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Samuel Holleman May 17, 2013 Phillip DeFranco Creator Sourcefed 5405 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 Dear Mr. DeFranco, Maybe the Sourcefed is looking for someone who can write proficiently, work well independently (along with others) and contribute quality work to the channel. If so, the please accept and consider the attached resume for the position as a host on Sourcefed. As a writer for my high school newspaper, I wrote detailed and well researched editorials and worked alongside my fellow staffers in the writing process. With a background in writing and journalism, I will be able to bring new ideas, look at stories through angles previously unheard of, and take on the job from a purely journalistic standpoint or an editorialized one. Productively, I enjoy working with others on writing and presenting and intend to present many new ideas on how to distribute content to as many people as possible, as well as make them informitable with some humor thrown in. Being apart of this creative atmosphere would help mold me and my writing for the rest of my life. Although the resume outlines my work history in a very detailed manner, I believe a personal interview would better present what I can contribute. I would greatly appreciate the opportunity to meet with you in a face-to-face interview at a convenient time. Thank you for your consideration and I hope to hear from you soon. Fondly,

1222 Silverstone Avenue, Orlando, FL 32806, samuel.holleman@gmail.com (407)-668-8645


Samuel Holleman OBJECTIVE To learn more about writing and presenting news in the form of Youtube videos through a part-time or full-time job. EDUCATION Completed three years at William R. Boone High School Graduation date: May 2014 GPA 3.7. EXPERIENCE Newspaper Staff Member, William R. Boone High School • August 2011-present. Columnist for campus newspaper. Experience in taking photographs, designing layout, writing, and editoring stories.

Newspaper Staff Member, Howard Middle School • August 2009-June 2010. Editorial Writer for online newspaper. Researched using library and Web sources. Composed informative editorials. HONORS, AWARDS, AND MEMBERSHIPS • Ranger of the Year Award for exemplifying the qualities and characteristics of loyalty and dedication to Howard Middle School. Outstanding citizenship, leadership, and superior academic achievement. • Sound of the Braves Marching Band. Member, 2010-present • Science Olympiad team. Member, 2013

1222 Silverstone Avenue, Orlando, FL 32806, samuel.holleman@gmail.com (407)-668-8645


Self analytical evaluation

My career in journalism started with nothing other than pure jealousy. Back in the 7th grade, my friend Alex was given the opportunity to be on our middle school’s online newspaper staff for it’s first you. He accepted the offer. When he told me about this, as I mentioned before, I got jealous. I didn’t even know I wanted to do something like that until Alex started doing it. So when 8th grade rolled around, I applied for staff and got accepted. It was during this year I discovered my love for writing editorials. I could write an editorial. It was something I understood and felt was important. So I wrote a lot of them to experiment with different areas of the news to write about, only to find that I enjoyed writing about all of them. I signed up for J1 at the beginning of freshman year, got on Boone high school’s newspaper staff, and now I will be copy editor my senior year. Over the course of this year I learned why we have deadlines. I was aware of why they existed, but until this year I hadn’t experienced the devastation that follows an un-followed deadline. I have also refined my ability to work with others throughout the production process. I learned how to do everything I can to assist my fellow staffers at every turn.


Reflection 1

This is my most significant piece this year because I believe it is the best representation of what I am capable of. It was a fairly easy deadline, which did play a part in choosing the best piece. The last two paragraphs evolved the most over the production process because those were the hardest paragraphs to compose. The last two paragraphs are where my point is actually being conveyed, so fitting what would span over 300 words into about 60 was difficult to do. I learned to value each and every word written. Through the process of condensing my point at the end, I learned to choose my words carefully in order convey my idea the best way possible. What I like about it is the fact that I don’t get to the point of the column until the end, giving me free-reign to be as sarcastic as I choose to be.


Reflection 1


Reflection 1 5

Friday, October 5, 2012 hilights.org

hi-lights thenews CLUB ELECTS NEW OFFICERS

STUDENTS ELECT HOMECOMING COURT

National Honor Society elected new officers on Sep. 21. All officers are seniors. The president is Christine Maloney, Vice President is Elaina Carrion; Secretary is Emily Porterfield; Treasurer is Merrie Grace Harding and the Service Chair is Jessica Kneeland.

Students of all grade levels were selected on Sept. 28 for homecoming court. Representing the senior class are Cameron McNeill, Merrie Grace Harding, Elaina Carrion, Shelbee Simmons, Sarah Berlinsky, Connor McClellan, William McMillin, Dillon Knox, Aaron Turman and John Townsend.

Sam Holleman, columnist

Boo Boo wins On August 8, 2012, the world became aware of a show that is what can only be described as “the show of the century.” One may think that this is somewhat of a bold statement given we are only 12 years into the century. But TLC’s Here Comes Honey Boo Boo has reached a new level of television entertainment that cannot be considered anything other than the show of the century. This masterpiece is about a 6-year-old beauty pageant contestant Alana “Honey Boo Boo” Thompson (originally featured on TLC’s Toddlers in Tiaras) her mother, Mama; her father, Sugar Bear; and her sisters Pumpkin, Chubbs and Chickadee as they live out there compelling and fascinating lives in McIntyre, Georgia. First of all, the show has such a broad audience appeal that anyone can tune in and have a good time. This show has it all: a loving family, humor for all ages, a pig named Glitzy, and of course, farting. It is very rare that a show comes along where entire families can sit together and enjoy an hour of quality television. Furthermore, Here Comes Honey Boo Boo is the epitome of LOLing. From Glitzty the pig “oooo’ing” on the table to Mama farting in the title sequence, one cannot stop laughing from the beginning to the end of each episode. This show puts classics such as Cheers, M*A*S*H and Alf to shame. Finally, this show has not been ruined by Hollywood because it stays true to its core values. Here Comes Honey Boo Boo remains a spectacular show without succumbing to the pressures of Hollywood. This is what separates a mediocre show from a great one, because if a show needs to sell out to succeed, it has already failed. Here Comes Honey Boo Boo is the show of the century, but not because of its broad appeal, its humor or even its ability to succeed without selling out; rather because (sadly) everyone can be entertained by the show. It possesses the humor of a 4-year-old who just discovered the wonders of poop and because even Hollywood wants to avoid any association with it. It is the show of the century because August 8, 2012, is the point in time when America stooped to a new low. This sad excuse for entertainment got more views than the RNC. Somehow, listening to a 6-year-old’s concerns about Mama eating their pet pig is better television than listening to a man who could be the next leader of our country has to say. In 100 years from now, historians will look back at this point and say that this is where America lost, and Boo Boo won.

[ Awareness from, page 1 However, that is not always true. On Aug. 18, 2010, her 47th birthday, Annette Montgomery learned she had stage two breast cancer. No one else in her family had ever been diagnosed with breast cancer. “Cancer makes you try not to take things for granted. It’s hard to relive it again, but when people go through chemo and need help, I try to always be there,” Montgomery, government teacher, said. With two young boys at home and a strong will to keep working, Montgomery did not let cancer stop her from achieving anything, let alone her daily routines. “It is all about setting up a plan. Without a plan it is very overwhelming; with a plan you can keep your life in

control,” Montgomery said. As of today, Montgomery has been cancer free and out of chemotherapy for 18 months. Every cancer free year lowers her chances of cancerous cells being triggered. Football’s largest fundraiser and newest tradition is the pink and white football game, which takes place on campus every other spring. The first annual game raised $18,000 two years ago. Colonial High School hosted the second pink and white game, which raised $12,000. Much like the age-old tradition of the Boone/Edgewater match up, a barrel is the trophy. The barrel is pink and white in spirit of breast cancer awareness. “The pink and white game was my wife’s idea. She believed that it would be beneficial to our kids and community,” football coach Phil Ziglar said. Ziglar’s wife works for MD Anderson, a cancer center searching for

a way to cure all types of cancer. Ziglar’s first wife passed away after her fight with lung cancer. This campus is an official Relay for Life location. Another national fundraiser is the Susan G. Komen Race for the cure. The local event is Oct. 21, at the University of Central Florida. If interested, visit www.komen.org. With a 93 percent survival rate for the first stage of breast cancer and a 15 percent survival rate for the last stage, this 5K race raises awareness for the fight against breast cancer and also celebrates the survivors. Those who lost their lives to the fight against cancer are also honored at the event. “I look at Mrs. Montgomery and others and they just keep going; they don’t let it affect their family. I am really proud of them,” Sarah Kittrell, digital design teacher, said.

ßthebarrel

SH &Hollering Screaming

Pink, white tackles cancer The Pink and White Barrel is given to the winning team.

Annette Montgomery

State alters minimum standards [ Graduation from, page 1

ßgradebygrade All grades must complete 4 English and Math, 3 Science and Social Science, 8 Electives, 1 Art and 1 Physical Education • •

9

• • • • • •

10 11 12

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (Must pass to earn Algebra credit) Geometry (Must pass to earn Geometry credit) Biology (Must pass to earn Biology credit) US History EOC (30% of grade) One online course required

• • • •

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (Must pass to earn Algebra credit) Geometry (30% of grade) Biology (30% of grade) US History EOC (30% of grade) One online course required

• • •

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (30% of grade) US History EOC (30% of grade)

FCAT Reading and Mathematics (Must pass both sections to graduate)

and eight required electives remain unchanged. However, freshmen and sophomores must successfully complete one online class through virtual school. No specifications are given for what online class should be completed. An online class completed in grades six through eight is also acceptable. A common concern regarding the online class is a student’s access to a computer. “If I was unable to get a computer, I would go to the public library because [computers there] are available all the time,” sophomore Nicole Neal said. Florida is phasing out Florida Comprehensive Achievement Tests and replacing them with End of Course Exams. FCAT tested students grades 3 to 11 in reading, math, writing and science. In previous years, 10th grade reading and math FCAT’s had to be passed with a three or higher for graduation. Now, juniors, sophomores and freshmen must pass FCAT 2.0 Reading with a 3 or better for graduation, unless students are able to opt out with a higher ACT scores. EOCs are being administered in

Algebra 1, Geometry, Biology and U.S. History. Current freshmen and sophomores will take all four of the exams prior to graduation; juniors will take Algebra 1 and U.S. History; freshmen must pass Algebra 1, geometry and biology to graduate; sophomores must pass Algebra 1 to graduate. In addition to the new exit exams, the EOCs, except for Algebra, will also make up 30 percent of sophomores final grades. For freshmen, only the U.S. History EOC exam represents 30 percent of their grade, and for juniors, Algebra 1 and U.S. History EOC exams will represent 30 percent of their grade. Current seniors’ final exams represent 10 percent of their final grade. “The FCAT is sort of familiar to our age group, but throwing in the EOC instead is overwhelming and if you don’t do so well, you suffer huge consequences for it,” Neal said. Students who are unsure if they are on track to graduate should make an appointment to speak with their counselors or go to www.fldoe.org to check state graduation requirements for their grade level. “[If I wasn’t on track] I wouldn’t be happy with myself because all my hard work would be for nothing,” junior Clint Lyttle said.

Organization benefits campus sports [ BHSAA from, page 1 “Without BHSAA, the school’s facilities would get worn and unusable at some point,” Scott Bell, Vice President of BHSAA, said. “We try to focus on the needs of all sports and then prioritize which needs are the most.” While BHSAA strives to support athletics, it primarily focuses on the larger facility needs. For example, BHSAA purchased the new stadium scoreboard three years ago, which benefits all the sports that play there.

Last year, they also purchased a new scoreboard for softball, new mats for the cheerleaders and re-finished the gymnasium floor. “We are so grateful for BHSAA because now we have a full competition floor of a mat, when before we had seven mats that were actually wrestling,” Cindy Hutsell, cheerleading coach, said. “Now we can practice our routine without saying, ‘Let’s pretend there’s another mat right here.’ We are so blessed to have them.” With 867 entries and over $14,000 raised in the 4th Annual Reservation Run, it breaks school records for the most runners and most money

accumulated at this event. Sports teams and clubs are encouraged to partake in the run because each runner who registers under said club or sport, receives a portion of the proceeds. Bravettes earned an extra $1,000 for having the most participants. BHSAA originated with the help of the Boone Sports Legacy Board and Boone Boosters. Their mission was to improve the school’s facilities and to raise funds for athletics. They joined together to form BHSAA and together be a strong unit. If one is interested in volunteering for BHSAA he can either contact Kelly Mutters, located in the Trading Post.

Without BHSAA the school’s facilities would get worn out and unusable at some point. Scott Bell BHSAA vice president


ReflecTion two

If I were to choose one piece to work more on, I would choose the KTD from March. The production process of this article started out strong; it was on the page very early on and it fit in the provided space. The biggest struggle was not the fact that our points were under-developed or nonexistent, but rather the way that they were delivered was less than ideal. If I learned anything from this column, it would be to read your work and make sure that everything you want to be said is said correctly. Without doing that the reader could be left dazed and confused. What I do like about this piece though is the topic itself. Kid’s sense of entitlement is a great issue to discuss, I just wish the way it was discussed worked out differently.


ReflecTion two


ReflecTion two 4

Friday, March 15, 2013 hilights.org

hi-lights

‘ KTD thenews

A student may be a great reader, but may not be interested in the subject matter or may just have trouble picking a correct answer. Reagan Robins, sophomore

FCAT causes controversy

Kids These Days

Test continues to have mixed reviews

Sam Holleman, columnist

Austin Hall, columnist

Visine is on sale Austin Hall: I feel like we live in a world of royalty; a world full of princesses and princes that feel like they own the world. I have no idea where it comes from, but kids these days have a strange sense of entitlement. Sam Holleman: I think it’s the parents. They are so afraid of telling their children ‘no’ that these kids have developed this philosophy of always getting what they want. AH: I agree. I hear parents say things like ‘you’re spoiled to death!’ and I do not understand it. That parent worked his or her whole life to make more than enough money to support his or her family, so that they could provide their children with nice things, but they then turn around and buy their child everything they want. SH: Our parents worked their fart cannons off to get everything they have in their lives, and they don’t want their kids to have to do the same things they did, so they go to the extreme and hand everything to our generation on a silver platter with a cherry on top and maybe a side of mashed potatoes. Mashed potatoes and a dessert item with a cherry on the same shiny silver platter may seem like an odd combination, but my point is made nonetheless. AH: I do agree that it doesn’t sound very appetizing. It’s kind of counter-intuitive because the point of a cherry is to put on ice cream. Without the ice cream, it is just a plate with a cherry and some potatoes. If any of these kids wanted the ice cream and mashed potatoes, they could have it. Mommy and daddy would buy it for them in a heartbeat. SH: ‘No’ has become a forgotten word in the parent dictionary. And because of that, we have kids with an attitude of ‘give me things because I deserve them’ rather than ‘I will earn the things I want.’ AH: And the kids who say they deserve them are usually the last ones who do. The ones who seem to complain about how they do not get everything they ask for, are usually the kids who do not work for anything. They whine and complain and moan until their wishes are fulfilled by mommy and daddy. These are the kids who give us teenagers a bad name. I am not saying that I am perfect and that I do not ask for things that I want, but I like to think that I do not throw a fit. I ask for things within reason, or I just work my thunder buns off and I buy it with my own hard-earned money. Money that I earned with my blood, sweat and tears. But mostly tears...definitely a lot of tears. SH: Kids these days have never truly had to work for anything. Granted, they haven’t been around a very long time to work for stuff, but over the time they have been around, they merely ask for it. Instead of having to get a job to have spending money, kids just ask for it from their parent(s) or guardians. Everything is handed to them and because of that, they have learned nothing about working and paying for their efforts. AH: I get what you’re saying, but it seems to be a recurring pattern. I feel the same way about the whole “kids not working for anything and asking for everything” stuff, but I feel like it is not all their fault. The job market for the entire country has been very low for the past decade, so it is not entirely our generation’s fault for the unemployment. There are people who try to get a job but just can’t. The lucky few who do get a job should be appreciative of the opportunity to get that cash flow. SH: You would think the lack of prosperity in the job market would wake our generation up to the fact that we need to actually try in order to succeed, but here we are. AH: Our generation seems to be one that is allergic to work. Kind of like how we are allergic to healthy foods. It seems like everyone gets red, itchy eyes from the thought of work, but it is pollen season so who knows. I think Visine is on sale, so they can use that to help with their eyes.

By CIARA MCCOY With the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test approaching quickly, there are still numerous questions about the FCAT exam itself. FCAT began in 1998 and replaced the State Student Assessment Test (SSAT) and the High School Competency Test (HSCT). Freshmen and sophomores are currently the only grades that take the reading portion of the test. Sophomores also take a writing portion. There used to be math and science portions as well, but those have since been replaced with end of course exams. English II teacher Katherine Anderson believes FCAT may reflect a student’s test anxiety on that given day. Anderson believes students should be given more than one opportunity to prove themselves. “I believe that FCAT is a valid assessment of a student’s academic knowledge, but it should not be the sole determining factor of a students academic ability or a school’s,” Anderson said. Junior Trenton Haddock said he definitely dislikes the FCAT. “Not just one test can show [how good a student is at reading]. Numerous things can affect how good or bad you

do,” Haddock said. Students’ results from the FCAT are compiled to generate a grade for each public school. Under this plan, public schools receive a grade from A to F, depending on student performance. The higher a public school scores, the more funding it receives from the state. One needs to pass the FCAT to graduate. If one were to fail, he would have to keep taking it until he passes. If one has all the credits he needs, but does not pass the FCAT he may receive a certificate of completion, but will not receive his high school diploma until he passes the test itself. A score of 18 on the reading section of the ACT or a 280 on the reading section of the SAT can be used to waive the FCAT requirement after the student has failed the 10th grade FCAT at least three times. Sophomore Reagan Robins is not a fan of FCAT and does not believe that the reading portion is a proficient test to show a student’s reading ability. A student might be a proficient reader, but might not excel as well in the analytical department. “A student may be a great reader, but may not be interested in the subject matter or may just have trouble picking a correct answer,” Robins said. Robins believes there is not much one can do to prepare for FCAT, but states that FCAT Explorer is one of the

best resources a student can use. FCAT Explorer is an online resource where students can access a practice test with over 500 questions. Each student is given a unique username and password to access this program. Senior Julio Colon only prepared by doing what he usually did for his English class. He believes FCAT won’t have an overall beneficial effect on him in the upcoming future. “[FCAT testing] is pointless and no one likes it,” Colon said. FCAT is predicted to be gone completely in the next two years for high school. EOC exams are by subject area and are relevant to the material the students learned that year. EOC exams are not extra exams the students have to take in addition to a final exam because the exam itself is the final exam for the class. Currently EOC exams are in effect for biology, United States history, Algebra I and geometry. Students are set to take the FCAT the week of April 15 and Anderson is doing all she can to prepare her students for the upcoming test. Anderson explained that she teaches FCAT skills, lessons that specifically correlate to FCAT, Springboard lessons, and she uses the data from benchmark testing to prepare students. Students may not like the FCAT, but the state believes it is showing how much students have learned overall.

U.S. History: April 22 - May 3 Biology I: April 29 - May 10 Algebra I: May 6 - May 17 Actual dates not yet known; these are the testing windows. Geometry: May 13 -May 24

EOCschedule

Make up days for all tests: May 28- May 31

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Reflectionthree I am proud of this picture because of it’s depth of field and the angle it was taken at. The way this photograph was taken is also what attracted me to the picture while scrolling through my photography work.

I am proud of this picture because of how the rule of thirds applies to it. What attracted me to this photograph was the fact that it is a mid-action shot.

I am proud of this picture because of the depth of field, where the center of visual interest is, and the angle at which it was taken. I was attracted to this photo because of the angle it was taken at.


four reflection

I was an asset to the 2013 newspaper staff through my copy and how I assisted fellow staffers throughout the production process. I provided quality written material each deadline. I also assisted my fellow staffers whenever possible in order to get the paper as close to meeting deadline as possible.


Reflection five This year has definitely not been a smooth ride. As a staff we have not made deadline on time. And as a staffer, I must take at least some of the responsibility for that. One of the biggest hardships I have faced this summer has definitely been finding where I can help. People were constantly behind deadline and I couldn’t figure out how I could help. I felt lost. I knew how to help (in most cases), but placing that knowledge into practice was less than difficult. For instance, during the first deadline, fellow staffers needed help with cobing and other simple design that I could easily assist with. But I didn’t know how to jump in and start working. They, nor anyone else come directly to me and ask for my assistance so just jumping in and working on their stuff didn’t seem like a comfortable idea. I have now come to the realization that one’s comfortability is outweighed by the desire to meet deadline as a staff. I have learned to ignore my own social insecurities and focus on the larger issue at hand. If I were faced with a similar issue in the future, I would ignore that tiny voice in my head saying “don’t be weird, stick to your little corner” and start helping wherever help is needed.


Sixth reflection

My mid-term goals were to be more proactive with web stories, take better pictures, and put more effort into Kids These Days. I believe that I accomplished these goals pretty sufficiently. I turned in all of my web stories, thanks mostly to my weight lifting beat. I actually used the camera this year so I was able to progress in my picture-taking abilities. The photo days really helped out with that as well because I was able to log some quality bonding hours with the camera and therefore, learn more about it. And I believe that Kids These Days worked out alright in the end. It will not go down as the best column in the history of Boone High School, but it was acceptable.


Sixth reflection

Document not found


Reflection seven CLUB ELECTS NEW OFFICERS

STUDENTS ELECT HOMECOMING COURT

National Honor Society elected new officers on Sep. 21. All officers are seniors. The president is Christine Maloney, Vice President is Elaina Carrion; Secretary is Emily Porterfield; Treasurer is Merrie Grace Harding and the Service Chair is Jessica Kneeland.

Students of all grade levels were selected on Sept. 28 for homecoming court. Representing the senior class are Cameron McNeill, Merrie Grace Harding, Elaina Carrion, Shelbee Simmons, Sarah Berlinsky, Connor McClellan, William McMillin, Dillon Knox, Aaron Turman and John Townsend.

&

Pink, white tackles cancer [ Awareness from,

Screaming Hollering page 1 Sam Holleman, columnist

Boo Boo wins On August 8, 2012, the world became aware of a show that is what can only be described as “the show of the century.” One may think that this is somewhat of a bold statement given we are only 12 years into the century. But TLC’s Here Comes Honey Boo Boo has reached a new level of television entertainment that cannot be considered anything other than the show of the century. This masterpiece is about a 6-year-old beauty pageant contestant Alana “Honey Boo Boo” Thompson (originally featured on TLC’s Toddlers in Tiaras) her mother, Mama; her father, Sugar Bear; and her sisters Pumpkin, Chubbs and Chickadee as they live out there compelling and fascinating lives in McIntyre, Georgia. First of all, the show has such a broad audience appeal that anyone can tune in and have a good time. This show has it all: a loving family, humor for all ages, a pig named Glitzy, and of course, farting. It is very rare that a show comes along where entire families can sit together and enjoy an hour of quality television. Furthermore, Here Comes Honey Boo Boo is the epitome of LOLing. From Glitzty the pig “oooo’ing” on the table to Mama farting in the title sequence, one cannot stop laughing from the beginning to the end of each episode. This show puts classics such as Cheers, M*A*S*H and Alf to shame. Finally, this show has not been ruined by Hollywood because it stays true to its core values. Here Comes Honey Boo Boo remains a spectacular show without succumbing to the pressures of Hollywood. This is what separates a mediocre show from a great one, because if a show needs to sell out to succeed, it has already failed. Here Comes Honey Boo Boo is the show of the century, but not because of its broad appeal, its humor or even its ability to succeed without selling out; rather because (sadly) everyone can be entertained by the show. It possesses the humor of a 4-year-old who just discovered the wonders of poop and because even Hollywood wants to avoid any association with it. It is the show of the century because August 8, 2012, is the point in time when America stooped to a new low. This sad excuse for entertainment got more views than the RNC. Somehow, listening to a 6-year-old’s concerns about Mama eating their pet pig is better television than listening to a man who could be the next leader of our country has to say. In 100 years from now, historians will look back at this point and say that this is where America lost, and Boo Boo won.

4

However, that is not always true. On Aug. 18, 2010, her 47th birthday, Annette Montgomery learned she had stage two breast cancer. No one else in her family had ever been diagnosed with breast cancer. “Cancer makes you try not to take things for granted. It’s hard to relive it again, but when people go through chemo and need help, I try to always be there,” Montgomery, government teacher, said. With two young boys at home and a strong will to keep working, Montgomery did not let cancer stop her from achieving anything, let alone her daily routines. “It is all about setting up a plan. Without a plan it is very overwhelming; with a plan you can keep your life in

control,” Montgomery said. As of today, Montgomery has been cancer free and out of chemotherapy for 18 months. Every cancer free year lowers her chances of cancerous cells being triggered. Football’s largest fundraiser and newest tradition is the pink and white football game, which takes place on campus every other spring. The first annual game raised $18,000 two years ago. Colonial High School hosted the second pink and white game, which raised $12,000. Much like the age-old tradition of the Boone/Edgewater match up, a barrel is the trophy. The barrel is pink and white in spirit of breast cancer awareness. “The pink and white game was my wife’s idea. She believed that it would be beneficial to our kids and community,” football coach Phil Ziglar said. Ziglar’s wife works for MD Anderson, a cancer center searching for

a way to cure all types of cancer. Ziglar’s first wife passed away after her fight with lung cancer. This campus is an official Relay for Life location. Another national fundraiser is the Susan G. Komen Race for the cure. The local event is Oct. 21, at the University of Central Florida. If interested, visit www.komen.org. With a 93 percent survival rate for the first stage of breast cancer and a 15 percent survival rate for the last stage, this 5K race raises awareness for the fight against breast cancer and also celebrates the survivors. Those who lost their lives to the fight against cancer are also honored at the event. “I look at Mrs. Montgomery and others and they just keep going; they don’t let it affect their family. I am really proud of them,” Sarah Kittrell, digital design teacher, said.

ßthebarrel

SH

The Pink and White Barrel is given to the winning team.

Annette Montgomery

State alters minimum standards [ Graduation from, page 1

ßgradebygrade All grades must complete 4 English and Math, 3 Science and Social Science, 8 Electives, 1 Art and 1 Physical Education • •

9

• • • • • •

10 11 12

and eight required electives remain unchanged. However, freshmen and sophomores must successfully complete one online class through virtual school. No specifications are given for what online class should be completed. An online class completed in grades six through eight is also acceptable. A common concern regarding the online class is a student’s access to a computer. “If I was unable to get a computer, I would go to the public library because [computers there] are available all the time,” sophomore Nicole Neal said. Florida is phasing out Florida Comprehensive Achievement Tests and replacing them with End of Course Exams. FCAT tested students grades 3 to 11 in reading, math, writing and science. In previous years, 10th grade reading and math FCAT’s had to be passed with a three or higher for graduation. Now, juniors, sophomores and freshmen must pass FCAT 2.0 Reading with a 3 or better for graduation, unless students are able to opt out with a higher ACT scores. EOCs are being administered in

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (Must pass to earn Algebra credit) Geometry (Must pass to earn Geometry credit) Biology (Must pass to earn Biology credit) US History EOC (30% of grade) One online course required

• • • •

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (Must pass to earn Algebra credit) Geometry (30% of grade) Biology (30% of grade) US History EOC (30% of grade) One online course required

• • •

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (30% of grade) US History EOC (30% of grade)

FCAT Reading and Mathematics (Must pass both sections to graduate)

Algebra 1, Geometry, Biology and U.S. History. Current freshmen and sophomores will take all four of the exams prior to graduation; juniors will take Algebra 1 and U.S. History; freshmen must pass Algebra 1, geometry and biology to graduate; sophomores must pass Algebra 1 to graduate. In addition to the new exit exams, the EOCs, except for Algebra, will also make up 30 percent of sophomores final grades. For freshmen, only the U.S. History EOC exam represents 30 percent of their grade, and for juniors, Algebra 1 and U.S. History EOC exams will represent 30 percent of their grade. Current seniors’ final exams represent 10 percent of their final grade. “The FCAT is sort of familiar to our age group, but throwing in the EOC instead is overwhelming and if you don’t do so well, you suffer huge consequences for it,” Neal said. Students who are unsure if they are on track to graduate should make an appointment to speak with their counselors or go to www.fldoe.org to check state graduation requirements for their grade level. “[If I wasn’t on track] I wouldn’t be happy with myself because all my hard work would be for nothing,” junior Clint Lyttle said.

1. N5. Personal opinion: Off-campus issues- Boo Boo won, pg. 5. October 5, 2012 This piece is a good representation of me because it shows my style of writing and also presents what I can do on my own and takes a new angle to a widely discussed topic during that time.

Organization benefits campus sports [ BHSAA from, page 1 “Without BHSAA, the school’s facilities would get worn and unusable at some point,” Scott Bell, Vice President of BHSAA, said. “We try to focus on the needs of all sports and then prioritize which needs are the most.” While BHSAA strives to support athletics, it primarily focuses on the larger facility needs. For example, BHSAA purchased the new stadium scoreboard three years ago, which benefits all the sports that play there.

Last year, they also purchased a new scoreboard for softball, new mats for the cheerleaders and re-finished the gymnasium floor. “We are so grateful for BHSAA because now we have a full competition floor of a mat, when before we had seven mats that were actually wrestling,” Cindy Hutsell, cheerleading coach, said. “Now we can practice our routine without saying, ‘Let’s pretend there’s another mat right here.’ We are so blessed to have them.” With 867 entries and over $14,000 raised in the 4th Annual Reservation Run, it breaks school records for the most runners and most money

accumulated at this event. Sports teams and clubs are encouraged to partake in the run because each runner who registers under said club or sport, receives a portion of the proceeds. Bravettes earned an extra $1,000 for having the most participants. BHSAA originated with the help of the Boone Sports Legacy Board and Boone Boosters. Their mission was to improve the school’s facilities and to raise funds for athletics. They joined together to form BHSAA and together be a strong unit. If one is interested in volunteering for BHSAA he can either contact Kelly Mutters, located in the Trading Post.

Friday, December 14, 2012 hilights.org

thenews

KTD Kids These Days

Sam Holleman, columnist

Austin Hall, columnist

Kids do not speak good Sam Holleman: So, kids. In the present… Austin Hall: Kids suck, so much. Kids like, just like, they like, just speak like they have like, turrets. Do you know what I mean? SH: Yeah, like, I totally like, got you man. You know what I’m saying? AH: Ya, I feel you. Can you believe what YOLO has turned into? SH: No, no, I was walking to third period and I overheard this kid say that he just YOLO’d a test. He used the acronym as a verb. That is like saying you BOGO’d some flavor shock Gushers at Albertson’s, or that you BTW’d your step-sister last night. AH: My friend actually did YOLO a test once. He spelled out the word “YOLO” with the bubbles. Needless to say, he failed the test, even with a 16 percent curve. I mean, he didn’t study for the test, so he was going to fail anyways, but I guess if you’re going to fail, do it with style. SH: YOLO should not be used as a verb. AH: YOLO is not a verb! Among the list of words that kids these days have created is “legitly.” SH: Legitly doesn’t exist. AH: Exactly! I have heard girls say along the lines of “Like, legit? She like, legitly did that?!” And I just wanted to go on a rampage. Legitly is not a word. And yes (let’s call this mystery man Robert for now) Robert may have actually been texting your BFF Rebecca, but he LEGITIMATELY texted her 10 minutes after you two broke up over an argument over Taylor Swift’s new album. He did not legitly text her. Be quiet. SH: Legit is a legitimate word, but legitly is nowhere to be found in the dictionary. AH: The word “legit” has become more of a question. SH: Exactly. AH: It has gone from “I can win an iPhone 5 if I know how many states there are? That must be legit.” To girls with annoying voices walking around the hallway asking people, “Like, legit?” It just seems like kids these days try to slip that word into everything, to sound more intelligent. SH: I blame Bieber. He is the one who brought swag into the world in that song called “Swag’s Mean.” AH: I do not think that Bieber really has anything to do with it. I blame the rap industry. They are the ones creating useless words like “YOLO” and “swag.” SH: That’s true, but why limit it to just the rap industry? I blame society as a whole. If people did not accept these words into their vocabulary, then they would not become popular. It is the youth that caused YOLO, swag, legitly, and totes to be a common thing. LOL is in the dictionary now because people wanted it to be in there, because people accepted it as a word, and now it is a word. We as a whole (not necessarily as individuals) want these words to become common phrases. AH: This is true. Kids these days have so much influence over the country. It is ridiculous. That thought scares me. Let’s hope that in the future us kids will grow out of these terrible habits and not pass them on to our children. SH: We will never knock the habit of making up ignorant phrases. YOLO, swag and phrases such as that will slowly fade away and new ones will take their place. It has been going on for years. In the 80’s it was rad, then the 90’s rolled around and phat took its place. At the new millennium raw was big, and now there is swag. That is the scariest part about this: as one dies, a new one is waiting to take its place. AH: Stuck in this circle of stupidity are all of the citizens that have to listen to the incomprehensible babbling that goes on between the youth of today.

4

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Friday, October 5, 2012 hilights.org

hi-lights thenews

Without BHSAA the school’s facilities would get worn out and unusable at some point. Scott Bell BHSAA vice president

hi-lights I don’t really mind courses being cut because there’s a wide amount of courses being offered. Alan Kominowski, senior

Scholarship program changes [ Colleges from, page 1

in 2014 and beyond will have to achieve a 1170 on the SAT and a 26 on the ACT. “It will just take more planning and preparation on the students’ and families’ part,” guidance counselor Jeanette Summers said. Because of these new score requirements, 30 percent fewer students in the state will qualify. “[If I didn’t receive Bright Futures], I would be disappointed, especially because my parents expect me to get it because both of my siblings did. It’s not something that I considered not getting,” Dawkins said. These requirements are expected to affect minorities. In 2014, 49 percent of black students and 37 percent of Hispanics who now qualify will not qualify. Though test scores will affect a large portion of students who apply, senior Taj Johnson agrees with these

community service hours. In the 2010-2011 school year, the amount of community service hours needed to receive the Florida Academic Scholars award jumped from 75 to 100 hours. The Florida Medallion Scholars award added a requirement of 75 hours. The change which may impact students the most is the need for higher SAT and ACT scores. For the graduating class of 2012, the requirement was a 1270 on the SAT and a 28 on the ACT for the FAS award. However, for the class of 2013, the requirement will be boosted to a 1280 on the SAT. For the class of 2014 and thereafter, the requirement will be a 1290 on the SAT and a 29 on the ACT. The 980 required in 2012 for the FMS award is now a 1020 for the class of 2013. Those graduating

tougher standards. “I think the scores required are way too low for college bound students,” Johnson, said. One reason for these new standards is the program’s growing cost. With the establishment of Bright Futures in 1997, the cost for it was $70 million annually. Now, it is around $429 million. To solve the budget problem, less students are being awarded the scholarship. The constant changes and growing costs have made parents more skeptical of the program. “I think the legislature will keep reducing the amount and I will have to pay more,” Chris Dawkins, Brynne’s father, said. Students must apply after Dec. 1 and before they graduate. Applications are submitted online at www. floridastudentfinancialaid.org/SSFAD/

State limits dual enrollment [ Community colleges from, page 1

the University of Central Florida’s dual enrolment program where the rule change does not apply. This is not an option for all juniors in Keefer’s situation because UCF requires a 3.8 GPA and a 1200 on the SAT. Keefer will start at UCF in the summer term, and if she takes a full course load for the following two terms, she will be able to graduate with an AA. Senior Alan Kominowski is okay with the class limitations. Kominowski is currently taking humanities, algebra and economics at Valencia through dual

can’t get my general associates degree [like] I was planning to,” Trimble said. Junior Taylor Keefer will also not graduate high school with her associates degree. When she registered for Valencia courses this summer, no one informed her of the change effective in 2013. “I feel like we are being punished for getting ahead. My entire plan was messed up,” Keefer said. Currently, Keefer is applying to

enrollment. “I don’t mind courses being cut because there’s a wide amount of courses being offered,” Kominowski said. The decision to make cuts was made by the state to save money by not giving as many free college courses. Dual enrollment is free for students, but it is paid by the state. Last year, the cost of dual enrollment in Florida was $50 million. By limiting class options to the basic high school graduation requirements, the state saves $39 million a year.

Andrew Hungerford 1141 S. Osceola Ave. Orlando, FL 32806 studio: 407.420.9596 ahungerford@cfl.rr.com

HUNGERFORD design hungerforddesign.com

GIANT

Subs

1101 South Orange Avenue Orlando, FL 32806 (407) 839-3633

Friday, May 10, 2013 hilights.org

thenews hi-lights

STUDENT OBLIGATIONS

LEGEND YEARBOOK ‘BEST OF SHOW’ Congratulations to the Legend Yearbook. They placed sixth in the largest yearbook category of National Scholastic Press Association’s Best of Show in San Francisco; this is their highest Best of Show Ranking.

KTD Sam Holleman, columnist

Austin Hall, columnist

Kids painted chrome AH: This is my last column I will write for the newspaper. I’m ashamed that it’s with you, but I guess I’ll take what I’ve got and go out with a small bang. SH: You sure know how to make a guy feel special. Since this is it for you, what do you want to write about? AH: I want to talk about abortion and flag burning. Let’s tackle those subjects right now. SH: I’m going to go out on a limb and say Mrs. Burke won’t approve of that idea, so let’s talk about the future. AH: FFFFUUUUUTTTTTUUUUURRRREEEEE Everything will be chrome. Even the plants. SH: SpongeBob is the voice of a generation. Speaking of generations (#cheesytransitions), how do you think our generation will do when we are the ones in charge? AH: I think our generation will kick some butt and take no names. Parents say we are entitled because we will do anything to get what we want; I don’t think that is always a bad thing. I think want for everything we want will drive us to succeed in the world. SH: The adult generation says that kids are not mentally or physically prepared to lead this country. But at some point the adult generation were kids and there was an adult generation that critiqued their every move. AH: I think the generation before the generation before us, told the generation directly before us that they were entitled and wouldn’t make it in the “real world.” That is the same generation that tells our generation that we will not make it in life. I feel like when we get older we will say the same thing to the generation that will succeed our generation and they will tell the next generation and so on and so forth. SH: It’s like the circle of life… but with responsibility… and it doesn’t really go in a circular formation. It is more like a line that starts on one point and goes in the same direction with seemingly no end in sight. But “never-ending line ray of responsibility” does not have a nice ring to it, so let’s just go with circle of life. AH: We could compromise on the issue. It could be a downward spiral that goes in a downward circular descent. SH: Maybe not downward because that would imply a worsening condition of each generation’s intelligence. Maybe it could be a lateral spiral, like a screw laying on its side, but that would imply the circle would end. AH: What are you even saying right now? SH: I’m getting lost in my own thoughts. AH: That’s because of the amount of polyester and spandex you currently wear. SH: These shorts are a gift from the heavens. You are just jealous you do not possess this clothing masterpiece. AH: Like a hallmark angel? Or like Supernatural angels where they go around stealing souls and whatnot? SH: Na, like one of those angels from Doctor Who. I haven’t closed my eyes for three days... AH: As fun as a Doctor Who based conversation would be, we should probably get back on the initial topic. SH: Our generation has been branded with some very unflattering concepts (YOLO, Swag, and something called Dance Moms), but those who support these concepts are the vocal minority messing life up for everyone else. There is a prominent silent majority that is masked and oppressed. These are kids who study, read for fun and watch Nat. Geo. AH: No one wants to admit they are wrong. They would much rather accentuate the negatives to prove their point, than acknowledge the uplifting truth; the fact that, not all kids are like this. We speak for that majority. I’m not trying to say we are perfect people, but we look around us and just voice what we see. We try to bring these problems to light so maybe one day, we can like, fix the like, problem, sooooo like, ya. Problems are like, not good.

This piece is a good representation of me because, with the help of my friend Austin, it brings a new type of column writing to Hi-Lights, discusses an issue that needs to be made previlent all while bringing a smile to the reader’s face.

Mama B’s

Parents did you know that you can check your Brave’s Destiny Profile from home? You can see the library book and textbooks checked out to your Brave. You can also view any outstanding financial obligations. Go to http://destiny.ocps.net. Find and click on Boone High School. Click on login button, top right corner. Username: Student number and Password: eight digit birth day.

Kids These Days

2. N5. Personal opinion: Off-campus issues- Kids do not speak good, pg. 4. December 14, 2012.

Seniors tease juniors [ Step-Up from, page 1 entire student body. Seniors are pranking freshmen and juniors are pranking sophomores, which is not its original intention. “Unfortunately, this night was usually a chance for the junior girls to write horrible things on the sophomore girls’ lawns/sidewalks. Or even worse vandalize the cars in the driveway. Pretty much always sparked by jealousy,” Class of 2007 graduate Casey Shea said. Moriah Perkins had her house toilet papered three times last year as only a freshman. She had moved to Orlando from Mississippi at the beginning of the year and did not know many of the seniors. So when she woke up the next day to find her house covered in toilet paper she was shocked. “[The underclassmen] are friends with older classmates now. It all depends on groups,” sophomore Moriah Perkins said. The pranks have also become more damaging and destructive. Kids have cracked concrete driveways, put bricks through sunroofs and keyed cars, which are criminal acts. These damaging pranks have gotten police involved and also left an unworthy reputation on campus. “It is good if it is just toilet papering. [But] messing with houses and cars gets the cops involved and the school has to deal with it which is bad,” senior Dylan Dragon said. School resource officer Scott Daniels has not been personally involved in any

photo/MORIAH PERKINS

TOILET PAPER TRAGEDY. Even though she was a freshman and technically should not have been involved, Moriah Perkins’s house was toilet papered three times last year. “The seniors take pride in what they do and the pranks they pull. It is a big deal to be a senior,” Perkins said. More freshmen and sophomores were affected by Senior Step-up last year than juniors. of the punishments given to students during Senior Step-up, but he has heard about the pranks and jokes pulled. “Recently, parents have been good at controlling the situations and they just want things fixed. It opens up a whole new potential though because you are running from a scene which if you are caught can get you in trouble as well,” Daniels said. Anytime one damages someone

else’s property, he is charged with destruction of property. One can be charged with a felony depending on the value of the object damaged. He can be arrested or given a fine. “It is not necessary. It is something that once might have been a joke and is now used as a way to be vindictive and to be a dig at someone. [Students] do not know when to stop,” Daniels said.

Andrew Hungerford 1141 S. Osceola Ave. Orlando, FL 32806 studio: 407.420.9596 ahungerford@cfl.rr.com

HUNGERFORD design hungerforddesign.com

Covenan Cleaning Services “Where Service Is Our Pledge”

3601 S. Conway Rd. Suite A Orlando, FL 32812

Joanne M. Halloran Master Cruise Counselor 103 Rockingham Ct., Longwood, FL 32779

CleaningOrlando.com

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DOUGLAS HUHN, D.M.D. CLETE HUHN, D.D.S. General Dentistry 11000 S. Orange Ave. Orlando, FL 32806

3. N5. Personal opinion: Off-campus issues- Kids painted chrome, pg. 4. May 10, 2013.

Phone: (407) 422-6281 Fax: (407) 422-2361

cell: 407-468-7519 Email: jhalloran@cfl.rr.com www.newdirectionscruises.com Licensed and Bonded

This piece is a good representation of me because it expresses my style of writing and brings to light the writing chemistry that exists between me and my co-author.


Reflection eight

I have grown not only in writing itself, but also in self-confidence with my writing. Thanks to this class, I no longer care if people read over my shoulder out of fear they may get the wrong impression of it because it isn’t done yet. My portfolio has progressed tremendously from last year because it isn’t just page after page of text. There is actually design involved in this portfolio. Also, I included all of the required materials and documents this year, which is a much needed improvement.


Desgin


Double Page Spread


Single spread


Cli ps


writing 5

Friday, October 5, 2012 hilights.org

hi-lights thenews CLUB ELECTS NEW OFFICERS

STUDENTS ELECT HOMECOMING COURT

National Honor Society elected new officers on Sep. 21. All officers are seniors. The president is Christine Maloney, Vice President is Elaina Carrion; Secretary is Emily Porterfield; Treasurer is Merrie Grace Harding and the Service Chair is Jessica Kneeland.

Students of all grade levels were selected on Sept. 28 for homecoming court. Representing the senior class are Cameron McNeill, Merrie Grace Harding, Elaina Carrion, Shelbee Simmons, Sarah Berlinsky, Connor McClellan, William McMillin, Dillon Knox, Aaron Turman and John Townsend.

&

[ Awareness from,

Screaming Hollering page 1 Sam Holleman, columnist

Boo Boo wins On August 8, 2012, the world became aware of a show that is what can only be described as “the show of the century.” One may think that this is somewhat of a bold statement given we are only 12 years into the century. But TLC’s Here Comes Honey Boo Boo has reached a new level of television entertainment that cannot be considered anything other than the show of the century. This masterpiece is about a 6-year-old beauty pageant contestant Alana “Honey Boo Boo” Thompson (originally featured on TLC’s Toddlers in Tiaras) her mother, Mama; her father, Sugar Bear; and her sisters Pumpkin, Chubbs and Chickadee as they live out there compelling and fascinating lives in McIntyre, Georgia. First of all, the show has such a broad audience appeal that anyone can tune in and have a good time. This show has it all: a loving family, humor for all ages, a pig named Glitzy, and of course, farting. It is very rare that a show comes along where entire families can sit together and enjoy an hour of quality television. Furthermore, Here Comes Honey Boo Boo is the epitome of LOLing. From Glitzty the pig “oooo’ing” on the table to Mama farting in the title sequence, one cannot stop laughing from the beginning to the end of each episode. This show puts classics such as Cheers, M*A*S*H and Alf to shame. Finally, this show has not been ruined by Hollywood because it stays true to its core values. Here Comes Honey Boo Boo remains a spectacular show without succumbing to the pressures of Hollywood. This is what separates a mediocre show from a great one, because if a show needs to sell out to succeed, it has already failed. Here Comes Honey Boo Boo is the show of the century, but not because of its broad appeal, its humor or even its ability to succeed without selling out; rather because (sadly) everyone can be entertained by the show. It possesses the humor of a 4-year-old who just discovered the wonders of poop and because even Hollywood wants to avoid any association with it. It is the show of the century because August 8, 2012, is the point in time when America stooped to a new low. This sad excuse for entertainment got more views than the RNC. Somehow, listening to a 6-year-old’s concerns about Mama eating their pet pig is better television than listening to a man who could be the next leader of our country has to say. In 100 years from now, historians will look back at this point and say that this is where America lost, and Boo Boo won.

However, that is not always true. On Aug. 18, 2010, her 47th birthday, Annette Montgomery learned she had stage two breast cancer. No one else in her family had ever been diagnosed with breast cancer. “Cancer makes you try not to take things for granted. It’s hard to relive it again, but when people go through chemo and need help, I try to always be there,” Montgomery, government teacher, said. With two young boys at home and a strong will to keep working, Montgomery did not let cancer stop her from achieving anything, let alone her daily routines. “It is all about setting up a plan. Without a plan it is very overwhelming; with a plan you can keep your life in

control,” Montgomery said. As of today, Montgomery has been cancer free and out of chemotherapy for 18 months. Every cancer free year lowers her chances of cancerous cells being triggered. Football’s largest fundraiser and newest tradition is the pink and white football game, which takes place on campus every other spring. The first annual game raised $18,000 two years ago. Colonial High School hosted the second pink and white game, which raised $12,000. Much like the age-old tradition of the Boone/Edgewater match up, a barrel is the trophy. The barrel is pink and white in spirit of breast cancer awareness. “The pink and white game was my wife’s idea. She believed that it would be beneficial to our kids and community,” football coach Phil Ziglar said. Ziglar’s wife works for MD Anderson, a cancer center searching for

a way to cure all types of cancer. Ziglar’s first wife passed away after her fight with lung cancer. This campus is an official Relay for Life location. Another national fundraiser is the Susan G. Komen Race for the cure. The local event is Oct. 21, at the University of Central Florida. If interested, visit www.komen.org. With a 93 percent survival rate for the first stage of breast cancer and a 15 percent survival rate for the last stage, this 5K race raises awareness for the fight against breast cancer and also celebrates the survivors. Those who lost their lives to the fight against cancer are also honored at the event. “I look at Mrs. Montgomery and others and they just keep going; they don’t let it affect their family. I am really proud of them,” Sarah Kittrell, digital design teacher, said.

ßthebarrel

SH

Pink, white tackles cancer The Pink and White Barrel is given to the winning team.

Annette Montgomery

State alters minimum standards [ Graduation from, page 1

ßgradebygrade All grades must complete 4 English and Math, 3 Science and Social Science, 8 Electives, 1 Art and 1 Physical Education • •

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• • • • • •

10 11 12

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (Must pass to earn Algebra credit) Geometry (Must pass to earn Geometry credit) Biology (Must pass to earn Biology credit) US History EOC (30% of grade) One online course required

• • • •

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (Must pass to earn Algebra credit) Geometry (30% of grade) Biology (30% of grade) US History EOC (30% of grade) One online course required

• • •

FCAT 2.0 Reading (Must pass to graduate) Algebra 1 EOC (30% of grade) US History EOC (30% of grade)

FCAT Reading and Mathematics (Must pass both sections to graduate)

and eight required electives remain unchanged. However, freshmen and sophomores must successfully complete one online class through virtual school. No specifications are given for what online class should be completed. An online class completed in grades six through eight is also acceptable. A common concern regarding the online class is a student’s access to a computer. “If I was unable to get a computer, I would go to the public library because [computers there] are available all the time,” sophomore Nicole Neal said. Florida is phasing out Florida Comprehensive Achievement Tests and replacing them with End of Course Exams. FCAT tested students grades 3 to 11 in reading, math, writing and science. In previous years, 10th grade reading and math FCAT’s had to be passed with a three or higher for graduation. Now, juniors, sophomores and freshmen must pass FCAT 2.0 Reading with a 3 or better for graduation, unless students are able to opt out with a higher ACT scores. EOCs are being administered in

Algebra 1, Geometry, Biology and U.S. History. Current freshmen and sophomores will take all four of the exams prior to graduation; juniors will take Algebra 1 and U.S. History; freshmen must pass Algebra 1, geometry and biology to graduate; sophomores must pass Algebra 1 to graduate. In addition to the new exit exams, the EOCs, except for Algebra, will also make up 30 percent of sophomores final grades. For freshmen, only the U.S. History EOC exam represents 30 percent of their grade, and for juniors, Algebra 1 and U.S. History EOC exams will represent 30 percent of their grade. Current seniors’ final exams represent 10 percent of their final grade. “The FCAT is sort of familiar to our age group, but throwing in the EOC instead is overwhelming and if you don’t do so well, you suffer huge consequences for it,” Neal said. Students who are unsure if they are on track to graduate should make an appointment to speak with their counselors or go to www.fldoe.org to check state graduation requirements for their grade level. “[If I wasn’t on track] I wouldn’t be happy with myself because all my hard work would be for nothing,” junior Clint Lyttle said.

Organization benefits campus sports [ BHSAA from, page 1 “Without BHSAA, the school’s facilities would get worn and unusable at some point,” Scott Bell, Vice President of BHSAA, said. “We try to focus on the needs of all sports and then prioritize which needs are the most.” While BHSAA strives to support athletics, it primarily focuses on the larger facility needs. For example, BHSAA purchased the new stadium scoreboard three years ago, which benefits all the sports that play there.

Last year, they also purchased a new scoreboard for softball, new mats for the cheerleaders and re-finished the gymnasium floor. “We are so grateful for BHSAA because now we have a full competition floor of a mat, when before we had seven mats that were actually wrestling,” Cindy Hutsell, cheerleading coach, said. “Now we can practice our routine without saying, ‘Let’s pretend there’s another mat right here.’ We are so blessed to have them.” With 867 entries and over $14,000 raised in the 4th Annual Reservation Run, it breaks school records for the most runners and most money

What’s mine: Writing

accumulated at this event. Sports teams and clubs are encouraged to partake in the run because each runner who registers under said club or sport, receives a portion of the proceeds. Bravettes earned an extra $1,000 for having the most participants. BHSAA originated with the help of the Boone Sports Legacy Board and Boone Boosters. Their mission was to improve the school’s facilities and to raise funds for athletics. They joined together to form BHSAA and together be a strong unit. If one is interested in volunteering for BHSAA he can either contact Kelly Mutters, located in the Trading Post.

Without BHSAA the school’s facilities would get worn out and unusable at some point. Scott Bell BHSAA vice president


Writing continued

thenews

SH Screaming & Hollering

&

Sam Holleman, columnist

Calm down Facebook According to the online commercial released by Facebook, the social networking sight and chairs are the same. For those who have not seen this commercial, this is what it said: Facebook is like chairs. It is also like, doorbells, dance floors and basketball. It also talks about how Facebook is like the universe and ultimately, makes one feel depressed and friendless. But the bottom line is, Mark Zuckerburg and his advertising staff are trying to persuade people that chairs and Facebook are similar. Contrary to the advertisement, chairs are not like Facebook because one cannot sit on Facebook and eat a sandwich (or Flavor Shock Gushers if one is feeling adventurous). One could argue that they could open up Facebook on a web page and then sit on the computer, but sitting on one’s computer does not sound like the ideal way to take care of an expensive electronic device such as a computer. The closest one could get to sitting on Facebook would be sitting on the servers at Facebook headquarters, but I don’t think Zuckerburg would appreciate that. Furthermore, Facebook is not like a chair because chairs have been around a lot longer. While Facebook has graced the world with its presence for 7 years, chairs have been around for just a little bit longer about 4,500 years longer). Chairs are scattered throughout history. The founding fathers did not place their heinny on Facebook when signing the Declaration of Independence; Abraham Lincoln did not plant his peach on his Facebook page while signing the Emancipation Proclamation. Did Susan B. Anthony situate her fart-cannon on a picture someone tagged her in on Facebook during the women’s suffrage movement? The correct answer is no. In addition, chairs and Facebook are not similar because “Facebook” is what the Harvard scholars refer to as a proper noun, while, on the other hand, “chairs” is a common noun. A proper noun is a subgroup of nouns that is the name of a person, place or thing. For instance, Facebook is a proper noun because it is the name of a website. A common noun, such as doorbell and chair, are words for general items. Facebook and chairs are not similar in any way, shape or form. Facebook needs to stop trying to sound intellectual, simplistic yet complicated all at the same time. Facebook is a website teenagers use to post quotes no one cares about that someone who nobody knows said at some point and for looking at pictures of a kid named Brian who seems to be running into a bit of bad luck. Calm down Facebook.

#fastfacts

I don’t care; I eat as many calories as I want. I work out. Luis Serrano, senior

Country weighs options [ Fitness from, page 1

Broccoli has high levels of antioxidants, which can help to product your body’s cells.

Nearly 12 percent of enlistment-age men and 35 percent of women are too heavy to join the Army.

Not only does lifting weights keep you in shape, it also help supports your metabolism.

To see student’s opinions about this topic, scan this QR code with your smartphone.

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Friday, November 9, 2012 hilights.org

children are overweight or at risk of becoming overweight. AUniversity of South Florida research study published in February 2012 says studies show obese children ages 10-13 have an 80 percent chance of being obese adults. This increases their likelihood of having heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and other health problems. The same USF study finds 24.4 percent of children in Florida are obese. Among Florida high school students, 30 percent are overweight or at risk of becoming overweight. Schools in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties have invested in anti-obesity programs. Each school system has policies which lower junk food in its vending machines. Certain schools participate in “Read and Ride” programs. Students are encouraged to ride donated exercise bicycles while they read. Exercising is one way to lose weight, but counting calories is also effective. Initiatives like Disney Channel’s 2010 “Magic of Healthy Living,” Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” campaign launched in January 2010, and mandates for calorie counts on menus and vending machines are being established in response to childhood obesity. Calories are burned in several ways. One is Basal Metabolic Rate which burns 60 percent of calories in the body; general movement of the body burns 30 percent of the body’s calories; athletic activities 30 minutes a day burn 10 percent the body’s calories. Teens who are involved in sports or are active burn more calories and need higher caloric intakes. According to livestrong.com, highly active teens could need 5,000 calories a day. Overweight or obese teens have to reduce their caloric intake and be more active to reach a healthy weight, but a teen’s healthy weight also depends on age, sex and body frame.

The average female ages 14-18 needs 1,800-2,400 calories a day. Males ages 14-18 need 1,800-3,200 a day. Teens who do not monitor their calorie intake digest about 3,500-4,000 calories a day. Cutting calories can decrease weight, but cutting calories too fast slows the metabolism and the weight can come back. Cutting calories gradually is best. “I don’t care; I eat as many calories as I want. I work out,” senior Luis Serrano said. With passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration started requiring calorie counts on restaurants’ menus who have more than 20 locations. In September 2012, New York approved a plan to prohibit sales of sugary drinks like sodas and high sugary juices over 16 ounces in restaurants. This is a first in the nation. Following in New York’s footsteps, Coke, Pepsi and Dr. Pepper are creating vending machines with calorie counts on buttons. These vending machines will be released in 2013, first in Chicago and San Antonio, as test markets. Vending machine operators with more than 20 machines must post calorie information. “I think this is beneficial for people trying to keep a healthy diet,” sophomore Jenna Winn said. A potential problem with this is that people already know that soda and junk food are not the healthiest snacks, but choose these foods anyway. “[It’s a] waste of time and money. Information doesn’t change behavior,” Liston said. Regardless, the national movement to combat childhood obesity continues and only time will tell the results of the fight.

Nutrition Facts Olive Garden pasta penne with marinara sauce Serving Size Dinner portion Calories 490 Total Fat 8 grams Chick-fil-a chicken sandwich Serving Size 1 sandwich Calories 440 Total Fat 16 grams McDonald’s fries Serving Size Small (2.5ounces) Calories 230 Total Fat 11 grams Planet Smoothie PB and J Serving Size 16 ounces Calories 500 Total Fat 16 grams Burger King Whopper sandwich Serving Size 1 sandwich Calories 630 Total Fat 35 grams Subway turkey (no cheese) with lettuce, tomato and onion Serving Size 6” sub Calories 280 Total Fat 3.5 grams Wendy’s frosty Serving Size Small (212 grams) Calories 300 Total Fat 8 grams

Changes put pressure on school [ school grade from, page 1 to achieve academically whether it be in FCAT, EOC, APs, SAT and ACT,” Principal Margaret McMillen said. However, the standards for these tests have changed, which may negatively affect the campus. A student now needs to perform better on FCAT and the new EOC tests to achieve a passing grade. In addition to these higher standards in testing, more students are expected to pass. At least 25 percent of students must meet high standards in reading or the school grade will be lowered by one letter grade. Two years ago the school received a B for this reason. Junior Sydney Jones agrees that grading should be more rigourous. “In other states, the standard is higher than in Florida. So it may look like a school is passing when it’s not. The standard should be higher and we should expect more out of our students,” Jones said. Another change is that English for Speakers of Other Languages and special education students will now be

included in grade calculations. This may cause the school’s grade to drop because students who have only been learning English for a year will perform worse on tests than native speakers. Despite the changes, there are changes that will improve the school’s chances for getting an A. The way advanced placement classes are accounted for has been revised to equally include participation and performance, meaning that instead of mainly focusing on how many students are taking advanced placement classes, more importance will be put on how many are passing. Students at this school consistently perform well on Advanced Placement exams. “I’m glad the formula was adapted to reflect all of the indicators of what goes on in a high school like graduation rates, ACT and SAT performances. I disagree however with how some of the cells are calculated. Particularly with the case of special education students and second language learners,” McMillen said. The changes have increased the pressure for the school to perform well because an A grade would create a good image for the school and is important to

both parents and students. “I would feel great [if the school received an A], because obviously it’s good for the school you kid goes to get graded well. Especially since [Sydney] is a junior. It looks good for future colleges for her high school to be represented well,” Reginald Jones, Sydney Jones’s father, said. McMillen says that if an A is not rewarded to the school, administration will look at the areas that need attention and try to improve upon them. “I would be disappointed [if the school got a low grade] but I know that myself as a student is better than the grade,” S. Jones said. McMillen also agrees that the grade does not fully reflect the school. “I would give Boone an A plus. I know our students. I see how hard they work. They excel in classrooms and in all their endeavors. This is an amazing campus. When we talk about Boone, it’s our faculty, students and community. It’s not just good, it’s special,” McMillen said. After calculations are made by the Department of Education, grades are expected to be released by December.

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I would give Boone an A plus. When we talk about Boone, it’s our faculty, students and community. It’s not just good, it’s special. Margaret McMillen, principal


4

Writing again Friday, December 14, 2012 hilights.org

thenews

KTD Kids These Days

Sam Holleman, columnist

Austin Hall, columnist

Kids do not speak good Sam Holleman: So, kids. In the present… Austin Hall: Kids suck, so much. Kids like, just like, they like, just speak like they have like, turrets. Do you know what I mean? SH: Yeah, like, I totally like, got you man. You know what I’m saying? AH: Ya, I feel you. Can you believe what YOLO has turned into? SH: No, no, I was walking to third period and I overheard this kid say that he just YOLO’d a test. He used the acronym as a verb. That is like saying you BOGO’d some flavor shock Gushers at Albertson’s, or that you BTW’d your step-sister last night. AH: My friend actually did YOLO a test once. He spelled out the word “YOLO” with the bubbles. Needless to say, he failed the test, even with a 16 percent curve. I mean, he didn’t study for the test, so he was going to fail anyways, but I guess if you’re going to fail, do it with style. SH: YOLO should not be used as a verb. AH: YOLO is not a verb! Among the list of words that kids these days have created is “legitly.” SH: Legitly doesn’t exist. AH: Exactly! I have heard girls say along the lines of “Like, legit? She like, legitly did that?!” And I just wanted to go on a rampage. Legitly is not a word. And yes (let’s call this mystery man Robert for now) Robert may have actually been texting your BFF Rebecca, but he LEGITIMATELY texted her 10 minutes after you two broke up over an argument over Taylor Swift’s new album. He did not legitly text her. Be quiet. SH: Legit is a legitimate word, but legitly is nowhere to be found in the dictionary. AH: The word “legit” has become more of a question. SH: Exactly. AH: It has gone from “I can win an iPhone 5 if I know how many states there are? That must be legit.” To girls with annoying voices walking around the hallway asking people, “Like, legit?” It just seems like kids these days try to slip that word into everything, to sound more intelligent. SH: I blame Bieber. He is the one who brought swag into the world in that song called “Swag’s Mean.” AH: I do not think that Bieber really has anything to do with it. I blame the rap industry. They are the ones creating useless words like “YOLO” and “swag.” SH: That’s true, but why limit it to just the rap industry? I blame society as a whole. If people did not accept these words into their vocabulary, then they would not become popular. It is the youth that caused YOLO, swag, legitly, and totes to be a common thing. LOL is in the dictionary now because people wanted it to be in there, because people accepted it as a word, and now it is a word. We as a whole (not necessarily as individuals) want these words to become common phrases. AH: This is true. Kids these days have so much influence over the country. It is ridiculous. That thought scares me. Let’s hope that in the future us kids will grow out of these terrible habits and not pass them on to our children. SH: We will never knock the habit of making up ignorant phrases. YOLO, swag and phrases such as that will slowly fade away and new ones will take their place. It has been going on for years. In the 80’s it was rad, then the 90’s rolled around and phat took its place. At the new millennium raw was big, and now there is swag. That is the scariest part about this: as one dies, a new one is waiting to take its place. AH: Stuck in this circle of stupidity are all of the citizens that have to listen to the incomprehensible babbling that goes on between the youth of today.

hi-lights I don’t really mind courses being cut because there’s a wide amount of courses being offered. Alan Kominowski, senior

Scholarship program changes [ Colleges from, page 1 community service hours. In the 2010-2011 school year, the amount of community service hours needed to receive the Florida Academic Scholars award jumped from 75 to 100 hours. The Florida Medallion Scholars award added a requirement of 75 hours. The change which may impact students the most is the need for higher SAT and ACT scores. For the graduating class of 2012, the requirement was a 1270 on the SAT and a 28 on the ACT for the FAS award. However, for the class of 2013, the requirement will be boosted to a 1280 on the SAT. For the class of 2014 and thereafter, the requirement will be a 1290 on the SAT and a 29 on the ACT. The 980 required in 2012 for the FMS award is now a 1020 for the class of 2013. Those graduating

in 2014 and beyond will have to achieve a 1170 on the SAT and a 26 on the ACT. “It will just take more planning and preparation on the students’ and families’ part,” guidance counselor Jeanette Summers said. Because of these new score requirements, 30 percent fewer students in the state will qualify. “[If I didn’t receive Bright Futures], I would be disappointed, especially because my parents expect me to get it because both of my siblings did. It’s not something that I considered not getting,” Dawkins said. These requirements are expected to affect minorities. In 2014, 49 percent of black students and 37 percent of Hispanics who now qualify will not qualify. Though test scores will affect a large portion of students who apply, senior Taj Johnson agrees with these

tougher standards. “I think the scores required are way too low for college bound students,” Johnson, said. One reason for these new standards is the program’s growing cost. With the establishment of Bright Futures in 1997, the cost for it was $70 million annually. Now, it is around $429 million. To solve the budget problem, less students are being awarded the scholarship. The constant changes and growing costs have made parents more skeptical of the program. “I think the legislature will keep reducing the amount and I will have to pay more,” Chris Dawkins, Brynne’s father, said. Students must apply after Dec. 1 and before they graduate. Applications are submitted online at www. floridastudentfinancialaid.org/SSFAD/

State limits dual enrollment [ Community colleges from, page 1 can’t get my general associates degree [like] I was planning to,” Trimble said. Junior Taylor Keefer will also not graduate high school with her associates degree. When she registered for Valencia courses this summer, no one informed her of the change effective in 2013. “I feel like we are being punished for getting ahead. My entire plan was messed up,” Keefer said. Currently, Keefer is applying to

the University of Central Florida’s dual enrolment program where the rule change does not apply. This is not an option for all juniors in Keefer’s situation because UCF requires a 3.8 GPA and a 1200 on the SAT. Keefer will start at UCF in the summer term, and if she takes a full course load for the following two terms, she will be able to graduate with an AA. Senior Alan Kominowski is okay with the class limitations. Kominowski is currently taking humanities, algebra and economics at Valencia through dual

enrollment. “I don’t mind courses being cut because there’s a wide amount of courses being offered,” Kominowski said. The decision to make cuts was made by the state to save money by not giving as many free college courses. Dual enrollment is free for students, but it is paid by the state. Last year, the cost of dual enrollment in Florida was $50 million. By limiting class options to the basic high school graduation requirements, the state saves $39 million a year.

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Friday, February 8, 2013 hilights.org

hi-lights

‘ KTD thenews

The nice part about [the Reservation Run] is that it’s not just a fundraiser for a specific group. It’s a win-win for everybody. Doug Patterson, athletic director

Rate shows positive growth

Kids These Days

[ Graduation rate from, page 1

Sam Holleman, columnist

Austin Hall, columnist

Prada for Christmas Austin Hall: Back in the mid-1900’s, artists were famous based on talent. Artists like B.B. King, Aretha Franklin and Freddy Mercury (the moustached god with a voice worthy of the gift of immortality) used to dominate the music industry. Sam Holleman: Now, the requirements to be a musical artist consist of 1) Starring in a Disney movie or television show 2) Being quirky and 3) Having young girls want to be you or date you. AH: If you didn’t notice, the requirement “one must be talented” was not included. Nowadays, you can have your voice auto tuned or completely altered with a pitch correction program and lip sync every concert or live event. As long as you don’t give TMZ a reason to fall in love with you, like getting caught doing salvia or smoking weed or getting pregnant, then you’ll be set for stardom. SH: Correct! And if you want to hear some quality music, listen to Jetsail Drive’s fantastic EP. Its release date is to be announced. AH: Their EP will never come out. It is probably because their music is comparable to, and is just as bad as Nickleback. So if it even does come out I suggest you don’t listen to it. SH: Well, I think their music is fantastic, but back to the topic at hand: people have different tastes in music. Oh, and we should just get this out of the way that our complaints have nothing to do with taste in music, but everything to do with respect to music as an art form. AH: An art form that has been turned into a moneymaking business scheme. When I was in my band, I played in it because it was fun. SH: Musicians have slowly gravitated away from the “music” aspect and moved closer to the industry side. They have gotten so focused on money and fame that the reason they started writing music (for the love of music) has been tossed to the side like a mechanical pencil when it runs out of lead. AH: Musicians were not always focused on the fame and money. It used to be about expressing one’s self. SH: Throughout history there have been musical “artists” that have brought disgrace to the music industry, but they were never praised and honored for poorly concealing their lack of talent until now. Something happened in the past 20 years that has caused the mainstream industry to go from respectable and talented to pointless and computer-animated. AH: Take boy bands for example. Boy bands are put together for their looks and to take advantage of teenage girls in USA. Boy bands usually have at least one genuinely talented member. I’m not saying I’m a fan of One Direction’s music, but I can appreciate the talented members as individuals. Some of the members are actually really talented but the music they perform doesn’t properly showcase these individuals’ talents. In my opinion, Zayn Malik is the most talented one, but Harry Styles is still the front man of the group. I can not figure out why the most talented one is not the leader. SH: Boy bands have been around for 50-some-odd years. The Monkees were the first boy band (Davy Jones being the most talented), and The Beatles are one of the most famous bands in the world. So what is different now? Why are The Beatles praised for their work while One Direction (in our opinion) doesn’t deserve a glance when crossing the sidewalk on the way to Taco Bell. I’m not saying we should praise One Direction, but what makes The Beatles so much better? AH: The clothing and hairstyles. Or should I say...Harry Styles...hahahahahahaha SH: Shut up. AH: To me, it seems like you are in...deNIALL. Maybe you’re upset because you got Prada for Christmas instead of...LOUIS Vuitton.

plagued legislators for years and they are still searching for a solution. State leaders, such as Governor Rick Scott, see the increase as “moving in the right direction” and others, like founding member of Fund Education Now Kathleen Oropeza, see it as evidence that the education reforms aren’t working. “Look at the facts on the ground,” Oropeza said. “It’s still not showing that we’re supporting our children properly

or that they’re being successful.” Florida also struggles with a high mobility rate. When a student transfers from one high school to another, it appears on record that a student never graduated from his original high school, harming that school’s graduation rate. Florida’s mobility rate is one of the highest in the country with 33.54 percent of white students and 29.86 percent of African American students moving at least once. “I think that it’s sad that these people are failing school and closing so many doors for themselves at such an early

age in life,” senior Justin Fontes said. Florida’s low graduation rate shows improvements still need to be made, but the growth Justin Fontes from 2003 shows there is clear improvement in Florida’s public education system. “Once you are at Boone, you are a Brave, and we will do everything we can to open as many doors for you as we can,” Dr. McMillen said.

Fundraiser provides fun [ Reservation Run from, page 1 athletic facilities. “The nice part about it is that it’s not just a fundraiser for a specific group. It’s set up for many groups. It’s a win-win for everybody,” Patterson said. Last year, 800 runners participated in the Reservation Run. This year, BHSAA hopes to have 1,000 participants. Timed runs are eligible for an award. Awards will be given to the top three overall male and female runners, as well as the top three male and females in seven different age groups ranging from under 13 to over 60. Clubs and teams are administered awards for meeting requirements, such

as having the most participants. The winners of these awards will win extra money in addition to their 50 percent per registration earned by all clubs. The race is not only a school event. It involves the whole Boone community. “It’s an exciting event that gathers our students and community together, neighbors come out and watch so it brings together the community,” Linda Coleman, head of the Reservation Run committee, said. “It helps the clubs and teams, and makes sports facility improvements. Without fundraisers, we would be without a lot of this.” One can register by picking up registration forms at the Trading Post or in the main office. Or one can register by going to: www.booneathletics.ocps.

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even more writing 4

Friday, March 15, 2013 hilights.org

hi-lights

‘ KTD thenews

A student may be a great reader, but may not be interested in the subject matter or may just have trouble picking a correct answer. Reagan Robins, sophomore

FCAT causes controversy

Kids These Days

Test continues to have mixed reviews

Sam Holleman, columnist

Austin Hall, columnist

Visine is on sale Austin Hall: I feel like we live in a world of royalty; a world full of princesses and princes that feel like they own the world. I have no idea where it comes from, but kids these days have a strange sense of entitlement. Sam Holleman: I think it’s the parents. They are so afraid of telling their children ‘no’ that these kids have developed this philosophy of always getting what they want. AH: I agree. I hear parents say things like ‘you’re spoiled to death!’ and I do not understand it. That parent worked his or her whole life to make more than enough money to support his or her family, so that they could provide their children with nice things, but they then turn around and buy their child everything they want. SH: Our parents worked their fart cannons off to get everything they have in their lives, and they don’t want their kids to have to do the same things they did, so they go to the extreme and hand everything to our generation on a silver platter with a cherry on top and maybe a side of mashed potatoes. Mashed potatoes and a dessert item with a cherry on the same shiny silver platter may seem like an odd combination, but my point is made nonetheless. AH: I do agree that it doesn’t sound very appetizing. It’s kind of counter-intuitive because the point of a cherry is to put on ice cream. Without the ice cream, it is just a plate with a cherry and some potatoes. If any of these kids wanted the ice cream and mashed potatoes, they could have it. Mommy and daddy would buy it for them in a heartbeat. SH: ‘No’ has become a forgotten word in the parent dictionary. And because of that, we have kids with an attitude of ‘give me things because I deserve them’ rather than ‘I will earn the things I want.’ AH: And the kids who say they deserve them are usually the last ones who do. The ones who seem to complain about how they do not get everything they ask for, are usually the kids who do not work for anything. They whine and complain and moan until their wishes are fulfilled by mommy and daddy. These are the kids who give us teenagers a bad name. I am not saying that I am perfect and that I do not ask for things that I want, but I like to think that I do not throw a fit. I ask for things within reason, or I just work my thunder buns off and I buy it with my own hard-earned money. Money that I earned with my blood, sweat and tears. But mostly tears...definitely a lot of tears. SH: Kids these days have never truly had to work for anything. Granted, they haven’t been around a very long time to work for stuff, but over the time they have been around, they merely ask for it. Instead of having to get a job to have spending money, kids just ask for it from their parent(s) or guardians. Everything is handed to them and because of that, they have learned nothing about working and paying for their efforts. AH: I get what you’re saying, but it seems to be a recurring pattern. I feel the same way about the whole “kids not working for anything and asking for everything” stuff, but I feel like it is not all their fault. The job market for the entire country has been very low for the past decade, so it is not entirely our generation’s fault for the unemployment. There are people who try to get a job but just can’t. The lucky few who do get a job should be appreciative of the opportunity to get that cash flow. SH: You would think the lack of prosperity in the job market would wake our generation up to the fact that we need to actually try in order to succeed, but here we are. AH: Our generation seems to be one that is allergic to work. Kind of like how we are allergic to healthy foods. It seems like everyone gets red, itchy eyes from the thought of work, but it is pollen season so who knows. I think Visine is on sale, so they can use that to help with their eyes.

By CIARA MCCOY With the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test approaching quickly, there are still numerous questions about the FCAT exam itself. FCAT began in 1998 and replaced the State Student Assessment Test (SSAT) and the High School Competency Test (HSCT). Freshmen and sophomores are currently the only grades that take the reading portion of the test. Sophomores also take a writing portion. There used to be math and science portions as well, but those have since been replaced with end of course exams. English II teacher Katherine Anderson believes FCAT may reflect a student’s test anxiety on that given day. Anderson believes students should be given more than one opportunity to prove themselves. “I believe that FCAT is a valid assessment of a student’s academic knowledge, but it should not be the sole determining factor of a students academic ability or a school’s,” Anderson said. Junior Trenton Haddock said he definitely dislikes the FCAT. “Not just one test can show [how good a student is at reading]. Numerous things can affect how good or bad you

do,” Haddock said. Students’ results from the FCAT are compiled to generate a grade for each public school. Under this plan, public schools receive a grade from A to F, depending on student performance. The higher a public school scores, the more funding it receives from the state. One needs to pass the FCAT to graduate. If one were to fail, he would have to keep taking it until he passes. If one has all the credits he needs, but does not pass the FCAT he may receive a certificate of completion, but will not receive his high school diploma until he passes the test itself. A score of 18 on the reading section of the ACT or a 280 on the reading section of the SAT can be used to waive the FCAT requirement after the student has failed the 10th grade FCAT at least three times. Sophomore Reagan Robins is not a fan of FCAT and does not believe that the reading portion is a proficient test to show a student’s reading ability. A student might be a proficient reader, but might not excel as well in the analytical department. “A student may be a great reader, but may not be interested in the subject matter or may just have trouble picking a correct answer,” Robins said. Robins believes there is not much one can do to prepare for FCAT, but states that FCAT Explorer is one of the

best resources a student can use. FCAT Explorer is an online resource where students can access a practice test with over 500 questions. Each student is given a unique username and password to access this program. Senior Julio Colon only prepared by doing what he usually did for his English class. He believes FCAT won’t have an overall beneficial effect on him in the upcoming future. “[FCAT testing] is pointless and no one likes it,” Colon said. FCAT is predicted to be gone completely in the next two years for high school. EOC exams are by subject area and are relevant to the material the students learned that year. EOC exams are not extra exams the students have to take in addition to a final exam because the exam itself is the final exam for the class. Currently EOC exams are in effect for biology, United States history, Algebra I and geometry. Students are set to take the FCAT the week of April 15 and Anderson is doing all she can to prepare her students for the upcoming test. Anderson explained that she teaches FCAT skills, lessons that specifically correlate to FCAT, Springboard lessons, and she uses the data from benchmark testing to prepare students. Students may not like the FCAT, but the state believes it is showing how much students have learned overall.

U.S. History: April 22 - May 3 Biology I: April 29 - May 10 Algebra I: May 6 - May 17 Actual dates not yet known; these are the testing windows. Geometry: May 13 -May 24

EOCschedule

Make up days for all tests: May 28- May 31

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Friday, May 10, 2013 hilights.org

thenews hi-lights

STUDENT OBLIGATIONS

LEGEND YEARBOOK ‘BEST OF SHOW’

Parents did you know that you can check your Brave’s Destiny Profile from home? You can see the library book and textbooks checked out to your Brave. You can also view any outstanding financial obligations. Go to http://destiny.ocps.net. Find and click on Boone High School. Click on login button, top right corner. Username: Student number and Password: eight digit birth day.

Congratulations to the Legend Yearbook. They placed sixth in the largest yearbook category of National Scholastic Press Association’s Best of Show in San Francisco; this is their highest Best of Show Ranking.

KTD Kids These Days

Sam Holleman, columnist

Austin Hall, columnist

Kids painted chrome AH: This is my last column I will write for the newspaper. I’m ashamed that it’s with you, but I guess I’ll take what I’ve got and go out with a small bang. SH: You sure know how to make a guy feel special. Since this is it for you, what do you want to write about? AH: I want to talk about abortion and flag burning. Let’s tackle those subjects right now. SH: I’m going to go out on a limb and say Mrs. Burke won’t approve of that idea, so let’s talk about the future. AH: FFFFUUUUUTTTTTUUUUURRRREEEEE Everything will be chrome. Even the plants. SH: SpongeBob is the voice of a generation. Speaking of generations (#cheesytransitions), how do you think our generation will do when we are the ones in charge? AH: I think our generation will kick some butt and take no names. Parents say we are entitled because we will do anything to get what we want; I don’t think that is always a bad thing. I think want for everything we want will drive us to succeed in the world. SH: The adult generation says that kids are not mentally or physically prepared to lead this country. But at some point the adult generation were kids and there was an adult generation that critiqued their every move. AH: I think the generation before the generation before us, told the generation directly before us that they were entitled and wouldn’t make it in the “real world.” That is the same generation that tells our generation that we will not make it in life. I feel like when we get older we will say the same thing to the generation that will succeed our generation and they will tell the next generation and so on and so forth. SH: It’s like the circle of life… but with responsibility… and it doesn’t really go in a circular formation. It is more like a line that starts on one point and goes in the same direction with seemingly no end in sight. But “never-ending line ray of responsibility” does not have a nice ring to it, so let’s just go with circle of life. AH: We could compromise on the issue. It could be a downward spiral that goes in a downward circular descent. SH: Maybe not downward because that would imply a worsening condition of each generation’s intelligence. Maybe it could be a lateral spiral, like a screw laying on its side, but that would imply the circle would end. AH: What are you even saying right now? SH: I’m getting lost in my own thoughts. AH: That’s because of the amount of polyester and spandex you currently wear. SH: These shorts are a gift from the heavens. You are just jealous you do not possess this clothing masterpiece. AH: Like a hallmark angel? Or like Supernatural angels where they go around stealing souls and whatnot? SH: Na, like one of those angels from Doctor Who. I haven’t closed my eyes for three days... AH: As fun as a Doctor Who based conversation would be, we should probably get back on the initial topic. SH: Our generation has been branded with some very unflattering concepts (YOLO, Swag, and something called Dance Moms), but those who support these concepts are the vocal minority messing life up for everyone else. There is a prominent silent majority that is masked and oppressed. These are kids who study, read for fun and watch Nat. Geo. AH: No one wants to admit they are wrong. They would much rather accentuate the negatives to prove their point, than acknowledge the uplifting truth; the fact that, not all kids are like this. We speak for that majority. I’m not trying to say we are perfect people, but we look around us and just voice what we see. We try to bring these problems to light so maybe one day, we can like, fix the like, problem, sooooo like, ya. Problems are like, not good.

Seniors tease juniors [ Step-Up from, page 1 entire student body. Seniors are pranking freshmen and juniors are pranking sophomores, which is not its original intention. “Unfortunately, this night was usually a chance for the junior girls to write horrible things on the sophomore girls’ lawns/sidewalks. Or even worse vandalize the cars in the driveway. Pretty much always sparked by jealousy,” Class of 2007 graduate Casey Shea said. Moriah Perkins had her house toilet papered three times last year as only a freshman. She had moved to Orlando from Mississippi at the beginning of the year and did not know many of the seniors. So when she woke up the next day to find her house covered in toilet paper she was shocked. “[The underclassmen] are friends with older classmates now. It all depends on groups,” sophomore Moriah Perkins said. The pranks have also become more damaging and destructive. Kids have cracked concrete driveways, put bricks through sunroofs and keyed cars, which are criminal acts. These damaging pranks have gotten police involved and also left an unworthy reputation on campus. “It is good if it is just toilet papering. [But] messing with houses and cars gets the cops involved and the school has to deal with it which is bad,” senior Dylan Dragon said. School resource officer Scott Daniels has not been personally involved in any

photo/MORIAH PERKINS

TOILET PAPER TRAGEDY. Even though she was a freshman and technically should not have been involved, Moriah Perkins’s house was toilet papered three times last year. “The seniors take pride in what they do and the pranks they pull. It is a big deal to be a senior,” Perkins said. More freshmen and sophomores were affected by Senior Step-up last year than juniors. of the punishments given to students during Senior Step-up, but he has heard about the pranks and jokes pulled. “Recently, parents have been good at controlling the situations and they just want things fixed. It opens up a whole new potential though because you are running from a scene which if you are caught can get you in trouble as well,” Daniels said. Anytime one damages someone

else’s property, he is charged with destruction of property. One can be charged with a felony depending on the value of the object damaged. He can be arrested or given a fine. “It is not necessary. It is something that once might have been a joke and is now used as a way to be vindictive and to be a dig at someone. [Students] do not know when to stop,” Daniels said.

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