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brand standards

ONE BY ONE WAT C H C o

brand standards


WHERE WE KEEP TIME Time is something which we hav e been curious about since the day we discov ered change. Time stays with it and we k ee p it.

DAYS DIVIDE Five thousand years ago, Sumerians in the Tig ris-Euphrates valley in today’s Iraq had a calendar that divided the year into 30 day months, divided the day into 12 periods (each corresponding to 2 of our hours), and divided these periods into 30 parts (each like 4 of our minutes).

MESOLITHIC PERIOD “Ice-age hunters in Europe over 20,000 years ago scratched lines and gouged holes in sticks and bones, possibly counting the days between phases of the moon.”

NIST

1500 CE

18000 BCE 3000 BCE

NIST

MECHANICAL MOVEMENTS In 1656, Christiaan Huygens, a Dutch scientist, made the first pendulum clock, regulated by a mechanism with a “natural” period of oscillation. (Galileo Galilei is credited with inventing the pendulum-clock concept, and he studied the motion of the pendulum as early as 1582. He even sketched out a design for a pendulum clock, but he never actually constructed one before his death in 1642.) Huygens’ early pendulum clock had an error of less than 1 minute a day, the first time such accuracy had been achieved. His later refinements reduced his clock’s error to less than 10 seconds a day. NIST

WHO HAS THE CORRECT TIME? All included information is from The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

2000 CE


WATCH HISTORY 1500

THE EARLIEST WATCHES

1600

THE BALANCE SPRING

1700

FIRST CHRONOMETER

1800

INTERCHANGEABLE PARTS

1900

PROGRESSIVE MOVEMENTS

The first watch movements were straight verge movements, with no balance springs. These first timepieces were notoriously innaccurate and utilized only an hour hand. What al lowed horologists to create a clock that did not need hanging weights was the spiral-leaf main spring. At the end of this period, astronomical data and dates were already being displayed on watches, but even with all of the embellishments, timekeeping was very poor.

It was not until 1675 that a spiral balance spring was used. This element took daily timekeeping accuracy from fractions of an hour to fractions of a minute. There is dispute as to who created the balance spring but many think it was Huygens since he also worked on the spiral spring. As accuracy increased, a minute hand was added. The commonality was to have the hours marked in Roman Numerals, and minutes in Aarabic.

The basics of the chonometers design included a balance completely detached from the trin, a helical balance spring instead of a spiral spring and maintaining power whilst being wound. All designs had some for m of temperature conmpensation. This accuracy allowed the second hand to be added to the watches.

It wasn’t until 1840 that interchangeable parts came into the watch market. While most watches at that time were hand finished the Swiss opted for low-cost machine made watch es that allowed parts to be swapped. The main change to the watch making was that holes were drilled with a panotg raph, which allowed for each watch to share the same holes. It was the American’s who capitalized on this and began mass production in the 1850’s.

As mechanical advancements occured within watches parts started to become smaller. This change in interior for m allowed watches to become smaller and therefore move from the pocket to the wrist. Watches started sharing similar features such as the chronog raph, datework, alar mwork, and moonwork. All of this standardization began to wash all of the brands into one indistinguishable space.

Since 1923, NIST radio station WWV has p r ov i d e d r o u n d - t h e - c l o c k s h o r t wave b r o a d c a s t s o f t i m e a n d f r e q u e n c y s i g n a l s. W W V ’s a u d i o s i g n a l i s a l s o o f f e r e d by t e l ep h o n e : d i a l (303) 499-7111 (not toll-free). A sister station, W W V H , wa s e s t abl i s h e d i n 1 9 4 8 i n H awa i i , a n d i t s s i g n a l c a n b e h e a rd by d i a l i n g ( 8 0 8 ) 3 3 5 - 4 3 6 3 i n H awa i i .

T i m e s i g n a l s a r e a n i m p o r t a n t by p r o d u c t o f t h e G l o b a l Po s i t i o n i n g S y s t e m ( G P S ) , a n d i n d e e d t h i s h a s b e c o m e t h e p r e m i e r s a t e l l i t e s o u rc e f o r t i m e s i g n a l s. T h e t i m e s c a l e o p e r a t e d by t h e U S N O s e r ve s a s r e f e r e n c e f o r G P S, bu t i t is impor tant to note that the time scales of N I S T a n d U S N O a r e h i g h l y c o o rd i n a t e d ( t h a t i s, s y n c h r o n i ze d t o we l l w i t h i n 1 0 0 n a n o s e c o n d s, or 100 billionths of a second).

O f f i c i a l U. S. G ove r n m e n t t i m e, a s p r ov i d e d by N I S T a n d U S N O, i s ava i l abl e o n t h e I n t e r n e t a t h t t p : / / w w w. t i m e. gov. N I S T a l s o o f f e r s a n I n t e rn e t T i m e S e r v i c e ( I T S ) a n d a n Au t o m a t e d C o m p u t e r T i m e S e r v i c e ( AC T S ) t h a t a l l ow s e t t i n g o f computer and other clocks through the Inter net o r ove r s t a n d a rd c o m m e rc i a l t e l e p h o n e l i n e s.


Why is it important to build a strong, appropriate and consistent One By One brand? To a l low t he customer to pa r t icipate i n t he na r rat ive movement s of t he bra nd. To i ncrea se awa reness t hat One By One is a n A mer ica n Co. To bu i ld g reater publ ic awa reness of A mer ica n Cu lt ure. To promote t he va lue of A mer ica n Cra ft s.


Identity & Brand? Why Worry?

Does our logo define our brand?

The Key

Whether we want to be or not, we are a brand. We’re out there— and our members and others are continually for ming opinions about us. Those opinions will be positive, negative or ambiguous. We need to participate actively in influencing opinions.

Our logo is a thing—it idenifies us on objects and in environments. In and of itself, it doesn’t say a whole lot about the entire company itself. As beautiful or unique as any logo may be, it remains essentially inanimate. Without being placed onto or into something, it is meaningless.

The key to successfully branding One By One is personal responsibility.

We can choose to be either visible or invisible. We can become perceived as either a good brand or a bad brand; a clear brand or a confusing brand; a helpful brand or an irritating brand; a responsible brand or an irresponsible brand. It’s up to us.

When our logo is placed into positive environments that ref lect our goals, values and initiaties, our organization will be well-represented and our desired messages delivered. Placed into a poor or inappropriate environment, the logo may only serve to misrepresent or confuse our goals, values and initiatives, and may reflect our company negatively. Our visual identity—our logo and supporting elements—identifies us. It says WHO we are. Our brand is the activation and manifestation of our goals, initiatives, mission and values. It demonstrates WHAT we are, and WHY we are.

All those involved in creating One By One Watches, environments and initiatives—Watchmakers, designers, stores owners, and sales-people—must be personally responsible for ensuring that the positive attributes of the organization are embodied in every ef fort; that the members and audiences are being well served; that the organization is getting credit for all its efforts. This cannot be accomplished merely with an identity manual or systematic branding guidlines. It can only be achieved with thoughtful, intelligent, creative efforts by thoughtful, intelligent, creative people. We must prog ram, write, design and deliver all that we do according to who we say we are. And then we must ensure that we are creditted for everything that we produce.

The pur pose of our branding prog ram is to evoke an appropriate emotional response from the viewer by embodying—within all our messages and actions—the positive emotional characteristics of the organization.

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ONE BY ONE WAT C H C o LOGO The One By One logo is a celebration of the balance achieved from each single moment’s correspondence with another. It is not only a literall balance between the two rounds but also holds space the way a musical note might within time. The for m is meant to be solid and adaptable, refined and mechanical at the same time. Within its many adaptations the logo should always be identifiable. During certain instances when the logo is of minimal size the descriptor may be dropped and at other times the company name. It is always important that the logotype be seen in all instances.

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ONE BY ONE WAT C H C o

4 FORMAL ARRANGEMENTS Each can be downloaded from the public website. At no instance may the mark be alterred in any way. At no point may the wordmark be used without the symbol.

WAT C H C o


COLOR PALETTE One By One’s color palette is deter mined by its application. The company preffer that the logo only show up white or black depending on the backg round. The mark was designed so that it would be completely recognizalbe without color and that it would ref lect it’s surroundings. Because all marketing will be done inter nally all designers will be breifed on the specific colors for that project. The mark may be defined by texture from an image as seen on the right. Aside from specific adaptations, One By One as that American Colors are used. T hese colros are bur nt red {C34, M90, Y100, K18} and Navy {C100, M19, Y12, K80}. T hese colors are best used as brief accents throughout all extensions of the One By One Company.


TYPOGRAPHY There are two families of type that should be used for all “per manent” On e By One materials, including stationer y, business cards, for ms, membership cards and signage: Univer se 59 Ultra and Baskerville. T hese typefaces may also be used wherever else they may be appropriate, but promotional materials and publications are not limited to these fonts and should be produced in the typefaces that are most appropriate to the subject matter being presented.

UNIVERSE 59 ULTRA CONDENSED

BASKERVILLE REGULAR

BASKERVILLE ITALIC

BASKERVILLE SEMIBOLD

BASKERVILLE SEMIBOLD ITALIC

BENDER BOLD

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TYPE LAYOUT When creating parag raphs of infor mation there are two dif ferent ways to present the text. One is horizontal which is the width of more than one column and vertical is always made up of one single column. When creating these rows and columns there are two dif ferent character options.

Wel l H a n.. you St ated t h at I need not B e Su r pr i sed to see L i le come Dow n to ou r C o.. I wou ld B e some su rpr i sed I f He Shou ld come t ho I wou ld love to H ave a l l good B oy s w it h u s But st i l l I wou ld adv i se H i m to Re m a i n at Home & let t hem D r a f t S ome of t hem Home Tor r ies

HORIZONTAL PARAGRAPH BASKERVILLE REGULAR 10/14 LINE-SPACING: 75 KERNING: OPTICAL

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VERTICAL PARAGRAPH BASKERVILLE REGULAR 10/18 LINE-SPACING: 90 KERNING: OPTICAL

We c a n not E x s pect t h i s Rebel l ion P ut Dow n w it h out F ight i ng & I a m i n favor of Doi ng t he F ight i ng a s soon a s Pos s ible & t hen t hose of u s t h at a re Spa red to l ive c a n Ret u r n to t here Hon nest Fr iend s I w i l l tel l you t h at L ieut Wa l ker & W i l l & a l l conv a lescent s were lef t at Helen a W i l l w a s get t i ng P ret t y Stout a g a i n But I told H i m t h at comei ng w it h t h i s E x ped it ion m ight t h row H i m Ba c k s ic k a g a i n & He conc luded to st ay t hough I E x s pect t h at He H a s w r iten to you B efore t h i s t i me


TITLING UNIVERS 59 ULTRA CONDENSED 14/16 LINE-SPACING: 75 KERNING: OPTICAL

DESCRIPTORS BASKERVILLE ITALIC 10/14 LINE-SPACING: 90 KERNING: OPTICAL

LOGO TYPOGRAPHY FONT ARRANGEMENTS Elements of titling may become larger but the y must still kee p a 7:8 raito.

Well I m u st cl ose fo r t h i s t i m e Pl ea se w r it e S oo n & w r it e all t h e Ne ws & Pa rt i c ul a rs & Pl e a se E xc u se t h i s I ll co mpose d l e t t e r & my P oo r w r it i n g & I w ill t r y & D o B e t t e r i n t h e F ut u re .


ONE BY ONE 2750 LAKE DRIVE SPOONER WI 54801

WAT CH C o

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O N E B Y O N E WAT C H C O M PA N Y

BUSINESS CARD, LETTERHEAD & ENVELOPE Online one can find the layouts for all three stationar y material. T he y are of fered in a PDF for mat and are to be printed on French Paperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speckletone Kraft 100C.

J A M E S M U R P H Y Wa t ch m a k e r

ONE BY ONE WATCH C o

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O N E B Y O N E WAT C H C O M PA N Y


. 5 In ch es LET TER HE A D

(8 . 5 i n x11i n)

BUS I N E S S C A R D

( 2i n x 3 . 5 i n)

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J A M E S M U R P H Y

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Wa t ch m a k e r

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No. 9

9/18

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O N E B Y O N E WAT C H C O M PA N Y

18 pt

ONE BY ONE 2750 LAKE DRIVE SPOONER WI 54801

B AC K

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O N E B Y O N E WAT C H C O M PA N Y

. 5 In ch es

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FALL BANDS 2011

COPYRIGHT 2011 ONEBYONE.COM

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WEBSITE T he One By One Website can be found by going to 1x1.com. T here anyone can shop, experience the company, vie w the histor y, contact the company and access social networking pa ges.


ADVERTISEMENT SPREADS All advertisement spreads are to utilize the g rid layout of the ta g when marketting a product.


PACKAGING T he wood packa ging is to be hand crafted from recycled Wisconsin Cheese boxes. Each box is beautifull y assembed all the way do wn to the placement of watch manual.

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THERE IS SUR OTHER TH A N PURPOSE OF T Ancient Haiku


RELY NOTHING THE SINGLE THE MOMENT.


ONE BY ONE .COM

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One By One Brands Standards Manual