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2018 - 2020 portfolio of works

‘Boulouki’ Itinerant Workshop on Traditional Building Techniques Nikitara 5-7 Athens, 106 78, info@boulouki.org, +30 211 1828348


ABOUT| Boulouki is an interdisciplinary research collaborative, whose work is focused on the study of traditional building techniques and materials. In Greek Boulouki means “gaggle”, travelling group, a name evoking the tradition of travelling companies of stone masons and craftsmen. Its aim is to trace and document the living carriers of such traditional knowledge; to study and to further disseminate it through workshops and actual building projects which are organized in collaboration with local communities. Based upon these thematic axes, the group’s course of action includes conducting research, organizing workshops, conferences and cultural events; promoting projects in collaboration with local communities and their stakeholders. So far, Boulouki has mostly worked in Epirus, a mountainous area of Greece, once celebrated for its stone masons, and also a crossroads for various Balkan cultures. Our aim is to develop a ‘hands-on’ approach of cultural heritage, through the processes of making, repairing and building, to contribute to the study of traditional building techniques as an operative field of knowledge, orientated -apart from conservation and documentation- towards contemporary building practices. Until this day, Boulouki has developed a network of partners from major academic institutions in Greece, such as the National Technical University of Athens, the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, the University of Patras and the University of Ioannina, while renowned professors from various disciplines and practitioners from the fields of restoration and heritage management have given lectures and presented their work in Boulouki’s workshops. Since May 2018, Boulouki operates as an Urban Non-Profit Company, based in Athens.

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REAPPEARANCES| Places of origin as a foundation for the development of participatory models in the heritage management of cultural landscapes

KALDERIMI X2| Paving the way for a new generation of craftspeople

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VOVOUSA| From the forest to the sawmills and carpentry workshops

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SHELTERS| Rearranging the traditional wood-fired oven Introducing a tree-house in Tzoumerka

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BOULOUKI AT THE BRIDGE| The arch, the wall and the ‘kalderimi’

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APPENDIX| 151 List of Images

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REAPPEARANCES| Places of origin as a foundation for the development of participatory models in the heritage management of cultural landscapes

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REAPPEARANCES| location: Aristi, Zagori, Epirus, NW Greece date: 17/08/2020 - 13/09/2020 tutors: Michalis Besiris, Kostas Tarnanas, Christos Tsekas, Pavlos Vichas aegis: Region of Epirus, Ministry of Culture and Sports, Hellenic National Commission for UNESCO co-organisers: Boulouki, Aristi Youth Foundation, TCG Epirus Department sponsors: Ministry of Culture and Sports, local businesses, crowdfunding campaign, White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities, Municipality of Zagori coordination: Faidon Moudopoulos - Athanasiou, Anna Zacharaki collaboration: HSGME LITHOS Lab, Vassilis Ganiatsas (symposium moderator), Georgios Smyris (symposium moderator) photography: Eleni Mitropoulou

‘Reappearances’ project was a combination of a practical workshop and a participatory restoration of an old cobbled pathway, important part of Aristi’s ‘kalderimi’ network, in Zagori region. The main goal of the workshop was to involve the local community in the appreciation and management of its own cultural landscape and public space. Through this process, we traced the potential of a cultural heritage management model based on active civil engagement. Placing the focus on local stakeholders, the program was targeted at the people of Aristi: those who permanently reside in the village, as well as those who originate from Aristi and the broader area of Zagori, but live in different places around Greece and abroad. Three young local apprentices and twenty volunteers worked under the guidance of four experienced stonemasons during four weeks in order to construct a sixty meter long pathway, around sixty five square meters of dry stone walls, along with a small public fountain. In the course of the restoration project, local collective memories over the historical use of the pathway were rejuvenated. Another crucial part of the project was the one-day symposium on the cultural landscapes and the art of drystone knowledge, during which two round-table discussions were hosted; the first one regarding the use of local materials in the cultural landscapes and the second one regarding the legal framework of drystone craftsmanship. Representatives from academic and respected institutional bodies –including the Ministry of Culture– but also masons and local authorities, participated in the discussions, which concluded with issuing two decrees of multilateral understanding. The project was also framed with parallel activities, such as hiking along Voidomatis in the UNESCO global geopark of Vikos- Aoos, a cultural walk at the historic place where the Grambala Battle took place, a visit in the sacred forest of Ayia Paraskevi and documentaries screening.

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Part of the restored cobbled pathway (02)

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The dilapitated kalderimi of Aristi. Condition on site (03)

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Survey drawing (04)

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Master- mason Christos Tsekas chiselling the stones (05)

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An apprentice working on the dry-stone retaining wall (06)

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A participant working on the cobbled pathway (07)

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Team work during the 2nd week of the workshop (08)

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A participant working on the dry-stone retaining wall (09)

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A participant working on the cobbled pathway (10)

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Works in progress (11)

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Design proposal drawing (12)

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Conversation with professor Vassilis Nitsiakos concerning community participation in heritage conservation (13)

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Professor Vassilis Dalkavoukis in an open discussion with the participants about the enthological history of Zagori (14)

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Team work on the cobbled pathway during the 3rd week of the workshop (15)

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Film screening organized by Zagoriwood in the central square of Aristi village (16)

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Part of the restored cobbled pathway (17)

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Part of the restored cobbled pathway (18)

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KALDERIMI X2| Paving the way for a new generation of craftspeople

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KALDERIMI X2| location: Plaka, North Tzoumerka, Epirus, NW Greece date: 07/09/2019 - 31/10/2019 tutors: Giorgos Anastasiadis, Dimitris Photis, Kostas Tarnanas aegis: Greek Ministry of Culture & Sports, Region of Epirus co-organisers: Municipality of North Tzoumerka, Technical Chamber of Greece (TCG), Department of West Macedonia of TCG sponsors: The Headley Trust, AEGEAS NGO, local businesses support: Metsovion Interdisciplinary Research Center of NTUA photography: Athena Apostolou, Anna Lagaria, Pietro Radin, Penelope Thomaidou, George Zoilis

‘Kalderimi X2’ consisted of a two-month apprenticeship in traditional stone masonry, aiming to foster a new generation of craftspeople from Greece and other Balkan countries and a twelve-day workshop targeting a broader audience such as architects and engineers, conservators and artists. One of the main goals of this program was to re-introduce the more or less forgotten building technique of ‘kalderimi’ (a particular type of cobbled pathway), whose ‘loss’ has already had a severe impact on the cultural landscape of the Balkan region. Nine apprentices from Greece, Serbia, Albania and Bosnia worked for two months under the guidance of three highly experienced masons-tutors, on the rebuilding of the old pathway (around 400m long) that leads to the historical Bridge of Plaka; while twenty-two participants from the entire Balkan area joined forces with them during the twelve-day workshop. The initiative was also supported by five volunteers and six more local craftsmen. Moreover, Boulouki was honored to receive five carved stones as a present by the prominent sculptor Theodoros Papayiannis, professor emeritus in the Athens School of Fine Arts, to be embed in the restored ‘kalderimi’. “Kalderimi X2” was also framed by a series of lectures and presentations given by renowned academics and practitioners from various disciplines, as well as NGO’s from Greece and abroad who shared their approaches towards a participatory understanding of heritage. Moreover, the educational part of this program was enriched by additional ‘hands-on’ seminars and demonstrations on topics such as manual stone extraction, lime and clay mortars. Finally, Boulouki organized a series of open events in which the local communities of Tzoumerka were highly involved, including a photographic exhibition from the archive of Spyros Mantas, an profound researcher of Balkan stone bridges, a film screening of “The Mountain Tears” (2018) followed by Q&A with director Stelios Charalampopoulos and a feast dedicated to the elder stone masons of Tzoumerka and Epirus.

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Part of the restored cobbled pathway (02)

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The dilapitated kalderimi of Plaka. Condition on site (03)

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Map of the intervention area (04)

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Thomas Papaioannou. Apprentice, 19 years old (05)

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Craftsmen of Pyrsogianni village in 1932 (06)

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New generation of craftsmen form Greece and the Balkans with their tutors (07)

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A mason’s tools (08)

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The mason-tutor and his apprentices (09)

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Hand made timber scaffold for a dry-stone retaining wall (10)

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Carving an “arkas”, a type of a traditional stone balustrade (11)

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Works in progress (12)

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Laying the corner stones (13)

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Reconstruction plan. Detail including two types of kalderimi (14)

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Placing the snake (15)

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A human face carved by sculptor Theodoros Papagiannis and his assistant Fato Sulli (16)

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Theodoros Papagiannis speaks on his work to the workshop participants at the “Theodoros Papagiannis” Museum of Contemporary Art (17)

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Demonstration of traditional stone extraction during the 12-day workshop (18) (19)

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Master-mason Kostas Tarnanas from Pentalofos (Kozani, Greece) extracting stone by Arachthos River (20)

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Demonstration of traditional stone carving techniques by elder stone mason, Giorgos Pappas (21)

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Practice on tools during a special event dedicated to stone carving (22)

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A participant working on the pathway (23)

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Day trip to Kipina Monastery, North Tzoumerka (24)

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Team work during the 12-day workshop (25)

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A participant working on the pathway during the 12-day workshop (26)

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Elder Stone Mason’s Feast, during the 12-day workshop (27)

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From Tzoumerka to Iceland. Guest NGO’s presenting their work (28)

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The dry-stone retaining wall in its final form (29)

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“A bird on a branch” by Theodoros Papagiannis, embedded in the new kalderimi (30)

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Dry-stone wall rebuilt in order to allow the tree growth (31)

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Master-mason Dimitris Fotis overlooking the restored kalderimi (32)

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VOVOUSA| From the forest to the sawmills and carpentry workshops

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VOVOUSA| location: Vovousa, Zagori, Epirus, NW Greece date: 17/07/2019 - 20/07/2019 tutors: Alekos Drougias (head-tutor carpenter), Zissis Dimou (carpenter), Charalampos Dimou (Carpenter), Stergios Nakkas (carpenter), Christos Varsanis (carpenter), Yiannis Dimou (logger),Thanassis Stangoyiannis (logger), Michalis Vassiotis (logger) co-organiser: Vovousa Festival support: Region of Epirus, Municipality of Zagori, Vovousa Cultural Foundation, Administrative Board of the Northern Pindos National Park Management Agency, Protect Aoos photography: George Detsis, Anna Lagaria

During Vovousa Festival 2019, Boulouki was invited to organize a workshop dedicated to the local tradition of logging and carpentry in the village of Vovousa, Zagori. Wandering between the nearby forest, the local carpentry workshops and the riverside settlement, accompanied by fifteen participants, a group of local craftspeople and forester Nikos Kanellopoulos, we explored the aspects of wood as a living organism and a building material, a local economic resource and a cultural symbol. The idea behind this four-day program was to provide a spherical understanding of working with wood, as a complex cultural process both in theory and practice. During the first day we focused on the craft of traditional logging and the meanings of sustainable forest management; while the rest of the days were dedicated to the practice of woodworking with the use of traditional handtools alongside local carpenters, and to wood conservation techniques under the guidance of conservation scientist Dimitris Tsipotas. By the end of the workshop, we delivered a double wooden door that we designed and constructed for the local open air Water Power Museum, as requested by the community.

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Vovousa village is known for its local tradition of logging and carpentry (02)

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Demonstration of logging by local carpenters (03)

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Reading the growth rings (04)

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Demonstration of woodworking techniques by head-tutor carpenter Alekos Drougias (05)

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A participant treating an old wooden door during the wood conservation seminar (06)

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After the first phase of the conservation treatment (07)

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Visiting local carpentry workshops of Vovousa (08)

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Exploring architectural applications of wood in local residential buildings (09)

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Drawings of the wooden double door constructed during the last day of the workshop (10)

ΒΩΒΟΥΣΑ ΙΩΑΝΝΙΝΩΝ - ΥΠΑΙΘΡΙΟ ΜΟΥΣΕΙΟ ΥΔΡΟΚΙΝΗΣΗΣ - ΝΕΡΟΜΥΛ 88


Local carpenters assisting participants during the construction (11)

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The new wooden double door for the local open air Water Power Museum of Vovousa (12)

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SHELTERS| Rearranging the traditional wood-fired oven Introducing a tree-house in Tzoumerka

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SHELTERS| location: Melissourgoi & Pramanta, Tzoumerka, Epirus, NW Greece date: 01/05/2019 - 06/05/2019 tutors: Christos Kyriakogonas, Pavlos Vihas, Georgos Karvelas, Tryfonas Papaioannou photography: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis, Ioanna-Maria Vemmou sponsors: Dalkafouki Oikos - Traditional Restoration Materials, Stergiou ABEE, Bougias Stones, I. & T. Tzitziklis - Clay Bricks and Roof Tiles Factory, MrBill - DIY

Shelters consisted of two 6-day long workshops which took place in tandem, at the Mountain Refuge of Melissourgoi and the Mountain Refuge of Pramanta, each focusing on different materials and building techniques. By virtue of both their proximity and distance from the fragile environment of vernacular settlements, Mountain Refuges seems to invite our building imagination towards creative adaptations of tradition. On the one hand, the adjacency to the settlements allows us to reflect on the significance of architectural types, as formal structures and as carriers of multiple layers of knowledge. On the other hand, the distance from those great ‘teachers’, invites us to ‘play’ and imagine the ways through which traditional techniques, natural materials and the unmediated relation to the actual work, could be identified today and thus express our current values. In this manner ‘Shelters’ are introduced as places of a ‘protected play’. During our stay, we attempted to probe contemporary interpretations of tradition’s teachings, by engaging with two different constructions. Within this framework, those willing to participate were asked to choose between two topics, concerning the practical part of the workshops: A. STONE - CLAY: Rearranging the traditional wood-fired oven B. WOOD: Introducing a treehouse in Tzoumerka Both structures were designed with the participation of the managers of the refuges who supported the works wholeheartedly. Finally, the participants had the opportunity to attend joint lectures of technical and theoretical content around the topics of both workshops and also to meet and share their experiences in gatherings by the fire that took place almost every night.

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A “Shelters” poster on the sycamore of Melissourgoi central square (02)

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A. STONE - CLAY: Rearranging the traditional wood-fired oven| Drawing from the traditional typology, and also from contemporary adaptations, the new wood-fired oven of the Melissourgoi Shelter was constructed with local stone, as well as, fired clay bricks and mud plasters for the dome. The local stone mason Pavlos Vihas and the earth construction specialist, Christos Kiriakogonas (member of Natural Building Collaborative), were the instructors during the building process.

Construction sketch for the wood-fired oven (03)

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Firing the oven for first time (04)

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First day of works in Melissourgoi Mountain Refuge (05)

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Axonometric sketch of the wood- fired oven (06)

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Concrete model of the oven presented to the manager of Melissourgoi refuge (07)

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Laying the foundations of the oven (08)

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Participants working together on the oven’s brick dome (09)

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Local stone mason Pavlos Vihas, head-instructor, during the oven’s building process (10)

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Building the brick arch for the oven’s door (11)

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Hand tool for aligning the clay bricks (12)

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Shaping the dome with fired clay bricks and mud plasters (13)

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First cooking in the new wood-fired oven of Melissourgoi Shelter (14)

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Professor Maria Arakadaki giving a lecture on “receptive spaces of fire” (15)

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B. WOOD: Introducing a treehouse in Tzoumerka| The treehouse, which the family running the Shelter of Pramanta has been longing for, was constructed entirely out of wooden parts using traditional joints. The building process was led by Tryfonas Papaioannou, a local carpenter from the village of Kypseli and the architect - carpenter Giorgos Karvelas.

Construction sketch for the treehouse (16)

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Interior view of the treehouse attic (17)

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Using hand tools to shape the traditional joints of wooden parts (18)

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Participant trying to join two wooden parts (19)

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Local carpenter and head-tutor Tryfonas Papaioannou using his portable self-built bandsaw assisted by a participant (20)

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Construction of the treehouse’s wooden frame (21)

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Wooden tiles for the roof drying after tar & linseed oil coating application (22)

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Treehouse works in progress (23)

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Axonometric sketch of the treehouse (24)

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The treehouse of Pramanta Mountain Shelter, completed (25)

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BOULOUKI AT THE BRIDGE| The arch, the wall and the ‘kalderimi’

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BOULOUKI AT THE BRIDGE| location: Plaka, North Tzoumerka, Epirus, NW Greece date: 20/08/2018 - 31/08/2018 tutors: Christos Tsekas, Pavlos Vichas, Kostas Pliakopanos, Charis Mpoumpougiannis, Giorgos Triantafyllos, Dimitris & Kostas Photis, Nikos Manthos, Dimitris Georgoulis, Kostas Tarnanas aegis: Region of Epirus co-organisers: Municipality of North Tzoumerka, Metsovion Interdisciplinary Research Centre sponsors: local businesses photography: George Dimitrakopoulos

Back in 2018, the region of North Tzoumerka came to the forefront of the national agenda concerning cultural heritage, as the reconstruction project of the ‘Bridge of Plaka’ (once the largest one-arched bridge of the Balkan area) was about to begin. It was evident to us, that the reconstruction of this significant landmark could be an ideal opportunity to provide a new impetus for an operative and participatory understanding of heritage in Greece. In this direction, we organized our first Twelve-day Stone Masonry Workshop in August 2018, on the cobbled pathway that used to lead to the historic bridge. The main objective of this workshop was to gather young professionals from fields related to the built environment (craftsmen, engineers, artists) in a systematic approach of the traditional knowledge concerning stone, while getting to know the amazing region of Tzoumerka. Prompted by the historic Plaka Bridge, the workshop focused on the three fundamental structural parts of a stone bridge: the arch, the wall and the kalderimi, which also respond to three different building types and techniques. Selected among more than 90 applications from Greece and abroad, the 18 participants were introduced to these building techniques while repairing parts of the old cobbled pathway that leads to the historical bridge, under the guidance of 10 experienced tutor masons1. Moreover, distinguished academics and professionals in the fields of conservation, regional development and cultural management presented several lectures to a wide audience of participants and the local community, and many more parallel cultural activities took place during the workshop. This first workshop led to the Kalderimi X2 project that was implemented in 2019.

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Cobbled pathway, partly restored during the 12-day workshop (02)

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Demonstration of stone extraction (03)

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Hand tools for stone carving (04)

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A mason’s hand tools (05)

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Demonstration of stone carving techniques by Konstantinos Stavroulas, an elder stone mason (06)

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Lecture by the distinguished professor of architectural history Manolis Korres (07)

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Participants cleaning together the old cobbled pathway (08) (09)

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A small arched bridge over an irrigation channel (10)

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Dry stone walls, restored (11) (12)

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Local mason Christos Tsekas working on the cobbled pathway (13)

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Construction drawings for the restoration of a selected part of the pathway (14)

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The restored cobbled pathway (15)

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Film screening by the riverside and the historical bridge of Plaka (16)

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THE TEAM| CORE MEMBERS Panos Kostoulas is an architect, graduated from University of Patras (UP). Since then, he has worked with several architectural firms in India and Greece, and also as a part-time lecturer in Ooty McGan’s School of Architecture in Tamil Nadu, India. He has been part of various projects related to natural and traditional building techniques and has organised two workshops for earth architecture. He is currently completing a postgraduate program on Materials Science and Technology at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), focusing on historical mortars. Panos is a co-founder and coadministrator of Boulouki.

Ionas Sklavounos graduated in architecture from the University of Patras (UP) and completed his post-graduate studies in Epistemology of Architecture at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), where he also worked as Teaching Assistant in the courses of Architectural Design and Analysis and Study of Historical Settlements and Ensembles. At the moment his pursuing doctoral studies at the University of Antwerp (UA) within the “Communities of Tacit Knowledge: Architecture and its ways of Knowing” Innovative Training Network. He is a co-founder and co-administrator of Boulouki.

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Mina Kouvara is a professional architect and maker/artist by nature, and holds a MSc related to the environment and development of mountainous and remote regions (NTUA-MIRC). Her research and practice focuses on the fusion of workmanship, heritage and education in reference to the socio-economic realm. Landscape as substance (matter and spirit) and as a theoretical and institutional tool is fundamental to her methodological approach. Mina is a co-founder of Boulouki and former core member (2018-06/2020). Contact: mina.koov [at] gmail.com

Grigoris Koutropoulos is an architect. He graduated from the University of Patras (UP), where he also worked as a teaching assistant at the department of Architecture and participated in three research programs related to cultural heritage led by the institution. He has attended various workshops on restoration of traditional buildings in Greece and Albania. During the last years, he has worked as a collaborator with two architectural firms which are focused in surveys for the restoration of listed monuments in Greece, Cyprus, Turkey and Egypt. He is currently completing a post-graduate program on cultural management of monuments at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (NKUA). Grigoris is a co-founder of Boulouki.

Christoforos Theocharis is a civil engineer (Democritus University of Thrace - DUTH) and has been actively involved in the field of the built environment for more than ten years. Parallel to his job in an engineering office in Vienna, he completed his Master’s degree at Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) with a major in Building Science and Technology. During his stay in Austria, he has planned and supervised the construction of several small and middle-range buildings in Vienna and its surroundings, as member of Bauklimatik GmbH. He has participated in several workshops on vernacular architecture and traditional building techniques in Germany, Austria, Albania and Greece. Christoforos is a co-founder of Boulouki.

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ADVISORS David Baxter MA Arch Hist: BA(Hons) T&CP: DIP UD: IHBC David Baxter is a Conservation Professional with over 35 years experience in Historic Buildings and Traditional Architecture. He has been European Projects Director for the IHBC and Director of the International Built Heritage Conservation Training Centre at Banffy Castle Romania, training over 1600 students from 26 countries in traditional building craft skills. He has extensive experience in design/ implementation of projects funded by the EU/ International Foundations, in Community Development through Heritage, and Exchange of knowledge and Expertise at an International level. He was Director of Restoration to the Romanian Royal Family for Royal properties from 2007 -2014, and served as a Member of The Presidential Commission of Romania for Built Heritage, Historic Sites and the Natural Environment. He currently is an External Advisor to Boulouki and a Specialist Lecturer to CHWB.

Karen Knight BA, AMA, FRSA Karen is an experienced museum professional with a career focused on access to collections, buildings and research, and on the role of museums in learning at all age levels. She has a track record of achieving organisational focus and change, as well as a proven ability to influence and gain support from Government, public and private benefactors, and other stakeholders. In recent years she has worked with organisations in the UK and across the Balkans which focus on the retention of traditional craft skills and the renovation of heritage buildings.

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COLLABORATORS Faidon Moudopoulos Athanasiou is a PhD student at the Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield. His research focuses in the early modern (Ottoman) archaeology of the Zagori mountains, NW Greece, funded by the White Rose College for the Arts and Humanities (AHRC) and the A.G. Leventis Foundation. He holds a BA in History and Archaeology from the University of Crete and MAs in Aegean Archaeology and Heritage Management from the Universities of Sheffield and Kent, respectively. His research interests range from post-medieval and early-modern archaeology to archaeological theory, the history of archaeology and cultural heritage management.

Maria Chassioti is an architect and holds a Diploma of Architecture with Honors from University of Patras (UP). Her research interest focuses on interdisciplinary creative collaborations through research, design and production of a series of genre-defying spatial performances and installations. She was a member of the curatorial team of the Greek Participation at the 13th and 14th International Exhibition of Architecture - La Biennale di Venezia. Since 2012 she has collaborated with a number of design offices in Athens and participated in the study of small and large scale projects in Greece and abroad. She currently continues her post-graduate program in History and Theory of Art at the Athens School of Fine Arts (ASFA).

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APPENDIX| List of Images

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LIST OF IMAGES| REAPPEARANCES| Image 01: Building the drainage of the cobbled pathway Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 02: Part of the restored cobbled pathway Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 03: The dilapitated kalderimi of Aristi. Condition on site Credit: BLK Image 04: Survey drawing Credit: Grigoris Koutropoulos, BLK Image 05: Master- mason Christos Tsekas chiselling the stones Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 06: An apprentice working on the dry-stone retaining wall Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 07: A participant working on the cobbled pathway Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 08: Team work during the 2nd week of the workshop Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 09: A participant working on the dry-stone retaining wall Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 10: A participant working on the cobbled pathway Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 11: Works in progress Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 12: Design proposal drawing Credit: Grigoris Koutropoulos, BLK

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Image 13: Conversation with professor Vassilis Nitsiakos concerning community participation in heritage conservation Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 14: Professor Vassilis Dalkavoukis in an open discussion with the participants about the enthological history of Zagori Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 15: Team work on the cobbled pathway during the 3rd week of the workshop Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 16: Film screening organized by Zagoriwood in the central square of Aristi village Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou Image 17-18: Part of the restored cobbled pathway Credit: Eleni Mitropoulou

KALDERIMI X2|

Image 01: “A snake on the pathway” carved by Theodoros Papagiannis He is a sculptor and professor emeritus in Athens School of Fine Arts. Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 02: Part of the restored cobbled pathway Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 03: The dilapitated kalderimi of Plaka. Condition on site Credit: Panagiotis Kostoulas, BLK Image 04: Map of the intervention area Credit: Grigoris Koutropoulos, BLK Image 05: Apprentice Thomas Papaioannou, 19 years old Credit: Argiris Karagiorgas Image 06: Craftsmen of Pyrsogianni village in 1932 Credit: Spiros Mantas

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Image 07: New generation of craftsmen form Greece and the Balkans with their tutors Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 08: A mason’s tools Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 09: The mason-tutor and his apprentices Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 10: Hand made timber scaffold for a dry-stone retaining wall Credit: Anna Lagaria Image 11: Carving an “arkas”, a type of a traditional stone balustrade Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 12: Works in progress Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 13: Laying the corner stones Credit: Athena Apostolou Image 14: Reconstruction plan. Detail including two types of kalderimi Credit: Grigoris Koutropoulos, BLK Image 15: Placing the snake Credit: Athena Apostolou Image 16: A human face carved by sculptor Theodoros Papagiannis and his assistant Fato Sulli Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 17: Theodoros Papagiannis speaks on his work to the workshop participants at the “Theodoros Papagiannis” Museum of Contemporary Art Credit: Penelope Thomaidou Images 18-19: Demonstration of traditional stone extraction during the 2-week workshop Credit: Athena Apostolou

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Image 20: Master-mason Kostas Tarnanas from Pentalofos (Kozani, Greece) extracting stone by Aracthos River Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 21: Demonstration of traditional stone carving techniques by elder stone mason, Giorgos Pappas Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 22: Practice on tools during a special event dedicated to stone carving Credit: Athena Apostolou Image 23: A participant working on the pathway Credit: Athena Apostolou Image 24: Day trip to Kipina Monastery, North Tzoumerka Credit: Athena Apostolou Image 25: Team work during the 2-week workshop Credit: Athena Apostolou Image 26: A participant working on the pathway during the 12-day workshop Credit: Athena Apostolou Image 27: Elder Stone Mason’s Feast, during the 12-day workshop Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 28: From Tzoumerka to Iceland. Guest NGO’s presenting their work Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 29: The dry-stone retaining wall in its final form Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 30: “A bird on a branch” by Theodoros Papagiannis, embedded in the new ‘kalderimi’ Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 31: Dry-stone wall rebuilt in order to allow the tree growth Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK

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Image 32: Master-mason Dimitris Fotis overlooking the restored kalderimi Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis

VOVOUSA| Image 01: From the forest to the sawmills and carpentry workshops Credit: George Detsis Image 02: Vovousa village is known for its local tradition of logging and carpentry Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 03: Demonstration of logging by local carpenters Credit: George Detsis Image 04: Reading the growth rings Credit: George Detsis Image 05: Demonstration of woodworking techniques by head-tutor carpenter Alekos Drougias Credit: George Detsis Image 06: A participant treating an old wooden door during the wood conservation seminar Credit: George Detsis Image 07: After the first phase of the conservation treatment Credit: George Detsis Image 08: Visiting local carpentry workshops of Vovousa Credit: Anna Lagaria Image 09: Exploring architectural applications of wood in local residential buildings Credit: George Detsis Image 10: Drawings of the wooden double door constructed during the last day of the workshop Credit: Grigoris Koutropoulos, BLK

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Image 11: Local carpenters assisting participants during the construction Credit: Mina Kouvara, BLK Image 12: The new wooden double door for the local open air Water Power Museum of Vovousa Credit: George Detsis

SHELTERS| Image 01: Mountains of Tzoumerka Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 02: A “Shelters” poster on the sycamore of Melissourgoi central square Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 03: Construction sketch for the wood-fired oven Credit: Grigoris Koutropoulos, BLK Image 04: Firing the oven for first time Credit: Maria Chassioti Image 05: First day of works in Melissourgoi Mountain Refuge Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 06: Axonometric sketch of the wood- fired oven Credit: Grigoris Koutropoulos, BLK Image 07: Concrete model of the oven presented to the manager of Melissourgoi refuge Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 08: Laying the foundations of the oven Credit: Panagiotis Kostoulas, BLK Image 09: Participants working together on the oven’s brick dome Credit: Amalia Milioni Image 10: Local stone mason Pavlos Vihas, head-instructor, during the oven’s building process Credit: Panagiotis Kostoulas, BLK

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Image 11: Building the brick arch for the oven’s door Credit: Amalia Milioni Image 12: Hand tool for aligning the clay bricks Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 13: Shaping the dome with fired clay bricks and mud plasters Credit: Ionas Sklavounos, BLK Image 14: First cooking in the new wood-fired oven of Melissourgoi Shelter Credit: Panagiotis Kostoulas, BLK Image 15: Professor Maria Arakadaki giving a lecture on “receptive spaces of fire” Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 16: Construction sketch for the treehouse Credit: Grigoris Koutropoulos, BLK Image 17: Interior view of the treehouse attic Credit: Maria Chassioti Image 18: Using hand tools to shape the traditional joints of wooden parts Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 19: Participant trying to join two wooden parts Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 20: Local carpenter and head-tutor Tryfonas Papaioannou using his portable selfbuilt bandsaw assisted by a participant Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 21: Construction of the treehouse’s wooden frame Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 22: Wooden tiles for the roof drying after tar & linseed oil coating application Credit: Grigoris Koutropoulos, BLK Image 23: Working together with Treehouse works in progress

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Credit: Pietro Radin, George Zoilis Image 24: Axonometric sketch of the treehouse Credit: Grigoris Koutropoulos, BLK Image 25: The treehouse of Pramanta Mountain Shelter, completed Credit: Panagiotis Kostoulas, BLK

BOULOUKI AT THE BRIDGE|

Image 01: Boulouki at the Bridge Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Image 02: Cobbled pathway, partly restored during the 12-day workshop Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Image 03: Demonstration of stone extraction Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Image 04: Hand tools for stone carving Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Image 05: A mason’s hand tools Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Image 06: Demonstration of stone carving techniques by Konstantinos Stavroulas, an elder stone mason Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Image 07: Lecture by the distinguished professor of architectural history Manolis Korres Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Images 08-09: Participants cleaning together the old cobbled pathway Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Image 10: A small arched bridge over an irrigation channel Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Images 11-12: Dry stone walls, restored

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Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Image 13: Local mason Christos Tsekas working on the cobbled pathway Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Image 14: Construction drawings for the restoration of a selected part of the pathway Credit: Grigoris Koutropoulos, BLK Image 15: The restored cobbled pathway Credit: Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos Image 16: Film screening by the riverside and the historical bridge of Plaka Credit: Vasiliki Tsimi

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‘Boulouki’ Itinerant Workshop on Traditional Building Techniques Nikitara 5-7 Athens, 106 78, info@boulouki.org, +30 211 1828348


Profile for Boulouki

Portfolio 2018-2020  

A portfolio of works for the period 2018-2020 by Boulouki

Portfolio 2018-2020  

A portfolio of works for the period 2018-2020 by Boulouki

Profile for boulouki
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