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Sam Holleman


Sam Holleman Sam Holleman

May 15, 2014 Philip DeFranco Creator P.O. Box address: Attention: Philip DeFranco 6433 Topanga Canyon Blvd. #805 Canoga Park, CA 91303 Dear Mr. DeFranco, Perhaps Sourcefed is looking for someone who can write proficiently, work well both independently and in a group setting, and constantly contribute quality work to the channel. If so, please accept and consider the attached resume for the position as host on Sourcefed. As a writer for my high school newspaper, I wrote detailed and well researched editorials and worked alongside my fellow staffers in the writing process. With a background in writing and journalism, I will be able to bring new ideas, look at stories through angles previously unheard of, and take on the job from an easily accessible journalistic standpoint. Productively, I enjoy working with others on writing and presenting stories and intend to present many new ideas on how to distribute content to as many people as possible, as well as make them informative with some humor thrown in. Being a part of this creative atmosphere would help mold me and my writing skills for the rest of my life. Although the resume outlines my work history in a very detailed manner, I believe a personal interview would better present what I can contribute. I would greatly appreciate the opportunity to meet with you in a face-to-face interview at a convenient time. Thank you for your consideration and I hope to hear from you soon. Fondly,

Samuel Holleman Writer

1222 Silverstone ave. Orlando, FL 32806

samuel.holleman@gmail.com

407-668-8645


Sam Holleman Sam Holleman

Objective To improve writing and news delivery skills through creating Youtube videos as a full time career.

Education Completed three years at William R. Boone High School Graduation date: May, 29, 2014 G.P.A. 3.7

Experience -August 2011-June 2013. Columnist and feature/sports writer for campus newspaper. Experience with photography, graphic design, writing, face-to-face interviewing, and advertisement sales. -August 2013-present. Copy editor, columnist, and feature/sports writer for campus newspaper. Experience with all aforementioned traits and in addition: editing stories and design. -August 2012-present. Online reporter, feature writer, sports reporter, editorial writer, and multimedia contributor for hilights.org. Experience in online researching and videography. -February 12, 2014. Author, editor, and cover page designer for published short story: Flash. Experience in writing, designing, and editing. - March 17, 2014. Author and editor of published novel: Finding Purpose. Experience in writing, designing, and editing. -April 7, 2014. Author, editor, and cover page designer of soon-to-be-published poem and screenplay: I Have Thought. Experience in writing, designing, and editing.

Memberships, Honors, and Awards Newspaper Staff Member, William R. Boone High School -May 2013. All-Florida Award for Column Writing. Marching Band member, William R. Boone High School -August 2010-June 2013. Performer for the Sound of the Braves Marching band. Experience in teamwork, following orders, and musical performance. -August 2013-present. Operations Captain for the Sound of the Braves Marching Band. Experience in leading a team, giving orders, and loading a truck. -May 2013. The Instrumentalist Magazine Merit Award.

1222 Silverstone ave. Orlando, FL 32806

samuel.holleman@gmail.com

407-668-8645


Selfanalytical essay My career in journalism started with nothing other than pure jealousy. Back in the seventh grade, my friend Alex was given the opportunity to be on our middle school’s online newspaper staff for its first year. He accepted the offer. When he told me about this, as I mentioned before, I got jealous. I didn’t even know I wanted to do something like that until Alex started doing it. So when eight grade rolled around, I applied for staff and got accepted. It was during this year I discovered my love for writing editorials. I could write an editorial. It was something I understood and felt important doing. So I wrote a lot of them to experiment with different areas of the news to write about, only to find that I enjoyed writing about all of them. I signed up for J1 at the beginning of freshman year, got on Boone high school’s newspaper staff, and became Copy Editor senior year. Over the course of this year I learned why we have deadlines. I was aware of why they existed, but this year I experienced deadlines from the view of an editor rather than a staffer, where if someone’s work doesn’t get done, I became one of the people who had to do it for them. I have also refined my ability to work with others throughout the production process. I learned how to do everything I can to assist my fellow staffer at every turn. Along with those I learned how to overcome hardships during the deadline process. I learned that if I make a mistake, although it feels easier to just not show up, the best thing to do is own it and fix it as soon as possible.


Reflection 1

This is my most significant piece this year because I believe it is the best representation of what I am capable of. It was a fairly easy deadline, which did play a role in choosing the best piece. The opening paragraphs evolved the most over the production process because those were the hardest paragraphs to compose. The opening paragraphs are where the information is being provided for the reader to understand the issue, and insuring that it is phrased the best way possible was a bit of struggle for this story. I learned to value the phrasing of sentences. Though the process of editing I learned to phrase each sentence in the best way in order to convey the information the best way possible. What I like about this piece is the topic itself, and the graphic. I am very proud of the graphic.


Reflection 1


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Friday, October 4, 2013 hilights.org

insight

TLL

Through Lizzy’s Lens Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Cheif

It is only an extra chromosome When signing up for volunteer opportunities, the majority of the time I wonder how I will impact and teach those who I am serving. I never stopped to think about what the people I served would teach me in return. Looking in retrospect, this all changed in the summer of 2012 when Key Club asked me to help at “iCan Bike Camp,” formerly called “Lose the Training Wheels.” The camp’s brochure description read: “teach children with disabilities how to ride bikes using specially modified bikes.” The Down Syndrome Foundation of Central Florida sponsored the camp. I was apprehensive about signing up to volunteer because I had not worked with special needs individuals. Prior to volunteering at this camp, I had preconceived notions that people with Down Syndrome were different because they looked and learned differently. After teaching two children and one teen how to ride bikes I realized that the real difference between myself and a child with Down Syndrome was our biology. We all learn at different rates, look different and have our own ways of expressing ourselves; therefore, kids with disabilities aren’t that different. The first child I worked with was Fredrick; he was an 8 year old from Denmark. He not only had Down Syndrome, but also type 2 diabetes. Regardless of his circumstances, Fredrick always smiled and laughed, unless I did not have animal stickers to reward him with, of course. Fredrick taught me to smile through tough times and to appreciate life. In a weeks time, he went from being scared to ride a bike, to being able to ride one independently. Seeing him get up on a two-wheel bike on his own was one of the most rewarding experiences I have ever had. Once we finished a few laps we went to see his mom. She had tears streamed down her cheeks and a huge smile stretched across her face. By teaching students how to ride bikes, the DSFF and iCan Shine crew give people with disabilities a chance to learn something they might never had thought of trying. A child named Benjamin, 10, said “I feel like I can do anything now” after he learned how to ride a bike. This independence helps kids with disabilities become more confident and comfortable with their surroundings. I made lifelong friends because I decided to give up a week of my summer vacation to help others. One special friend I made is Elyse. She is 22, is going to the University of Central Florida and has a job at Quality One Wireless. It blows my mind to see what people are capable of doing. I encourage students to go outside of their comfort zone. One could find a new passion, change someone’s life, and ultimately learn valuable life lessons.

I encourage students to go outside of their comfort zone. One XdjaYÑcYVcZleVhh^dcPVcYRX]Vc\ZhdbZdcZÈha^[Z# Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Cheif

1955

$0.75 $1.00

1960

Raising the standard

$1.60

1970

$3.10

1980 1990

The minimum wage has increased tremendously over the years but many are now arguing that it is not enough, especially given that when America’s wage is compared to countries like Australia and France, where the minimum wage is $15 and $12 an hour respectively. $3.80 $5.15

2000 2010

$7.25

2013

$7.25 $1.00

$2.00

$3.00

$4.00

$5.00

$6.00

$7.00

Source: www.infoplease.com

$8.00 infographic/SAM HOLLEMAN

Seeing the big picture There are a few hundred McDonald’s employees protesting in New York for a higher minimum wage. In fact, “higher” is a bit of an understatement. The protesters want the federal minimum wage to more than double, from $7.25 an hour to $15 an hour. And although there may be a bit of shock at the sticker price, they are within good reason to be protesting for such drastic change. The current Federal minimum wage (which has been the same since 2009) is $7.25 an hour, which if employed full time amounts to $15,080 annually. This amount is skimming just over the poverty line. Because the economy is in a state where minimum wage jobs, designed to be held by teenagers, are held by heads of the household, a family of four will drop far below the poverty line of 23,550. Given this information, the reasonable thing to do would be to raise the minimum wage to a rate in which Americans earning this wage could live without significant financial worry. Not only would raising the minimum wage assist those receiving the salary, but also assist the government in separating itself from the dependency 35% of Americans have on federal financial assistance such as food stamps and welfare. Plus, with more money being earned, more money will be spent on goods and services and that helps stimulate the economy. This



viewpoint

Reflection 1

hi-lights

The federal minimum wage should be raised to meet the ^cÒViZY standard of living

Áyourthoughts

issue seems pretty straightforward. Yes, raising the minimum wage to $15 would have all of the aforementioned positive affects, but one major part of this nationwide transaction has been overlooked: the source. Where does the extra $7.75 per hour come from? It won’t come from the paychecks of the higher-ups of the business because that would defeat the entire point of their embankment on the businessstarting adventure: to make money. The extra money will come from the new prices of the goods and services the company provides, which will be higher to compensate for the new minimum wage causing the consumer to be less likely to purchase the goods and services that businesses assumed we would be spending more on because of the higher wages, or businesses will cut half of their staff in order to afford the higher wages for their workers, leaving even more people out of work. But there is a bigger picture to this debate that the counterargument does not address: the general welfare of the American people. It is not feasible for someone to live comfortably on $7.25 an hour. To a teenager, $7.25 an hour is feasible, but it is an inconceivable amount to provide for a family. To best benefit the American family, the new minimum wage should be for those who are 18 years of age or older. Given that teenagers aren’t the head of the household this compromise is extremely fair. But at the end of the day if people cannot afford to play for the essentials then something needs to be changed.

What do you think of the minimum wage being raised to $15?

[This is] bad because prices of goods will increase. Also it is unfair because those who work minimum wage jobs don’t usually have a [college ] degree and those that do [have a degree] are making $15 an hour so that is unfair to those who have earned a degree. Ivan Kaled, senior

They shouldn’t do this because in order to offset the raised salary, more money will need to be printed which l^aaXgZViZ^cÒVi^dcVcY^cÒVi^dc^h bad for the economy. Joshua Roberts, freshman

[A higher wage] sounds good on paper but realistically businesses and companies can’t afford for the minimum wage to be that much. Eleanor Clark, senior

Ábeheard Send letters to the editor to Hi-Lights, 1000 E. Kaley St., Orlando, FL 32806, or drop off in Room 224. You can also send to editor@hilights.org. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To be considered for print, all letters must be signed and cannot contain libelous information. Contact us at 407-893-7200 ext. 6012614

To advertise call Meghan Cotton

Comment on the web at hilights.org

Follow us on twitter @boonepubs


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sports hilights

Friday, March 14, 2014 hilights.org

VARIETY SHOW

YEARBOOK DELIVERY

The performing arts department plans to entertain you in this evening of entertainment, April 26 in the auditorium at 7 p.m.

Yearbooks will be delivered May 9. Seniors may pick up their books at lunch and underclassmen are after school. Extra books will be sold after school on May 14 in Room 224 for $85 cash. Books are first come, first serve.

N28.

Reflection 2

photos/SAM HOLLEMAN

LEAP. In the 110 meter hurdles, senior Keiton Best, jumps over the final hurdle. “‘win.’ That is all that goes through my mind hen i am competing,” Best said. He placed seventh in the event at 15.94 seconds.

Team exemplifies personalities

Athletes use sport to grow closer as a family

DASH. At the Gateway Panthers Classic, senior Alexandria Meneses runs the 100-meter race. “You have to run happy, but look mean while doing it,” Meneses said. She ran 5:45.04 in this race.

His father threw 178’ 11” in the discus and his uncle threw 182’. Currently, Strange’s best PR is 151’ 4”. The hours of practicing and conditioning change more than scores on a sheet of paper. “Track has affected how I act as a person, the terms I use, how I speak, it has matured me,” Crawford said. On March 1, the team competed in the Lake Brantley Invitational. Reddick placed fourth in the 100-meter dash and 200-meter dash at 11.12 seconds and 22.3 seconds, respectively. Senior Keiton Best placed fifth in the 110meter hurdles at 15.96 seconds. Junior Jared Hines placed fourth in the boy’s 3200 meter run at 10:11.09 and ____ Alexandria Meneses placed sixth in the 1600 meter run at 5:32.15. At the Lake Highland Invitational on March 8, the boys placed third overall and the girls placed 17. Senior Jamal Clark placed fourth in the boys long jump, jumping 40’ 10.25”. Senior Miranda Miller placed fourth in the girls shot put at 31’10” and junior Luis Rivera placed third in the boys shot put, throwing 43’7”. Strange placed second in the discus at 141’ 8”. The boys 4x100 meter relay team placed third at 43.57. Best placed fourth in the 110-meter hurdles and the 300-meter hurdles at 16.46 and 41.8, respectively. Reddick placed third in the 100-meter dash and the 200-meter dash at 10.94 seconds and 22.02, respectively. Hines placed 10th in the 1600 meter run at 4:39.94. The ninth place winner timed in at 4:39.64. “It is fate. We must not worry ourselves with facts and figures,” Hines said. “Because I have won once I know I’ve given my all.” The next meet is at Showalter Field for the Metro Conference Prelims tomorrow starting at 8:30 a.m.

By SAM HOLLEMAN As the sneakers of 27 schools worth of track and field athletes pound the green artificial grass and rubber track of Lake Brantley High School, coach Josh Shearouse interrupts junior Anthony Henders mid-newspaper interview, jokingly telling him that if he talks any trash about his coaching, he will kick him off the team. “It’s our personalities that make Boone stand out at the meets. We all like each other so when we walk into the meet, if our bright orange uniforms didn’t do it, our loud, outgoing personalities do it,” coach Josh Shearouse said. “They get it from the coaching staff.” At the Gateway Panthers Classic on Feb. 22, the Braves placed fourth and the Lady Braves placed 14th overall. Senior Robert Strange won the discus event throwing 149 feet (only to beat that distance by 2’ 4” the following Saturday at Lake Brantley). Sophomore Jordan Crawford placed fourth in the 400-meter dash at 59.77 seconds. The girl’s 4x400 relay team placed fourth at 4:20.79. Senior Brandon Reddick placed second in the 100-meter dash at 11.06 seconds. But to these athletes, track means more than scores on a sheet of paper. To Crawford, sprinting is a way to express herself. To Strange, throwing means proudly following in his father’s and uncle’s footsteps. “My two idols are my dad and uncle. My dad broke the school record when he went to Boone and then 13 years later my uncle broke it with my dad as the coach. I have quite a legacy to live up to,” Strange said.

SPRINT. At the Gateway Invitational, junior Ariel Collier runs the 100-meter dash. “I just try to focus on increasing my speed and pushing myself as much as I can to come in first,” Collier said. She placed 30th at 13.83 seconds.

They all like each other. They aren’t as worried about individual scores as they are about the team. They are a family. Josh Shearouse Track and Field head coach

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Friday, October 4, 2013 hilights.org

hi-lights insight GIRLS SOCCER TRYOUTS

BOYS SOCCER TRYOUTS

Girl’s soccer tryouts are Oct. 7-11 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Barber Park. On Oct. 9, they are 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. In order to tryout, girl’s must turn in a completed OCPS physical form to i]Z[gdcid[ÑXZ)-]djgheg^dgidign^c\dji#;dgbdgZ^c[dgbVi^dcXdciVXi8dVX]Hb^i]Vh Kimberly.smith2@ocps.net.

Boy’s soccer tryouts are Oct. 14-18 at Airport Lakes from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. On Oct. 16 they are 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. To try out, boys must provide a completed OCPS physical form idi]Z[gdcid[ÑXZ)-]djgheg^dgidign^c\dji#;dgbdgZ^c[dgbVi^dcXdciVXi8dVX] Hurring at bhurring@orlandocityyouth.org.

Syria up in smoke History on the verge of repeating itself

Military action in a war of might March Syrian Government deploys army to attack rebel forces

2012

July Roughly 200 civilians are killed in brutal massacre

August The United Nations accuses Syria of war crimes

December Rebels capture a military base in the suburbs

2013 February 200 wounded and dozens killed in car bombing in Damascus

August 21 1,400 killed in chemical weapons bombing

August 31 President Obama calls upon Congress to vote on Syria

September 9 Russia proposes Syria gives up all chemical weapons

source/THE WASHINGTON POST

hi-lightsnewspaper

OTHER

EDITORIAL BOARD

Editorial Policy

Principal Margaret McMillen

POLICY STATEMENT

Hi-Lights is a student publication of William R. Boone High School, 1000 E. Kaley Ave., Orlando, Florida, 32806. The ideas and views of the aforementioned students and faculty are not those of Boone or the Orange County School Board. Opinions expressed in unsigned editorials are those of the editorial board, who determine the content. Opinions expressed in columns are those of the authors. Comments, letters, stories and ideas are welcome and encouraged under the following: 1. The material is not obscene or libelous 2. The material is signed The staff reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, length, punctuation, accuracy, invasion of privacy and potential disruption of the school.

STAFFERS Jackson Crumbly, Natalie Disla, Garrett Gastfield, Kaley Gilbert, Victor Komives, Stephanie Landis, Tommy McDonald, Mackenzie Mock

By VICTOR KOMIVES The atrocities committed by the Syrian government are unforgivable. According to The Huffington Post, President Bashar Al-Assad’s regime in Syria have killed over 110,000 of their own people since conflict erupted in March 2011. Should the U.S. intervene, these numbers could escalate very quickly. Assad’s regime will not hesitate to destroy any opposition that would result from U.S. missiles strikes. The chemical attacks on Aug. 21 was just a sample of what is to come should the U.S. take action. These missiles have a long range, and could easily wipe out entire cities. These missiles are also intercontinental and could be used against the U.S. and its allies. Allies of America in the Middle East would be the prime target of these Syrian chemical weapons. Should the U.S. intervene, the religious conflict between the Sunni and Shiite Muslims would only escalate. Syria’s very diverse population would take advantage of the chaos. Internal conflict would surely ensue. Just like what’s going on now in Baghdad, thousands would be killed to create “pure” neighborhoods; essentially ethnic cleansing. This religious conflict could cause more deaths than desired. Intervening in Syria would only lead to a long, drawn out war, like we experienced in Iraq and Afghanistan. In a time where the U.S. has just pulled out of Iraq, with the economy back on track, the deployment of troops to the country would take time to execute, and would greatly increase our debt. The Syrian government also receives outside aid from countries like Russia, China, North Korea and Iraq. They have a much better equipped army than most other middle eastern countries. Furthermore, the U.S. must take a look at what the future government would look like. The U.S. does not know much about what Syrian rebels want, or even if they’d be U.S. friendly, should they come into power. The U.S. economy has not recovered from the wars with Iraq and Afghanistan. We simply cannot afford another war. The U.S. economy needs time to recover before we intervene in the Middle East again. Right now, the only understandable action to take with Syria is to try to resolve tensions with diplomacy. Instead of charging headfirst into this fight, we should use diplomatic pressure to persuade Assad and his regime. Syria’s problem is very dismal, but it’s nothing peace talks can’t fix. This war is unnecessary, and is not worth risking the lives of soldiers and civilians.

Intervening in Syria would be disastrous for both the U.S. and Syria. We should use diplomacy to cease hostilities.

SCHOLASTIC ASSOCIATIONS

Adviser Renee Burke

Editor-In-Chief Lizzy Gordon Design Editor Gabriella Fakhoury Copy Editor Sam Holleman Business Manager Meghan Cotton Index Editor Ciara McCoy Webmaster Olivia Quattrone Social Media Editor Delanee Bogan

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May

First major protest against the Syrian government begins

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American action in the war in Syria is necessary to save lives and bring peace to a nation of unrest.



N5.

By SAM HOLLEMAN According to a Gallop poll, only one-third of the United States believes we should intervene in Syria. There hasn’t been so few people to believe in something since Robert Downey Jr. tried to be a professional singer (Oh, you don’t remember his 2005 album The Futurist? Exactly). There are talks of Syria handing over all of their chemical weapons, but that won’t have any affect on the over 100,000 people who have been killed by non-chemical weapons along with who knows how many will be killed. The only way for real action to happen, for real lives to be saved and real bad guys to be taken down is for America to intervene in the Syrian civil war. First of all, over 110,000 people have been killed in the Syrian conflict so far. That is the equivalent of taking out the entire city of Green Bay. We are one of the few countries in the world that actually has the ability to make a difference in the world. It is our duty to assist this war-ridden country and bring the death toll to a halt. Moreover, no American lives would be lost in the process. Following President Obama’s plan, no American boots would touch Syrian soil. Any military action we would do would not involve soldiers being sent overseas to fight the war on the ground. Yes, we may attack from the sea or by air using drones, but no American lives would be put at risk due to our involvement in Syria and implying something such as that is just blatantly inaccurate. Additionally, if we don’t stop the use of chemical weapons on innocent people now, then when do we? We cannot decide when enough people are killed for us to do something about it. Maybe 1,999 people isn’t enough to intervene but 2,000 is enough. That is not moral in any way. The death’s of 1,400 people is 1,400 too many. The problem with possible intervention and the entire ominous situation that is Syria is that we don’t know what will happen if the U.S. does or does not invade Syria. All people can do is speculate what might happen. “We might start a new World War by going into Syria,” “We might lose American soldiers lives if we intervene,” “Syria might be the next Iraq or Afghanistan.” Given the lack of facts surrounding this issue, the power of “might” and “what if” have a lot of say. As more information comes to the world’s attention, opinions will change and countries actions will alter accordingly. The only way to change this from a war of might to a war of the past is by taking action and turning our hopes for the ominous situation into reality.



Hi-Lights is associated with Florida Scholastic, Columbia Scholastic and National Scholastic Press Associations and Quill and Scroll.

OUR MISSION

This paper is a quality product whose sole purpose is to pursue the truth, and to provide information and factual news pertaining to Boone and the community around it. Any questions or comments can be directed to (407) 893-7200, extension 6012614 or Room 224, as well as by email to editor @hilights.org. If you find any errors, please call our offices or visit us.

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Friday, December 13, 2013 hilights.org

insight

hilights

We do lack the desire to build relationships and friendships unless it is from within the screen of a smart phone. Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Cheif

TLL Searches lack efficiency Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Cheif

Texting disengages teenagers If you were to call me on the phone, I would most likely suffer through a minute conversing with you before I hastily said “can you just text me?” I’m not the only one who feels this way; this behavior is quite common for teenagers living in the 21st century. According to Pew Internet Research, 72 percent of teens prefer to text their friends than call them on the phone. Nowadays, it is not uncommon to see a group of teenagers at a diner, each glued to their phones, not talking to one another at all. What does this say about our generation? Are we uninterested in face-to-face interaction, or do we merely lack the ability to hold substantial, deep conversations with one another? The answer all of these questions is yes. We lack the desire to build relationships and friendships unless it is from within the screen of a smart phone. We also do not possess the skills to hold intellectual conversations because we have grown up in a society where saying “happy birthday!” on a Facebook wall is more personal and common than receiving a birthday card via snail mail. Texting has caused people, teens especially, to lack communication skills and patience. Lacking communication skills can be detrimental to one’s future because, according to the Workforce Solutions Group at St. Louis Community College, 60 percent of employers say applicants lack communication and interpersonal skills. Being able to speak face-to-face with someone is a valuable life skill used in the real world. Further, we have lost our patience. Students tend to feel upset when they do not receive a quick reply to a text message. Because of our lack of patience, we get antsy with our friends that take time to gather their thoughts when responding to a question we ask in person. One way to practice patience and communication skills is to meet friends for lunch at a restaurant where one must dine in. Have everyone place their phones face down in the center of the table and whoever reaches for their phone first has to pay tip. Works every time. I encourage students to put down their cell phones and ask their friends how they are really feeling. It is surprising what one can find out about a friend once he stops to listen.

ourview

N3.

<

Through Lizzy’s Lens

Being guided by 15 security guards to the gymnasium immediately after walking onto campus at 7 a.m. is not exactly a warm welcome Boone High School. This is especially true if the motives behind these actions remain unclear until you are told to open your backpack and spread your legs. It is not a pleasant experience and could even be considered an invasion of privacy. Public schools within the county are selected at random, and on the selected day, each student is searched for contraband by a contracted security service. These searches are designed to be a surprise to the students so they do not purposefully leave contraband that they would have otherwise brought to school at home. The county should not be able to rummage through student’s personal items and search their persons. The argument is that if there are random searches in schools, it will prevent students from bringing contraband on campus and, with any luck, save lives. And they are right. Students have brought guns and other weapons on campuses and done horrible things, like the 14-year-old freshman in Massachusetts who killed his math teacher with a box cutter. So if doing conducting searches save even a few lives, then they are worth doing. But if searches are going to happen again at Boone (which they are), the implementation of them should be altered drastically because how they ran the first time around at Boone was anything other than smooth and effective. First, every student needs to be searched. Random is never random in the eyes of a displeased public. If security guards are going to pat down students, either all students or no students should be searched. Otherwise those actions are subject to ridicule of racist or sexist speculation. Also, if school wide searches are to continue, they need to be efficient. Having 3,000 students funnel into a gymnasium built to hold a few hundred people, five minutes before school starts, is not efficient. Students were late to classes, due to no fault of their own, but rather due to the county’s ineffective plan. Additionally, all social media should be monitored during the searches. Immediately after people started rolling onto

School wide searches are within the school’s legal ability, but should be more efficient.

illustration/VICTOR KOMIVES

campus, information about the school wide search blewup on Twitter, Facebook, and all other social media, thus nullifying any chances of the county keeping this search a surprise to the student population. Without the element of surprise the county will not possess a legitimate grasp on how much contraband is being brought onto school campuses. While we are not advocating searches, and believe they are an invasion of our privacy, we acknowledge that once we step on school grounds administrators have in loco parentis. This means that while we are at school, during school hours, the school is our parent. They are responsible for us and can search our person, our locker, and our car. To truly seek out student’s contraband, OCPS should have waited until 7:30 a.m., then put the school in lock down and gone room-to-room, student-by-student. There wouldn’t be time or prior knowledge to dispose of one’s contraband, ultimately fulfilling the integrity of the search. If these school wide searches are going to be effective in any capacity, students cannot be aware they are about to happen. Knowledge is power and in this last search students had the power. If OCPS security is going to conduct searches in this manner it is apparent that they are more focused on giving the appearance of safety versus really making campuses safe. If the county’s true intention with these searches is to confiscate contraband, then change must be made. Otherwise these actions are nothing more than an intentionally false sense of security.

ßbeheard Send letters to the editor to Hi-Lights, 1000 E. Kaley St., Orlando, FL 32806, or drop off in Room 224. You can also send to editor@hilights.org. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To be considered for print, all letters must be signed and cannot contain libelous information.

284

Number of students who have died due to in-school violence between 1999 and 2010.

130 Number of student deaths on school campuses nationwide due to shootings between 1999 and 2010.

2 The percentage of student-age homicides that occur on school grounds nationwide. source: Schoolsafety.org

ßourbad Contact us at 407-893-7200 ext. 6012614 Comment on the web at hilights.org To advertise call Meghan Cotton at our offices. The paper is free to students and subscriptions are available for $10. Ad sizes available: Business card $25; Eighth page $45; Quarter page $95; Half page $125; Full page $175

hilightsnewspaper

OthEr

EDiToriaL BoarD

Editorial Policy

Editor-In-Chief Lizzy Gordon Design Editor Gabriella Fakhoury Copy Editor Sam Holleman Business Manager Meghan Cotton Index Editor Ciara McCoy Webmaster Olivia Quattrone Social Media Editor Delanee Bogan

STaFFErS Jackson Crumbly, Natalie

#fastfigures

Disla, Garrett Gastfield, Kaley Gilbert, Victor Komives, Stephanie Landis, Tommy McDonald, Mackenzie Mock

Adviser Renee Burke Principal Dr. Margaret McMillen

PoLiCy STaTEmEnT

Hilights is a student publication of William R. Boone High School, 1000 E. Kaley Ave., Orlando, Florida, 32806. The ideas and views of the aforementioned students and faculty are not those of Boone or the Orange County School Board. Opinions expressed in unsigned editorials are those of the editorial board, who determine the content. Opinions expressed in columns are those of the authors. Comments, letters, stories and ideas are welcome and encouraged under the following: 1. The material is not obscene or libelous 2. The material is signed The staff reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, length, punctuation, accuracy, invasion of privacy and potential disruption of the school.

Last issue we made mistakes and would like to correct the errors. We aim for accuracy and value your readership. We apologize. • We labeled junior Cooper Fay as a sophomore. • We labeled senior Deion Thomas as a junior. • Ian Gold’s tattoo is not a “pirate ship,” it is a tall ship.

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Hilights is associated with Florida Scholastic, Columbia Scholastic and National Scholastic Press Associations and Quill and Scroll.

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This paper is a quality product whose sole purpose is to pursue the truth, and to provide information and factual news pertaining to Boone and the community around it. Any questions or comments can be directed to (407) 893-7200, extension 6012614 or Room 224, as well as by email to editor hilightsnp@gmail.com. If you find any errors, please call our offices or visit us.

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Reflection 3

I have grown not only in my writng this year, but my confidence in my writing. Thanks to this class I no longer care if someone reads what I am writing over my shoulder out of fear they may get the wrong impression because it isnt dont year. My portfolio has progressed as well in design definately. It is finally a regular design rather than page after page of text or an almost all white page with a title and then a little bit of red color.


In Sight, page 2, October 4, 2013

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Friday, October 4, 2013 hilights.org

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Through Lizzy’s Lens Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Cheif

It is only an extra chromosome When signing up for volunteer opportunities, the majority of the time I wonder how I will impact and teach those who I am serving. I never stopped to think about what the people I served would teach me in return. Looking in retrospect, this all changed in the summer of 2012 when Key Club asked me to help at “iCan Bike Camp,” formerly called “Lose the Training Wheels.” The camp’s brochure description read: “teach children with disabilities how to ride bikes using specially modified bikes.” The Down Syndrome Foundation of Central Florida sponsored the camp. I was apprehensive about signing up to volunteer because I had not worked with special needs individuals. Prior to volunteering at this camp, I had preconceived notions that people with Down Syndrome were different because they looked and learned differently. After teaching two children and one teen how to ride bikes I realized that the real difference between myself and a child with Down Syndrome was our biology. We all learn at different rates, look different and have our own ways of expressing ourselves; therefore, kids with disabilities aren’t that different. The first child I worked with was Fredrick; he was an 8 year old from Denmark. He not only had Down Syndrome, but also type 2 diabetes. Regardless of his circumstances, Fredrick always smiled and laughed, unless I did not have animal stickers to reward him with, of course. Fredrick taught me to smile through tough times and to appreciate life. In a weeks time, he went from being scared to ride a bike, to being able to ride one independently. Seeing him get up on a two-wheel bike on his own was one of the most rewarding experiences I have ever had. Once we finished a few laps we went to see his mom. She had tears streamed down her cheeks and a huge smile stretched across her face. By teaching students how to ride bikes, the DSFF and iCan Shine crew give people with disabilities a chance to learn something they might never had thought of trying. A child named Benjamin, 10, said “I feel like I can do anything now” after he learned how to ride a bike. This independence helps kids with disabilities become more confident and comfortable with their surroundings. I made lifelong friends because I decided to give up a week of my summer vacation to help others. One special friend I made is Elyse. She is 22, is going to the University of Central Florida and has a job at Quality One Wireless. It blows my mind to see what people are capable of doing. I encourage students to go outside of their comfort zone. One could find a new passion, change someone’s life, and ultimately learn valuable life lessons.

I encourage students to go outside of their comfort zone. One XdjaYÑcYVcZleVhh^dcPVcYRX]Vc\ZhdbZdcZÈha^[Z# Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Cheif

1955

$0.75 $1.00

1960

Raising the standard

$1.60

1970

$3.10

1980 1990

The minimum wage has increased tremendously over the years but many are now arguing that it is not enough, especially given that when America’s wage is compared to countries like Australia and France, where the minimum wage is $15 and $12 an hour respectively. $3.80 $5.15

2000 2010

$7.25

2013

$7.25 $1.00

$2.00

$3.00

$4.00

$5.00

$6.00

$7.00

Source: www.infoplease.com

$8.00 infographic/SAM HOLLEMAN

Seeing the big picture There are a few hundred McDonald’s employees protesting in New York for a higher minimum wage. In fact, “higher” is a bit of an understatement. The protesters want the federal minimum wage to more than double, from $7.25 an hour to $15 an hour. And although there may be a bit of shock at the sticker price, they are within good reason to be protesting for such drastic change. The current Federal minimum wage (which has been the same since 2009) is $7.25 an hour, which if employed full time amounts to $15,080 annually. This amount is skimming just over the poverty line. Because the economy is in a state where minimum wage jobs, designed to be held by teenagers, are held by heads of the household, a family of four will drop far below the poverty line of 23,550. Given this information, the reasonable thing to do would be to raise the minimum wage to a rate in which Americans earning this wage could live without significant financial worry. Not only would raising the minimum wage assist those receiving the salary, but also assist the government in separating itself from the dependency 35% of Americans have on federal financial assistance such as food stamps and welfare. Plus, with more money being earned, more money will be spent on goods and services and that helps stimulate the economy. This



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The federal minimum wage should be raised to meet the ^cÒViZY standard of living

Áyourthoughts

issue seems pretty straightforward. Yes, raising the minimum wage to $15 would have all of the aforementioned positive affects, but one major part of this nationwide transaction has been overlooked: the source. Where does the extra $7.75 per hour come from? It won’t come from the paychecks of the higher-ups of the business because that would defeat the entire point of their embankment on the businessstarting adventure: to make money. The extra money will come from the new prices of the goods and services the company provides, which will be higher to compensate for the new minimum wage causing the consumer to be less likely to purchase the goods and services that businesses assumed we would be spending more on because of the higher wages, or businesses will cut half of their staff in order to afford the higher wages for their workers, leaving even more people out of work. But there is a bigger picture to this debate that the counterargument does not address: the general welfare of the American people. It is not feasible for someone to live comfortably on $7.25 an hour. To a teenager, $7.25 an hour is feasible, but it is an inconceivable amount to provide for a family. To best benefit the American family, the new minimum wage should be for those who are 18 years of age or older. Given that teenagers aren’t the head of the household this compromise is extremely fair. But at the end of the day if people cannot afford to play for the essentials then something needs to be changed.

What do you think of the minimum wage being raised to $15?

[This is] bad because prices of goods will increase. Also it is unfair because those who work minimum wage jobs don’t usually have a [college ] degree and those that do [have a degree] are making $15 an hour so that is unfair to those who have earned a degree. Ivan Kaled, senior

They shouldn’t do this because in order to offset the raised salary, more money will need to be printed which l^aaXgZViZ^cÒVi^dcVcY^cÒVi^dc^h bad for the economy. Joshua Roberts, freshman

[A higher wage] sounds good on paper but realistically businesses and companies can’t afford for the minimum wage to be that much. Eleanor Clark, senior

Ábeheard Send letters to the editor to Hi-Lights, 1000 E. Kaley St., Orlando, FL 32806, or drop off in Room 224. You can also send to editor@hilights.org. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To be considered for print, all letters must be signed and cannot contain libelous information. Contact us at 407-893-7200 ext. 6012614

To advertise call Meghan Cotton

Comment on the web at hilights.org

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In Sight, page 3, October 4, 2013

Friday, October 4, 2013 hilights.org

hi-lights insight GIRLS SOCCER TRYOUTS

BOYS SOCCER TRYOUTS

Girl’s soccer tryouts are Oct. 7-11 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Barber Park. On Oct. 9, they are 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. In order to tryout, girl’s must turn in a completed OCPS physical form to i]Z[gdcid[ÑXZ)-]djgheg^dgidign^c\dji#;dgbdgZ^c[dgbVi^dcXdciVXi8dVX]Hb^i]Vh Kimberly.smith2@ocps.net.

Boy’s soccer tryouts are Oct. 14-18 at Airport Lakes from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. On Oct. 16 they are 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. To try out, boys must provide a completed OCPS physical form idi]Z[gdcid[ÑXZ)-]djgheg^dgidign^c\dji#;dgbdgZ^c[dgbVi^dcXdciVXi8dVX] Hurring at bhurring@orlandocityyouth.org.

Syria up in smoke History on the verge of repeating itself

Military action in a war of might

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March

2012

December

2013 February 200 wounded and dozens killed in car bombing in Damascus

August 21 August 31 President Obama calls upon Congress to vote on Syria

1,400 killed in chemical weapons bombing

September 9 Russia proposes Syria gives up all chemical weapons

source/THE WASHINGTON POST

EDITORIAL BOARD

Editorial Policy

Gastfield, Kaley Gilbert, Victor Komives, Stephanie Landis, Tommy McDonald, Mackenzie Mock

August The United Nations accuses Syria of war crimes

Rebels capture a military base in the suburbs

OTHER

STAFFERS Jackson Crumbly, Natalie Disla, Garrett

Syrian Government deploys army to attack rebel forces

July Roughly 200 civilians are killed in brutal massacre

hi-lightsnewspaper Editor-In-Chief Lizzy Gordon Design Editor Gabriella Fakhoury Copy Editor Sam Holleman Business Manager Meghan Cotton Index Editor Ciara McCoy Webmaster Olivia Quattrone Social Media Editor Delanee Bogan

May

First major protest against the Syrian government begins

Adviser Renee Burke

POLICY STATEMENT

By VICTOR KOMIVES The atrocities committed by the Syrian government are unforgivable. According to The Huffington Post, President Bashar Al-Assad’s regime in Syria have killed over 110,000 of their own people since conflict erupted in March 2011. Should the U.S. intervene, these numbers could escalate very quickly. Assad’s regime will not hesitate to destroy any opposition that would result from U.S. missiles strikes. The chemical attacks on Aug. 21 was just a sample of what is to come should the U.S. take action. These missiles have a long range, and could easily wipe out entire cities. These missiles are also intercontinental and could be used against the U.S. and its allies. Allies of America in the Middle East would be the prime target of these Syrian chemical weapons. Should the U.S. intervene, the religious conflict between the Sunni and Shiite Muslims would only escalate. Syria’s very diverse population would take advantage of the chaos. Internal conflict would surely ensue. Just like what’s going on now in Baghdad, thousands would be killed to create “pure” neighborhoods; essentially ethnic cleansing. This religious conflict could cause more deaths than desired. Intervening in Syria would only lead to a long, drawn out war, like we experienced in Iraq and Afghanistan. In a time where the U.S. has just pulled out of Iraq, with the economy back on track, the deployment of troops to the country would take time to execute, and would greatly increase our debt. The Syrian government also receives outside aid from countries like Russia, China, North Korea and Iraq. They have a much better equipped army than most other middle eastern countries. Furthermore, the U.S. must take a look at what the future government would look like. The U.S. does not know much about what Syrian rebels want, or even if they’d be U.S. friendly, should they come into power. The U.S. economy has not recovered from the wars with Iraq and Afghanistan. We simply cannot afford another war. The U.S. economy needs time to recover before we intervene in the Middle East again. Right now, the only understandable action to take with Syria is to try to resolve tensions with diplomacy. Instead of charging headfirst into this fight, we should use diplomatic pressure to persuade Assad and his regime. Syria’s problem is very dismal, but it’s nothing peace talks can’t fix. This war is unnecessary, and is not worth risking the lives of soldiers and civilians.

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By SAM HOLLEMAN According to a Gallop poll, only one-third of the United States believes we should intervene in Syria. There hasn’t been so few people to believe in something since Robert Downey Jr. tried to be a professional singer (Oh, you don’t remember his 2005 album The Futurist? Exactly). There are talks of Syria handing over all of their chemical weapons, but that won’t have any affect on the over 100,000 people who have been killed by non-chemical weapons along with who knows how many will be killed. The only way for real action to happen, for real lives to be saved and real bad guys to be taken down is for America to intervene in the Syrian civil war. First of all, over 110,000 people have been killed in the Syrian conflict so far. That is the equivalent of taking out the entire city of Green Bay. We are one of the few countries in the world that actually has the ability to make a difference in the world. It is our duty to assist this war-ridden country and bring the death toll to a halt. Moreover, no American lives would be lost in the process. Following President Obama’s plan, no American boots would touch Syrian soil. Any military action we would do would not involve soldiers being sent overseas to fight the war on the ground. Yes, we may attack from the sea or by air using drones, but no American lives would be put at risk due to our involvement in Syria and implying something such as that is just blatantly inaccurate. Additionally, if we don’t stop the use of chemical weapons on innocent people now, then when do we? We cannot decide when enough people are killed for us to do something about it. Maybe 1,999 people isn’t enough to intervene but 2,000 is enough. That is not moral in any way. The death’s of 1,400 people is 1,400 too many. The problem with possible intervention and the entire ominous situation that is Syria is that we don’t know what will happen if the U.S. does or does not invade Syria. All people can do is speculate what might happen. “We might start a new World War by going into Syria,” “We might lose American soldiers lives if we intervene,” “Syria might be the next Iraq or Afghanistan.” Given the lack of facts surrounding this issue, the power of “might” and “what if” have a lot of say. As more information comes to the world’s attention, opinions will change and countries actions will alter accordingly. The only way to change this from a war of might to a war of the past is by taking action and turning our hopes for the ominous situation into reality.

American action in the war in Syria is necessary to save lives and bring peace to a nation of unrest.



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Intervening in Syria would be disastrous for both the U.S. and Syria. We should use diplomacy to cease hostilities.

SCHOLASTIC ASSOCIATIONS Principal Margaret McMillen

Hi-Lights is a student publication of William R. Boone High School, 1000 E. Kaley Ave., Orlando, Florida, 32806. The ideas and views of the aforementioned students and faculty are not those of Boone or the Orange County School Board. Opinions expressed in unsigned editorials are those of the editorial board, who determine the content. Opinions expressed in columns are those of the authors. Comments, letters, stories and ideas are welcome and encouraged under the following: 1. The material is not obscene or libelous 2. The material is signed The staff reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, length, punctuation, accuracy, invasion of privacy and potential disruption of the school.

Hi-Lights is associated with Florida Scholastic, Columbia Scholastic and National Scholastic Press Associations and Quill and Scroll.

OUR MISSION

This paper is a quality product whose sole purpose is to pursue the truth, and to provide information and factual news pertaining to Boone and the community around it. Any questions or comments can be directed to (407) 893-7200, extension 6012614 or Room 224, as well as by email to editor @hilights.org. If you find any errors, please call our offices or visit us.

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Check out hilights.org for up-to-date news and information. Scan this QR code to go right to the site.


In Sight, page 2, November 1, 2013

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insight Through Lizzy’s Lens Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Cheif

Shave it for later There is more to the month of November than meets the eye. Americans observe Thanksgiving, Adoption Awareness, Sweet Potato Awareness, Movember and No Shave November throughout the month. No Shave November, being among the most popular observances, celebrates the affect testosterone has on men’s facial hair. The majority of participants are uneducated about the history and purpose of this observance. In 2004, a group of 30 men committed to going 30 days without shaving to raise awareness for prostate cancer and depression in males. Later, this same group of men created the Movember Foundation. The foundation raises money to fund men’s health programs. Last year, they funded over 560 programs like the Prostate Cancer Foundation. Their punch line is “changing the face of men’s health.” Movember is slightly different from No Shave November in that men specifically grow moustaches. Last year over 1.1 million people from all over the world registered to participate in Movember raising more than $147 million. This light-hearted observance serves a serious purpose. According to cancer. org, one in six men will get prostate cancer during his lifetime and one in 36 men will die from it. As for depression, over six million men are diagnosed with it each year. Regardless of gender, race and ethnicity, more than 19 million Americans are affected by depression. Because of this, the Movember Foundation appeals to various demographics of people. When participating in Movember, one can grow a moustache on his own or he can join a team of “Mo Bros.” After signing up, one can receive updates about local Movember parties and celebrations that further the awareness of men’s health. Movember does not discriminate against women. On the contrary, the Movember Foundation encourages what they call “Mo Sistas” to get involved. Mo Sistas can help raise awareness for men’s health by registering, recruiting team members, raising funds, hosting Movember parties and encouraging men to maintain a healthy lifestyle. People blindly participate in No Shave November and Movember without realizing the true meaning of the observance. Go to movember.com to learn more about men’s health and how to help raise awareness.

sam Holleman, copy Editor

although they should be concerned with, it is not the job of a child star to be a positive influence on kids.

Miley Cyrus is a person. She performed an act and people have talked about it. She has a way of providing fodder for conversation. On Aug. 25, Cyrus went on stage at the MTV Video Music Awards and performed a very erotic techno-teddybear-filled set with Robin Thicke. While Kendrick Lamar and 2-Chainz were present, their performance didn’t involve a molested foam finger or the excessive use of one’s tongue for reasons that remain unclear to this day. What followed the performance can only be described as the most widespread negative backlash to a celebrity’s action in recent years. Libelous tweets accusing Miley of being a bad role model went viral along with entire articles dedicated to this rude behavior and how her father is to blame. People were disgusted by her actions and want her gone from the public’s eye. Adults view Cyrus as an idol to children because she was Disney’s wholesome Hannah Montana. Now that Cyrus has chosen a more scandalous lifestyle, they want her to disappear. Parents are making that opinion very public. The problem with this is that by protesting her actions in an extremely public fashion, they are pushing Cyrus front and center in the public’s eye. By spewing hate-filled opinions over Twitter, Facebook and any other outlet there is, the opinion is overlooked and the post becomes nothing more than an advertisement for Miley and her actions. She is becoming more famous by the cries of those wishing for her to lose fame. To focus on the more principle issue regarding these events, Cyrus is not a good role model. Kids should not look at her or her actions and think, “I want to be just like her.” So if she shouldn’t be a role model, then why are we constantly talking about her? Many child stars go on to do great things only for the title “child star” to be tainted by the few who make bad decisions. The latter of those two are the ones who get the attention. Ron Howard started acting when he was 6 years old as Opie Taylor on The Andy Griffith Show and now, at age 59, just released his newest film Rush, which is a box-office hit. Where is his Hollywood buzz? Where is the seemingly constant flow of tweets and status updates about how amazing Ron Howard is? Heck, most of the generation of adults trying to protect children from Miley Cyrus have no idea who Ron Howard is. That is where the issue lies; not with an abundance of bad influences, but rather a lack of attention surrounding the abundance of good ones. Attention goes straight toward those who go against the flow of Hollywood. Those who go with the flow, often flow right under the audience’s attention span. What headline is going to catch more people’s attention: “Joseph Gordon-Levitt acts well again in his new movie” or “Amanda Bynes attempts to pull off the ‘bring in the

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Kendrick Lamar and 2-Chainz were present but their performance didn’t involve a molested foam finger or excessive use of one’s tongue.

Kids these days 

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dancing lobsters’ look in court”? It is the audience’s fault that the celebrities they don’t want in front of kids are in front of their kids. Dry-humping a foam finger on national television at the VMAs is far more discussable than an actor who was a child star still being an actor. Don’t blame Miley for being a bad influence on kids. She is 20 years old. Most kids her age are in college living without regrets (living without regrets is a euphemism for excessive partying and doing things they will totally regret 10 years later). Just because she has been put in front of a camera doesn’t mean her thought process is in any way different than her peers. What little kids think of her isn’t exactly on the top of her list of concerns. Should she acknowledge the fact that she is in front of a camera and that millions of eyes could be on her at any point and because of that she should give consideration to the younger viewers by secondguessing performances that involve spanking an African American woman dressed in Beatlejuice-esque leggings and an over-sized teddy bear backpack’s butt? Yes. But her main concern isn’t what adults think. Her main concern is finding herself, like her peers. The only difference is that she is in front of a camera when she does it. Yes, there are bad role models in this world. But saying they are bad isn’t going to do anything. Society needs to hype good doers rather than give those who do not provide quality to the world all of the air-time. They are out there. All we need to do is start talking about them.

ßletter to the editor immigrant relates to article

This is to thank you for providing our school with a professional publication we all enjoy and learn from. Please tell Mackenzie Mock that I related so much to her article Brave Students Face New World. Coming to the USA as an adult was an interesting, but challenging thing for me to do. I worked as a teacher in Venezuela, my country of origin, for 10 years and adapting to the American culture was a big stretch for me. Starting with learning English to wanting to be certified as English teacher with a foreign accent! Then having my own daughters raised here was also a stretch for me because I tried to infuse in them my culture and my husband’s culture (he is from El Salvador). One day, I

went to see my daughters at a school function for the 4th of July and when I saw them waving an American flag, it hit me that they were Americans and they felt that way. So, now after becoming an American citizen, I have learned that I have two great parents who shaped my life: Venezuela and the USA! I love and respect both of my countries and thank America for receiving me as its adopted child. God Bless America!

Carlota Iglesias, assistant principal

ßfollowus @boonepubs We’re on twitter, Facebook, instagram and Vine

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ßbeheard Send letters to the editor to Hilights, 1000 E. Kaley St., Orlando, FL 32806, or drop off in Room 224. You can also send to hilightsnp@gmail.com. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To be considered for print, all letters must be signed and cannot contain libelous information. Contact us at 407-893-7200 ext. 6012614 or via email at hilightsnp@gmail.com Comment on the web at hilights.org To advertise call Meghan Cotton at our offices. The paper is free to students and subscriptions are available for $10. Ad sizes available: Business card $25; Eighth page $45; Quarter page $95; Half page $125; Full page $175


In Sight, page 2, December 13, 2013

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insight Through Lizzy’s Lens Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Cheif

Texting disengages teenagers If you were to call me on the phone, I would most likely suffer through a minute conversing with you before I hastily said “can you just text me?” I’m not the only one who feels this way; this behavior is quite common for teenagers living in the 21st century. According to Pew Internet Research, 72 percent of teens prefer to text their friends than call them on the phone. Nowadays, it is not uncommon to see a group of teenagers at a diner, each glued to their phones, not talking to one another at all. What does this say about our generation? Are we uninterested in face-to-face interaction, or do we merely lack the ability to hold substantial, deep conversations with one another? The answer all of these questions is yes. We lack the desire to build relationships and friendships unless it is from within the screen of a smart phone. We also do not possess the skills to hold intellectual conversations because we have grown up in a society where saying “happy birthday!” on a Facebook wall is more personal and common than receiving a birthday card via snail mail. Texting has caused people, teens especially, to lack communication skills and patience. Lacking communication skills can be detrimental to one’s future because, according to the Workforce Solutions Group at St. Louis Community College, 60 percent of employers say applicants lack communication and interpersonal skills. Being able to speak face-to-face with someone is a valuable life skill used in the real world. Further, we have lost our patience. Students tend to feel upset when they do not receive a quick reply to a text message. Because of our lack of patience, we get antsy with our friends that take time to gather their thoughts when responding to a question we ask in person. One way to practice patience and communication skills is to meet friends for lunch at a restaurant where one must dine in. Have everyone place their phones face down in the center of the table and whoever reaches for their phone first has to pay tip. Works every time. I encourage students to put down their cell phones and ask their friends how they are really feeling. It is surprising what one can find out about a friend once he stops to listen.

Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Cheif

Being guided by 15 security guards to the gymnasium immediately after walking onto campus at 7 a.m. is not exactly a warm welcome Boone High School. This is especially true if the motives behind these actions remain unclear until you are told to open your backpack and spread your legs. It is not a pleasant experience and could even be considered an invasion of privacy. Public schools within the county are selected at random, and on the selected day, each student is searched for contraband by a contracted security service. These searches are designed to be a surprise to the students so they do not purposefully leave contraband that they would have otherwise brought to school at home. The county should not be able to rummage through student’s personal items and search their persons. The argument is that if there are random searches in schools, it will prevent students from bringing contraband on campus and, with any luck, save lives. And they are right. Students have brought guns and other weapons on campuses and done horrible things, like the 14-year-old freshman in Massachusetts who killed his math teacher with a box cutter. So if doing conducting searches save even a few lives, then they are worth doing. But if searches are going to happen again at Boone (which they are), the implementation of them should be altered drastically because how they ran the first time around at Boone was anything other than smooth and effective. First, every student needs to be searched. Random is never random in the eyes of a displeased public. If security guards are going to pat down students, either all students or no students should be searched. Otherwise those actions are subject to ridicule of racist or sexist speculation. Also, if school wide searches are to continue, they need to be efficient. Having 3,000 students funnel into a gymnasium built to hold a few hundred people, five minutes before school starts, is not efficient. Students were late to classes, due to no fault of their own, but rather due to the county’s ineffective plan. Additionally, all social media should be monitored during the searches. Immediately after people started rolling onto

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We do lack the desire to build relationships and friendships unless it is from within the screen of a smart phone.

Searches lack efficiency <

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School wide searches are within the school’s legal ability, but should be more efficient.

illustration/VICTOR KOMIVES

campus, information about the school wide search blewup on Twitter, Facebook, and all other social media, thus nullifying any chances of the county keeping this search a surprise to the student population. Without the element of surprise the county will not possess a legitimate grasp on how much contraband is being brought onto school campuses. While we are not advocating searches, and believe they are an invasion of our privacy, we acknowledge that once we step on school grounds administrators have in loco parentis. This means that while we are at school, during school hours, the school is our parent. They are responsible for us and can search our person, our locker, and our car. To truly seek out student’s contraband, OCPS should have waited until 7:30 a.m., then put the school in lock down and gone room-to-room, student-by-student. There wouldn’t be time or prior knowledge to dispose of one’s contraband, ultimately fulfilling the integrity of the search. If these school wide searches are going to be effective in any capacity, students cannot be aware they are about to happen. Knowledge is power and in this last search students had the power. If OCPS security is going to conduct searches in this manner it is apparent that they are more focused on giving the appearance of safety versus really making campuses safe. If the county’s true intention with these searches is to confiscate contraband, then change must be made. Otherwise these actions are nothing more than an intentionally false sense of security.

ßbeheard Send letters to the editor to Hi-Lights, 1000 E. Kaley St., Orlando, FL 32806, or drop off in Room 224. You can also send to editor@hilights.org. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To be considered for print, all letters must be signed and cannot contain libelous information.

284

Number of students who have died due to in-school violence between 1999 and 2010.

130 Number of student deaths on school campuses nationwide due to shootings between 1999 and 2010.

2 The percentage of student-age homicides that occur on school grounds nationwide. source: Schoolsafety.org

ßourbad Contact us at 407-893-7200 ext. 6012614 Comment on the web at hilights.org To advertise call Meghan Cotton at our offices. The paper is free to students and subscriptions are available for $10. Ad sizes available: Business card $25; Eighth page $45; Quarter page $95; Half page $125; Full page $175

hilightsnewspaper

OthEr

EDiToriaL BoarD

Editorial Policy

Editor-In-Chief Lizzy Gordon Design Editor Gabriella Fakhoury Copy Editor Sam Holleman Business Manager Meghan Cotton Index Editor Ciara McCoy Webmaster Olivia Quattrone Social Media Editor Delanee Bogan

STaFFErS Jackson Crumbly, Natalie

#fastfigures

Disla, Garrett Gastfield, Kaley Gilbert, Victor Komives, Stephanie Landis, Tommy McDonald, Mackenzie Mock

Adviser Renee Burke Principal Dr. Margaret McMillen

PoLiCy STaTEmEnT

Hilights is a student publication of William R. Boone High School, 1000 E. Kaley Ave., Orlando, Florida, 32806. The ideas and views of the aforementioned students and faculty are not those of Boone or the Orange County School Board. Opinions expressed in unsigned editorials are those of the editorial board, who determine the content. Opinions expressed in columns are those of the authors. Comments, letters, stories and ideas are welcome and encouraged under the following: 1. The material is not obscene or libelous 2. The material is signed The staff reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, length, punctuation, accuracy, invasion of privacy and potential disruption of the school.

Last issue we made mistakes and would like to correct the errors. We aim for accuracy and value your readership. We apologize. • We labeled junior Cooper Fay as a sophomore. • We labeled senior Deion Thomas as a junior. • Ian Gold’s tattoo is not a “pirate ship,” it is a tall ship.

SChoLaSTiC aSSoCiaTionS

Hilights is associated with Florida Scholastic, Columbia Scholastic and National Scholastic Press Associations and Quill and Scroll.

our miSSion

This paper is a quality product whose sole purpose is to pursue the truth, and to provide information and factual news pertaining to Boone and the community around it. Any questions or comments can be directed to (407) 893-7200, extension 6012614 or Room 224, as well as by email to editor hilightsnp@gmail.com. If you find any errors, please call our offices or visit us.

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In Sight, page 2, February 7, 2014

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Friday, February 7, 2014 hilights.org

insight Through Lizzy’s Lens Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Cheif

Hook up culture With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, many people find themselves feeling lonelier than ever. To help avoid this lonely feeling, single people have renamed the holiday Singles Awareness Day. In an act to celebrate a holiday that focuses on people who are in romantic relationships, singles exchange sweets with friends, watch Netflix alone, or even resort to hooking up; the latter is not the answer. The definition of “hooking up” is as ambiguous as that of “Thirsty Thursday.” A survey conducted on Jan. 16, found that 48 percent of students on campus define hooking up as kissing another person; whereas, 44 percent define it as having sex and 7 percent define it as oral sex. Hooking up serves as a temporary remedy to cure one’s loneliness. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 20 percent of 15-year-old girls reported feeling lonely on a consistent basis. Girls who are insecure and lonely rely on attention and affection from their male peers to feel better about themselves. What girls don’t realize is that these boys don’t want them because they have a good heart, but because they see her as an object they can use for their own pleasure. Clinical psychologist and school consultant Catherine Steiner-Adair was quoted on NBCNews saying, “[Students] are yearning for intimacy that goes beyond biology. They just don’t know how to achieve it.” Is it necessarily true that teenagers want intimacy beyond physicality? If students really did desire committed relationships they wouldn’t answer surveys saying they hook up “because it’s cool and not a big deal.” Students our age want whatever they can get. Our loneliness drives us to use people for physical pleasure rather than for intimate relationships. We hunger for affection, not love. The media plays a role in today’s hook up culture. According to the American Camp Association, 83 percent of episodes of the Top 20 shows among teenagers showed some sexual content, this included 20 percent showing sexual intercourse. Media is teaching teenagers that the hook up culture is normal and doesn’t have emotional repercussions. What they don’t showcase is the fact that teens who participate in hooking up have the highest levels of emotional distress and depression. People try to fill a void of loneliness and they won’t find it with someone who sees them as just an object.

As the school year gets closer to the end, it will soon be time to register for next year’s classes, which means soon it will be time to convince yourself that taking five AP classes is not only reasonable, but also doable. Two years ago, College Board began a national campaign among public schools to push students to take AP classes. As each student receives his scores on the PSAT he took his sophomore year of high school, he will also receive a list of AP classes College Board (based on scores) believes that student can succeed in. They determine this based on how well each student does on each individual section of the test. Because AP classes can be beneficial to a student’s grade point average given they are double weighted, guidance counselors are strongly suggesting students take AP classes. Colleges are looking at how many AP courses a student takes, because they see it as an indication of whether or not a student can handle collegelevel courses. Although AP courses are beneficial, the means by which they go about determining which students are recommended for advanced placement needs to be changed. Scores on a standardized test do not encompass the potential success of a student. A student could have the

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Sam Holleman, Copy Editor

All people are not equal <

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...it will soon be time to register for next year’s classes, which means it will soon be time to convince yourself that taking five AP classes is not only reasonable, but also doable.

Although AP classes are beneficial, the means by which College Board recommends students for them should be changed.

intellect needed to succeed in an AP class, and that can become apparent in a standardized test such as the PSAT, but the student could also have a work ethic that leaves much to be desired. Those students don’t belong in an AP class because they will not be able to handle the hours of homework that accomplishes them. Students in the opposite situation would have a much better chance of succeeding in an AP class, but because they did poorly on the PSAT, they are not recommended. It is also wrong to push students to take as many AP classes as they can. Each course requires a time commitment that, if too many are taken at once, can become overwhelming and lessens the chances of a student succeeding. To properly assess a student’s potential success in an AP class, the student’s grades should be a factor. If a student has good grades and a high GPA, he should be considered for AP classes. But that should not be the only requirement. Students should also need a recommendation from a teacher they had for a subject similar to the one(s) they are hoping to have at the AP level. So if a student is looking to take AP U.S. History next year, he should need a recommendation from his current history teacher. And finally, students looking to take AP classes should not have too many commitments outside of school. AP classes require hours of homework. If a student is already committed to other activities, he will not be able to succeed in his AP class(es). AP classes are beneficial, but that doesn’t mean everyone is cut out and should be recommended for them.

illustration/SAM HOLLEMAN

ßletters to the editor Push for AP classes

AP courses, though hard, can be very rewarding. I am a senior in AP Human Geography and I believe that if I had taken this class as a freshman I would have had a different high school career. I feel that if someone tries, they can pass and get a good enough grade.

Tanner Collins, senior

AP shackles students

It is unfair and bluntly unjust for high schools to assume that students can pack their schedules with as many AP courses as possible without overwhelming themselves. High school is meant to explore one’s self; discover what their interests are and what they are passionate about. Not shackle up at home withdrawn from society because of hours of homework assignments that require completion. Humans are not robots. People are social creatures, and these courses limit that ability. Students should be at their acme, jubilant and expressive, trying new activities, learning freely. But how is that possible if they are forced to study and invest all of their effort

into learning information for one final standardized test?

Gabriela Komives, freshman

Take what you can handle

AP classes are really beneficial if you can handle them. They really aren’t for everyone, though. First of all, you have to be at least above average in the classes you are in and should be getting good grades in them. If you can’t get an A or B in an honors class, then it really isn’t a good idea to go into AP. AP classes also give out a lot of work, so taking as many as you can might get very stressful; only a select few can handle such a task.

Nathan Fontaine, sophomore

Get a head start with AP

AP classes are a great way to really get ahead and to see if you are a determined individual. Organization, motivation and determination are needed to excel in these rigorous courses. It might be challenging, but it is definitely worth it. AP courses are for everyone. I would suggest taking as many AP classes as possible.

Byron Garcia, freshman

ßfollowus On Twitter @hilightsnp On Facebook at facebook.com/hilights

ßbeheard Send letters to the editor to Hi-Lights, 1000 E. Kaley St., Orlando, FL 32806, or drop off in Room 224. You can also send to hilightsnp@gmail.com. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To be considered for print, all letters must be signed and cannot contain libelous information. Contact us at 407-893-7200 ext. 6012614 or via email at hilightsnp@gmail.com Comment on the web at hilights.org To advertise call Meghan Cotton at our offices. The paper is free to students and subscriptions are available for $10. Ad sizes available: Business card $25; Eighth page $45; Quarter page $95; Half page $125; Full page $175


In Sight, page 2, March 14, 2014

Friday, March 14, 2014 hilights.org

insight Through Lizzy’s Lens

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Dogs continue to make people healthier and all together happier. Lizzy Gordon, editor-in-cheif

Although student loans are effective in the short term, they can cause issues later in life.

$tudent loans create burden With more pressure on high school graduates to go to college, and the price of tuition for universities being higher than ever, student loans look more and more appealing. But as the years have progressed, college graduates are beginning to realize they are mice who saw a piece of cheese on the floor, only to find themselves stuck in a mouse trap four years later.

Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Cheif

Ever since I can remember, I have wanted to own a dog. I came close to achieving this dream of mine when I was 4 years old. My mother came home with a dog she received from a woman giving away free puppies in front of a supermarket, not sketchy at all. Regardless of her pre-existing allergies to dogs of all shapes and sizes, she attempted to deal with the pain for my sake. The dog initially greeted me by biting my hand. Ever since then, I have lived a childhood deprived of ever owning a dog for more than one day. Most people don’t realize that by owning a dog, one reaps physical and mental health benefits. A dog is more than just a man’s best friend; he is a friend that decreases his owner’s susceptibility to allergies, decreases levels of stress and increases his owner’s heart’s health. According to The Telegraph newspaper, children who grow up with dogs are 13 times less likely to develop eczema than those that grew up with cats. Eczema is a common skin allergy that develops in young children. Moreover, people without dogs are 39 percent likely to develop allergies to animals; those who own dogs are 19 percent likely to develop such allergies. When it comes to stress, the presence of a dog naturally calms people down, which is why homes often welcome these furry friends. One who does not own a dog will never be able to enjoy the moments that follow coming home from a rough day at school or work. One’s exceedingly high stress levels cease instantly once he swings open the door and is greeted by a dog whose grin stretches from ear to ear because his favorite person in the world is home. Florida State University knows that dogs lower stress levels and that is why they bring dogs on campus during exam week each year. Lastly, one’s heart is made healthier by the presence of a dog. Merely petting a dog lowers one’s blood pressure. While one physically becomes healthier, one’s heart is made warmer. Owning a dog creates a lot of responsibility but it doesn’t go without saying that the relationship between an owner and his dog is give and take. Although I do not own a dog, I have been able to experience joy and affection from dog sitting for my neighbors and family members. For this reason, I hope to own a dog in the near future. Dogs continue to make people healthier and all together happier. This is why everyone needs a dog.

Everyone needs a dog

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Jobs

Students should avoid taking out student loans if at all possible because college graduates are having difficulty paying them back. In this job market, combined with a constant increase in tuition costs, college is becoming harder and harder to afford, so families take out student loans. The problem occurs, when students get out of college. Half of all college graduates are jobless or unemployed, they can’t find a job and can’t afford to pay their student loans along with the cost of living.

X 40 million people have student loan debt as of 2010, which is equal to twice the total population of Florida

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Obligation

Furthermore, filing bankruptcy for student loan debt is not an option. When one declares bankruptcy, it means he does not have the money to pay off his debts and by claiming bankruptcy, he is clearing his debt with whatever money he does have available. This action will do a number on the person’s credit score, but in some situations, one’s credit score is the least of his financial concerns. However, student loans do not apply. No matter how much student loan debt one has, student loans are not bankruptable debt. They will not leave until they are paid off.

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Expensive

Additionally, the price of college tuition is increasing to previously unimaginable prices. This means more students will have to take out more loans, which means more debt and more problems. Biggy had it wrong: mo’ money does not mean mo’ problems, less money means mo’ problems (although that isn’t as catchy so we’ll let that one slide).

College tuition has gone up 500% since 1985

Student Loans source/FASTWEB.COM

FINAL STATEMENT: Student loans are dangerous.

They can be beneficial if they can be paid off in a timely fashion, but those who can pull that off are becoming fewer and farther between. Apply for scholarships, get good grades and qualify for grants, beg rich family members, do whatever needs to be done to pay for college, but avoid student loans if at all possible.

ßletters to the editor Loans benefit those less fortunate

Student loans are important. It helps the students who do not have money. Whether it is because they are jobless or cannot find the money to pay for college, there is nothing else they can do. For that reason loans are necessary.

Rafiki Niyibizi, freshman

Student loans are evil

I think measures should be taken to avoid student loans at all costs. They’re just not worth it, especially with the high rate of unemployment for college graduates. Large student loans follow many for years, even decades after graduating. They are evil.

Brett Tachi, senior

Reality check

Of course it would be better if students did not take student loans. That

way they would not graduate with debt. But the reality is that for many students, student loans are the only way. There is only so much scholarship money and family can pay for.

Kimberley Rozenfort, senior

Student loans are good

Well, it does say only half of college kids don’t have a job. But to account for the other half could be explained a few ways. If their parents have money, they could pay your loans and you can pay them back in a more “doable” amount of time. This makes them easier to pay back because they can have more time to get on their feet and can maybe pay less, depending on their parent’s generosity. Another way to handle student loans who are unemployed could be that while they don’t have a job at the moment, they will have one and can set up a deal to pay a certain amount each week or month over time.

Max Heller, freshman

ßbeheard Send letters to the editor to Hi-Lights, 1000 E. Kaley St., Orlando, FL 32806, or drop off in Room 224. You can also send to hilightsnp@gmail.com. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To be considered for print, all letters must be signed and cannot contain libelous information. Contact us at 407-893-7200 ext. 6012614 Comment on the web at hilights.org To advertise call Meghan Cotton

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Sports, page 16, March 14, 2014

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sports hilights

Friday, March 14, 2014 hilights.org

VARIETY SHOW

YEARBOOK DELIVERY

The performing arts department plans to entertain you in this evening of entertainment, April 26 in the auditorium at 7 p.m.

Yearbooks will be delivered May 9. Seniors may pick up their books at lunch and underclassmen are after school. Extra books will be sold after school on May 14 in Room 224 for $85 cash. Books are first come, first serve.

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LEAP. In the 110 meter hurdles, senior Keiton Best, jumps over the final hurdle. “‘win.’ That is all that goes through my mind hen i am competing,” Best said. He placed seventh in the event at 15.94 seconds.

Team exemplifies personalities DASH. At the Gateway Panthers Classic, senior Alexandria Meneses runs the 100-meter race. “You have to run happy, but look mean while doing it,” Meneses said. She ran 5:45.04 in this race.

SPRINT. At the Gateway Invitational, junior Ariel Collier runs the 100-meter dash. “I just try to focus on increasing my speed and pushing myself as much as I can to come in first,” Collier said. She placed 30th at 13.83 seconds.

Athletes use sport to grow closer as a family By SAM HOLLEMAN As the sneakers of 27 schools worth of track and field athletes pound the green artificial grass and rubber track of Lake Brantley High School, coach Josh Shearouse interrupts junior Anthony Henders mid-newspaper interview, jokingly telling him that if he talks any trash about his coaching, he will kick him off the team. “It’s our personalities that make Boone stand out at the meets. We all like each other so when we walk into the meet, if our bright orange uniforms didn’t do it, our loud, outgoing personalities do it,” coach Josh Shearouse said. “They get it from the coaching staff.” At the Gateway Panthers Classic on Feb. 22, the Braves placed fourth and the Lady Braves placed 14th overall. Senior Robert Strange won the discus event throwing 149 feet (only to beat that distance by 2’ 4” the following Saturday at Lake Brantley). Sophomore Jordan Crawford placed fourth in the 400-meter dash at 59.77 seconds. The girl’s 4x400 relay team placed fourth at 4:20.79. Senior Brandon Reddick placed second in the 100-meter dash at 11.06 seconds. But to these athletes, track means more than scores on a sheet of paper. To Crawford, sprinting is a way to express herself. To Strange, throwing means proudly following in his father’s and uncle’s footsteps. “My two idols are my dad and uncle. My dad broke the school record when he went to Boone and then 13 years later my uncle broke it with my dad as the coach. I have quite a legacy to live up to,” Strange said.

His father threw 178’ 11” in the discus and his uncle threw 182’. Currently, Strange’s best PR is 151’ 4”. The hours of practicing and conditioning change more than scores on a sheet of paper. “Track has affected how I act as a person, the terms I use, how I speak, it has matured me,” Crawford said. On March 1, the team competed in the Lake Brantley Invitational. Reddick placed fourth in the 100-meter dash and 200-meter dash at 11.12 seconds and 22.3 seconds, respectively. Senior Keiton Best placed fifth in the 110meter hurdles at 15.96 seconds. Junior Jared Hines placed fourth in the boy’s 3200 meter run at 10:11.09 and ____ Alexandria Meneses placed sixth in the 1600 meter run at 5:32.15. At the Lake Highland Invitational on March 8, the boys placed third overall and the girls placed 17. Senior Jamal Clark placed fourth in the boys long jump, jumping 40’ 10.25”. Senior Miranda Miller placed fourth in the girls shot put at 31’10” and junior Luis Rivera placed third in the boys shot put, throwing 43’7”. Strange placed second in the discus at 141’ 8”. The boys 4x100 meter relay team placed third at 43.57. Best placed fourth in the 110-meter hurdles and the 300-meter hurdles at 16.46 and 41.8, respectively. Reddick placed third in the 100-meter dash and the 200-meter dash at 10.94 seconds and 22.02, respectively. Hines placed 10th in the 1600 meter run at 4:39.94. The ninth place winner timed in at 4:39.64. “It is fate. We must not worry ourselves with facts and figures,” Hines said. “Because I have won once I know I’ve given my all.” The next meet is at Showalter Field for the Metro Conference Prelims tomorrow starting at 8:30 a.m.

They all like each other. They aren’t as worried about individual scores as they are about the team. They are a family. Josh Shearouse Track and Field head coach


In Sight, page 2, May 9, 2014

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Friday, May 9, 2014 hilights.org

insight

As if being a hormone-ridden teenager wasn’t hard enough, add the pressure of swimsuit season and expect nothing short of a mental breakdown. Lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-Chief

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through lizzy’s lens lizzy Gordon, Editor-in-chief

Improving one’s body image With summer break being weeks away, girls and boys are beginning to worry about their body image. As if being a hormone-ridden teenager wasn’t hard enough, add the pressure of swimsuit season and expect nothing short of a mental breakdown. This does not have to be the case. There are things one can do to feel more confident and comfortable in her skin. Thinking positively, creating a plan to counteract one’s insecurities and listing off your good qualities can transform one’s self perception. According to Deakin University, 90 percent of adolescent boys desire to be more muscular. According to the Dove Self-Esteem fund, 62 percent of teenage girls are insecure about their bodies. For those whose insecurities consume their thoughts, creating a plan of action that will conquer these insecurities is a positive initiative that will better one’s self perception. Make sure to take careful and healthy steps towards achieving body image goals. If one wants to be more toned, become more cognizant of the food you choose to consume. If executing a plan of action isn’t the solution for you, counteract those negative thoughts. Students may find it helpful to create a list of qualities they like about themselves. When focusing on one’s skills and beauty, confidence is boosted and a change in attitude will cause one to be happier. Even so, students might find it even more helpful to have a close friend make a list of their good qualities. It may sound cheesy, but you are beautiful just the way you are, regardless of society’s perception of what is beautiful. All you need to do is highlight your positive attributes. Another trick to overcoming these insecurities is to think positively. “Fake it ‘til you make it.” A person who acts and thinks positively will become more confident. Moreover, one may enjoy playing a game called warm and fuzzy. To play, everyone needs a sheet of paper, a marker and tape. Tape a piece of paper to a friend’s back and write something about that person that would make that person feel warm and fuzzy. Aside from the examples listed above, one may find it helpful to write his feelings in a journal. Keep track of accomplishments and positive things that people say about you. Choose to love yourself and always remember you are good enough. As The Help says, “You is kind, you is smart, you is important.”

illustration/VANESSA YANQUEN

What this generation knows <

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Social media has pulled this generation from the real world and simplified them to retweets and likes

This generation does not know a world without the Internet, eBay, spam mail from Nigerian princes, “purchasing” music, and only one Amazon. This generation was raised on social media, and because of this, adults are screaming and hollering about kids these days and how our views and our actions are negatively affected by such constant online interaction. The Internet is the largest man-made invention of the modern age. Without it, there would not be a modern age. It is a world within a world. Because it is such an influential creation, the first question on everyone’s mind is “is it a good addition to humanity?” No’s and yes’ fly back and forth in this debate. It has depleted the world of any sense of security and it has drawn kids of the digital generation away from being social and learning how to communicate face-to-face with other people. So it is easy to side against it. But, it has also brought people together in a way previously unimaginable. It has started movements, sparked revolutions and brought to light issues previously unheard of. So it is easy to see its benefits as well. Sadly, the cons outweigh the pros. Although it has brought people together, it has separated us more than ever. Kids today do not know how to communicate verbally with each other. Thanks to the Internet and it social media counterparts, this generation is having trouble comfortably holding conversations. They can socialize and hang out, but when it comes to verbally communicating with another

hilightsnewspaper

OthEr

Adviser Renee Burke Margaret McMillen

person face-to-face about something other than this Vine they saw the other day, their skills diminish. It’s all about texting, IMing, tweeting, posting and Instagramming, but rarely face-to-face communication. Furthermore, social media promotes the sharing of one’s life events with others. Users of social media often focus their posts and tweets on what is happening in their lives, which seems harmless at this age, but to a future employer, the smallest detail could be the difference between a job or not. Nothing is truly private on the Internet, especially when you are talking about social media - it’s just that social. There are no rules regarding who people can search for online; it is free reign to those on the dark side of the Internet. Security does not exist on social media, or anywhere on the Internet, for that matter. Moreover, social media has drained us down to a generation of likes and retweets. The world is now based on which celebrity’s Twitter account is the most followed or which hashtags are trending worldwide. We pay more attention to the lives of others than we do to those whose company we are in at the moment. The Internet has turned this generation into one that focuses on the now. Information moves so quickly that only the most breaking information is worthy of the public’s attention. The Internet has the potential to be a very good thing. It can bring people together and create change, and it has. But the negative change far outweighs the positive change.

ScholAStic ASSociAtionS Principal

EditoriAl BoArd Editor-In-Chief Lizzy Gordon Design Editor Gabriella Fakhoury Copy Editor Sam Holleman Business Manager Meghan Cotton Index Editor Ciara McCoy Webmaster Olivia Quattrone Social Media Editor Delanee Bogan

StAFFErS Jackson Crumbly, Natalie

Disla, Garrett Gastfield, Kaley Gilbert, Victor Komives, Stephanie Landis, Tommy McDonald, Mackenzie Mock

Editorial Policy Policy StAtEMEnt

Hilights is a student publication of William R. Boone High School, 1000 E. Kaley Ave., Orlando, Florida, 32806. The ideas and views of the aforementioned students and faculty are not those of Boone or the Orange County School Board. Opinions expressed in unsigned editorials are those of the editorial board, who determine the content. Opinions expressed in columns are those of the authors. Comments, letters, stories and ideas are welcome and encouraged under the following: 1. The material is not obscene or libelous 2. The material is signed The staff reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, length, punctuation, accuracy, invasion of privacy and potential disruption of the school.

Hilights is associated with Florida Scholastic, Columbia Scholastic and National Scholastic Press Associations and Quill and Scroll.

our MiSSion

This paper is a quality product whose sole purpose is to pursue the truth, and to provide information and factual news pertaining to Boone and the community around it. Any questions or comments can be directed to (407) 893-7200, extension 6012614 or Room 224, as well as by email to editor at hilights@gmail.com. If you find any errors, please call our offices or visit us.

SEE MorE

Check out hilights.org for up-todate news and information. Scan this QR code to go right to the site.


In Sight, page 2, May 9, 2014

FUNNIEST MOMENT THROUGHOUT HIGH SCHOOL

PERCUSSION AND GUARD CONCERT

A few weeks ago I fell down the stairs in the 200 building. Joseph Perez, sophomore

The percussion studio and Color Guard will perform in the auditorium on May 15 at 7 p.m.

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j Friday, May 9, 2014 hilights.org

hilights insight

Using AP exam scores to boost grades is grade inflation and is unfair to students.

By SAM HOLLEMAN Maintaining good grades is a constant battle. Students come to school everyday stressed out of their mind armed with nothing but a backpack, an open mind and their parent’s willingness to argue with guidance counselors and teachers in an attempt to convince them that their child is special and their grade should reflect that. Advanced Placement classes, the most advanced courses in all the land, are the epitome of stress. And to add to that stress, Apopka High School has developed a policy that states that if a student scores well on an AP exam, the corresponding AP class grade will be changed for the better because of it. College is well known for having classes where the grade is strongly based off of a single exam. So doing something similar in high school for classes that are of a college difficulty would make sense. But this policy does not prepare kids for college life, rather it inflates grades and provides an inaccurate representation of a student’s work ethic to colleges in the application process. It is not fair to a student who worked hard all year and pulled a B, to walk away from the class in June to see that a student who is smart but didn’t try all year (there is always one of those kids) pulled a better grade on the exam and was “rewarded” with a grade boost that doesn’t truly reflect his work ethic throughout the year. It is grade

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By KALEY GILBERT As entrance into college becomes more competitive, a d v a n c e d placement courses have become integral to the high school curriculum. But, a recent policy in two Orange County schools concerning the AP exam’s weight on the final class grade is causing tension. AP courses, known for their intensity and rigor, offer students a chance at college credit on the condition they pass the AP exam. A new policy in Orange County allows students who pass the exam be eligible for a grade change. Students who score a four on the exam receive grade changes to a B, while students who pass with a five receive an A in the course. Two schools in Orange County adopted this policy; Apopka High School will change final grades for all students who pass their exams and some Freedom High School teachers change their students’ grades after they passe the exam. Since this policy has not been implemented county wide, critics argue that it is giving students at the schools with the policy an unfair advantage. And they are completely right. With this policy adopted in only two schools it is completely unfair to students whose schools do not offer this. However, the policy itself is not the problem. The main reason students take AP courses is for the chance at college credit, which depends entirely on their exam score, not their grade in the class. This new policy allows students who have demonstrated overall mastery of the course (based on the exam) the chance to redeem their grade. Ultimately, what matters most is the AP score. AP classes are some of the most challenging and rigorous courses students face. Often, AP classes are more challenging than the college classes for which they take credit. Though College Board has

AP exam score policy inflates grades

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Students who pass the exam have shown mastery and should be entitled to a final grade change in the course.

source/COLLEGEBOARD.COM

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failed to comment on this policy, it should be implemented by them across the nation. This would eliminate any unfairness with the policy’s current implementation and allow all students to have a chance at a grade change, thus improving a student’s GPA. The issue of increased GPAs raises another argument against this policy. Critics believe changing students grades is unfair grade inflation, especially given the students who do well in the class but do not pass the exam. Critics argue that this grade inflation favors students who are naturally good test takers, but slacked off in the course. However, the purpose of the course is to give students not only the knowledge, but the skills to pass the exam. So the true test of students’ efforts still lies in how they do on the exam. Also, the opportunity at a grade change would further entice students to study and prepare for the exam, which both helps the student and the school. School grades are determined by the number of students who take and pass the exams so this is a win-win for students and schools. In increasing numbers high schools are not only pushing all students to take AP, but also to take multiple AP courses. Including many students who are not equipped to handle the rigor AP. These students sign up for AP classes not fully understanding the course load they are undertaking. Once enrolled in these courses, students struggle to be removed if later encountering difficulties due to Class Size Amendment. If these students manage to pass the exam despite struggling in the class they should be rewarded for their efforts and have their grades changed. They have demonstrated mastery of the class even if their class grades did not reflect that. In it’s current state, only enacted in two Orange County schools, this grade change policy is unfair. But the policy itself is a great idea that benefits both students and schools. With the implementation of this policy across the nation, students who struggle to cope with the rigor of AP courses, but demonstrate mastery of the course by passing the exam would be eligible for a final class grade change. After all, the exam is the true reflection of a student’s mastery.

<

AP exam score policy rewards students mastery

80,175 2013 graduates took an AP exam while in high school, 41, 149 of which passed with a three or higher

In an era of standardized testing, two reporters face off on final grades in advanced placement classes based on a passing score.

ßletters to the editor Exam reflects student’s knowledge

The AP exam reflects everything you were supposed to learn in the course. It makes sense to base your final grade

off the score you get on the AP exam. If you were to have a bad grade all year because you didn’t do your homework and then get a four or five on your AP exam, this means you retained most of

inflation and it already happens enough in the classroom with grading systems being different for each teacher, so to expand that would even further the issue. Additionally, turning a class into a more testing-based environment will turn more kids away from taking AP classes than it already does. Believe it or not, a student might actually want to take an AP class to become advanced in a certain subject for the love of the subject, not for the love of getting college credit. By making the grade dependent on one exam, it will recreate the entire issue the state had with FCAT where teachers began teaching to the test rather than to their respective subject. Doing this to AP classes will overrun them with more practice tests and mock exams than ever before because for some reason actually teaching a subject rather than cramming for a test is a more effective way for students to retain information. Moreover, because this policy is not active nationwide, students attending schools without this policy are at a competitive disadvantage against those who attend schools with the policy. Say Johnny has a 3.5 unweighted Grade Point Average and goes to a school where this policy is not in place. He has scored fives on three AP exams that he has taken over the years. Another guy named Joey should have an unweighted 3.2 GPA but because he goes to a school where the policy is in place and he scored fives on all three of his AP exams he now has a 3.6 GPA. When it comes to applying for colleges, students who are lucky enough to get a grade change in the class for scoring well on the exam will have a higher GPA on a college application and will therefore have a stronger chance of getting into the college of their choice. Succeeding in high school is hard, especially when the weight of getting accepted into college is added to it. Schools should prepare students to be successful whenever they can rather than inflating grades based on a single test. By implementing such an idea, it is only piling stress on the student and diminishing his chances of actually succeeding in a grade inflating-less world.

ßreadmore the information meaning you should pass the class with a high grade on your report card.

Gage Van Kuilenburg, freshman

Go to hilights.org to read more student’s opinions on this topic.


Sprig Sports supplement pages 36-37, May 9, 2014

spring 020

MEET

INSPIRES

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SEASON

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FLY HIGH At the Lake Highland Invitational on March 8, senior Deion Thomas soars through the air in the long jump. “My favorite part about long jump is that I feel like I’m flying. I just run, and I don’t look down,” Thomas said. Thomas placed 23rd, clearing 18-0.75. POWER THROUGH Senior Burkhardt Helfrich runs the 4x800 meter relay at the Gateway Panthers Classic on Feb. 22. “When I run, I feel so powerful, but also really calm. It’s like everything around me freezes,” Helfrich said. The relay team placed eighth overall, 10:37.58.

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< photo/Samuel Holleman

content by MATT CASLER and DELANEY SEACORD As senior James Chris Veguilla scanned the field crawling with coaches and athletes, a sense of selfassurance washed over him. He breathed in deeply, stared down the field and thrust the shot put through the air with all the strength he could muster. “[The biggest struggle at the Lake Highland meet was] the amount of teams out there. There were a lot more teams than there usually [were], so there was more competition,” Veguilla said. On March 8, 23 schools participated in the Lake Highland Elite Classic, which gave the team members an opportunity to showcase their abilities. “We performed pretty well. There were a lot of personal records for everyone. We all worked hard for those titles,” junior Ryan Harding said. Harding placed 18th in the 1,600-meter run, 4:49, setting a new personal record for himself. The coaches viewed Harding’s improvement, along with those of other athletes, as a turning point in the season when 13 athletes set personal records at that meet. “During that meet, the athletes realized their actual potential and performed at that level,” coach Jerry Williams said. “We saw some true season bests. This is when we saw a real shift towards season-long success.” In addition to team members setting new personal records, several athletes placed in their events, including senior Stephen Brock, who finished second in his 400-meter dash heat, and Melvin Torres, who won sixth in discus. The 4x100 meter relay team of seniors Shawn Latimer, Brandon Reddick, Stephen Brock and Robert C. Strange placed third in its heat. Additionally, Reddick finished third overall, out of 47 participants, in the 100-meter dash, 10.94, and senior Keiton Best placed first in his heat in the 110-meter hurdles, 16.37. Both boys achieved personal records for these performances, as well. The Lake Highland Elite Classic spurred team success at districts on April 18, where the boys placed third. “I feel like not only did I do well, but as a team, we did really well, which makes me, as a senior, proud because we came together as a family towards the end of the season, and [it] helped us start winning and placing in more events,” Veguilla said.

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photo/John Chapman

photo/John Chapman

greater competition at the Lake Highland Elite Classic motivated athletes to excel as a team

Gateway Panthers Classic, Feb. 22 “I feel really strong when I throw [discus]. It’s an indescribable feeling. [The team] worked really hard [for the first meet], but we also had so much fun,” junior MELVIN TORRES said.

Lake Highland Elite Classic, March 8

Metro Conference Prelims, March 19 “My favorite part is competing against people because it gives you an adrenaline rush and it is fun being competitive,” junior JUSTIN SPITZE said.

BRANDON REDDICK, senior Eyes on the finish line, Reddick sprints in the 200-meter dash at the Lake Highland Invitational on March 8. “When I win a race, all the hard work and training I’ve done makes sense and pays off,” Reddick said.

Brian Jaeger Elite Classic, April 12

> boys track and field 021

“Coming in second in my heat in the 100-meter dash was a great feeling. I felt really accomplished and proud after I found out [how I did],” senior SHAWN LATIMER said.

design by OLIVIA REES

photo/Matt Casler

“Pole vaulting is a high that I’ve never felt before. It hooks you with the adrenaline rush when you clear a new height, [and] when I win, I feel like no one can touch me,” junior ANTHONY HENDERS said. photo/Delaney Seacord


Excerpt from the short story Flash Clips

...The fate of a single man rests in the hands of his fellows. Clenching with criticism and squeezing with sentiment. Many will fall through the cracks between the fingers due to the immense pressure thrust upon them. But the few, the small minority that remains despite seemingly everything forced against them, now rests in what can only be referred to as the palm of success. We join a man who not only broke free of the capitalist shackles latched to his ankles, but once relinquished, grabbed ahold of the chain and, for lack of a better phrase, made them his bitch. Mr. Daniel Cody (although he prefers just Dan) did his time, worked his way up the corporate ladder, and is now resting on his Yacht in the middle of Lake Superior with only the concern of when he will mosey on back to his luxurious abode and continue his relaxation from within his four walls. The sun was straight up from the ground and seemed especially bright on this autumn day. The rays reflected off of his spotless white lake vessel and onto the water, reflecting a light of almost pure gold that spanned what must have 10 feet around him and his craft. Peace seemed to surround this ever-elongating moment. And in that moment, Dan dozed off. Mr. Cody awoke from his slumber rather abruptly thanks to the voice of an unknown man coming from somewhere in his immediate area. He was confused. How could there be a voice so close to him even though he is in the middle of a lake? Because Dan had just woken up not 7 seconds ago, he was not quick to realize maybe someone was on a boat nearby. But once he came to this realization, he decided that it was time to get up and see what was going on. “What the hell is going on?” “Sir! I apolog-“ “Who is that yelling? Where are you? What in gods name gave you the audacity to think it was a good idea wake me up from a delightful afternoon nap?” “Sir! I am over here!” The voice, and the direction in which it was originating, became clear to Dan and, now fully alert, charged toward the voice with an excessive amount of anger in each step in a way that could resemble nothing other than a young child going to take back a toy another child had stolen on the playground...


Cover of the short story Flash Clips


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Excerpt from the novel Finding Purpose Clips ... But maybe that is the American dream. Maybe the new American dream is being able to believe, think, and do what you want (within reasonable parameters) no matter who says otherwise. What if not having a singular ideology connecting us is the singular ideology connecting us? We live in a society of blue raspberry applesauce. First of all, one cannot pick blue raspberries in the wild. They don’t exist naturally. But God forbid our raspberry-flavored-foods are any shade even remotely close to their natural color, in which case we will assuredly fall into a thousand years of darkness where cannibalism is rampant, rape and pillaging going on left and right, and where Rob Schneider is respected for his comedy and acting skills. Moreover, it’s called APPLEsauce. It is supposed to taste like apples. Blue raspberry applesauce is like having a banana flavored cherry lollipop or a Cheetos flavored Dorito: It shouldn’t exist; yet it does. We can poor sugar-free sugar in our blue raspberry applesauce while watching a highlight real of mitt Romney campaign speeches (that’s right, outdated political jokes, I’m doing them) and people can say you shouldn’t do that, and you can do it anyways. We as Americans shouldn’t do half the things we want to do, but we do them anyways. It will always be achievable, because we will always want to do things. Whether or not it stays the “American Dream” we can always do whatever we want. When we decided it would be a good idea to let Rob Schneider have his own TV show, we were living the American dream. When we decided to have 4 Shrek movies, a Christmas special, and a spin off movie; that was the American Dream in action. And when Mark Zuckerburg tried to turn a social media sight where people complain about the line at Starbucks and they feel that, as a result, their day is “a day of prosperity and frustration” (taking one college class online doesn’t make you a genius because clearly you still can’t grasp the meaning of prosperity and/or frustration) into stocks, he was living the American dream. We obviously shouldn’t do the some of the things we do, yet it is those things that define us as a society, because we do them. America wouldn’t be the same without a bunch of middle-aged white guys having a midlife crisis by starting an independent nation. We were founded on doing whatever the hell we want to, because we can....


Cover of the novel Finding Purpose Clips


Clips


Excerpt from the poem & screenplay I Have Thought Ernie No you aren’t getting it

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Gabi What am I not getting? Ernie You just aren’t getting it Gabi Then help me ge…(get’s cut off) Ernie You just aren’t getting it! You just aren’t getting it… Neither makes eye contact for a while. Gabi is angry and so is Ernie. Ernie takes a long sip of coffee and sets it down. Ernie *sigh* He stares at his coffee cup. Ernie They can’t care about my story. Gabi doesn’t respond and begins to look at everything in the coffee shop but him. Ernie They cant ca…they cant care about my story because…I don’t know. Gabi continues to scan the room and now crosses her arms. Ernie I don’t care about my story. This got her attention back on him. Her arms are still crossed but her eyes are looking directly at him. His eyes, on the other hand haven’t moved from his coffee cup.


Cover of the poem & screenplay I have Thought

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Sound of the Braves show shirt design Clips

Somewhere 2013-2014 Boone High School Sound of the Braves


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6

Friday, October 5, 2012 hilights.org

specialfeature

hi-lights

This is a really good quotable quote that no one else can say and it will really make Burke happy to read.

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7

This would be some news brief that we could highlight but not write a story about. It could allow for more coverage on pages and throughout the paper. Short and sweet quick reads. That’s what readers like.

QUICK HEADLINE HERE

Friday, October 5, 2012 hilights.org

QUICK HEADLINE HERE

Headline Runt, sequisint. Endipient officitatus eium experum fugit prore magnam faccatus dolut facidem fugit estiumquat dolutem quaeprat magnis vendipsam ium quat esequam serumen Cae tecuptas esci diae. Nequi volest eosa autectionse ape pos noquia erspid quunt a imi, ommo temporpos aut iniment bis ne iaeratur, suscia sequoditas et lamendam etus untemporit nos et, maximil liquunt perias imus, tem il eum iustrum idquis et untur, odit, tempero bea nulluptatur aut iust ut labor remposti aut int peria qui officaborae voluptus maximus sit, blab ius ex ommo omnis maior sequatque inveratur? eius et, sus Mos et et occustis quaepre pelestrum ipsum sus es doluptas dolorecto ipsus millit lanto magnatquiae et ducipsu sciharciendist lique prae derferi asitium nobisliti cum voluptat sunt liquidello blaceatquae. Nam hil iliatur, alibus pa nustore quametur? volo tendaerum Usantur a volorios at peditinimus as quibust, suntem volo aliquam adi ius explignatis alia sum ipicit lautemquamus qui occupicta velessequia dis eaturidi aut laborum quam, bus, conseque remquas eos dignam omnitat emperae perrum quam eat. qui sim doluptae iduntem. Incto con perentiusam volorem Itatur autemolut dolum quat re et labo. Et exerrum exped ut nulliquiae maionsectur? At lam harum faccullo idem core, explabores ut autesciis eosam, ipis venet, ipicien disquiant, in doloraest eliquame nihiliquae eaeatus nonsequati conecatem asperiam, ut ium sus quo is nus tem fugiatis es quiaerum sam, optatat ullacie turendunt maiorro dolupta duci aditisc experch illest, sundes mil ium que voiliqui non con cus doluptatur, ipsam res rem accupitatio illit uta loria volore nusam voluptatur? Xeribea tintinu llescilitat unt as et que nus, omnis deriora verferit is dolectatur sa veniand itasse simint. plate il iur seque cullandest est, odigenimet Beaqui odi culquos mo verepre, volut odi dolo blandae. Ut aut libus et omnis vel iumque es doluptati cuptas nemos debiti cum magnis faccust, cone delia volupie ndiant is et res int. eossequ Boriscil ma con pra sera dendignim rerum ut autem asimodi quidus. tatem. Illicitatur millatur, ut quo volest mos qui doluptia vel Aped magnam, as is vollatemquam core expedit, ut eariata velit il ipsae. Nam fugia vel moles vent vendelique et alician turibusanis et venimus, il inte simintio. Ota quiam que sus rent voluptas min estiore stiantor re lam raerum velicia dolor Sollendellit volor abo. Sa dolut qui aliqui dolesed quost esciet eate natur? Udiorio eos eos asperiatem dus, volupti verro moluptati Ma doluptae exerspitate laut aut optur anducim aiorupt atiunt, pa- nis neceribus. runUllacest quisim alitisquam dolupis qui dior re inctate tio. non ent. Igendi Optaspis et viti te voloratius. optatur Ent ipsandit quam fugiam, omni blabore pudiamet restrum ute la illiquis ex et magnist eum hitat molendis se quatia sam nonse sent resere corrum ventur rerrovidebis sint doluptus et quia autem enem et hilitatur reicium nesecere vent a incilita por re vendita volupta vel est accum ra dendolupta porum tion essequidisi odit optatest volo verum ut sequibusdae mi, duntor antior alibus rempedi tatur, cullo volest optur alis et, ium fuga. Ique reperio quiandigenis as siodit, omnit eosamus tatur? Inctus dolessi consendi nonsendis sunt. debis resectis quis ex et volecaepero Gent od ut ipideribus corem quiat laboremqui con pelicut officia dolesene vel id tatur res voluptate verspel escimi, ullaut lab im nusandem veratia sitiusci velist eum el ma enis eaquae et vernatem nitat dolorepedit unto odit volo eicide omnis ent et eum, tem hiliand nam ent veratempore iusciis es ucienis et as eat. eos mos nes minus. Lenis necea venda verspiditate Tur? Quunt. Laut molum volori blaborest et mod eumet fugiaep erspic te nis ute quatur simin nos qui voluptae num voloreperi re porem sed voluptas et reperume mincia cus et voluptate natem. Ur? asperum voluptas auda diorecta voloreQui ullabo. Ic te presequid quam apit que nus nobit ea velperrum earum quae loribus reseque coriae laut quidi con et la optas pa se sam sant vel inum am voloribusam etur aspello sed excerestium repuda doluptamus in nullori beariatquae am iumquae praquam eaquae earumquo blat. tion sequam Comnis min earcienduci nihictus porit eosamus, aut arum iuscima quiate labor siment, sima pro velit laut aut aut et estinctas siminvel id quia aut maximus torendio mo harum explandelene ea pra aut eaqui natatem ute voluptation il iniet natisit, sunt, consequidunt pro optaqui con perum enet quidipi arundis autatecae. Iquassum ex et fugitae re sam et volor derirehenis mint ea sam, sum conem res et esto dolorendaaecnte nis estior ant ullorepe di ut ut quossim voloremqui aut acerovita consequis plandi offic temporesequo consed utempore, quiatem voluptatur, occum undi aut et fuga. Mos nietur

Headline

Content by John Smith and Jane Doe

This would be some news brief that we could highlight but not write a story about. It could allow for more coverage on pages and throughout the paper. Short and sweet quick reads. That’s what readers like.

hi-lights specialfeature

Writers explain division

‘ Thoughts on things This is an intro to a DPS on controversial topics and an explaination of both sides of each topic so people understand whats going on in the world and yeah. This is an intro to a DPS on controversial topics and an explaination of both sides of each topic so people understand whats going on in the world and yeah. This is an intro to a DPS on controversial topics and an explaination of both sides of each topic so people understand whats going on in the world and yeah.

Headline Sollendellit volor abo. Sa dolut qui aliqui dolesed quost esciet eate natur? Udiorio eos eos asperiatem dus, volupti verro moluptati Ma doluptae exerspitate laut aut optur anducim aiorupt atiunt, pa- nis neceribus. runUllacest quisim alitisquam dolupis qui dior re inctate tio. non ent. Igendi Optaspis et viti te voloratius. optatur Ent ipsandit quam fugiam, omni blabore pudiamet restrum ute la illiquis ex et magnist eum hitat molendis se quatia sam nonse sent resere corrum ventur rerrovidebis sint doluptus et quia autem enem et hilitatur reicium nesecere vent a incilita por re vendita volupta vel est accum ra dendolupta porum tion essequidisi odit optatest volo verum ut sequibusdae mi, duntor antior alibus rempedi tatur, cullo volest optur alis et, ium fuga. Ique reperio quiandigenis as siodit, omnit eosamus tatur? Inctus dolessi consendi nonsendis sunt. debis resectis quis ex et volecaepero Gent od ut ipideribus corem quiat laboremqui con pelicut officia dolesene vel id tatur res voluptate verspel escimi, ullaut lab im nusandem veratia sitiusci velist eum el ma enis eaquae et vernatem nitat dolorepedit unto odit volo eicide omnis ent et eum, tem hiliand nam ent veratempore iusciis es ucienis et as eat. eos mos nes minus. Lenis necea venda verspiditate Tur? Quunt. Laut molum volori blaborest et mod eumet fugiaep erspic te nis ute quatur simin nos qui voluptae num voloreperi re porem sed voluptas et reperume mincia cus et voluptate natem. Ur? asperum voluptas auda diorecta voloreQui ullabo. Ic te presequid quam apit que nus nobit ea velperrum earum quae loribus reseque coriae laut quidi con et la optas pa se sam sant vel inum am voloribusam etur aspello sed excerestium repuda doluptamus in nullori beariatquae am iumquae praquam eaquae earumquo blat. tion sequam Comnis min earcienduci nihictus porit eosamus, aut arum iuscima quiate labor siment, sima pro velit laut aut aut et estinctas siminvel id quia aut maximus torendio mo harum explandelene ea pra aut eaqui natatem ute voluptation il iniet natisit, sunt, consequidunt pro optaqui con perum enet quidipi arundis autatecae. Iquassum ex et fugitae re sam et volor derirehenis mint ea sam, sum conem res et esto dolorendaaecnte nis estior ant ullorepe di ut ut quossim voloremqui aut acerovita consequis plandi offic temporesequo consed utempore, quiatem voluptatur, occum undi aut et fuga. Mos nietur

Design 1


Learn how to read and play music on a myriad of instruments

Talent

Join Boone High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s percussion studio by contacting Jose Eslava at jose.eslava@ocps.net

Percussion

Design 2 front


Find yourself in a welcoming environment that accepts everyone.

Friendship Belonging

Make lifelong friendships with similar interests

Design 2 back


Design 3


Sam Holleman


Samuel Holleman 2014