring to our attention. This project investigates the ways in which we make sense of those scenes to which our attention was intuitively attracted, and how we attempt to integrate their possible significance into our personal narratives.

Selin Gurgun (PhD, FST) Combatting misinformation through social media design Use of Social Network Sites (SNS) for information seeking has amplified the dissemination of misinformation. One of the promising strategies to mitigate the problem is challenging other users’ posts on SNS. However, such social challenges are rare. Two factors are identified to explain why people do not challenge misinformation. First, users may hold negative views about challenging other users. Second, features for challenging misinformation are not apparent in the design of SNS. This research aims to analyze users’ perceptions, whether these perceptions discourage them from engaging and then to explore, devise and test SNS features that empower users to challenge misinformation. The main contributions of the study are in two aspects. First, it will be the first study to investigate reasons why people avoid challenging misinformation. Second, this research could be a useful aid for empowering users to express their concerns on cyberspace when they encounter misinformation without feeling constrained.

Selin Sonmez (PhD, FMC) Writing the wrongs: On the role and effectiveness of apology as a remedy for international crimes and historical injustices. Can the present provide an effective apology for the past? Can successors apologise on behalf of their ancestors, and can indirect victims forgive on behalf of theirs? This research examines the issue and question surrounding present states, international organisations, or religious institutions’ obligation to apologise for the wrongdoings of its predecessors. Literature surrounding the role of apology is predominantly centred around studying effectiveness and whether states should apologise for the past. A gap in research is present as there is a need to attempt to define apology clearly and systematically within law. Through a combination of doctrinal legal research and compilation of case-studies, this thesis aims to not only incorporate the “effectiveness of apology” debate, but also to produce a comprehensive typology of apology in international law. This will serve as a useful tool for states and international bodies in determining how to approach apologising if they so choose to.

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Tanya Andrewes (PhD, FHSS) Registered nurses’ experiences of using open education resources as continuing professional development for revalidation with the Nursing and Midwifery Council My research uses the constructivist grounded theory method to contribute to the professional knowledge base in nursing and in open education, seeking to discover how nurses use open education resources (OERs) for continuing professional development (CPD). This presentation summarises my recent systematic review, that both situates my research within the existing knowledge base and that identifies a clear gap in knowledge. The literature search returned primary research papers in the broad areas of OER development and use, OERS for nursing and healthcare education and OERs for professional development (CPD). Within the data, four themes were revealed, these being ‘incentives for OER use’, ‘engagement with OERs’, ‘impact of OERs on the student experience’ and ‘barriers and challenges of OER use’. In the presentation, I will expand on the themes discovered and reflect on the influence of these themes on my research as I go forward to data collection.

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PRE-RECORDED PRESENTATIONS

Anna Marsh (PhD, FHSS) Midwives and social media: Friend request declined? Dennis Seaman (PhD, BUBS) The corporate governance effects of the audit committee informal process: Investigating practice in an emerging economy Ellis Day (PhD, FHSS) The impact of current care delivery models for older people with complex care needs at the Day Hospital, Christchurch Hina Tariq (PhD, FHSS) Development and content validation of contracture assessment screening tool Kelsie Fletcher (PhD, FHSS) The development of a constructivist grounded theory examining the lived experiences of disaster nurses deployed internationally Lucy Childs (PhD, FMC) The quest for life and intelligence in digital puppets Rushan Arshad (PhD, FST) Towards the development of a simulation framework for collaborative process in context of industry 4.0 Sydney Ochieng (PhD, FMC) Visual communication in social marketing for social change: Leveraging microfinance poverty reduction narrative through social marketing Tanya Andrewes (PhD, FHSS) Registered nurses’ experiences of using open education resources as continuing professional development for revalidation with the Nursing and Midwifery Council

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PRE-RECORDED PRESENTATIONS ABSTRACTS

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Anna Marsh (PhD, FHSS) Midwives and social media: Friend request declined? How do midwives use social media within their professional role? Phase 1: Review of literature around midwives’ views and experiences of using social media. Phase 2: Content Analysis of midwives’ Instagram posts of birth from the UK, USA, Australia and New Zealand. Influencers identified and data scraped using online tool. Scoping review themes: Knowledge Sharing, Community and Reluctance Amongst Nurses and Midwives to Engage, with subthemes of Fear and Uncertainty of What to Say. There is currently little research around social media and the midwifery profession, despite research showing that 89% of women turn to it for advice during pregnancy (Baker and Yang 2018). Outcomes will inform midwives’ practices and provide the foundations for further research into the area, with the long-term aim of creating more practical guidance for midwives.

Dennis Seaman (PhD, BUBS) The corporate governance effects of the audit committee informal process: Investigating practice in an emerging economy The audit committee role has become demanding in recent times due to past high corporate failures. Scholars have explored audit committees’ characteristics, examining attributes of independence, size, expertise, diligence in association with financial reporting quality. Nevertheless, empirical findings have remained inconclusive, as much research has been quantitative and either used archival data or examined associations through published statements. Also, the processes that condition audit committee activities and governance outcomes remained under explored. Researchers argued that the inconsistency is due to the lack of understanding of the actual processes audit committees employ. Undertaking 21 interviews of Nigerian committee members and others who attend committee meetings, this study finds that the duality of Nigerian audit committees and composition of members condition the audit committee processes and how members perceive their role. The study contributes to the literature the dynamics of having shareholders as audit committee members unlike the case in other jurisdictions.

Ellis Day (PhD, FHSS) The impact of current care delivery models for older people with complex care needs at the Day Hospital, Christchurch There is a growing need to understand the impact of current care methods as well as designing future initiatives which cater for a rapidly ageing population. This is of particular interest on a local level – and addressed by the Day Hospital, Christchurch. This specialist centre champions care by delivering dedicated services to aid it’s principal user – older people within it’s catchment. Meeting the evolving needs of this group requires a significant amount of versatility, as witnessed with the Covid-19 pandemic. Certain high-risk settings had to re-think their operational schedules to minimise exposure for those individuals who were particularly susceptible to infection. This research aims to examine the effectiveness of these current care practices and to inform on the feasibility of a new intervention. This will be achieved through interviews with both clinical stakeholders, as well as the intended recipients of the care – older people with complex care needs.

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Hina Tariq (PhD, FHSS) Development and content validation of contracture assessment screening tool This study aimed to evaluate the content validity of Contracture Assessment Screening Tool (CAST), (originally constructed by Dorset Healthcare University Foundation Trust) through analysis of the available literature and 2) expert opinion. A systematic review was conducted to identify factors associated with the development and progression of joint contractures in adults. The literature search was conducted on MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, and EMBASE. Studies with participants aged ≥18 which assessed contracture as an outcome were included. Two reviewers screened citations, performed quality assessment and data extraction. Thirty-four studies were included in the synthesis. The findings of this review were used to design an online two-round Delphi consensus survey which was completed by thirty experts who ranked the items on a Likert scale for inclusion in CAST. A validated CAST will allow the identification of adult residents of care homes who are either at risk of developing or worsening of joint contractures.

Kelsie Fletcher (PhD, FHSS) The development of a constructivist grounded theory examining the lived experiences of disaster nurses deployed internationally What is it like to be a nurse working in international disaster management? Qualitative research strengths are exploratory or descriptive, and consider participants’ frame of reference, context and setting. Grounded theory moves beyond description and considers the why; the meaning and actions associated with the description and construct new concepts that may explicate the experience. This approach is particularly relevant in an underresearched area of interest such as disaster nursing. Five initial in-depth interviews have been conducted. The use of line-by-line coding and constant comparison have been used. Theoretical sampling is developing, and sensitizing concepts are strengthening through early analysis. The gap in research in experiences of disaster nurses highlights the need to contribute to the growing body of evidence. Comprising the largest discipline of the health care workforce, the value added by understanding their roles, responsibilities and experiences can help shape the future of disaster nursing.

Lucy Childs (PhD, FMC) The quest for life and intelligence in digital puppets This study uses digital puppetry practice to explore questions around the intersection of computer technology and humanity. Digital puppetry is a technique that puts the human-in-the-loop by combining motion capture, algorithms and puppetry while permitting improvisation and collaboration giving scope for spontaneity. The limited movement palettes called for by the method produce expressivity in computer graphics objects that not only creates the illusion they are alive and thinking but are flawed and vulnerable. Using a practice-asresearch methodology that provides moments for reflection during the process of creation as well as reflection on the creative outcomes, digital puppetry performance is presented as a way to explore how the Ur-narrative can attenuate our fears surrounding artificial life and intelligence. This research contributes to discourses surrounding critically reflective artistic research practices, human computer interfaces, artificial general intelligence, a pro-puppetry thesis and art and technology as mirrors reflecting what it is to be human.

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Rushan Arshad (PhD, FST) Towards the development of a simulation framework for collaborative process in context of industry 4.0 The landscape of modern industrial systems is changing with more complex systems using technologies like IoT, Big Data and AI are coming into picture, particularly towards industry 4.0. In such complex systems, errors and anomalies can prove to be very costly if they are not detected at an early stage. Simulation provides a mechanism to test, detect and minimize the errors at design phase. However, simulation of such systems is beyond the scope of traditional simulation software. Therefore, in this project, we aim to develop a simulation framework that can simulate the integration of business and manufacturing parts of a modern industrial system, possible involving multiple organizations. Design Science methodology is used for the development of the simulation framework. To support confidentiality when simulating collaborative processes involving multiple organizations, federated simulation Is used.

Sydney Ochieng (PhD, FMC) Visual communication in social marketing for social change: Leveraging microfinance poverty reduction narrative through social marketing How would visual communication study and social semiotic analysis leverage the microfinance institutions’ social marketing and poverty reduction discourse? Contextualised on micro-finance efforts in eradicating poverty in Africa through micro-credits, specifically in Kenya: This study examines the empowerment effects and importance of visual communication in social marketing. It discusses the persuasive impacts of visual metaphors in microfinance advertisements built for social change in social belief, attitude, and awareness. The persuasion should impact how and why the poor should participate in the micro-finance poverty alleviation efforts. The concept of poverty is extensive but fragmented; multidimensional, complex, individual or context-specific and absolute or relative. However, this study initiates to look at the financial and social dimensions of poverty in the slums of Kenya’s urban centres; hence, the critical analysis of micro-finance marketing and communication theories centred on visual communication to achieve financial inclusion and build social capital for the poor.

Tanya Andrewes (PhD, FHSS) Registered nurses’ experiences of using open education resources as continuing professional development for revalidation with the Nursing and Midwifery Council My research uses the constructivist grounded theory method to contribute to the professional knowledge base in nursing and in open education, seeking to discover how nurses use open education resources (OERs) for continuing professional development (CPD). This presentation summarises my recent systematic review, that both situates my research within the existing knowledge base and that identifies a clear gap in knowledge. The literature search returned primary research papers in the broad areas of OER development and use, OERS for nursing and healthcare education and OERs for professional development (CPD). Within the data, four themes were revealed, these being ‘incentives for OER use’, ‘engagement with OERs’, ‘impact of OERs on the student experience’ and ‘barriers and challenges of OER use’. In the presentation, I will expand on the themes discovered and reflect on the influence of these themes on my research as I go forward to data collection.

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#PGRConf21


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VIRTUAL POSTER EXHIBITION

Abier Hamidi (PhD, FHSS) HIV epidemic in Libya: Identifying gaps Calvin Laursen (PhD, FST) Exploring ambiguity through situational models Ceyda Kiyak (MRes, FST) Minimising online gambling related harm through persuasive technologies Daniel Dimanov (PhD, FST) MONCAE: Multi-Objective Neuroevolution of Convolutional Autoencoders Dola Akinniranye (PhD, BUBS) National culture, sub-cultures and work-related ethical values: Is there a link or not? Elie Charabieh (PhD, FST) Recidivism risk factors in Lebanese prisoners Faisal Alsubaie (PhD, BUBS) The effect of cultural tightness-looseness on tourism destination choice for Western Europeans: Evidence from Saudi Arabia Hayden Scott-Pratt (PhD, FST) and Sigrid Osborne (MRes, FST) Unlikely allies: Combining archaeobotanical and metallurgical material in archaeological research. An example from the Iron Age settlement at Hengistbury Head Iram Bibi (PhD, FST) Reliability, validity, and feasibility of a generic quality of life scale for use directly with community dwelling older people with dementia Jack Wieland (PhD, FST) Investigating the role of microsatellite instability in reproduction Jordan King (MRes, FST) Exploring nostalgic experiences in video games Juncheng Wang (PhD, FST) A model design for virtual idol based on audience analysis Katie Thompson (PhD, FST) The effect of insects on elephant-induced tree damage within a small, fenced reserve in South Africa Kazeem Balogun (PhD, FST) Overview of blackblaze HDD analysis for predictive maintenance Liz Bailey (PhD, FMC) Is history repeating itself?

Visit www.bournemouth.ac.uk/pg-conference to view posters


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Maureen Kehinde (PhD, BUBS) A qualitative inquiry investigation of policy-practice decoupling factors of environmental sustainability in universities: A case study of North-East Scottish universities Megan Jadzinski (PhD, FHSS) How are Fitness to Practise processes applied in the Higher Education Institutions, in relation to Health and Care Profession Council or Nursing and Midwifery Council healthcare courses? Mirte Korpershoek (PhD FST) Rock art as an environmental archive Nurudeen Adesina (PhD, FHSS) Effectiveness and usability of digital tools to support dietary self-management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A systematic review Omowonuola Okunnu (PhD, FMC) A comparative study of the interconnectedness of religion and politics in Northern and Southern Nigeria: The role of literacy level Penny Wells (PhD, FMC) How people relate to environmental disaster in contemporary literature: An ecocritical approach Rabeea Maqsood (PhD, FHSS) The association between Combat Related Traumatic Injury and Heart Rate Variability in the UK Armed Forces personnel and veterans – a quantitative secondary data analysis of the ADVANCE study Rosie Harper (PhD, FHSS) Nudging: A theoretical concept for a very practical approach to pelvic floor muscle training Sitsada Sartamorn (PhD, BUBS) Hybrid social media marketing: How metaverse and other cutting-edge technologies impact on consumer experiences by reducing borders between real and virtual space in the Thai organic food market Samantha Everard (MRes, FHSS) How do people with multiple disabilities experience, engage with and participate in self-employment support Shell Smith (PhD, FHSS) Does motorcyclists’ identification, perception, and knowledge towards risk change regarding their motorcycling qualifications and experience? Taalia Nadeem (PhD, BUBS) Understanding the social representation of uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAVs): How public and stakeholder views empower or constrain pathways to adoption Zhiqi Li (PhD, FMC) Deep learning for scene flow estimation: Methods and applications

Visit www.bournemouth.ac.uk/pg-conference to view posters


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VIRTUAL POSTER ABSTRACTS

Abier Hamidi (PhD, FHSS) HIV epidemic in Libya: Identifying gaps HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) became a public issue in Libya after the infection of 400 children in El-Fatih Hospital in 1988. Due to the civil war, social and religious barriers, HIV prevalence is hard to establish, but it is generally believed to be increasing. This review (a) assesses the size and scope of the available literature on the HIV epidemic in Libya; and, (b) identifies the nature and extent of research conducted to date. A comprehensive search was performed using PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Academic Search Ultimate, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar. Primary research studies and official reports that are exclusively on Libya published during 1988 -2021 were considered. In total 25 studies were included. The literature suggests there is an increase in HIV infection rates in Libya. Culturally sensitive research will assist in reducing HIV stigma and decreasing infection rates.

Calvin Laursen (PhD, FST) Exploring ambiguity through situational models Unlike syntactic ambiguity, as commonly seen in garden path sentences, situational ambiguity arises not from the language in the text but from the situation the text describes. We created ambiguous and non-ambiguous texts using subject/object relationships, as found in work relating to mental models, to create situationally ambiguous texts not completely unlike a garden path sentence. In contrast to the former, questions following these situational models do not ask readers which possibility they prefer rather tests if readers became aware of the ambiguity (were they aware there was more than one interpretation of the described situation). We investigate the differences in how situational ambiguity is realised and whether the subject of the text matters. Initial findings suggest situational ambiguity is hard for readers to detect and models of situations in real space are harder to answer than models that don’t. We propose that readers do not realise ambiguity while reading the stimulus but only when combining two independently retained object relationships during the question phase.

Ceyda Kiyak (MRes, FST) Minimising online gambling related harm through persuasive technologies How effective are the various types of interactions in breaking through disassociation of at-risk and social gamblers? After identifying whether the participant is at-risk or social gambler with The Problem Gambling Severity Index on an online survey, fifty participants will be invited to the lab experiment. Participants will be given two tablet devices: on the first device they will play the gambling session with virtual money for 20 min; on the second device, participants will be randomised to five different interactions (experimental groups: cognitive tasks, interactive dialogue, infographic; control groups: neutral interaction, no interaction). Participants will then complete Jacob’s Disassociation Questionnaire, acceptability, and demographic questionnaire. The results of this research may enable prevention and intervention strategies in problem gambling. Moreover, it will allow gambling industry and policymakers to better develop responsible gambling applications and may even lead a policy change.

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Daniel Dimanov (PhD, FST) MONCAE: Multi-Objective Neuroevolution of Convolutional Autoencoders With this poster, we present a novel neuroevolutionary method to identify the architecture and hyperparameters of convolutional autoencoders, which has been published in an ICLR workshop. Remarkably, we used a hypervolume indicator employing neuroevolution for in the context of neural architecture search for autoencoders, for the first time to the best of our knowledge. We rely on novel decoding of the architecture to automatically reconstruct the decoder from the encoding. We tested our approach with MNIST, Fashion-MNIST and CIFAR10 to verify the performance of the approach. Results show that images were compressed by a factor of more than 10, while still retaining enough information to achieve image classification for the majority of the tasks. Thus, this new approach can be used to speed up the AutoML pipeline for image compression and much more.

Dola Akinniranye (PhD, BUBS) National Culture, Sub-cultures and Work-related ethical values: Is there a link or not? In the past, researchers have linked work-related ethical values to national cultures. However, there is limited research on sub-cultural variations within a national culture. Additionally, research is needed on the intraethnic cultural differences in Nigeria and the UK. Hence, this research will investigate the link between national cultures, sub-cultures and work-related ethical values. Using a quantitative method, the GLOBE’s measurement will be adopted to answer the question: Can sub- cultural variations impact work-related ethical values in spite of the national culture? The research will build on the findings of House et al 2004 on variations across national and societal cultures, and Hofstede 1980’s on national culture’s differences. It will enhance research on multiethnic diversity within a national culture by investigating intra-cultural differences’ impact on work-ethical values in Nigeria and the UK. Finally, four under-researched dimensions of the GLOBE will be measured in both countries national and regional cultures.

Elie Charabieh (PhD, FST) Recidivism risk factors in Lebanese prisoners Given the high cost of reoffending (e.g., direct cost of imprisonment, cost of crime victimisation, exacerbating overcrowding in prisons) this novel research aims to answer the following: What are the risk/protective factors for recidivism in prisoners in Lebanon? To answer this research question, I use a mix of quantitative (dataset of over 45,000 individuals released from Lebanese prisons between 2013-2018) and qualitative research (in-depth video-recorded interviews with 10-15 notorious prisoners). As seen in Western studies, preliminary findings suggest that males, younger age (18-29), being divorced, not completing any schooling, having been previously imprisoned, having 3 or more criminal cases, and being charged with a drug/theft related crime, significantly increase the reimprisonment risk. Notable differences in reimprisonment rates were also found across nationalities and crime types. Knowledge of these factors will help the Lebanese government target high-risk offenders and improve their chances of leading crime-free lives upon their release.

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Faisal Alsubaie (PhD, BUBS) The effect of cultural tightness-looseness on tourism destination choice for Western Europeans: Evidence from Saudi Arabia This study addresses the question “How do the changes in cultural tightness–looseness (CTL) influence the perceptions of Western European tourists and their willingness to visit Saudi Arabia (SA)”? To answer this research question, the study adopts a research design of two phases sequential mixed method; (1) first phase employs a quantitative survey to measurement the tourists’ perceptions of the recent changes in cultural tightness (i.e., the strength of cultural norms and tolerance for deviant behaviour) and their impacts on their intention to visit SA. (2) the second phase employs a qualitative semi-structured interviews to get an in-depth explanation of the findings of the first phase of the study. This study contributes to the literature by developing a framework using CTL theory to investigate the effects of CTL on tourism destination choice in a Saudi context which has not been examined before.

Hayden Scott-Pratt (PhD, FST) and Sigrid Osborne (MRes, FST) Unlikely allies: Combining archaeobotanical and metallurgical material in archaeological research. An example from the Iron Age settlement at Hengistbury Head How can an investigation of plant material inclusions in metallurgical waste inform on the use of furnaces in the Iron Age at Hengistbury Head? This poster presents a novel approach to studying ancient metal production practices. It focuses on a case study of material excavated from the Iron Age settlement at Hengistbury Head, Dorset. It shows how using the field of botany can support interpretations on a prehistoric metal production process. On investigating the metallurgical slag recovered at Hengistbury Head an unusual macroscopic inclusion deemed to be plant material was discovered. A sample of the slag with the plant inclusion was investigated looking for phytoliths, microscopic plant remains. Investigating smelting parameters and furnace construction in antiquity is fraught with difficulty. Previously the packing of a furnace with organic matter has been inferred from occasional plant imprints. The phytolith analysis proved that the slag contained microscopic and macroscopic plant remains. This is new evidence and alters the interpretation of how Iron Age furnaces on Hengistbury Head may have been constructed. Iram Bibi (PhD, FST) Reliability, validity, and feasibility of a generic quality of life scale for use directly with community dwelling older people with dementia Currently, measures of quality of life (QoL) used with people with dementia (PWD) are mainly health-related. Health is not an actual attribute of but a means to attain QoL. The ICECAP-O scale measures attributes of QoL. In this study, ICECAP-O was tested with community dwelling PWD for face validity (N = 5), feasibility to administer, internal, and test-retest reliability (N = 54). The ICECAP-O was found to have good face validity and feasibility to administer. It also had acceptable test-retest reliability (r = .68, p<.01, n = 54; r = .56, p<.01, n = 54; for ICECAP-O raw and tariff scores respectively) and moderate to good levels of Cronbach alpha (.68 for raw score of 1st administration and .70 for the raw and tariff scores of 2nd administration) (Cicchetti, 1994). Therefore, ICECAP-O appears to be a useful measure for future research to directly assess actual attributes of community-dwelling PWD’s QoL.

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Jack Wieland (PhD, FST) Investigating the role of microsatellite instability in reproduction Infertility is defined as the inability to conceive after one year without the use of birth control methods. Previous research has revealed that genetic analysis to date is strongly associated with different nucleotide pathogenic variants within different DNA repair systems. However, there is little understanding in how microsatellite instability and the role of the immune system contributing to infertility. The workflow presented shows how this conclusion was drawn using a self-designed MySQl database utilising the research published to date. The next step from this is to undertake laboratory and computational bioinformatic analysis to demonstrate how microsatellite instability contributes to infertility. Other future directions of this research may explore how other genomic abnormalities contribute to infertility that may have not been reported in research to date.

Jordan King (MRes, FST) Exploring nostalgic experiences in video games Video game players may experience emotional demands, such as nostalgia, when thinking of a memorable game which can increase levels of well-being and social connectedness (Wulf, Bowman, Velez & Breuer, 2020). Yet previous literature has asked participants to think about a nostalgic game, the current study aims to have participants play a memorable video game to see what may make a video game nostalgic, explore how is nostalgia experienced before and after playing a nostalgic video game and, explore whether nostalgia is a positive experience which relates to well-being. Using a mixed method approach, quantitative data will explore levels of nostalgia before and after playing a nostalgic video game, and levels of well-being. Qualitative data will be collected to explore what may make a video game nostalgic which will be analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. This contributes to existing literature on video game nostalgia by having participants play video games.

Juncheng Wang (PhD, FST) A model design for virtual idol based on audience analysis This poster aims to investigate why the virtual idol is popular based on audience analysis. Moreover, the design model for the virtual idol will be proposed based on a range of factors on virtual idols’ popularity. As illustrating the popularity of virtual idols should be considered in different aspects. Examine the attitude of virtual idols’ audience by sentiment analysis, inspect, and establish new design model for the virtual idol. Explore the potential factors of virtual idols’ popularity by semi-structure interview. Verify the design model for the virtual idol by questionnaire. To start with, an experiment has been conducted on the attitude of the audience of virtual idols towards 24 selected videos about popular virtual idols on YouTube. The results show that the audience are generally positive towards the virtual idols on YouTube. The positive themes mainly include animations, songs, Vocaloid artists, shows, voices, fan-arts, personalities, skins, and the young group.

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Katie Thompson (PhD, FST) The effect of insects on elephant-induced tree damage within a small, fenced reserve in South Africa Within small, fenced reserves, studies exploring elephant damage on trees and their recovery have overlooked secondary damages that could be contributing to tree mortality. The aim of this study is to assess the significance of both elephant damage and secondary damage, and the subsequent tree recovery. This was conducted in in the small fenced Karongwe Private Game Reserve (KPGR), South Africa. We analysed the level of damage, recovery and insect presence using vegetation transects, where all trees ≥2 m in height were surveyed (n=1278 trees). Forty tree species were recorded, with 5 species accounting for 77% of the dataset and used for further analysis. Termites were found to be more likely to colonise damaged trees without signs of recovery. However, wood borers were more likely to colonise damaged trees showing signs of recovery. Termites and wood borer presence on damaged trees was not dependent on tree height.

Kazeem Balogun (PhD, FST) Overview of blackblaze HDD analysis for predictive maintenance With recent studies showing viability of machine learning (ML) among other tools as a better approach in performing Hard Disk Drive (HDD) analysis and enable fault detection models, the adoption of ML in the field of predictive maintenance (PM) becomes more complex. The complexity is not farfetched to the increase in sensor deployment, large volumes of generated data, variances in attributes or parameters and differences in characteristics of data sets. We provide an overview of HDD analysis using Backblaze as a case study and literature review of different ML approaches to HDD analysis for PM. We observed reasonable amount of studies in this direction, but the application of ML towards HDD analysis for PM needs more focus to improve model accuracy and stimulate further work in this area. We shall conclude this study by proposing our ground-breaking state-of-the art HDD analysis and model enhancement.

Liz Bailey (PhD, FMC) Is history repeating itself? Parallels can be drawn between the power of the publisher over the author in the 1700s and the power of the internet over the author today. By drawing comparisons between the Stationer’s Company of 1556 and the tech giant Facebook, it becomes apparent how similar the situation is today. Through review of the natural evolution of the destruction of the publishing monopolies of the 1700’s and the current fight back at tech giants like Facebook, it becomes apparent how history demonstrates that power is never perpetual, monopolies are constantly built up and destroyed. This is the natural law of things.

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Maureen Kehinde (PhD, BUBS) A qualitative inquiry investigation of policy-practice decoupling factors of environmental sustainability in universities: A case study of North-East Scottish universities This research presents the findings from an investigation of decouplings between policy and practice of environmental sustainability in North East Scottish universities. Embedding environmental sustainability on university campus and into institutional culture requires universities to walk their talks, ensuring that there is strong alignment between policy claims and actual practice. However, the realities of institutional progress suggests that for some universities there continues to be practice discrepancies in the operation of environmental sustainability on campus. This research adopts Institutional theory as underpinning lens and qualitative inquiry multi-case study methodology to address the question what are the factors which further the occurrence of Policy-practice decoupling of environmental sustainability in universities? The research found that bounded rationality, fragmentation of the internal and external environment, outsourcing and centralisation are factors which further the disconnect between policy and practice of environmental sustainability in North East Scottish universities.

Megan Jadzinski (PhD, FHSS) How are Fitness to Practise processes applied in higher education institutions, in relation to Health and Care Profession Council or Nursing and Midwifery Council healthcare courses? Higher education institutions (HEIs) are required to manage concerns raised regarding pre-registration healthcare students. All HEIs are required to have a Fitness to Practice (FTP) policy to manage concerns. Due to limited guidance from regulatory bodies, variations occur. The aim of this research is to understand how the FTP processes are applied. A qualitative methodology will be utilised. Two stages will occur. Firstly, a review of FTP documentation from multiple universities. Secondly, online interviews with HEI staff who manage the process within their organisation. Following a systematic review, limited evidence was found with recommendations that further exploration is required. Limited research has been conducted on the FTP process within HEIs in England. Multiple gaps, including, a need for a more consistent and fair approach has been identified. The output from this research could impact the way in which FTP cases are managed.

Mirte Korpershoek (PhD FST) Rock art as an environmental archive Rock art occurs worldwide, across societies and time periods. Traditionally, rock art studies examine the intention behind the images: the symbolism and shamanistic ritual interpretations. In my research, I am investigating whether rock art depictions are useful to understanding the palaeoenvironmental context of the people who created the art. I will compare the images -focusing on depictions of humans, animals and activities/tools- to published archaeological assemblages, to establish to what extent rock art accurately depicts the way of living and environments of the artists. I will also compare themes in rock art from various locations to see whether there are any similarities and what this could mean. Machine learning will be applied to these themes to identify the most common figurative motifs per region. Here I will present the first results from South America: I discuss the prevalence of human and wild animal depictions from this region.

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Nurudeen Adesina (PhD, FHSS) Effectiveness and usability of digital tools to support dietary self-management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A systematic review A systematic search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane library and Web of Science using key search terms identified 1476 papers reporting research studies, of which 16 met specified inclusion criteria. The quality of the included studies was assessed using the ErasmusAGE Quality Score or the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool version 2018. Meta-analysis was not conducted due to the presence of substantial heterogeneity of data across the included studies. Our findings show that adoption of digital tools to support lifestyle improvement relating to healthy diet, health behaviour and adherence to therapy in women with GDM is a usable intervention. However, there was a lack of evidence concerning the effectiveness of the tools to support dietary management of GDM. Our systematic review suggests consideration for ethnic specific dietary advice and evidence-based framework in the development of effective digital tool for dietary management of GDM.

Omowonuola Okunnu (PhD, FMC) A comparative study of the interconnectedness of religion and politics in Northern and Southern Nigeria: The role of literacy level Although research on the determinants of political outcomes has been a subject of debate for many decades and perhaps centuries, findings are often awash with nuances and not on par with realities at the regional level. There are more questions arising from dynamics in the societies, related to political campaigning and social movements at the regional level. Consequently, the aim of this project is to examine the independent and mediating effects of religion and literacy levels on voters’ decision and electoral outcomes at regional levels amongst female voters in Nigeria. A mixed-method approach is adopted to ameliorate any contradictions between qualitative and quantitative findings. Early findings of this research suggest a battery of issues ranging from divergence in perceptions of religious issues; poor attitude to political outcomes; a weak awareness of political issues; and an underdeveloped attention is paid to gender imbalances in politics.

Penny Wells (PhD, FMC) How people relate to environmental disaster in contemporary literature: An ecocritical approach Taking six contemporary eco-novels containing scenarios of environmental disaster, this study examines how each is portrayed. The question of whether the disasters are natural or man-made is examined using Garrard’s six philosophical positions of ecocriticism, and further discourse analysis from ecological and scientific perspectives. The extent to which the characters engage with their natural environment in terms of their cultural capital (Bourdieu) will also be looked at. As well as exploring the political rhetoric of each book, from the various stakeholders’ perspectives, the study also incorporates a separate sociological research element which sets out to explore other ways in which authors may or may not express their concerns about our shared environment. In these ways, scientism or philosophical arguments will not be the sole focus, and room will be made for a more phenomenological approach, allowing for human experience both within and outwith the novels.

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Rabeea Maqsood (PhD, FHSS) The association between Combat Related Traumatic Injury and Heart Rate Variability in the UK Armed Forces personnel and veterans – a quantitative secondary data analysis of the ADVANCE study. CRTI’s impact on HRV and its link to Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) risk have not been examined. This study aims to explore: the association between CRTI and HRV, and HRV’s potential to predict CVD risk. This study employs a baseline cross-sectional analysis of the ArmeD SerVices TrAuma and RehabilitatioN OutComE (ADVANCE) longitudinal cohort study, consisting of 579 adult male UK combat-veterans (UK-Afghanistan War 2003-14) with CRTI; frequency-matched to 565 uninjured men by age, service, rank, regiment, deployment period and rolein-theatre. Measures include single-lead ECG based HRV (RMSSD, SDNN, LF, HF, LF/HF-5-min ECG recordings), arterial stiffness (augmentation index, pulse wave velocity), injury-severity (NISS scores), and metabolic syndrome. Kubios software and SPSS will be used for HRV data-analysis and descriptive tests, respectively. CRTI’s influence on HRV and its relationship to CVD risk will be examined using T-tests and correlation. The findings may contribute to intervention development for veteran’s rehabilitation programme and trauma care.

Rosie Harper (PhD, FHSS) Nudging: A theoretical concept for a very practical approach to pelvic floor muscle training. A third of women suffer from stress incontinence which affects their physical, mental and social wellbeing. Pelvic floor exercises are the gold standard treatment, but women’s adherence to these exercises is poor. It is suggested behaviour change techniques, including nudge theory, could be used to improve adherence. The research will explore the role of nudge theory in causing predictable changes in behaviour in antenatal women, gain insight into antenatal women’s experience of digital nudges and allow a better understanding of the influence of digital nudges on pelvic floor muscle training adherence. The first phase involves a literature review to explore the effect of digital nudges on exercise adherence in antenatal women. Phase two of the study involves qualitative data collection and analysis to explore women’s experience of digital nudges. The third phase of the study will be a feasibility study which includes a pilot of the intervention - digital nudges.

Sitsada Sartamorn (PhD, BUBS) Hybrid social media marketing: How metaverse and other cutting-edge technologies impact on consumer experiences by reducing borders between real and virtual space in the Thai organic food market. The pandemic of Covid-19 has affected us in a world-changing way, a world where people cannot unite. However, this obstacle is now diminishing, thanks to the concept of globalisation and advanced technology development. This study aims to explore the impact of the “metaverse” and other cutting-edge innovative technologies on the marketing space of the future and consider how these advanced technologies should be integrated into the design of marketing strategies and propose a way forward. This study focuses on the organic food market in Thailand and explores how technology can integrate the boundaries between the real and the virtual, increase consumer experience and enhance the effectiveness of marketing strategies based on advanced technology. This study will use a qualitative research method to strategically design hybrid social media marketing.

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Samantha Everard (MRes, FHSS) How do people with multiple disabilities experience, engage with and participate in self-employment support “Seeing every individual for their ability, especially those with hidden impairments, makes good business sense” (Kirby, 2014a), but when a person with multiple disabilities decides to experience, engage with and participate in self-employment support, there is currently a lack of clarity and guidance to meet the individual needs of disabled people wanting to engage in self-employment. An internet search will bring up numerous results with websites and organisations offering generalised support, but there is very limited information offering a personcentric service. This research aims to identify gaps within the general self-employment support model and work towards a more cohesive level of accessible information, advice, guidance and resources. My research is focussed on gathering qualitative data through one-to-one interviews using Photovoice as this allows the participants with multiple disabilities to openly engage with the topic and tell stories about their experiences in their own individual ways.

Shell Smith (PhD, FHSS) Does motorcyclists’ identification, perception, and knowledge towards risk change regarding their motorcycling qualifications and experience? Motorcyclists are one of the most vulnerable road user groups in the U.K. with an average of 6 deaths and 94 serious injuries per week. A common collision scenario is a road user driving across the path of a motorcyclist. Consequently, the research questions ask where motorcyclists and car drivers are directing their visual attention and hazard perception and whether there are differences between advanced motorcyclists and advanced car drivers vs standard trained motorcyclists and car drivers. Prior research specifically targeted at motorcycle collision prevention is limited, with only 15 studies using eye-tracking methodology. To target gaps in the literature; this is a mixed methods study using qualitative interviews, questionnaires, and eye-tracking. Initial findings indicate that motorcyclists and car drivers demonstrate different visual attention patterns. Thus, it is possible to change driving and motorcycle test training to teach how to direct visual attention and cognition to hazards.

Taalia Nadeem (PhD, BUBS) Understanding the social representation of uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAVs): How public and stakeholder views empower or constrain pathways to adoption UAVs now support various purposes including within healthcare logistics. There are benefits of using UAVs, but their capabilities are challenged by the public. A solid understanding of public acceptance of UAVs is important to develop appropriate regulatory strategies therefore, the following research questions arise: What is the influence of mass media on UAV perception? What attributes and perceived risks of UAVs influence adoption? How do personal attributes affect views of UAVs? A mixed method approach is proposed including a phase of qualitative research to understand concerns and identify segments according to attitudes, behaviours, or values. This will be followed by a large-scale questionnaire. Studies demonstrate that mainstream media is the main source of information about UAVs, but due to lack of knowledge, the public is unable to make a more informed opinion, and this calls for a deeper understanding of people’s knowledge of UAVs.

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Zhiqi Li (PhD, FMC) Deep learning for scene flow estimation: Methods and applications Scene flow estimation aims at obtaining structure information and 3D motion of dynamic scenes. It has long been an interest of research in computer vision and 3D computer graphics. It is a fundamental task for various applications like autonomous driving. Compared to previous methods utilizing image representations, many recent researches build upon the power of deep analysis on point clouds and focus on point clouds representation to conduct 3D flow estimation. In this survey, we comprehensively review the pioneering literature in scene flow estimation based on point clouds, delve in detail into their learning paradigms and present insightful comparison between the state-of-the-art methods using deep learning for scene flow estimation. Furthermore, we introduce various higher-level scene understanding tasks (object tracking, motion segmentation, etc.) which could benefit from the latest progress on scene flow estimation. The paper concludes with an overview of foreseeable research trends for scene flow estimation.

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11228-11/2021