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Doctoral College

The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference Wednesday 2 December 2020

www.bournemouth.ac.uk/pg-conference


Welcome

TO THE 12TH ANNUAL POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH CONFERENCE 2020 This annual event highlights the wide range of postgraduate research taking place at Bournemouth University through a variety of platforms, and this year we are going fully virtual. There are oral presentations being delivered via Zoom and a poster exhibition on the conference webpage. The conference will commence with opening remarks from our Doctoral College Academic Managers Dr Fiona Knight and Dr Julia Taylor, and this year we have the pleasure of being joined by Professor Edwin van Teijlingen as our conference keynote speaker. Professor van Teijlingen is a highly regarded academic and experienced doctoral supervisor, you can read his biography and keynote abstract on page 3 as he shares his insights into the flexibility required when undertaking research.

I would like to thank those who have contributed to the co-ordination and delivery of the conference this year. To all of our presenters and poster exhibitors and of course to you for attending and showing your support to our expanding postgraduate research community, helping nurture a positive and encouraging postgraduate research culture here at Bournemouth University. I hope you find the conference interesting, engaging and inspiring. I look forward to sharing the day with you. Natalie Stewart (Research Skills & Development Officer) @NatStewartBU Doctoral College Conference Organiser

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME & ABSTRACTS On pages 4-5 you will discover the conference programme, followed by headline details of each oral presentation presenter and their abstracts. On pages 10-11 you can see the posters being exhibited on the website, followed by their full poster abstracts. Don’t forget to visit the poster exhibition on our dedicated conference webpage.

bournemouth.ac.uk/pg-conference

Twitter Share conference highlights on twitter using the hashtags #BUPGRConf20 | #BUDoctoralCollege Event feedback Each year we open an anonymous feedback form following the conference. This year to gain a richer picture of how the conference is being received this feedback form will be open throughout the day. To provide feedback on what you are enjoying or what you think could be improved please submit your feedback via www.bournemouth.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/BUPGRConf20


KEYNOTE BIOGRAPHY & ABSTRACT

Professor Edwin van Teijlingen, Professor of Reproductive Health Research, Faculty of Health & Social Sciences. Professor Edwin van Teijlingen is a sociologist with a PhD from the University of Aberdeen. His main interests are in health promotion/education, health services research, and sociocultural aspects of health and health care. Edwin’s methodological expertise is in qualitative research, mixed-methods research, and systematic reviewing. He is a member of the UK Research and Innovation International Development Peer Review College (2020-23). Edwin has published more than 300 papers and edited ten books, including Psychology & Sociology Applied to Medicine (Elsevier 2019), a widely used textbook for medical students. He has published on academic writing and presented sessions on publishing academic papers at various universities in Europe and South Asia. He is currently supervisor for nine PhD students and one MPhil student. He has examined over 40 PhDs in eight different countries in Europe, Asia and Australia. He is currently Visiting Professor at the University of Nottingham (UK), two colleges affiliated with two different universities (Tribhuvan University and Pokhara University) in Nepal, and at Mahatma Gandhi University in the State of Kerala, India. You can view Edwin’s full academic profile on the BU Staff Profile pages.

Flexibility in Research: Dealing with Adversity We live in interesting times. Not many could have predicted last year that the world would face a pandemic and lockdown. Who would have predicted millions of people would be stopped in their daily life and work to reduce the spread of a previously unknown virus? Or would not have laughed if I had predicted that UK PhD viva would overnight change from a face-to-face event in a small tutorial room to online examinations as standard? Many people’s PhD project will have been affected by Covid-19, the public health measures to limit the spread of the virus or the anxieties around all this. However, this is not a unique event that comes along to spoil your research. Most students will experience problems and obstacles; it is part and parcel of any study. Some students face problems accessing their fieldwork site or getting access to data, others face recruitment problems, or conflicting demand on their time (especially students working or with childcare responsibilities) or financial issues. My first key message is that the PhD hardly ever (never?) goes exactly to plan. My second message is that most students do overcome their problems and realise that although their thesis is not exactly what they expected when they started, theirs is still useful and adding to knowledge. The final message is: Now you know it will not go according to plan, don’t stress too much, try to be flexible, believe in yourself, and work with your supervisors to try to solve problems as they appear on your path!

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CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

09:30

09:45 – 10:45

10:45 – 11:00 11:00 – 12:00

12:00 – 13:00

Opening Remarks Dr Fiona Knight and Dr Julia Taylor Doctoral College Academic Managers Session 1 Oral Presentations Deborah Taylor Development of Psychological Ownership   Abier Hamidi How effective is the current Information, Education and Communication (IEC) strategy in reducing Libyan married women’s vulnerabilities to HIV?’ Charlotte Clayton The role of a Midwifery continuity of CARE model in reducing health inequalities in women and babies from low-income backgrounds: The Mi-CARE Study. Tabitha Grist Parker The Last Festival – Classism and Relativism in relation to Stonehenge’s Contested Landscape Break Session 2 Oral Presentations Chloe Casey Exploring the wellbeing of postgraduate researchers at Bournemouth University Matthew Edge Exploring closed loop supply chain strategies for single use medical devices (SUMD) toward developing sustainable and competitive manufacturing processes emerging from COVID-19 global pandemic Jess Rose Voices from Behind Closed Doors: Participatory Film-making Inside a Refuge for Survivors of Domestic Abuse Khanh Hoang Fake news on Vietnam social media in the context of Covid-19 Lunch & Poster Viewing


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13:00 – 14:00

14:00 – 15:00

15:00

Keynote Flexibility in Research: Dealing with Adversity Professor Edwin van Teijlingen Professor of Reproductive Health Research Session 3 Oral Presentations Malika Felton Adapting postgraduate research in the context of the coronavirus pandemic Edward Loveman Imperialism & Englishness in the context of Sports Fandom Jo Wells Exploring collaborative practices within criminal justice liaison and diversion schemes Mary Hogarth Specialist magazines navigating digital disruption: my evolving research journey Closing Remarks Natalie Stewart Doctoral College Research Skills & Development Officer Poster Viewing

Visit www.bournemouth.ac.uk/pg-conference to view posters


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ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Abier Hamidi (PhD, FHSS) How effective is the current Information, Education and Communication (IEC) strategy in reducing Libyan married women’s vulnerabilities to HIV?’ There is little data on the number of Libyan women infected with HIV, however it is estimated that 40% of people living with HIV in the Middle East and North Africa are women, the majority infected through unprotected sex, by their husbands. This PhD aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the current IEC strategy in reducing Libyan married women’s vulnerabilities to HIV. This study will apply mixed method approach (a) quantitative data from married women aged 18-50 years old; (b) qualitative data from relevant policy, programme stakeholders and representatives of non-governmental community- based organisations working on HIV. A literature review will also be carried out to critically appraise the existing IEC strategy and activities. It is expected that findings from this study would encourage policymakers to not only re-evaluate their HIV communication strategy but simultaneously provoke them into acknowledging and responding to the lack of women’s rights in the country.

Charlotte Clayton (PhD, FHSS) The role of a Midwifery continuity of CARE model in reducing health inequalities in women and babies from lowincome backgrounds: The Mi-CARE Study. Childbearing women living in deprived areas experience some of the poorest birth outcomes and are 50% more likely to die compared to women in the least deprived neighbourhoods. The Covid-19 pandemic has further amplified existing, deep rooted maternal health inequalities. The Social Determinants of Health (SDH); the conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live and age, play a significant role in the root causes of health inequities. Evidence shows that addressing the SDH alongside Midwifery Continuity of Care (MCC) reduces inequalities. How midwives working in MCC models address the SDH as part of their public health role is not clear. There is also a lack of qualitative evidence examining the SDH from women’s perspectives. Drawing on Constructivist Grounded Theory, this study will generate theory to help explain how midwives address the SDH impacting on women’s lives and contribute to evidence about public health prevention strategies within the NHS.

Chloe Casey (PhD, FHSS) Exploring the wellbeing of postgraduate researchers at Bournemouth University Most of the research around student mental health focuses on undergraduate students. However, recent international research suggests that these issues are just as prevalent among postgraduate research students (PGRs). The occurrence of mental health problems among PGRs from the United Kingdom (UK) is not clearly defined, nor are the reasons underpinning this. This PhD project, supported by the BU Doctoral College, aimed to provide novel contributions to the understanding of PGR wellbeing using a mixed-methods feasibility study to address the following research questions: “What are the factors that most affect BU PGR wellbeing?” and, “What initiatives could help BU PGRs promote their wellbeing?” This presentation will provide an overview of the research so far, sharing the findings of surveys, interviews, and focus groups with PGRs at BU. The initial results of the co-produced wellbeing initiatives, trialled with PGRs at the beginning of the academic year, will also be shared.


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Deborah Taylor (PhD, BUBS) Development of Psychological Ownership “Taking ownership” is a phrase often used within organisations, but its conceptualisation is still relatively recent. Psychological Ownership is an emotional and cognitive feeling of attachment to a target such as the organisation or an individual’s job role which results in feelings that it is “mine”. Current research has concentrated on experienced knowledge workers and there is little understanding of the factors that influence its development. This research aims to examine the development of job and organisational psychological ownership in individuals at the start of their careers during a work placement. 25 interviews with placement students, organisations and Placement Development Advisors suggest that PO can develop in individuals far earlier than initially posited partially influenced by organisations and line managers “giving ownership”. Whilst there are many benefits of ownership; proactiveness, recognition and fulfilment, high levels of PO can result in individuals feeling weighed down with responsibility leading to stress.

Edward Loveman (PhD, BUBS) Imperialism & Englishness in the context of Sports Fandom Sports fans will regularly engage with skewed narratives of nation and identity, buttressed by accounts of England as a ‘land of hope and glory’, augmented by romantic recounting of the global hegemony of the English Empire. Presently, research has pushed us to consider how the shared community of the sports fan has become a necessary way of stabilising and maintaining an insular, parochial, and at times, xenophobic English identity. However, there is a need to gain ‘deep’ understanding of the contemporary social processes within self-identification that sustain the inherent inequalities of the English nation-state. Adopting a postcolonial framework, I question to what extent audiences of ‘live’ televised sport mega events are active agents in both the (re)production, embodiment, and creation of imperial ‘Englishness’. It is in the mundane performances of normative ‘Englishness’ that fans can provide an important focus upon which to understand English nationhood in the 21st century.

Jess Rose (PhD, FMC) Voices from Behind Closed Doors: Participatory Film-making Inside a Refuge for Survivors of Domestic Abuse Voices From Behind Closed Doors provides a space for survivors of domestic abuse to narrate their own stories. With residents of a women’s refuge, I will be making a participatory documentary on the subject of coercive control, aiming to make a unique contribution to knowledge on the lived experiences of survivors of domestic abuse, and to illuminate police understanding of coercive control. The study is conducted under the framework of what Sara Kindon terms a ‘feminist practice of looking’ (2003), which involves ‘looking ‘alongside’ rather than ‘at’ research subjects’ (2003: 142), a form of intersectional narrative feminist research. Research questions central to this project focus on the ways in which survivors make sense of their own experiences and identify their needs, emphasising the importance of listening to survivors of domestic abuse as key voices in the development of police training in this area.


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Jo Wells (PhD, FHSS) Exploring collaborative practices within criminal justice liaison and diversion schemes The Criminal Justice Liaison and Diversion schemes (CJLDs) across England and Wales use a standard service specification that uses ‘vulnerability criteria’ to identify individuals to divert from criminal justice and into care. It employs a model of inter-professional collaboration between the police and NHS teams. These partnership arrangements aim to reduce recidivism, as well as to improve health outcomes for individuals who encounter the criminal justice system, however, outcomes have so far been inconclusive. The study will use discourse analysis to explore the organisational culture(s) of partnership practice in the custody suite, as Practitioners and police construct the’ vulnerability’ of detainees. The research aims to identify how detainees have internalised these discourses about their vulnerability during the custody processes and whether this alters their identity. Ultimately, this is an exploration of the dynamics of power in the custody suite and how it impacts the relationships between police, practitioners, and suspects.

Khanh Hoang (PhD, FHSS) Fake news on Vietnam social media in the context of Covid-19 Fake news on social media is a global concern, with the limited insight offered by research. In this presentation, we establish some patterns of fake news related to the Covid-19 crisis, with Vietnamese Facebook users’ perception. The results mainly come from our nation-wide survey following the pandemic that received 1,137 responses. However, to begin with, we had carried out 21 in-depth interviews to get an initial understanding. Our data show that Vietnamese Facebook users are facing a great deal of fake news, including the completely madeup, incompletely accurate and misleading. In the context of Covid-19, almost every Vietnamese Facebook users have experienced fake news exposure. Their various behaviours to tackle this kind of news strongly demonstrate their active role in social news usage. Toward different categories of fake news perceived by users, the response to completely made-up news seems to be the most aggressive.

Malika Felton (PhD, FHSS) Adapting postgraduate research in the context of the coronavirus pandemic Undertaking a PhD is an independent journey and no two people will have the same experience, although everyone will face both ups and downs. However, in 2020 we all share a common struggle, completing our research during a global pandemic. While the exact barriers coronavirus caused will differ between projects, we have all adapted and changed how we work, and even what we are researching. This presentation will discuss how I coped with the changes to my PhD, including the stopping of all clinical studies in the NHS. I will discuss the skills and experience I gained, while sharing my coping strategies. Ultimately, I would not have got to this stage without sharing my highs and lows with my peers so I hope this presentation shows that although a PhD can feel like a lonely journey that there is shared experience with others, and we can get through it together.


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Mary Hogarth (PhD, FMC) Specialist magazines navigating digital disruption: my evolving research journey This short presentation will focus on my PhD, investigating the evolution of specialist magazine business models following the digital disruption that has occurred in publishing. A core aspect of the presentation will include an overview of my progression following a successful Probationary Review and demonstrate how writing my first research paper (earlier this year), has impacted on the direction of my study. Furthermore, the presentation will set out my initial methodological framework, while also documenting those critical challenges faced, identifying essential lessons learned on my research journey thus far. The presentation will culminate in a summary of initial vital findings and identify potential opportunities with regards to disseminating new knowledge from emerging themes, such as servitization and a move to change magazine subscribers into members.

Matthew Edge (MRes, BUBS) Exploring closed loop supply chain strategies for single use medical devices (SUMD) toward developing sustainable and competitive manufacturing processes emerging from COVID-19 global pandemic Is potential adoption of closed-loop single-use medical device supply chains economically, socially and environmentally sustainable for manufacturers? A two-part concurrent research methodology considers: A structured literature review of SUMD supply chain cycle exploring definitions, relationships, dimensions and costbenefit of reprocessing; and qualitative research with interpretivism approach collecting rich subjective data from interviewed participants occupying critical supply chain positions within selected medical device manufacturers. Key parameters examined include medical device economics, supply and logistic risks, cost-benefit analysis and supply chain strategies. A structured literature review identified limited published material and growing interest in triple bottom line, centric to medical device sustainability. Current research suggests the UK healthcare system is encountering significant clinical challenges and cost-reduction initiatives with device manufacturers following current guidance and resisting extending reprocessing services. The research advances academic and commercial awareness toward economic, social and environmental considerations pivotal toward sustainability and product improvement.

Tabitha Grist Parker (MRes, FST) The Last Festival – Classism and Relativism in relation to Stonehenge’s Contested Landscape The 1985 free festival at Stonehenge, which culminated in the Battle of the Beanfield, was a pivotal event in Stonehenge’s modern social history. This is forms an important part of the discussion within my MRes: Stonehenge’s Modern Social History, 1900-2020. Research questions include: Why does Stonehenge have a significant role in society today? Is Stonehenge a battleground between disparate sub-cultures of society? What can Stonehenge’s social history tell us about the contemporary use of Ancient Monuments? Methodology: Extensive 20th and 21st century literary and media research. Primary data collection in the form of interviews. Initial findings show that classism is prevalent in the social history of Stonehenge, with public access a reoccurring issue. This project will present a multivocal relativist view and aims to be a relevant source of information for this period of Stonehenge’s history.


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POSTER EXHIBITION

Bronwyn Sherriff (PhD, FHSS) Coping with Covid-19: reflecting on the process of modifying methods midway Carrie Tbaily (MRes, FHSS) Exploring caregiver perspectives of adults with Severe or Profound and multiple Learning Disabilities Accessing Sedentary Hydrotherapy (SPLASH study) Chloe Casey (PhD, FHSS) Initiatives to promote the wellbeing of postgraduate researchers at Bournemouth University Debora Almeida (PhD, FHSS) Is there a difference between dominant and non-dominant hand performance during simulated infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (iCPR)? Greg Tansil (MRes, FST) Study to identify risk factors that predict which children will repeatedly go missing Jessica Doherty (PhD, FHSS) A Pilot Study to Improve emotional well-being of Early Career Midwives: A Modified Dialectical Behavioural Therapy Skills Training Group Intervention Karim Khaled (PhD, FHSS) Validation of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC) Food Frequency Questionnaire for use among Adults in Lebanon Kelsie Fletcher (PhD, FHSS) The history of disaster nursing: developments from Nightingale to the 21st century. Kevin Davidson (MRes, FST) Mindful Resilience: supporting young people at risk of gaming and gambling-related harms Madhu Sapkota (PhD, FST) Project Introduction: Adaptive Simulation Modelling using the Digital Twin Paradigm

Visit www.bournemouth.ac.uk/pg-conference to view posters


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Mashael Alsufyani (PhD, FHSS) Exploring the Usage of Social Media by Female Saudi Nursing Students for Personal and Academic Purposes Natalie Stewart (PhD, BUBS) Promoting a positive and cohesive research culture for postgraduate researchers Rachel Clarke (MRes, BUBS) Leadership as a means of cultivating innovation: analogue people in a digital future Raksha Thapa (PhD, FHSS) Caste Exclusion and Health Discrimination in South Asia: A Systematic Review Raysa El Zein (PhD, FHSS) Feasibility study: effect of vegetable oil on memory in older-adults and those with MCI Sara Stride (PhD, FHSS) Taking time to explore appropriate methods Sulochana Dhakal-Rai (PhD, FHSS) Factors contributing to rising caesarean section rates in South Asian Countries: a systematic review Vanessa Bartholomew (PhD, FHSS) RETHINK – Can we reduce hospital admission in latent labour?

Visit www.bournemouth.ac.uk/pg-conference to view posters


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POSTER ABSTRACTS

Bronwyn Sherriff (PhD, FHSS) Coping with Covid-19: reflecting on the process of modifying methods midway Few PhD students wish to be faced with the task of adapting their research methods, especially midway, when timelines and project plans have been painstakingly prepared, revised, and scrutinised. Following the realisation that Covid-19 was unlikely to be a passing pandemic, this poster summarises the process taken to address the crucial question: Are the proposed methods still feasible considering the change in context? Approach: Although problem-solving and flexibility are important characteristics of any researcher, in the post-Covid-19 research milieu, the role of collaboration and stakeholder engagement are likely to become increasingly pivotal. Both represent invaluable tools for (re-)planning and (re-)designing healthcare research by informing essential research decisions. Contribution: The impact of Covid-19 remains an ongoing challenge to student researchers. This poster provides a pragmatic guide, particularly for healthcare research students, by explaining the approach used to modify the initial research design and presenting key considerations which may be useful.

Carrie Tbaily (MRes, FHSS) Exploring caregiver perspectives of adults with Severe or Profound and multiple Learning Disabilities Accessing Sedentary Hydrotherapy (SPLASH study) The term Learning Disability (LD) defines people with significant impairment in cognition and social functioning. Physical disability in LD is largely neurological. Previous neuro-hydrotherapy studies have adopted a medical model of disability. Taking a singular medical/social approach to LD research omits significant elements of impairment that these adults experience. The biopsychosocial model is therefore the most appropriate approach in regards to LD research. Through asking how caregivers perceive hydrotherapy to impact on the needs of adults with severe/profound LD, this mixed-methods pragmatist study seeks to explore caregiver experience, and identify any health/social care impacts. Using component design, caregiver experiences will be explored through thematic analysis of data gathered from in-depth semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. The themes explored through this study may help to better inform caregiver decision making in relation to hydrotherapy care-plans, and any biopsychosocial impacts highlighted could form the foundation for future studies to further explore/quantitatively measure.

Chloe Casey (PhD, FHSS) Initiatives to promote the wellbeing of postgraduate researchers at Bournemouth University In relation to wellbeing support, in the past there has been the assumption that what works for undergraduate students will also work for postgraduate researchers (PGRs). As a result, a lack of interventions published in the literature have been designed and evaluated specifically with PGRs in mind. Due to this, universities have previously embedded support provisions that may not have been relevant for PGRs. There is a need to investigate the type of interventions that will be best aligned to the specific needs of PGRs. Therefore, this Doctoral College supported PhD project aims to design, trial, and evaluate evidence-based initiatives that are co-produced with PGRs. This poster provides an overview of the initiatives that have been trialled as part of this project, including a peer-support area on Brightspace and a series of workshops (project planning, mindfulness and mentoring) focusing on methods to help PGRs cope with the stresses of research.


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Debora Almeida (PhD, FHSS) Is there a difference between dominant and non-dominant hand performance during simulated infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (iCPR)? Randomised study to compare two-finger technique (TFT) using dominant (DH) and non-dominant hand (NH) during simulated iCPR. Materials/methods: 24 participants performed 3-minute iCPR using the TFT with DH or NH followed by 3-minute iCPR with their other hand. Perceived fatigue rated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: No significant difference between DH and NH. However, perception of fatigue for NH (76.8 ±13.4) was significantly higher (p <.001) compared to DH (62.8 ±12.5). No significant difference between first and last 30 seconds of iCPR for DH and NH. No significant correlations between iCPR and perception of fatigue for DH. However, significant correlation for CR (r=0.43; p=0.040) and RL (r=-0.48; p=0.021) for the NH. Conclusion: No difference in performance of iCPR with DH versus NH. However, perception of fatigue is higher in NH for CR and RL. Guidelines could recommend rescuers to change hands every two min to reduce effects of fatigue on performance.

Greg Tansil (MRes, FST) Study to identify risk factors that predict which children will repeatedly go missing Missing children face significant risks and those who frequently go missing are particularly vulnerable to dangers such as abuse and sexual exploitation. Using data from one UK police force from June 2018 to July 2019 (N = 909), the research found; (1) over 80% of all missing child reports are repeat disappearances; (2) a small proportion of children who go missing repeatedly (8.3%) account for over half of all missing person episodes; (3) the likelihood of a child going missing on multiple occasions is associated with being criminally exploited, being a perpetrator of violence, adverse childhood experiences, being arrested and being in care; and (4) by combining these factors it is possible to predict the probability of a child going missing repeatedly. Understanding of the correlates of repeat disappearances allows the police and partner agencies to target preventative resources to those individuals most at risk of going missing again.

Jessica Doherty (PhD, FHSS) A Pilot Study to Improve emotional well-being of Early Career Midwives: A Modified Dialectical Behavioural Therapy Skills Training Group Intervention Early career midwives are at the highest risk of leaving the profession in the first 5 years of practice. Targeting the emotional labour and burnout relationship may alter this trajectory by equipping them with emotional toolkit and skills to manage their relationships in practice and improve their resilience to workplace-adversity. This pilot is a non-randomised two-phased sequential mixed-method design comprising of pre, post-test and three-month follow-up to explore the preliminary effectiveness of the intervention via standardised-measures of emotional labour, difficulties of emotional regulation, Mayer, Salovey and Caruso’s emotional intelligence, resilience at work and Maslach’s Burnout Inventory in the first phase. Qualitative semi-structured interviews will be conducted in the second phase to explore the feasibility, acceptability, applicability of the intervention and DBT skills in practice. This study is the first to test DBT Skills training in the midwifery profession.


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Karim Khaled (PhD, FHSS) Validation of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC) Food Frequency Questionnaire for use among Adults in Lebanon The aim of this study was to validate the EPIC food frequency questionnaire in Lebanon. The validation was done by comparing data collected from the EPIC FFQ with that collected from three 24-hour recalls. Unadjusted and energy adjusted correlations, Bland Altman plots, and weighed kappa statistics were used to assess the agreement between the two methods. Unadjusted and energy-adjusted correlation coefficients ranged from -0.002 (vitamin A) to 0.337 (carbohydrates) and were all statistically significant except for vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin A, selenium, and niacin. The weighed kappa estimates for unadjusted data ranged from -0.05 (vitamin C) to 0.248 (magnesium). Weighed kappa for energy-adjusted data ranged from -0.034 (vitamin A) to 0.203 (phosphorus). The visual inspection of the Bland-Altman plots revealed over-estimation of energy, carbohydrates, protein, and fat intakes by the FFQ method. This validation study demonstrated an overall acceptable agreement compared to the 24-h recall method.

Kelsie Fletcher (PhD, FHSS) The history of disaster nursing: developments from Nightingale to the 21st century. Nurses have a rich history in performing their duty both domestically and internationally in response to a disaster. Comprising the largest proportion of the healthcare workforce, nurses can inform disaster planning and management. With continuing conflict, humanitarian and natural disasters, epidemics and ongoing threat from covid-19, nurses’ roles and capacity to respond to global health needs is critical. Aims: The aim of this poster is to demonstrate key developments in the field of disaster nursing. Methods: A qualitative historical review was conducted to examine core developments in the history of disaster nursing. Results: A total of 10 articles refer to disaster nursing specifically, of which 4 of these are reports/policy. Conclusions: The complex but rich history of disaster nursing is interwoven throughout the historical literature. Understanding the developments of this newly recognised specialty field can inform future research agendas and this can inform the mitigation, prevention, response and recovery phases of disaster management.  

Kevin Davidson (MRes, FST) Mindful Resilience: supporting young people at risk of gaming and gambling-related harms There is increasing evidence of gambling-type behaviour in young gamers and associated harms to their health and wellbeing. This issue is being addressed by a project to develop the educational resources for healthcare practitioners in this field, with Bournemouth University partnering with the Young Gamers and Gamblers Education Trust (YGAM), Betknowmore, the Responsible Gambling Council, and Playtech. Within this project an MRes has been funded to draw upon literature on Mindfulness and Resilience in outlining a working concept of Mindful Resilience. This concept of Mindful Resilience will be applied to digital contexts, such as those where young gamers engage in gambling-type behaviour, to foster digital resilience. This poster will describe and outline a working concept of Mindful Resilience and demonstrate how it applies in the digital context.


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Madhu Sapkota (PhD, FST) Project Introduction: Adaptive Simulation Modelling using the Digital Twin Paradigm The simulation model used while undertaking the Structural Health Management (SHM) task to predict the response of the system/structure(s) to disturbances, got phase-out when the real system/structure material properties changes in non-uniform and complex way. In order to accurately predict future states of a system/ structure, which can change its behaviour to a large degree in response to environmental influences, the existence of precise models of the system and its surroundings is demandable. For this, simulation modelling within DT paradigm concept is proposed, with DT encompassing continuous and automatic model updating framework, reducing the computational (parametric) uncertainties that arises with time in the process and ultimately having a lifetime reliable prognosis tool for the structural behaviour. The solver (algorithm/framework) will be tested with a real-world problem by setting a DT environment integrated with an ultra-high-fidelity simulation model (for eg: cathodic protection (CP) model built for the prediction of the corrosion status of a seastructure).

Mashael Alsufyani (PhD, FHSS) Exploring the Usage of Social Media by Female Saudi Nursing Students for Personal and Academic Purposes Social media is a global communication tool, allowing users to exchange information easily through multiple platforms. The literature review indicates that the majority of studies undertaken on social media in the nursing field are conducted in the Western world, and that very few have been conducted in Saudi Arabia. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the role of social media in female Saudi nursing students’ lives and to explore the positive and negative influences of this from the students’ perspective. Grounded theory methodology will be used to explore the subject area through participants’ views. This study will adopt Charmaz’s approach by using the constant comparative method at each phase of the data collection and analysis and will be aided by using MAXQDA software. The outcomes will identify knowledge gaps relating to social media and nursing and will make recommendations on the usage of social media in Saudi Arabia in the nursing field.

Natalie Stewart (PhD, BUBS) Promoting a positive and cohesive research culture for postgraduate researchers Research culture is thought to be a substantive influencer in the overall student experience for postgraduate researchers (PGRs) in the UK Higher Education sector. In consecutive AdvanceHE Postgraduate Research Experience Survey (PRES), findings highlight over a third of responding PGRs are expressing dissatisfaction with their experience of the research culture at their own university (AdvanceHE 2019). Research culture is reported to be less positively experienced in seven core areas measured which includes, supervision, resources, progress and assessment, responsibilities, research skills and professional development. The aim of this research is to explore ways in which higher education institutions can actively create and influence more positive research cultures for their PGRs, who are working across a wide range of potential discipline areas. This poster outlines the rationale for this research and anticipated approach.


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Rachel Clarke (MRes, BUBS) Leadership as a means of cultivating innovation: analogue people in a digital future This research study considers how innovation is successfully nurtured within the UK small and medium sized business (SME) environment, and if leadership styles have a role to play when successfully cultivating an innovative culture within such SMEs. Furthermore, the research is investigating the tools that UK SMEs need to adopt to be able to successfully innovate. The research is a two-stage qualitative interview-based study in which data is collected from professional employees of identified SMEs within specific sectors. The participants are interviewed on their own, and then as part of a larger focus group, to enable the expansion of ideas and concepts presented. This research forms part of an emerging field of leadership within a practical context and contributes to the emerging knowledge of leadership, leadership styles, and innovation.

Raksha Thapa (PhD, FHSS) Caste Exclusion and Health Discrimination in South Asia: A Systematic Review The caste system is a three millennia old social stratification system in the world. This review investigates caste- based inequity in health care utilisation in South Asia, particularly focusing those at the bottom of the caste hierarchy, the so-called Dalit communities. A systematic methodology was followed, key databases (including CINAHL, Medline, SocINDEX, PubMed, Nepjol, JSTOR and ASSIA ) were searched using the PRISMA. Out of 15,109 papers nine selected papers were included in the review. The papers focused on studies in India (n=7) and Nepal (n=2) and using methods including qualitative (n=2), quantitative (n=3) and mixed method (n=4) approaches. The review identified four main themes; stigma, poverty, beliefs/cultures and healthcare. Caste-based inequality impacts upon all aspects of individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well-being, violence and peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opportunities to access education, employment and healthcare. Dalits appear to experience this significantly due to their lower caste and socioeconomic position which also increases their vulnerability to health.

Raysa El Zein (PhD, FHSS) Feasibility study: effect of vegetable oil on memory in older-adults and those with MCI Associations between diet and cognitive impairments in older-adults have been demonstrated in some studies. Inducing ketosis to provide an alternative energy source (ketones) by modifying the amount and type of dietary fat could reduce neuro-degeneration in older-adults. The aim of this feasibility study was to use a dietary intervention to investigate the effect of coconut oil intake (compared with sunflower oil) on cognition and quality of life in older-adults and those with Mild Cognitive Impairment. The study followed a randomized clinical trial design and participants were allocated either coconut oil or sunflower oil for 6 months. To date, data has been collected from 18 participants using questionnaires, interviews, food records, cognitive tests and blood ketone tests. Preliminary results from this study demonstrate the ability of participants to adhere to the dietary intervention and the potential effect of coconut oil intake in improving verbal memory in older-adults and those with MCI.


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Sara Stride (PhD, FHSS) Taking time to explore appropriate methods The first phases of my doctorate work used mixed methods to increase my understanding of midwives’ beliefs and attitudes regarding birth trauma. I identified five key themes; one of these was that midwives felt “ashamed” when women sustain severe birth trauma. Methods: Taking time to read and attend workshops this year has clarified the methods that I intend to use to now explore individual midwives’ experiences in more depth. Interviews will be facilitated using an online platform, as face to face contact needs to be minimised during the current Covid-19 Pandemic. Grounded theory will be used, so sampling, collection of data, analysis and theory construction will occur concurrently. Initial Findings: The study will provide data on midwives’ experiences when women sustain severe birth trauma. Contribution to knowledge: Understanding midwives’ experiences will enable me to identify the support midwives need.

Sulochana Dhakal-Rai (PhD, FHSS) Factors contributing to rising caesarean section rates in South Asian Countries: a systematic review Background: Caesarean Sections (CS) can save a mother’s life in childbirth but can also be an unnecessary medical intervention in a natural process. This systematic review investigates factors/indicators affecting increasing Caesarean Section rates in South Asia. Methods: Quantitative studies published from 2010 to 2018 were found on electronic databases. Critical Appraisal Skill Programme checklists were used for assessing the quality. Narrative synthesis of the indications/factors associated with CS was divided into distinct categories using content analysis. Results: Sixty-eight studies were included and both CS indications and significant associated factors were explored. The most common medical indications of CS were foetal distress and previous CS. Higher maternal age was the most common associated factor followed by higher education and urban residency. Maternal request was the most common non-medical indication of CS. Conclusion: Modifiable indicators/factors reflect global trends, suggesting we need a global strategy to stem the rise of unnecessary CS.

Vanessa Bartholomew (PhD, FHSS) RETHINK – Can we reduce hospital admission in latent labour? Background: Women experiencing an uncomplicated pregnancy are at increased risk of obstetric intervention if admitted to hospital during latent labour. Pain and fear are significant factors in early hospital admissions. Pain catastrophising (PC) is a strong predictor of childbirth pain. Studies have yet to consider whether PC influences the timing of hospital admission. Aim: To examine whether PC is a predictor for early hospital admission when in labour and subsequently birth outcomes. Design: A pragmatic, quasi-experimental study. Sample: Primigravid women who are experiencing an uncomplicated pregnancy, will be recruited between 25-33 weeks gestation. Target sample size is 384. Data Collection: Participants will complete two online questionnaires; one antenatal, the second three weeks postnatal. Birth outcomes will also be collected. Analysis: Logistic regression, will be used to assess if PC is a predictor of early hospital admission. Other explanatory factors (e.g. socioeconomic variables) will be considered. Significance level will be p≤0.05.


10908-11/2020

Profile for Bournemouth University

The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference  

Brochure for The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference

The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference  

Brochure for The 12th Annual Postgraduate Research Conference

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