Page 1

da BR w OO ki K ns E

portflio

two thousand and twelve


BU SS N I NE SS


3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812 dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

LEGEND YEARBOOK

da BR w OO ki K ns E

student life editor

3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812 dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

LEGEND YEARBOOK

da BR w OO ki K ns E

student life editor

3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812 dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

LEGEND YEARBOOK

da BR w OO ki K ns E

student life editor

3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812 dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

LEGEND YEARBOOK student life editor

da BR w OO ki K ns E

dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

student life editor

da BR w OO ki K ns E

da BR w OO ki K ns E

student life editor

3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812

LEGEND YEARBOOK

3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812 dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

LEGEND YEARBOOK student life editor

da BR w OO ki K ns E

LEGEND YEARBOOK

3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812 dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

LEGEND YEARBOOK student life editor

da BR w OO ki K ns E

dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812 dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

LEGEND YEARBOOK student life editor

da BR w OO ki K ns E

da BR w OO ki K ns E

3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812

3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812 dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

LEGEND YEARBOOK student life editor


CO VE R LE TT ER


KE BR OO

student life editor

3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812 dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

April 26, 2012 Kelli Acciardo Head of internships Seventeen Magazine 300 W. 57th St. 17th Fl. New York, NY 10019 Dear Ms. Acciardo, After research, I discovered that every summer Seventeen magazine holds internship opportunities for college students. I understand that the magazine is looking for young students who are interested in magazine journalism, and are well-versed and knowledgeable about teen culture and entertainment. I would love the opportunity to work with one of the most respected magazines in the country, and would appreciate your consideration for this internship. As a three year member of the Legend yearbook at my high school, I feel that I am well qualified in the journalism field. I am well versed in Adobe programs such as InDesign and Photoshop, that deal with the designing of elements for spreads, and I would enjoy witnessing the process of design for Seventeen magazine. I have also been an editor on my high school’s yearbook for two years, so I am well adjusted to meeting deadlines and staying on task. I truly enjoy creating published pieces that reach a large audience, and I admire that Seventeen magazine is one of the biggest published magazines nationwide for teens. I enjoy writing and especially take pleasure in writing interesting feature stories that are found in your magazine. Although I have attached my resume, I feel that a personal interview would better demonstrate my qualifications for this position. I would appreciate the opportunity to hear from you when possible. Thank you for considering me for this position.

Respectfully yours,

Brooke Dawkins Enclosed: Resume


RE SU ME


KE BR OO

student life editor

3842 Gatlin Woods Drive, Orlando, FL 32812 dawkinsbrooke.wordpress.com dawkinsbrooke@gmail.com 407-405-8502

OBJECTIVE To obtain an internship at Seventeen magazine EDUCATION Completed four years at William R. Boone High School Graduation Date June 2012 GPA 4.3 weighted Relevant high school courses: Journalism I, II, III, IV; English I Gifted; English II Gifted; Advanced Placement Language and Composition; Advanced Placement Literature; AP Calculus AB; AP Calculus BC; AP Chemistry; Multimedia Technologies EXPERIENCE/SKILLS Legend Yearbook, William R. Boone High School; experience writing and editing body copy and captions, photography, designing, using Adobe programs, meeting deadlines and showing leadership by helping other staffers with their page. • 09-10: Staffer: As a staffer, I was responsible for completing six spreads throughout seven deadlines. As well as taking pictures, I wrote stories that were published in the yearbook • 10-11: Club Editor: As the club editor, I was responsible for designing layouts for the book as well as taking and identifying the club photos. With the club photos I created the reference section, which contained club pictures, names, and different forms of secondary coverage. • 11-12: Student Life Editor: As the Student Life editor, I thought of unique page ideas that can be used in the yearbook and created layouts for all those pages. I also developed the issues section, and designed a specific layout to accompany the in-depth personal stories. I also shot different sporting events, such as volleyball and flag football, as well as helped other students with their layouts. Babysitting children ages: 1-13 VOLUNTEER WORK: Love Letters, Make ‘m Smile, Discovery Camp, West Minister Towers, One Great Day for Downtown, Green-up Boone, Relay for life, Cheer for a Cure, Boone Writing Center, Love Grows, Camp Lava Lava, Camp Skylight ACTIVITIES/AWARDS Winner of Dr. Nelson Young Orange County Science Expedition, 2008 Placed fourth in Florida’s State Science Fair, 2008 William R. Boone Homecoming Queen, 2011 Aug 2008-present: Cheerleader for Boone High School February 2011 and 2012: Cheerleading State Champion 2010-present: Member of National Honors Society 2010-2012: Legend Yearbook “Gallery of Excellence” 2010-2011: Legend Yearbook Silver Crown winner 2010-2011: Legend Yearbook Gold Crown winner REFERENCES Renee Burke- Yearbook Advisor Jennifer Hilley- AP Literature teacher Jennifer Trapp- Babysitting jobs


PE

RS ON AL

ES SAY


PERSONAL essay Ever since freshman year when I began Journalism classes I have always been interested in the creation of publications. Through Journalism, writers, photographers, and designers can express different ideas and share them with the public. Journalism also leaves something behind to be proud of. By publishing different pieces, they will always exist and acknowledged and appreciated by others. Especially recently, the social media and online sources have taken toll on almost all niches of life. However, I strongly believe

in print publication because it is timeless and traditional, and it’s important to be able to recollect on memories from high school from yearbooks. To succeed in Journalism, you must understand that there is always room for improvement. Creating a yearbook, for instance, is not about how many pages you can create and how many pictures you can cram in a book, but its about quality of pictures, design, and writing. In Journalism it’s important not to settle for deficient work and a published piece should completely transform from its first draft.


AN AL YS IS


SELF analysis I have learned countless things this year in yearbook. As a third year staffer and second year editor, one would assume that there wasn’t a great deal more to learn. However, I extensively enhanced my comprehension and skills relating to Journalism. Concerning design, I encompassed simple and “correct” design, and expanded my ideas to compose interesting and unique layouts for the Student Life section. I learned the importance of utilizes white space to draw attention to specific elements on the page, as well as using mods to create a simple but eye-catching design. I’ve always understood the importance of shipping deadlines to save money, but this year since we were especially short on funds, deadlines were even more important. Another important thing that I learned this year is the value of working together. With a majority underclassman staff, it was extremely important that you were always available to help so that they learned proper

journalism skills that will help carry them through their next few years on staff. Nevertheless, the most important thing that I got out of this year was to never give up. In some situations, you cant control the outcome, but for most of the situations, you can help tremendously. For example, selling enough books was a huge conflict the staff went through this year, and having to possibly face page cuts was shattering. However, if you can fix the problem: fix it. Hard work can fix any problem and by advertising the book to students and pushing more sales, we saved the book. I can take these things I have learned and apply them to real life situations that I will face everyday. When life presents a challenge, break it down into more manageable sections (similar to how we break a huge deadline into mini deadlines) and when life presents a problem, sit down with others around you and discuss how to fix it.


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REFLECTION one One specific page that I think students will find very interesting in this years books is the cars page. I think this is my most significant piece of work because it shows the importance of multiple drafts. The piece is hardly recognizable from the first draft to the final draft. My purpose for this page was to portray different types of old and new cars with interesting stories, despite their price. This was somewhat difficult to complete because its very difficult to find students whom have interesting cars besides their “quality.� Most students are able to easily recognize the expensive cars, but

I wanted this page to show cars that are important to students, whether they were personalized or full of memories. The design for this page went through many different drafts. At first, the page was submitted but upon a second look, appeared too box-like. To create this piece, many pictures had to be re-shot and re-cobbed, and I had to move things around and replace people in order to fit the more unique spread that encompassed more white space. I am most proud of this piece because it shows the product of hard work and turned out really well.


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page 26 traditional

dye and holly smith]

sending it to the body shop. The insurance paid for what needed to be fixed and with financial help from his dad, Cummins added a new glossy purple paint job, a roll cage resembling those of Nascar and special suspension. His personal touches helped create his dream car. “People ask me sometimes if I’d ever sell it and I’m like ‘no way‘ because I like it so much. [My favorite part is] the roll cage because I know I’ll be safe if I ever flip,” Cummins said. Having one of the most unique cars, Capps had a 1972 Plymouth Fury 3. He spent two years working on it, from getting a windshield to a new engine. “My car was free reign. I got to buy it as one thing and turn it into something completely different,” Capps said. “It’s the only kind of art that I can appreciate.” All four students spent time and money on their cars because it was important to them. It wasn’t just about having the coolest car in the lot, it was about getting the satisfaction of owning a car uniquely their own. [macy

“[My favorite tradition] is the Senior Snake because of the drumline. It really gets people going,” senior Elizabeth Crager said.

Among the sea of cars in the student parking lot, a handful stood out for being completely unique and personalized. Seniors Trevor Darr, Jami Bracewell, Michael Cummins and junior Bryan Capps were just a few of the many students with these specialized cars. Proud owner of his Chrysler 300 C, Darr’s split the cost of the customization with his parents for his 16th birthday present. He added 22-inch rims and a new paint job consisting of black and silver paint. “[My car] is so fresh and so clean. It’s fun to drive and people always look at me like, ‘dang’,” Darr said. Something as simple as putting heart covered seat covers over the front of her seats made Bracewell more comfortable in her own car. “I got them so my seats wouldn’t look so plain and boring. I wanted my car to have character and be different,” Bracewell said. Cummins, on the other hand, always dreamt of having his family’s Jeep and asked for it when he was 10-years-old. When he got it, someone ran into it,

students spent time and money to improve their cars

that’s how we ROLL

1. hot cheyenne. Confident and ready to ride away, junior Lauren Colvin opens the door to her Porsche Cheyenne Turbo. “It makes me feel special to have a nice car. It’s different than anyone else’s,” Colvin said. 2. military system. Standing next to his 2007 Jeep Wrangler, senior Naaron Gopaul is proud of his car. “I think [my car] says I’m tough because the military uses [Jeeps],” Gopaul said. 3. hand-me-down. In the student lot, senior Elsa Meister relaxes on her 1985 535i BMW that used to belong to her sister. “[My car says] that I’m awesome and that I have respect for older cars and can take care of things,” Meister said. 4. classic love. With his 1997 Oldsmobile Cutlass, senior Samuel Torres poses in the parking lot. “I love my car, and how old it is. It’s antique,” Torres said.

1

As she made her way across the country, senior Savannah Alzner put her trust into her 2000 Suzuki Vitara. Passed down from her dad, step mom and then to her, it endured her hardships and moved with her. Driving in her car, she moved from Florida to Texas to Delaware and then back to Florida. “[My car] has been through a lot but it’s still kickin’,” Alzner said. Since Alzner’s car had experienced so much, she was always finding interesting things in it. “It has so many secret compartments. I always find something unusual in it when it comes time to clean: Slim Fast cans, fake spiders, toy swords, etc.,” Alzner said. Alzner’s car always got her to her destination, even when the gas tank was on empty. And, although something was always broken, like a blown out tire, the CD player, and the door panel, it remained constant in her life and helped her persevere through life’s challenges. “My car has been with me through a lot of hard times and is my favorite place to sit and listen to music alone,” Alzner said.

girl’s best friend

3

1

PIMP my ride

2

4

photo/Brooke Dawkins

photos/Blake Rios

JEEP

% 9. 8 15.3%

FORD

HONDA

page 27 cars

203 cars on Sept. 16

26.6%

24.1%

TOYOTA 18.7%

CHEVY

NISSAN

5.4

cars in the lot %

pimped out ride. Junior Reid Mears spent his time and money customizing his 2008 Ford Expedition to make it his own. [1] PA system cost $250. “[I like it] because I can yell at people and I think it’s awesome.” [2] 26” rims were free for Mears. “[I got them] because a family friend has a shop and hooked me up.” [3] audio sound system cost $460. It included four 12”s and a custom 15” base. “[My favorite part] is how loud it is; that was the whole point of getting my car customized.” [4] hid lights cost $130. “[I love] how good it looks.”


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REFLECTION two I believe that the page that could still use work is the homecoming night’s page. Although the pictures and writing on the page are not bad, I still feel like it could’ve been better before it was sent out. Because of certain obstacles, I was forced to complete this page in one day, prior to shipping. However, from this page I learned how to multi-task and use the help from staff as an advantage. Within one day, I was able to write two stories, chose pictures and gather caption interviews.


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photo/Phabulous Photos

2

photo/Lindsay Wilhite

photo/Madeline Trybus

page 14 traditional

blaze. After the pep rally, the bon fire burns in the field by the student parking lots. The wood for the bon fire was donated by different lumber companies.

spirit step. At Braves Brawl, junior Jasmine Mojica steps with her squad. “[The crowd] seemed like they liked it. We heard loud cheering,” Mojica said. The steppin’ braves won third place.

photo/Phabulous Photos photo/Madeline Trybus

sophomore Madeline Podeswa said.

power stance. Getting ready to throw the ball, freshman Alexandra Nagle looks for a teammate to pass to. “I enjoyed it because I got to meet people from all different grades and people on my team,” Nagle said. Nagle played quarterback..

photo/Blake Rios

PEAT

They may have lost as freshman, but the class of 2012 graduated as “3-peat” Powder Bowl champions, victorious as sophomores, juniors and seniors in the girls-only football game. “Well, repetition is the father of learning so winning for the third time was second nature to us,” senior coach Austin Weller said. The seniors defeated the sophomores in the first round 40-0, and played the junior team in the finals, who defeated the freshman, 35-7, in the first round. “The adrenaline was going and I thought we were doing well as a team,” senior Brandi Recker said. The seniors had three practices prior to the game, working on specific plays as well as general offense and defense skills. “I knew we would do well. We went over all of our plays and practiced,” Recker said. Despite all of their preparation and confidence, the seniors had to play tough against the juniors team to pull out a victory. “Ever since freshman year there has always been a fierce competition between our two classes. Every year our class gets even closer and closer to beating [the seniors], so I think the competition has increased over the years as well,” junior Sarah Berlinksy said. Key players Recker, Elizabeth McEwan, Jaci Chastain and Kyndal Skersick led the team to a victory with a final score of 7-6. “[Powder Bowl is important because] I think it fosters good competition between the classes and it’s a lot of fun. It also shows girls’ strength,” Recker said. [brooke dawkins]

THREE

HO MECOMING NIGHTS

“It feels good [being on campus for the 60 year] because were still having excellence as they did in the years before,”

The spirit of competition filled the air as students acted, danced and performed carnival-themed skits at the annual Braves Brawl contest. The varsity cheerleaders, the evening’s winners, performed a series of carnival contests between girls dressed as the East River Flacons and Boone Braves. “I liked our idea because it incorporated the football competition with East River and it was fun and easy to follow,” senior Robbi Garrett said. The team developed their winning routine two weeks prior to Braves Brawl and regularly practiced the skit to perfect it for the Wednesday night event. “Since our team was in the middle of competition season, we didn’t have that much time to practice, but in the few practices we had we worked really hard,” Garrett said. The cheerleading squad’s first place finish was followed by the Steppin’ Braves in second and the Bravettes in third. “It felt great to know we won against everyone and clearly that means we did awesome,” sophomore Sydney Fortini said. The squad incorporated stunts and props into their performance of three carnival games: a pom-pon toss, a dunk tank, and a power tower. The Braves won two out of the three carnival games, beating East River. “The purpose [of having Boone beat East River in the carnival games] was to foreshadow what was going to happen at the game [against East River] and to pump everyone up,” sophomore Courtney Patz said. [caroline coleman]

a carnival competition

3

1

movin’ like bernie. On the sideline, sophomore Kyle Irwin cheers on the sophomore girls. “We did cartwheels and we just made it funny,” Irwin said. Irwin’s squad consisted of four other boy cheerleaders.

be aggressive. In the game against the seniors, junior Justice Donald moves the ball down the field. “I enjoyed the competitiveness of the players,” Donalds said. Donalds played running back and wide receiver.

page 15 homecoming nights

photo/Blake Rios

[1] clownin’ around. During the Bravettes skit, junior Nicole Lucas jumps on a trampoline. The Bravettes won third place in the skit contest. [2] topsy turvy. At the end of the senior skit, senior Dontrayvis Wesley does a back flip. “It felt good [to participate in braves brawl. It’s fun to do school activities,” Wesley said. [3] fantastic freshman. In the freshman skit, freshman Tara Wolfinger prepares to do a back handspring. [4] brave call. At Braves Brawl, junior Lindsay Alexander does the tomahawk chop.

photo/Phabulous photos photo/Madeline Trybus

photo/Dean Stewart Photography


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REFLECTION three

This is one of my favorite pictures that I took because it is very clear and shows good action. It shows Bailey Florin running past an opponent player and the picture portrays the players emotions very well. This picture also shows great depth of field because the grass and bleachers are blurred in the background.


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REFLECTION three I like this picture for multiple reasons. The first reason being that it is a very clear picture that shows movement and action. The picture also shows distinct strong colors. However my favorite part about the picture is the depth of field, and how the subject is clear but the background is blurred.


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REFLECTION three

I like this picture because the subjects are very clear, and the blurred background allows for good depth of field. This picture corresponds to the rule of thirds photo composition rule because the neither of the subjects are centered.


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REFLECTION four I believe I was an important addition to the 2012 Legend staff because I was always very open to help other staffers. From sitting down to students in my section, or even other sections, or going on interview runs for different people. During my first year on staff, I always looked up to my editor to help me with ideas about my page or production skills in general and as an editor I felt It was my duty to make myself appear knowledgeable and helpful. Also, I set examples about the importance of quality. For example, when someone in my section would give me their page, I wasn’t afraid to approach them and tell them what they should do to make the page better. Every little

detail on a page matters, just like every page in the book matters, and I believe that my ambition for a good quality book radiated among other students. Also, from multiple classes and the few years I’ve spent on Legend, I know a lot about different effects and functions on Photoshop and InDesign, which I shared with the rest of the staff. I believe I was an important addition to the Hilights online website because I uploaded multiple stories, photo galleries, and a sound slide to the site. I have already had people come up to me around the school and ask about the website and how to purchase pictures, and I help the websites popularity by guiding these students to our site.


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REFLECTION five One of the biggest hardships I faced this year was managing my time and activities. Because I was involved in other sports and taking three AP classes, it wasn’t unusual for me to feel very overwhelmed and stressed out. However, I learned a lot from this situation. I learned to manage my work load so that not everything will be due the same day. Procrastinating is the worst thing possible when dealing with multiple activities because the work load will build up and become too much to

handle. Parallel to procrastination, i learned that it’s extremely important to use you time wisely. I learned to take advantage of the time I had in class so that the work load wouldn’t clash with other homework. The things I learned from this situation will help me in the future because in real life I will have to balance work with other activities. By not procrastinating, I will be able to break down my workload and avoid overwhelming situations.


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REFLECTION six On the mid-term I was asked about my greatness weakness and I said that it was time management between different activities. To improve on this, I set goals to not procrastinate and get my work done as early as possible so that conflict doesn’t arise when things get busy. I improved on this by taking more advantage of my class time. However, things naturally settled down and I was able to manage my time and work more efficiently.


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YEARBOOK


REFLECTION seven

1

AN IN-DEPTH LOOK

texts

SEXTING

tantalize teens

students sent and passed provocative messages

Forcing her way down the hall with a fake smile, senior Jane Doe’s* heart dropped at the judging stares and disheartening whispers of her peers. Entering her freshman year, Doe started an open relationship with a senior. Mesmerized by his age and experience, Doe was willing to do anything to keep him interested. When he began pressuring her to send pictures, she felt obligated to say yes. “[Looking back now, I sent promiscuous pictures] so he would like me more,” Doe said. “I think I liked doing it because I thought it made him happy.” Doe declined several times, but eventually gave in. According to The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancies, 51 percent of girls say pressure from a guy is a reason they sexted. “The first time I was so nervous, but he consoled me and told me he’d never show anyone because my body was for him and he wouldn’t want anyone else [to see],” Doe said. It started with pictures in her bathing suit, then in a bra and eventually nothing. When school started in the fall, Doe was stunned to see her guy hand in hand with another girl. Initially she was upset, but he talked her into continuing their secret relationship. Even though there was another girl in his life, Doe continued to send him nude pictures until his girlfriend found them. Approximately 14 percent of sexters get caught, reported the Teen Online and Wireless Safety Survey. When his girlfriend found the pictures, she immediately sent them to her phone. Outraged, she took them into the guidance office and showed them to a counselor who called Doe’s parents immediately. “The worst part about it was my parents finding out. They wanted me to switch schools and talked about home school. I was grounded for a while and I couldn’t get my permit, but it wasn’t too bad. It was understandable,” Doe said. “[I regret it] more than anything. That’s the biggest mistake I’ve made. It was just for a stupid boy I don’t even talk to anymore. If I could take one thing back it would definitely be that.” Doe tried to deal with the effects of what happened but ultimately, the embarrassment forced her to change schools. Even after switching, people still stared. “[I am embarrassed] to know that people still talk about it,” Doe said. “When I switched schools I didn’t think people would know about it.” On the other hand, no one ever had to pressure senior John Smith* into sending pictures and he was never afraid of getting caught.

“[I’m never embarrassed because] I think it’s a lot different for guys,” Smith said. “It’s very much voluntary. I think in most situations it’s the guy pressuring the girl to send pictures.” For Smith, sending the pictures was a thrill. According to the Teen Online and Wireless Safety Survey, 40 percent of all sexters send promiscuous messages and pictures for entertainment. “A picture is worth a thousand words and it’s worth a lot of messages. It’s like you get to share a secret with someone that hopefully no one else ever sees,” Smith said. Rather than feeling embarrassed by the texts, Smith enjoyed it and said it made him feel ‘alive’. “It’s just a part of my body. I don’t see why it’s such a big deal,” Smith said. Unlike Smith, junior Sally Walker* looked back at her sexting experience with regret and discomfort. Walker first sent pictures her sophomore year when she was 16 to add excitement to the conversation with a boy she liked. He asked for the pictures and she sent them to him multiple times. “It wasn’t my idea. I thought it would make him like me more,” Walker said. “It was scary, especially the first time.” For Walker, the regret of sending nude pictures was based off her fear of getting caught rather than losing the boy she sent them to. “[I’m afraid of getting caught] because it’s illegal and I don’t want to go to jail. It was a bad decision on my part,” Walker said. “I felt self-conscious. What if he didn’t like what he saw?” Sending nude photos for anyone under 18 years of age is considered child pornography and is punishable by law. The sentence for this crime can be as severe as life in prison. Anyone caught receiving the pictures, can be registered as a sex offender, stipulating where they can live, go or work for the rest of their life. Overall, Walker regretted her decision to sext and would do anything to take it all back. More than 50 percent of all sexters regret what they did and wish they could take it back. “He liked me for a while, but when I stopped he was over me,” Walker said. One sext can change someone’s entire life and a picture, sent or received, can cause a lifetime of problems and ridicule. [taylor keefer and

According to the Teen Summit survey in 2011, one in five teens have engaged in sexting.

Y24: Informational Graphics: single. I chose this spread because it includes tons of statistics as well as a graph that I created in Adobe Illustrator.

of people that sext send them to their significant other, according to the Teen Online and Wireless Safety Survey in 2011.

2/5

photo illustrations

of all sexters sent the messages for fun, according to Teen Online and Wireless Safety Survey in 2011.

39

Thirty-nine percent of all teenagers sent or posted sexually suggestive messages, as reported by the 2011 National Campaign to Prevent Teen

macy dye] *names witheld

and Unplanned Pregnancy.

1/3

86%

According to the Teen Summit survey in 2011, over one-third of all teens know of a friend that has sent and/or received a sext message.

of sexters are never caught, according to Teen Online and Wireless Safety Survey in 2011.

O 22 18 N E 1 in 10 men and women have shared a naked image of themselves.

According to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy 2011,

percent of teen girls sent or posted nude or seminude pictures or videos of themselves according to the National Campaign survey in 2011.

seNiOr cOurt

Marvin Bracy and Yazmine ramos, Bradley Hutsell and savannah Alzner, Angel Lozada and Yesenia Vazquez, Brooke Dawkins, Austin Weller and elizabeth Mcewan.

percent of teen boys have sent or posted nude or semi-nude pictures or videos of themselves.

Student sexters

Students answer whether they have ever sent a provocative picture or message to another person.

According to the National Campaign poll in 2011.

150

148

134

120

1 in 10 sexters

90 60

54

40

30

didn’t know the person they sent the messages or pictures to, according to the Teen Summit survey of 2011.

0

yes

yes

no

no

sent provocative picture to someone sent provocative message to someone 188 students polled on Jan. 23

page 45 issues-sexting

“My favorite tradition at Boone is Chugapalooza because it isn’t a school tradition, it’s a student tradition,” senior Joel Simons said.

school celebrates

photo/Blake Waranch

page 44 traditional

SIXTY PERCENT

This digital action has affected students of all ages and genders with varying causes. The following is an in-depth look at sexting statistics.

BirtHDAY

AN ORANGE GUILD

1

photo/Blake Rios

4

spirit step. At Braves Brawl, junior Jasmine Mojica steps with her squad. “[The crowd] seemed like they liked it. We heard loud cheering,” Mojica said. The steppin’ braves won third place.

power stance. Getting ready to throw the ball, freshman Alexandra Nagle looks for a teammate to pass to. “I enjoyed it because I got to meet people from all different grades and people on my team,” Nagle said. Nagle played quarterback..

blaze. After the pep rally, the bon fire burns in the field by the student parking lots. The wood for the bon fire was donated by different lumber companies.

“It feels good [being on campus for the 60 year] because were still having excellence as they did in the years before,”

4

page 12 traditional

along for the ride. With a tight grip on the post, sophomore Joan Marie Spinelli rides on the crew team float. “I love how everyone was spirited for Boone and everyone supports our team” Spinelli said. The crew team dressed up in circus attire for their float.

be aggressive. In the game against the seniors, junior Justice Donald moves the ball down the field. “I enjoyed the competitiveness of the players,” Donalds said. Donalds played running back and wide receiver. movin’ like bernie. On the sideline, sophomore Kyle Irwin cheers on the sophomore girls. “We did cartwheels and we just made it funny,” Irwin said. Irwin’s squad consisted of four other boy cheerleaders.

page 15 homecoming nights

sophomore Madeline Podeswa said.

photos/Blake Rios

PIMP my ride 1

2

pimped out ride. Junior Reid Mears spent his time and money customizing his 2008 Ford Expedition to make it his own. [1] PA system cost $250. “[I like it] because I can yell at people and I think it’s awesome.” [2] 26” rims were free for Mears. “[I got them] because a family friend has a shop and hooked me up.” [3] audio sound system cost $460. It included four 12”s and a custom 15” base. “[My favorite part] is how loud it is; that was the whole point of getting my car customized.” [4] hid lights cost $130. “[I love] how good it looks.”

3 1

2

4 1. hot cheyenne. Confident and ready to ride away, junior Lauren Colvin opens the door to her Porsche Cheyenne Turbo. “It makes me feel special to have a nice car. It’s different than anyone else’s,”

Colvin said. 2. military system. Standing next to his 2007 Jeep Wrangler, senior Naaron Gopaul is proud of his car. “I think [my car] says I’m tough because the military uses [Jeeps],” Gopaul said. 3. hand-me-down. In the student lot, senior Elsa Meister relaxes on her 1985 535i BMW that used to belong to her sister. “[My car says] that I’m awesome and that I have respect for older cars and can take

3

4

care of things,” Meister said. 4. classic love. With his 1997 Oldsmobile Cutlass, senior Samuel Torres poses in the parking lot. “I love my car, and how old it is. It’s antique,” Torres said.

students spent time and money to improve their cars

Among the sea of cars in the student parking lot, a handful stood out for being completely unique and personalized. Seniors Trevor Darr, Jami Bracewell, Michael Cummins and junior Bryan Capps were just a few of the many students with these specialized cars. Proud owner of his Chrysler 300 C, Darr’s split the cost of the customization with his parents for his 16th birthday present. He added 22-inch rims and a new paint job consisting of black and silver paint. “[My car] is so fresh and so clean. It’s fun to drive and people always look at me like, ‘dang’,” Darr said. Something as simple as putting heart covered seat covers over the front of her seats made Bracewell more comfortable in her own car. “I got them so my seats wouldn’t look so plain and boring. I wanted my car to have character and be different,” Bracewell said. Cummins, on the other hand, always dreamt of having his family’s Jeep and asked for it when he was 10-years-old. When he got it, someone ran into it,

page 26 traditional

sending it to the body shop. The insurance paid for what needed to be fixed and with financial help from his dad, Cummins added a new glossy purple paint job, a roll cage resembling those of Nascar and special suspension. His personal touches helped create his dream car. “People ask me sometimes if I’d ever sell it and I’m like ‘no way‘ because I like it so much. [My favorite part is] the roll cage because I know I’ll be safe if I ever flip,” Cummins said. Having one of the most unique cars, Capps had a 1972 Plymouth Fury 3. He spent two years working on it, from getting a windshield to a new engine. “My car was free reign. I got to buy it as one thing and turn it into something completely different,” Capps said. “It’s the only kind of art that I can appreciate.” All four students spent time and money on their cars because it was important to them. It wasn’t just about having the coolest car in the lot, it was about getting the satisfaction of owning a car uniquely their own. [macy

dye and holly smith]

“[My favorite tradition] is the Senior Snake because of the drumline. It really gets people going,” senior Elizabeth Crager said.

girl’s best friend As she made her way across the country, senior Savannah Alzner put her trust into her 2000 Suzuki Vitara. Passed down from her dad, step mom and then to her, it endured her hardships and moved with her. Driving in her car, she moved from Florida to Texas to Delaware and then back to Florida. “[My car] has been through a lot but it’s still kickin’,” Alzner said. Since Alzner’s car had experienced so much, she was always finding interesting things in it. “It has so many secret compartments. I always find something unusual in it when it comes time to clean: Slim Fast cans, fake spiders, toy swords, etc.,” Alzner said. Alzner’s car always got her to her destination, even when the gas tank was on empty. And, although something was always broken, like a blown out tire, the CD player, and the door panel, it remained constant in her life and helped her persevere through life’s challenges. “My car has been with me through a lot of hard times and is my favorite place to sit and listen to music alone,” Alzner said.

photo/Brooke Dawkins

that’s how we ROLL

3

[1] banner love. In the parade, freshman Melissa Dunn and junior Jennifer Dunn lead the AWYS group holding the sign. “My favorite part of the parade was knowing I was helping to raise awareness of what happened, and seeing the joy on people’s faces,” J. Dunn said. [2] sticker support. To promote their message, junior Chandler Dye hands a sticker to a little girl. “I miss Eddie everyday so I felt like being a part of this brought him a little closer to me. I wanted to show respect for Eddie and Laura,” Dye said. [3] spread the word. Items in hand, sophomore Christopher Caplan hands out stickers and tee-shirts. “[My favorite part about the parade was] having all the little kids run up to me and ask me for a sticker,” Caplan said.

page 13 homecoming days

“[My favorite tradition] is the Senior Snake because it unifies us as a senior class,” senior Heidi Rhodes said.

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

photo/Phabulous photos photo/Madeline Trybus

The spirit of competition filled the air as students acted, danced and performed carnival-themed skits at the annual Braves Brawl contest. The varsity cheerleaders, the evening’s winners, performed a series of carnival contests between girls dressed as the East River Flacons and Boone Braves. “I liked our idea because it incorporated the football competition with East River and it was fun and easy to follow,” senior Robbi Garrett said. The team developed their winning routine two weeks prior to Braves Brawl and regularly practiced the skit to perfect it for the Wednesday night event. “Since our team was in the middle of competition season, we didn’t have that much time to practice, but in the few practices we had we worked really hard,” Garrett said. The cheerleading squad’s first place finish was followed by the Steppin’ Braves in second and the Bravettes in third. “It felt great to know we won against everyone and clearly that means we did awesome,” sophomore Sydney Fortini said. The squad incorporated stunts and props into their performance of three carnival games: a pom-pon toss, a dunk tank, and a power tower. The Braves won two out of the three carnival games, beating East River. “The purpose [of having Boone beat East River in the carnival games] was to foreshadow what was going to happen at the game [against East River] and to pump everyone up,” sophomore Courtney Patz said. [caroline coleman]

photo/Blake Rios

3

a carnival competition

PEAT

THREE

They may have lost as freshman, but the class of 2012 graduated as “3-peat” Powder Bowl champions, victorious as sophomores, juniors and seniors in the girls-only football game. “Well, repetition is the father of learning so winning for the third time was second nature to us,” senior coach Austin Weller said. The seniors defeated the sophomores in the first round 40-0, and played the junior team in the finals, who defeated the freshman, 35-7, in the first round. “The adrenaline was going and I thought we were doing well as a team,” senior Brandi Recker said. The seniors had three practices prior to the game, working on specific plays as well as general offense and defense skills. “I knew we would do well. We went over all of our plays and practiced,” Recker said. Despite all of their preparation and confidence, the seniors had to play tough against the juniors team to pull out a victory. “Ever since freshman year there has always been a fierce competition between our two classes. Every year our class gets even closer and closer to beating [the seniors], so I think the competition has increased over the years as well,” junior Sarah Berlinksy said. Key players Recker, Elizabeth McEwan, Jaci Chastain and Kyndal Skersick led the team to a victory with a final score of 7-6. “[Powder Bowl is important because] I think it fosters good competition between the classes and it’s a lot of fun. It also shows girls’ strength,” Recker said. [brooke dawkins]

3

2

photo/Blake Waranch

2 photo/Blake Waranch

HO MECOMING NIGHTS

photo/Phabulous Photos

2

photo/Madeline Trybus

1

photo/Lindsay Wilhite

photo/Phabulous Photos

[1] clownin’ around. During the Bravettes skit, junior Nicole Lucas jumps on a trampoline. The Bravettes won third place in the skit contest. [2] topsy turvy. At the end of the senior skit, senior Dontrayvis Wesley does a back flip. “It felt good [to participate in braves brawl. It’s fun to do school activities,” Wesley said. [3] fantastic freshman. In the freshman skit, freshman Tara Wolfinger prepares to do a back handspring. [4] brave call. At Braves Brawl, junior Lindsay Alexander does the tomahawk chop.

1

[1] wizard girl. In the hallways, senior Stephanie Nebeker walks in her Harry Potter inspired dress. “I enjoyed the Harry Potter day because I felt that I was in the wizardly world and wanted to do magic,” Nebeker said. [2] crazy cat. For “Zanny Zoo Day,” senior Kara Gill dresses up as a cheetah. “I liked the dress up days because a lot of people had creative costumes,” Gill said. [3] pretty in pink. On “First Day of School in 1950,” senior Matara Francis walks to class wearing a pink poodle skirt. “When I dressed up for the ‘50’s I really got into it,” Francis said. [4] wrapped. Showing his senior pride, senior William Isaacs wears his toga. “[I wore a toga] because I’m only going to be a senior once,” Isaacs said. Seniors wore togas on “Class Color Day.”

photo/Carly Burton

photo/Blake Waranch

4

photo/Blake Waranch

photo/Blake Waranch

photo/Blake Rios

2

3 DRESS UP DAYS

page 17 homecoming court and dance

[1] hand signs. With a painted chest, junior Jonathan Oquendo walks beside the American Sign Language float. “[The parade] is important because I am deaf and I want to support ASL,” Oquendo said. [2] sombrero. Dominican Republican flag in hand, sophomore Alec Dulskis walks with the Spanish Club. “[My favorite part of the parade] was seeing all the people participate,” Dulskis said. [3] bright beads. With the varsity squad, junior Victoria Batura hands out beads to the crowd. “[The parade is important] because it shows your excitement as a school and your school spirit,” Batura said. [4] beat east river. Holding a football, freshman Mckenna Crager rides on the freshman float. photo/Blake Waranch

1

[brooke dawkins and lindsey wilhite]

photo/Holly Smith

photo/Macy Dye

3

[1] sophomore court. Brendan Francis, Sydney Gregory, Baylee Thomas, Austin Hogan. [2] freshman court. Wesley Harper, Hannah Daly, Lauren Hutsell, Austin Kneeland. [3] junior court. John Townsend, Merrie Grace Harding, Caroline Jordan, Connor McClellan.

photo/Blake Waranch

photo/Macy Dye

photo/Blake Waranch

photo/Blake Waranch

photo/Blake Waranch

fist pump. In the gym, senior Gené Trujillo jams out to an upbeat song. “I liked [the] DJ more than past years,” Trujillo said. Two large screens played videos to the music throughout the night.

photo/Blake Waranch

A semi-truck coated with orange, white and blue decorations traveled through the parade, crammed with eager students presenting an overload of school spirit. The senior float, as well as other floats, depicted the carnival and 60th year theme as well as decorations that dealt with beating the East River Falcons. “I think it turned out really well. It represented our class in the best way and incorporated the theme well,” Senior Class president Elizabeth McEwan said. Seeing the class of 2012 come together as one showing Brave pride and belief in our school [made the float special].” Three weeks filled with planning and preparing props went into the float. After Braves Brawl, senior officers, parents and council members spent time finalizing the float. “[The amount of help we had] was good. We didn’t have a lot of volunteers but we had a few really committed volunteers that helped a lot,” senior Taylor Gies said. Props on the float included a five foot center piece cake, a ferris wheel, figurines wearing birthday attire, carnival flags and carnival cutouts for the sides of the float. The Senior Class won first place, out of the 14 floats, in the homecoming parade float competition. “[The senior float] was good; it was nice and big. It was very extravagant,” junior Simon Tran said.

photo/Christie Rieck

photos/Blake Waranch photo/Blake Waranch

photo/Olivia rees

photo/Blake Waranch

5

“[Being on campus for the 60th year is] entertaining because of all the excitement,” sophomore Nicolas Owens said.

pep up. On the senior float, seniors John Krauss and Solomon Attaway pump up the crowd. “[The parade is important] because it shows all the creativity,” Krauss said. The senior float won first place.

to first

students worked to build a first place float

2

1

page 16 traditional

seniors f l o a t

uNDercLAss cOurt

4 [1] jive. With hands in the air, junior Melanie Berrios dances the night away. “I think [the theme] was pretty original,” Berrios said. [2] two to tango. Hands locked together, freshmen Zhana Lopez and Davian Leslie dance. “It was fun and I liked how the decorations were,” Leslie said. [3] cha-cha. Side by side, freshmen Lauren Duffy and Abigail Hooven dance the “ChaCha Slide.” “[I like to dance because] I get to express myself,” Hooven said. Many participated in group dances such as the “Cupid Shuffle” and “Cha-Cha Slide.” [4] slow it down. To the rhythm of slow music, senior Rebecca Claypool dances with senior Brandon Figueredo. “[My favorite part] was the group dancing,” Claypool said. [5] break dance. Clapping to the music, junior Paul Nguyen dances. “[I liked homecoming] mainly because I was break dancing in the middle,” Nguyen said.

page 14 traditional

Y28: Student life spread: one spread. I chose this spread because I think it has very good modular design, and it shows a variety of different students with different types of cars.

3

2 photo/Blake Waranch

1

photo/Madeline Trybus

Y29: Student life spread multi-page presentation. I chose the three spreads that covered homecoming because I think that they broke up the event into three distinct groups that were equally and well represented on each of the spreads.

In an effort to encourage early ticket sales, the price started at $35. As the dance drew closer, the price rose to $40. The 945 students that attended homecoming had the opportunity to dance in the gymnasium or relax in the Kemosabe Commons while enjoying music and food. “It was definitely one of the best homecomings I’ve been to. It was my last homecoming ever, and my favorite,” senior Brooke Dawkins said. The homecoming week celebrations drew to a close with the presentation of the court at 10 p.m. at the dance on Friday night. “It’s awesome [to be voted homecoming king]. It’s a privilege. I didn’t know I’d win. I guess it’s cool to know people like you,” senior Bradley Hutsell said. Along with Hutsell, Student Government Association crowned Dawkins homecoming queen at the football game on Thursday night. “I was really excited and honored to win. It felt awesome knowing that I was representing our school as queen,” Dawkins said. [blake waranch]

photo/Blake Waranch

the carnival was here for the 60th year Music blared as eager students, pumped up to dance, packed into the balloon-filled gymnasium on Friday, Oct. 27. Weeks before the dance, both the Sophomore and Senior Class officers came up with the theme, “Our 60th Year, The Carnival is Here.” The Junior Class Council was in charge of activities and food for the dance and setting up the decorations. “I like the theme. At first, I was apprehensive, but then we added the vintage theme and a lot of things to offer people that don’t necessarily want to dance,” Merrie Grace Harding, Junior Class vice president, said. Initially the theme was only carnival based, but the councils added a vintage birthday theme to fit the school’s 60th year celebration with birthday-related decorations. A DJ hosted the dance competition and led different how-to group dances like the “ChaCha Slide” and the “Cupid Shuffle.” “[Homecoming is important because] it’s a good time to have school spirit and hang out with your friends,” sophomore Kevin Snavely said.

cars in the lot %

5.4

NISSAN

9.8%

15.3%CHEVY

JEEP

TOYOTA 18.7%

24.1% FORD

HONDA

26.6%

203 cars on Sept. 16

page 27 cars


RE FL EC TI

ON

7

MASS MEDIA


REFLECTION seven DM44: Photo and audio sideshow. I chose this sound slide because it incorporates pictures that relate to the audio, as well as tells a story. There are also a variety of people speaking in the slide show.

http://hilights.org/archives/4638

DM30: Photography portfolio of work. I chose to use pictures from this published photo gallery because they all show action and great depth of field

http://hilights.smugmug.com/Sports/2011-12-BHS-Hi-Lights/Flag-Football-5-1/22776092_2SJv6Q#!i=1826908434&k=HkkKmvr

DM3: News writing. I chose this article because it has ample background information explains the new event concisely.

http://hilights.org/archives/4290


RE FL EC TI

ON

8


REFLECTION eight Looking back at my previous portfolios, I have seen tremendous growth in a variety of elements. One of the biggest areas that I have seen growth in is design. My first portfolio consisted of one brush pattern that repeated on every single page. My portfolio from last years was also brushes, but was more advanced then my first year because i mixed a variety of brushes in Photoshop to create a cluster of feathers that repeated on every page. However, this portfolio has the most advance design because I used a variety of fonts, vectors, and images to create different elements that are carried on throughout the entire portfolio. I generated the design idea for this years portfolio

from elements i saw in different magazines, which is also something I learned how to do throughout the entire year: using magazines for ideas. Also, my layout designs that I created for the design portion of the portfolio have gotten much more advanced. My newer designs pay more attention to specific detail such as font size, color, and secondary coverage elements. I have developed layouts that don’t just follow the rules of design, but are appealing to the readers eye. Another aspect that has improved throughout my portfolios is my writing. I am making fewer spelling and syntactical mistakes because I have learned to proofread more.


DE SI G N


Color Page

student life

lead in . This is a present tense sentence describing the action taking place in the photo. “I am a really good quote that Burke will love,” name said. This is a past tense sentence that takes the reader beyond the picture with more info.

LOW point

“My least favorite part about summer was when I joined the band One Direction because we are just awful but its funny.” THIS guy

lead in . This is a present tense sentence describing the action taking place in the photo. “I am a really good quote that Burke will love,” name said. This is a past tense sentence that takes the reader beyond the picture with more info.

“My favorite part about summer was when I won the coolest girl award because it was the best moment of my entire life and it was cool.” RACHEL mcadams

HIGH point

HIGH and LOW of the summer?

lead in . This is a present tense sentence describing the action taking place in the photo. “I am a really good quote that Burke will love,” name said. This is a past tense sentence that takes the reader beyond the picture with more info.

lead in . This is a present tense sentence describing the action taking place in the photo. “I am a really good quote that Burke will love,” name said. This is a past tense sentence that takes the reader beyond the picture with more info.

students go on adventures during the summer

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quat occulluptat. Mi, atiae por acerrum quatemporpor am ditia dolorae nonsendam et hari a dignia et lam libusdae nonseque odi cus, cus as et quid quas apitas arum el modicip icimus, suntia non preprat. Taque nonsedi sciaspidus dolorum nulpa volum facerum fugiatem fugiam, is et, sedi volore volupta ecaestoris dolupic iisque nisquia doluptam sumque duscien imincia tquatium, si ut laut fugit labo. Nam ratur adipitatis minum eos qu i dolore suntibu sciam, ut voloum il min ped qui offictem laudit rerupit undem fugia vendam que moluptat magnime sae quiEpulinatius omnem hac fectus? Valinam publi pernit. Valique am posti, tanum entin nu sum

lead in . This is a present tense sentence describing the action taking place in the photo. “I am a really good quote that Burke will love,” name said. This is a past tense sentence that takes the reader beyond the picture with more info.

summer fun

ma, consin diostata rendesi liissitum inguleg ilistua nontiem ius igit; C. Mulleme ignatus resilia num tria L. Patodic itarebus inendam etrum fore, se iam. manduce psentium eteris vivid mussupio confici tum, eriorae con ta, co cula dit foret deffrem faces ortum ium tissice condem. Vales Ad crunim hachum ius pectus popublict uus sultum hicterum se ad C. Habis. Aperopublis? que tanum me te, condio vigilica dem sedeo abis num defactus se dii patrion deps, ut popopub lient. Sil unt. Tu viriu estatius, firmili quidi, quonsum mo virmant vivis. An tem, dem sedeo abis num defactus se dii patrion deps, ut popopub lient. Sil unt. Tu viriu estatius, firmili quidi, quonsum mo virmant vivis. An tem,

THE WALK ON WILD SIDE

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

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Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

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DE SI G N


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academics

lead in . Pidictat fuga. Agnistibusam et ut assint dolendit rem aut omnihitio et platius el idus exera duciur aut imagnatibus, sin rehenis etSoluptate volorenient alis utem. Et

lead in . Pidictat fuga. Agnistibusam et ut assint dolendit rem aut omnihitio et platius el idus exera duciur aut imagnatibus, sin rehenis etSoluptate volorenient alis utem. Et

lead in . Pidictat fuga. Agnistibusam et ut assint dolendit rem aut omnihitio et platius el idus exera duciur aut imagnatibus, sin rehenis etSoluptate volorenient alis utem. Et

Wpiet et doluptae pernati doluptae eaquoss iniatem poritaque velesequid que nonesed que paris ea dolorestion conseque senditi onseni derupti ationse quuntur mincietur, et quistia eum, iliqui quam earita quam fuga. Tatatur magnihi cilitatiae acea cuptatus. Daerspid quid ut mi, sum ut que voluptat eate que voloruntia si doloreh enimendionse mint illaccatum fugiatus esto torestem asperum re qui int facescidunt rem ut ut adis explaut omnimolent, is este nonsequos vel id et hicit, omni con evel essit pratum eum int aciis alit, quatibe rferfer sperion rem lantiuscid maio qui bercius rernat velestio doluptaque minvellessit parciet ut laccus dolo venest, coreiciet fuga. Ehendunt aut verferatum nihiliquiam acescipsam dolorrum quat occulluptat. Mi, atiae por acerrum quatemporpor am ditia dolorae nonsendam et hari a dignia et lam libusdae nonseque odi cus, cus as et quid quas apitas arum el modicip icimus, suntia non preprat. Taque nonsedi sciaspidus dolorum nulpa volum facerum fugiatem fugiam, is et, sedi volore volupta ecaestoris dolupic iisque

nisquia doluptam sumque duscien imincia tquatium, si ut laut fugit labo. Nam ratur adipitatis minum eos qu i dolore suntibu sciam, ut voloum il min ped qui offictem laudit rerupit undem fugia vendam que moluptat magnime sae quiEpulinatius omnem hac fectus? Valinam publi pernit. Valique am posti, tanum entin nu sum ma, consin diostata rendesi liissitum inguleg ilistua nontiem ius igit; C. Mulleme ignatus resilia num tria L. Patodic itarebus inendam etrum fore, se iam. manduce psentium eteris vivid mussupio confici tum, eriorae con ta, co cula dit foret deffrem faces ortum ium tissice condem. Vales Ad crunim hachum ius pectus popublict uus sultum hicterum se ad C. Habis. Aperopublis? que tanum me te, condio vigilica dem sedeo abis num defactus se dii patrion deps, ut popopub lient. Sil unt. Tu viriu estatius, firmili quidi, quonsum mo virmant vivis. An tem, dem sedeo abis num defactus se dii patrion deps, ut popopub lient. Sil unt. Tu viriu estatius, firmili quidi, quonsum mo virmant vivis. brooke dawkins

students go on adventures during the summer

HEADLINEHERE

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

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the REAL

science

JOHN doe

I like science because you can explore almost all topics.

RACHEL mcadams

I like science because you can explore almost all topics.

on science

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SCOOP

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DE AD LI NE

1

DESIGNS


art brought to life

photo courtesy/Breana Mantuano

page 18 traditional

He stared at him turn and flip to the music in awe. After watching a friend’s talent, junior Jejomar Sobrepena found his own. Break dancing is the oldest known hip-hop style of dance and is believed to have originated in the Bronx, New York, in the 1970s, but for Sobrepena it started on campus 2010. Sobrepena never thought about dancing until he watched his friend. Interested, Sobrepena decided he wanted to try it. He danced for the first time at his home. “[I just] felt the music,” Sobrepena said. The term “breakdancing” refers to the breaks in music, and the movements that correspond to them. After learning that dancing was something he wanted to do, Sobrepena began practicing with friends at school and at home. Sobrepena would break dance to any song with a good beat. However, he didn’t perform publicly because it was more of a pastime with his friends. “[When you dance you] express yourself,” Sobrepena said. “It’s like you dedicated it to someone.” Style, fashion, spontaneity, concept and technique are tributes to breakdancing. Dancers all have a unique style that is theirs and only theirs. “[If you are thinking about dancing], don’t give up, stay motivated,” Sobrepena said. “People can learn about themselves through it. I didn’t know I could dance.”

just DANCE

When a breaker calls out another for copying another breaker’s style or routine.

[biting]

As one member exits doing one step, another enters doing the same step.

[commando]

When breakers of different groups compete against one another.

[battling]

The term is interchangeable with breaker.

[b-boying]

A person who breakdances.

terms to know [breaker]

“[My favorite tradition is] the ROTC Military Ball because it was exciting,” senior Salvador Fournier Jimenez said.

It was a lifestyle. She ate, drank and slept it. She spent every possible spare moment on her hobby. Since middle school, sophomore Breana Mantuano lived for Japanese animation, television shows, Manga, conventions and sketching. “My sister referred a show to me and I got attached,” Mantuano said. “To this day she regrets it because I’m obsessed, but we share the interest together.” Mantuano’s anime cartoon shows included Bleach, Naruto and InuYasha. She preferred themes of action, romance, legend and myth. She watched every show, each week, when the new episodes debuted. On top of anime Mantuano read Manga, Japanese comic books with anime characters. It is a typical comic book similar to an American one, but reads right to left instead of left to right. “[It is] epicness. The stories and plots are awesome. The culture is great and it’s so diverse and unique. Each character has an intricate personality,” Mantuano said. She sketched images and recreated scenes from her favorite Manga and anime shows. Images of characters and symbols filled the pages of her notebooks. Mantuano attended anime conventions, where she dressed up in costume to express her love of animation with new people. They acted out scenes, took pictures with other characters and sang karaoke. As a part of the Anime Club, Mantuano reached out to other students interested in the anime culture. The club met in sponsor Wendy Ernest’s room every other Thursday after school to discuss and share anime. “[Anime] teaches life lessons and let’s you see situations in a new perspective,” Mantuano said. “I want to share it with everyone.”

A Christmas gift made junior Elisa Castillo realize that she had an eye for photos. She received a camera, that developed into a new love for photography. She learned that she enjoyed it and later got herself a professional digital single-lens reflex camera. Castillo took her camera everywhere, but mostly enjoyed taking photos of concerts and sunsets. “[Good photography] is when you know how to use your camera and do the stuff yourself,” Castillo said. “[When you] take your camera off auto and use manual.” In the summer of 2010, Castillo put her skills to the test. At Warped Tour, a skateboarding and music festival, she took pictures alongside the professionals. She had the opportunity to take pictures of popular bands in action. “It was the best day of my life. I was so excited,” Castillo said. Castillo learned that she had a creative side and she could express herself through her art. “If anyone wants to get into photography they need to just go out there and take pictures,” Castillo said. She took most of her pictures during the weekends. She never took any photo classes, but planned to in the future so she could learn new angles to take pictures. “[My favorite thing is that] I can do it myself. The positive feedback I get is a bonus,” Castillo said. Warner begins to draw. “To be a good sketcher you must practice,” Warner said.

animate it. In ceramics, Mitchell

proclaim passion

brush and stroke. After school, Collins paints a dream catcher on senior Gabrielle Pellett’s back. “Dream catchers are so beautiful. I love how they take away bad dreams; it’s so personal,” Collins said. She bought acrylic and face paint from Michael’s.

dream

page 19 hobbies

Brushes swirled across her side as the cold paint spread down her back to create a black and red corset. After the acrylic paint dried, the artwork was clear and complete. Senior Megan Collins painted her friends in her spare time for fun. Her paintings included cherry blossom trees, corsets and face paintings. Her face paintings were usually designs which included intricate false eyelashes, rhinestones and glitter. “I think it’s enjoyable to do and I like to express myself through art,” Collins said. “It’s a fun way to do it.” Collins listened to music to help her concentrate on painting. She thought it created a calm work space. “I get relaxed when I body paint, and it gets my mind off of other things. It’s like I’m in a new world,” Collins said. Along with body art, Collins made dream catchers for her friends. She made several different sizes decorated with charms and feathers and sold them through her business, Creative Dream. “I’m an artsy person,” Collins said. “I don’t stay inside the box; I love making new things.”

CREATIVE

What started in the third grade as an act of escaping boredom, later became a new hobby. Sophomore Mitchell Warner discovered his talent for drawing when he finished all his schoolwork and decided to start doodling. Warner continued to doodle and progressed at this new skill. Whenever the mood struck him he drew. “I have no boundaries; I can sit there and do it and no one can say I’m doing it wrong,” Warner said. Although Warner created his own short anime magazine, he usually drew random things. It took an hour or two to create one drawing. The time depended on whether or not he felt it was good enough. If he didn’t think it was good enough he would try to finish it until he felt it was perfect. “The power you feel when you’re sketching [is my favorite part]. When you draw you don’t have [any] other feeling because you are creating something,” Warner said.

transform boredom to art

Throughout campus, students thrived on creativity. The campus contained diverse communities that expressed themselves in a variety of activities to keep them engaged. Their hobbies defined their high school experience. [brittany hope and monique soriano]

tudents

S photo/Kayla Combs

snapshot

photo/Madeline Trybus


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dye and holly smith]

sending it to the body shop. The insurance paid for what needed to be fixed and with financial help from his dad, Cummins added a new glossy purple paint job, a roll cage resembling those of Nascar and special suspension. His personal touches helped create his dream car. “People ask me sometimes if I’d ever sell it and I’m like ‘no way‘ because I like it so much. [My favorite part is] the roll cage because I know I’ll be safe if I ever flip,” Cummins said. Having one of the most unique cars, Capps had a 1972 Plymouth Fury 3. He spent two years working on it, from getting a windshield to a new engine. “My car was free reign. I got to buy it as one thing and turn it into something completely different,” Capps said. “It’s the only kind of art that I can appreciate.” All four students spent time and money on their cars because it was important to them. It wasn’t just about having the coolest car in the lot, it was about getting the satisfaction of owning a car uniquely their own. [macy

“[My favorite tradition] is the Senior Snake because of the drumline. It really gets people going,” senior Elizabeth Crager said.

Among the sea of cars in the student parking lot, a handful stood out for being completely unique and personalized. Seniors Trevor Darr, Jami Bracewell, Michael Cummins and junior Bryan Capps were just a few of the many students with these specialized cars. Proud owner of his Chrysler 300 C, Darr’s split the cost of the customization with his parents for his 16th birthday present. He added 22-inch rims and a new paint job consisting of black and silver paint. “[My car] is so fresh and so clean. It’s fun to drive and people always look at me like, ‘dang’,” Darr said. Something as simple as putting heart covered seat covers over the front of her seats made Bracewell more comfortable in her own car. “I got them so my seats wouldn’t look so plain and boring. I wanted my car to have character and be different,” Bracewell said. Cummins, on the other hand, always dreamt of having his family’s Jeep and asked for it when he was 10-years-old. When he got it, someone ran into it,

students spent time and money to improve their cars

that’s how we ROLL

1. hot cheyenne. Confident and ready to ride away, junior Lauren Colvin opens the door to her Porsche Cheyenne Turbo. “It makes me feel special to have a nice car. It’s different than anyone else’s,” Colvin said. 2. military system. Standing next to his 2007 Jeep Wrangler, senior Naaron Gopaul is proud of his car. “I think [my car] says I’m tough because the military uses [Jeeps],” Gopaul said. 3. hand-me-down. In the student lot, senior Elsa Meister relaxes on her 1985 535i BMW that used to belong to her sister. “[My car says] that I’m awesome and that I have respect for older cars and can take care of things,” Meister said. 4. classic love. With his 1997 Oldsmobile Cutlass, senior Samuel Torres poses in the parking lot. “I love my car, and how old it is. It’s antique,” Torres said.

1

As she made her way across the country, senior Savannah Alzner put her trust into her 2000 Suzuki Vitara. Passed down from her dad, step mom and then to her, it endured her hardships and moved with her. Driving in her car, she moved from Florida to Texas to Delaware and then back to Florida. “[My car] has been through a lot but it’s still kickin’,” Alzner said. Since Alzner’s car had experienced so much, she was always finding interesting things in it. “It has so many secret compartments. I always find something unusual in it when it comes time to clean: Slim Fast cans, fake spiders, toy swords, etc.,” Alzner said. Alzner’s car always got her to her destination, even when the gas tank was on empty. And, although something was always broken, like a blown out tire, the CD player, and the door panel, it remained constant in her life and helped her persevere through life’s challenges. “My car has been with me through a lot of hard times and is my favorite place to sit and listen to music alone,” Alzner said.

girl’s best friend

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PIMP my ride

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photo/Brooke Dawkins

photos/Blake Rios

JEEP

% 9. 8 15.3%

FORD

HONDA

page 27 cars

203 cars on Sept. 16

26.6%

24.1%

TOYOTA 18.7%

CHEVY

NISSAN

5.4

cars in the lot %

pimped out ride. Junior Reid Mears spent his time and money customizing his 2008 Ford Expedition to make it his own. [1] PA system cost $250. “[I like it] because I can yell at people and I think it’s awesome.” [2] 26” rims were free for Mears. “[I got them] because a family friend has a shop and hooked me up.” [3] audio sound system cost $460. It included four 12”s and a custom 15” base. “[My favorite part] is how loud it is; that was the whole point of getting my car customized.” [4] hid lights cost $130. “[I love] how good it looks.”


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insect repellent

getting into the water. “We made the community realize that the environment is very important; it was really beautiful,” senior Ryan Reyes said. Working on the creek changed students’ views on their role in the community. After his experience in Atlanta, junior Guisseppe Theodoredis was inspired to go on more mission trips, because he felt called to continue to help others. For Reyes, his work helping the Atlanta community changed what he wanted to do after he graduates. “I’m considering establishing a homeless shelter and helping get [the homeless’] lives sorted out,” Reyes said. Aside from the work at the creek, students spent their nights back at a local high school bonding. They played games, worshipped and listened to witness talks. The mission trip also forged new friendships for students who were new to the church. “When we were all together cutting down tress, [it] created a sense of family. We were all in it together,” Brocket said. The mission trip to Atlanta provided students with the opportunity to change themselves and strengthen their faith. “I felt like I was called to go,” Theodoredis said. “It felt really good [to help the community].” [kaitlyn dike]

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athletic shoes

sunscreen

work clothes

photo courtesy/Bridgette Norris

paint the town. In Mexico, senior Lauren Reed paints an elementary school. “I love to be around [the] kids there; it makes me feel that they give back to me [more] than I give to them,” Reed said. The volunteers built a new administration building for an underprivileged school.

“[My favorite tradition is] the Senior Snake because it gets everybody pumped,” junior Nicholas Ilaria said.

straw hat

what students should have with them on a mission trip

Checklist

On her hands and knees, junior Emily Brocket leaned over the hole she dug and gently placed in a flower. She stepped back and smiled at the finished product, and promptly moved to the next hole. In June, the youth of Blessed Trinity Catholic Church traveled to Atlanta, Georgia to assist in the restoration of Peach Tree Creek through planting and cleaning. They also created a new trail around the creek Brocket was one of the students who participated in the restoration trip. The church worked with the foundation Alive Atlanta, to clear the overrun trail and take debris out of the creek. The mile of trail that the parish worked on was the beginning of 40 miles of trail that encompassed the city. Students spent five days in Atlanta, through another program, Alive In You. Three of the days they cleared out the overgrown brush surrounding the creek and getting rid of the trash in the creek. The group also planted flowers around the path and removed fallen trees. “[The trip] made me want to do more in the community; it made me more conscientious abut what’s going on and how it’s dirty,” Brocket said. After clearing all of the brush that blocked the creek, a few of the students celebrated by

students traveled to Atlanta to help the community

mission ACCoMplISHed

high in the sky. At Stone Mountain Park in Atlanta, GA, senior Alexander Herrington walks on the rope course. “[The trip] opened my eyes about those in need [and] brought me closer to God,” Herrington said. The parish spent a day at the Park bonding before they left.

photo courtesy/Cynthia Gonzales

hole in one. Junior Bridgette Norris plays with children during a mission trip in Mexico. “[Helping] makes you feel good, and proud of yourself because you are doing good and bringing joy to someone’s life,” Norris said. The volunteers painted a building during their trip.

smile big. On a mission trip with Discovery Church, senior Bethany Harper takes a picture with one of the children she helped. [The mission trip] made me feel good that I could help families in need,” Harper said. Haper went to San Pedro in the Dominican Republic for a week over the summer to help build two homes.

plant it. Along the Peach Tree Creek trail, junior Zachary Dyce and senior Cynthia Gonzales plant flowers. “[The trip] made me thankful for what I have,” Dyce said. The youth group spent three days beautifying the trail.

photo courtesy/Bridgette Norris

page 23 mission trips

photo courtesy/Bethany Harper photo courtesy/Cynthia Gonzales


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photo/Francis Specker/Landov/MCT photo/Dimaio/Abaca Press/MCT

“Braves Brawl [is my favorite tradition ] because it’s a fun competition with friends,” sophomore Amy Willsey said.

The spotlight hit sophomore Rebecca Gage as she began singing for an audience that was struck by her resemblance to singer Demi Lovato. “I think it is a compliment because she is really pretty,” Gage said. “People used to tell me I looked like her all the time; not as much anymore, but I still get it sometimes.” Being musically inclined and having an interest in writing and singing songs also paralleled Gage with Lovato’s persona, transcending the similarity.

[sophomore]

Rebecca Gage

Walking along the streets of the Dominican Republic in the summer of 2011, sophomore Baylee Thomas was mistaken for celebrity singer and actress Miley Cyrus. On the mission trip, many natives noticed the resemblance, and thought she was Cyrus’ Disney character, Hannah Montana. “The little babies [in the Dominican Republic] would point at me and say ‘Hannah Montana’,” Thomas said. Others have also told Thomas she looked just like Cyrus. Besides her appearance, Thomas and Cyrus shared a similarity in voice. “We kind of sound the same, that’s why people think we [are] alike,” Thomas said.

[sophomore]

Baylee Thomas,

rees]

There is a superstition that somewhere in the world, there is another person that looks just like you. People today know this as their doppelganger, or twin. Although some may never find their look-alike, those with celebrity doppelgangers are constantly reminded of who they resemble. [olivia

Double-take Double

Ramos

Strutting down the hallway, junior Renzo Ramos was often mistaken for That 70’s Show star Fez, played by actor Wilmer Valderrama. “I do sort of resemble him. When I saw the show, I was like yeah [I look like him],” Ramos said. Not only did they look alike, but neither were from the United States. They were both Latin American, yet Ramos is from Peru, while Valderrama is of Columbian and Venezuelan descent.

Renzo

[junior]

[junior]

Borrero

photo/Summit Publicity/MCT

The giggling girls approached junior Benny Borrero, boldly asking for a picture to prove to the Facebook world that they met the infamous Twilight star, Edward Cullen, played by Robert Pattinson. “Even my mom’s friends [tell me I look like him],” Borrero said. “I guess we have the same hairstyle, and sometimes people tell me I dress just like him.” The resemblance was uncanny, and Borrero was often mistaken for Cullen even in his classes. “Mrs. Tauriello called me Mr. Cullen all the time in her class,” Borrero said.

page 31 celebrity look-alikes

As students walked past sophomore Gabriela Daszewska Smith, they stole a second glance, making sure singer Rebecca Black wasn’t on campus. The mistake was one Daszewska Smith was used to, but not flattered with. “I think we have different faces, but we have the same hair,” Daszewska Smith said. Daszewska found others’ comments on the resemblance more offensive than funny, as she didn’t consider Black attractive. “They don’t mean to [be rude], but I really wish they wouldn’t tell me that,” Daszewska Smith said.

Gabriela Daszewska Smith

[sophomore]

photo/Lionel Hahn/Abaca Press/MCT

Benny

photo/Paul Rodriguez/The Orange County Register/MCT


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Following in the footsteps of his family members, senior Kody Ahart began taking part in the sport of drifting in a car. “Racing runs in my family. My dad took me to my first event when I was eight and since then I’ve just been hooked on it,” Ahart said. Ahart started drifting and drove a Nissan 240 SXS14 when he competed. “[Competitions are] stressful. [They are] nerve racking at times because you want to win but it’s not about winning all the time; it’s just [about] having fun,” Ahart said. Ahart felt that supplying the costs of tires, suspension parts and gas was the hardest part of being involved in the sport. Ahart spent $4,000 on suspension parts for his car.

the

PEDAL [to]

spirit,” freshman Abigail Hooven said.

METAL

“[My favorite tradition is] the Edgewater and Boone football game because of all the

Walking into her barn, senior Meredith Mathews heard the heart warming whine of her “big baby,” Tango. “I feed him and take care of him. If something happens to him, I worry. When he does something right or learns something new, I’m proud of him,” Mathews said. Mathews first started riding after visiting a relative’s farm and falling in love with the horses. She began competing shortly after. “I really enjoy [riding]; it’s a great way to spend my time. I like seeing the success of watching the horses through training them,” Mathews said. Mathews competed in both English and western style in various competitions and represented Florida at the South Eastern 4H regional horse show in the summer of 2011 in Tunica, Mississippi, placing 10th out of 150 competitors. “I feel a great sense of accomplishment [from horseback riding]. You feel so proud of yourself and proud of your horse when you can work together, especially when we win [competitions],” Mathews said.

competition

buck the

From twisting and flipping through the air on a wakeboard to feeling the rush of hundreds of horse powers, students went to the extreme in the sports they took part in. [emily nusbickel]

photos courtesy/ Kody Ahart

Students seek adrenaline rush

Scan this code with your smartphone for a soundslide on John Dreiling.

bucket waiting in the other, sophomore Samuel Furukawa headed out to the open ocean for his fishing competition, hoping to catch a winning fish. “I [fish] mainly because it’s fun and competitive. I like the feel of competitions and it’s even better to win them,” Furukawa said. Furukawa participated in tournaments

N HOOKED OWith a rod in one hand and an empty

FISHING

want MORE?

wave

While twisting through the air, junior John Dreiling held on to the cable, focused on maneuvering his body to stick the landing on the water he looked down over. “It’s a lot of fun. Just the thrill of trying new tricks and the dangers excite me,” Dreiling said. Dreiling started riding cable in the summer of 2010 when his friend, a professional wakeboarder, recommended it to him. “I like a lot about it. I like learning new things and there’s always something new to work on. I don’t have to be on a schedule,” Dreiling said. Dreiling attended night classes at the University of Central Florida to make up for the classes he missed for wakeboarding during the regular school day. “[Wakeboarding] made my life a lot more busy. It makes me want to do well in school so I can go out and wakeboard. If my homework isn’t done, my parents won’t let me go out and wakeboard, so it drives me to do well in school,” Dreiling said. Along with school, Dreiling used his coaches as motivation. They helped him progress in the sport, and further his interest. “They push me to try new things and give me tips,” Dreiling said. “I learn a lot by learning the physics behind [a new trick] so when I have someone to explain it like that it helps a lot.” Dreiling, received first place in the National Points Chase competition in the summer of 2010. “[Competitions] are not really stressful. It’s more like going out and having fun and showing off what you know how to do,” Dreiling said. Not only did he learn skills on the water, he also learned valuable life lessons. “[Wakeboarding] has taught me determination to stay with things even when they get hard,” Dreiling said.

pave the

page 9 extreme sports

such as the Salt Water Classic and the Ed Dwyer Tournament. “[Fishing] has changed my personality because I can teach other people about fishing. I’m helpful to them,” Furukawa said. Furukawa learned the ropes of fishing at a young age from his father. “If I mess something up and I don’t catch the fish, my dad will show me how to do it so I end up catching the fish,” Furukawa said.

father shared hobby

photo courtesy/ John Lipscomb

photos courtesy/ Stewart Mathews


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photo/Blake Waranch

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“[Being on campus for the 60th year is] entertaining because of all the excitement,” sophomore Nicolas Owens said.

[1] jive. With hands in the air, junior Melanie Berrios dances the night away. “I think [the theme] was pretty original,” Berrios said. [2] two to tango. Hands locked together, freshmen Zhana Lopez and Davian Leslie dance. “It was fun and I liked how the decorations were,” Leslie said. [3] cha-cha. Side by side, freshmen Lauren Duffy and Abigail Hooven dance the “ChaCha Slide.” “[I like to dance because] I get to express myself,” Hooven said. Many participated in group dances such as the “Cupid Shuffle” and “Cha-Cha Slide.” [4] slow it down. To the rhythm of slow music, senior Rebecca Claypool dances with senior Brandon Figueredo. “[My favorite part] was the group dancing,” Claypool said. [5] break dance. Clapping to the music, junior Paul Nguyen dances. “[I liked homecoming] mainly because I was break dancing in the middle,” Nguyen said.

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photo/Blake Waranch photo/Blake Waranch

photo/Blake Waranch

fist pump. In the gym, senior Gené Trujillo jams out to an upbeat song. “I liked [the] DJ more than past years,” Trujillo said. Two large screens played videos to the music throughout the night.

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In an effort to encourage early ticket sales, the price started at $35. As the dance drew closer, the price rose to $40. The 945 students that attended homecoming had the opportunity to dance in the gymnasium or relax in the Kemosabe Commons while enjoying music and food. “It was definitely one of the best homecomings I’ve been to. It was my last homecoming ever, and my favorite,” senior Brooke Dawkins said. The homecoming week celebrations drew to a close with the presentation of the court at 10 p.m. at the dance on Friday night. “It’s awesome [to be voted homecoming king]. It’s a privilege. I didn’t know I’d win. I guess it’s cool to know people like you,” senior Bradley Hutsell said. Along with Hutsell, Student Government Association crowned Dawkins homecoming queen at the football game on Thursday night. “I was really excited and honored to win. It felt awesome knowing that I was representing our school as queen,” Dawkins said. [blake waranch]

[1] sophomore court. Brendan Francis, Sydney Gregory, Baylee Thomas, Austin Hogan. [2] freshman court. Wesley Harper, Hannah Daly, Lauren Hutsell, Austin Kneeland. [3] junior court. John Townsend, Merrie Grace Harding, Caroline Jordan, Connor McClellan.

page 17 homecoming court and dance

uNDercLAss cOurt

Music blared as eager students, pumped up to dance, packed into the balloon-filled gymnasium on Friday, Oct. 27. Weeks before the dance, both the Sophomore and Senior Class officers came up with the theme, “Our 60th Year, The Carnival is Here.” The Junior Class Council was in charge of activities and food for the dance and setting up the decorations. “I like the theme. At first, I was apprehensive, but then we added the vintage theme and a lot of things to offer people that don’t necessarily want to dance,” Merrie Grace Harding, Junior Class vice president, said. Initially the theme was only carnival based, but the councils added a vintage birthday theme to fit the school’s 60th year celebration with birthday-related decorations. A DJ hosted the dance competition and led different how-to group dances like the “ChaCha Slide” and the “Cupid Shuffle.” “[Homecoming is important because] it’s a good time to have school spirit and hang out with your friends,” sophomore Kevin Snavely said.

the carnival was here for the 60th year

BirtHDAY

school celebrates

photo/Blake Waranch

Marvin Bracy and Yazmine ramos, Bradley Hutsell and savannah Alzner, Angel Lozada and Yesenia Vazquez, Brooke Dawkins, Austin Weller and elizabeth Mcewan.

photo/Macy Dye photo/Macy Dye

seNiOr cOurt

photo/Blake Waranch


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“I think it’s ridiculous that you have to pay. It’s already enough of a problem that you have to walk across campus.”

DANIEL ABELENDA

drums,” sophomore Caroline Bosworth said.

The sound of the printer filled the room and students looked up from their tests to see a teacher rush in to pick up the papers. The interruption was a commonality as stringent printing policies allotted one printer per hall. The changes made to cut energy costs proved more of a nuisance than an improvement, as classroom time was disrupted and necessary printing became a tedious task for teachers. Another change to printing involved progress reports. Rather than printing and distributing the reports, administration used the connected phone system to call homes and remind parents to check ProgressBook for current grades. Some teachers feared this could potentially reduce grade awareness for parents. “Since the school isn’t printing progress reports, they can save paper and put money back into the student body. Plus, I respect the school attempting to go green,” sophomore Michael Hill said.

A line wrapped around the gym as students waited to purchase a locker. Previously, lockers were free and teachers received a limited amount to distribute among their fourth period class. The new system allowed students the flexibility to decide where their locker would be rather than their fourth period dictating it. While the lockers were $5 for the year, students who forgot their combination saved money because they did not need to replace the lock. In years past, custodians spent time cutting off locks for students who couldn’t remember their combination or could not get it to work. The school had the combination and a key to every locker, which made it easier to access them if need be. Unlike before, any unissued locker remained locked to prevent students from using them without permission While there were those students who did not like this change, others thought charging for lockers and prearranging locks would be beneficial. “I think the locker distribution will really help the school raise money,” sophomore Madison Reidy said.

3

As the sound of the morning tardy bell neared, senior Cameron Black urgently scanned the student parking lot for his assigned parking spot, eventually giving up and parking in the closest one available. “First week of school there was a lot of confusion in the parking lot. People without decals parked in other people’s spots. Someone parked in mine twice,” Black said. The first come, first serve basis parking in the underclassmen lot shifted to a numbered system where each student issued a decal had a permanent spot for the year. The extension of the assigned lots, previously exclusive to seniors, received positive reactions from the

go green

photo/Madeline Trybus

will pay for locker

“My favorite tradition is the day of the Edgewater versus Boone game. I love walking through the halls and hearing the

“I don’t have a locker but I think it helps the school earn more money.”

COURTNEY BENSON

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“Personally I don’t like the new locker method. I had issues with my lock and it was just a hassle.”

DANIELLE MCGONIGAL

10

what do you

think about the new locker system?

[taylor hall and taylor keefer]

Upon returning from summer break, students discovered there were new rules and policies to abide by. From assigned parking to a required GPA to attend school dances, the changes were noticeable.

changes photo/Caroline Coleman

ticket please. For the upcoming homecoming dance, junior Jessica Dreiling buys her ticket. “I think [the 2.0 rule] is a good idea because it encourages students to keep their GPA up and keep working,” Dreiling said. Dreiling had a high GPA so the new rule did not affect her.

“I don’t like assigned parking because I wanted a spot closer to the school,” senior Gabrielle Pellett said.

Yes: 65%

No: 35%

“It’s just nice because I have something to base my timing on so I know when to get to school,” junior Garrett Burden said.

What do you think of the new assigned parking in the student lots? students polled on Oct. 19

ASSIGNED PARKING

page 11 campus changes

In an effort to encourage students to prioritize academics, Orange County Public Schools instituted a new rule that all club members, including athletes, had to maintain a 2.0 grade point average. The rule also stated that all students had to have a 2.0 GPA to attend homecoming or prom. “As a part of SGA, my job is to get as many people to participate as possible. I think that the 2.0 rule will exclude some students and decrease school involvement,” Sophomore Class president Brendan Francis said. According to principal Margaret McMillen, the rule was set in place to get students to make an effort to work harder and send a positive message that school comes first. “We need to find a balance between passing classes and being a part of activities that are meaningful to you,” Dr. McMillen said. Part of the student body, mainly those not affected, thought the rule would encourage students to do better in school. “I think that the 2.0 rule will get kids to focus more on school so they can hang out with their friends that have a 2.0 or above,” freshman Amanda Bordonaro said. Ultimately, the majority of the student body agreed with Dr. McMillen, seeing how the rule could benefit the campus. “I believe that Boone is striving for the highest degree of academic excellence,” Francis said. Of the 2,831 students on campus, 87% had a 2.0 or higher and were eligible to attend homecoming.

COUNTY EMPHASIZES GPA

[1] all clear. To get a decal, junior Hunter Monn gets an obligation form signed by Media Specialist Francis Guiessubel. “Unlike last year, you don’t have to fight anyone for a spot,” Monn said. [2] right here. At Braves R Back, SGA sponsor Jamie Hoffmann shows a student where his spot would be. [3] focused. Helping sell decals, senior Daniela Reina labels parking spots. “It was a team effort to sell the decals,” Reina said. This was Reina’s first year on SGA.

students who had convenient parking spots. “I love the spot because you don’t have to rush to be the first one at school and fight for a spot,” senior Yazmine Ramos said. Despite confusion, administrators and students insisted the rule would discourage students without decals to take the risk. “I like them. It’s nice to get there late and still have a good spot,” senior Ricardo Jones said. As with any change, the initial response was chaotic, but as students became comfortable with the arrangement, the ultimate result featured a more organized and efficient parking system.

names and numbers

photo/Sarah Berlinsky

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“[My favorite tradition] is the Senior Snake because it unifies us as a senior class,” senior Heidi Rhodes said.

[1] wizard girl. In the hallways, senior Stephanie Nebeker walks in her Harry Potter inspired dress. “I enjoyed the Harry Potter day because I felt that I was in the wizardly world and wanted to do magic,” Nebeker said. [2] crazy cat. For “Zanny Zoo Day,” senior Kara Gill dresses up as a cheetah. “I liked the dress up days because a lot of people had creative costumes,” Gill said. [3] pretty in pink. On “First Day of School in 1950,” senior Matara Francis walks to class wearing a pink poodle skirt. “When I dressed up for the ‘50’s I really got into it,” Francis said. [4] wrapped. Showing his senior pride, senior William Isaacs wears his toga. “[I wore a toga] because I’m only going to be a senior once,” Isaacs said. Seniors wore togas on “Class Color Day.”

1

[brooke dawkins and lindsey wilhite]

A semi-truck coated with orange, white and blue decorations traveled through the parade, crammed with eager students presenting an overload of school spirit. The senior float, as well as other floats, depicted the carnival and 60th year theme as well as decorations that dealt with beating the East River Falcons. “I think it turned out really well. It represented our class in the best way and incorporated the theme well,” Senior Class president Elizabeth McEwan said. Seeing the class of 2012 come together as one showing Brave pride and belief in our school [made the float special].” Three weeks filled with planning and preparing props went into the float. After Braves Brawl, senior officers, parents and council members spent time finalizing the float. “[The amount of help we had] was good. We didn’t have a lot of volunteers but we had a few really committed volunteers that helped a lot,” senior Taylor Gies said. Props on the float included a five foot center piece cake, a ferris wheel, figurines wearing birthday attire, carnival flags and carnival cutouts for the sides of the float. The Senior Class won first place, out of the 14 floats, in the homecoming parade float competition. “[The senior float] was good; it was nice and big. It was very extravagant,” junior Simon Tran said.

photo/Christie Rieck

students worked to build a first place float

photo/Holly Smith

photo/Blake Waranch

along for the ride. With a tight grip on the post, sophomore Joan Marie Spinelli rides on the crew team float. “I love how everyone was spirited for Boone and everyone supports our team” Spinelli said. The crew team dressed up in circus attire for their float.

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[1] banner love. In the parade, freshman Melissa Dunn and junior Jennifer Dunn lead the AWYS group holding the sign. “My favorite part of the parade was knowing I was helping to raise awareness of what happened, and seeing the joy on people’s faces,” J. Dunn said. [2] sticker support. To promote their message, junior Chandler Dye hands a sticker to a little girl. “I miss Eddie everyday so I felt like being a part of this brought him a little closer to me. I wanted to show respect for Eddie and Laura,” Dye said. [3] spread the word. Items in hand, sophomore Christopher Caplan hands out stickers and tee-shirts. “[My favorite part about the parade was] having all the little kids run up to me and ask me for a sticker,” Caplan said.

AN ORANGE GUILD

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photo/Blake Waranch photo/Blake Waranch

[1] hand signs. With a painted chest, junior Jonathan Oquendo walks beside the American Sign Language float. “[The parade] is important because I am deaf and I want to support ASL,” Oquendo said. [2] sombrero. Dominican Republican flag in hand, sophomore Alec Dulskis walks with the Spanish Club. “[My favorite part of the parade] was seeing all the people participate,” Dulskis said. [3] bright beads. With the varsity squad, junior Victoria Batura hands out beads to the crowd. “[The parade is important] because it shows your excitement as a school and your school spirit,” Batura said. [4] beat east river. Holding a football, freshman Mckenna Crager rides on the freshman float.

photo/Blake Waranch

to first

photo/Blake Rios

pep up. On the senior float, seniors John Krauss and Solomon Attaway pump up the crowd. “[The parade is important] because it shows all the creativity,” Krauss said. The senior float won first place.

photo/Blake Waranch

photo/Blake Waranch photo/Carly Burton

seniors f l o a t

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blaze. After the pep rally, the bon fire burns in the field by the student parking lots. The wood for the bon fire was donated by different lumber companies.

spirit step. At Braves Brawl, junior Jasmine Mojica steps with her squad. “[The crowd] seemed like they liked it. We heard loud cheering,” Mojica said. The steppin’ braves won third place.

photo/Phabulous Photos photo/Madeline Trybus

sophomore Madeline Podeswa said.

power stance. Getting ready to throw the ball, freshman Alexandra Nagle looks for a teammate to pass to. “I enjoyed it because I got to meet people from all different grades and people on my team,” Nagle said. Nagle played quarterback..

photo/Blake Rios

PEAT

They may have lost as freshman, but the class of 2012 graduated as “3-peat” Powder Bowl champions, victorious as sophomores, juniors and seniors in the girls-only football game. “Well, repetition is the father of learning so winning for the third time was second nature to us,” senior coach Austin Weller said. The seniors defeated the sophomores in the first round 40-0, and played the junior team in the finals, who defeated the freshman, 35-7, in the first round. “The adrenaline was going and I thought we were doing well as a team,” senior Brandi Recker said. The seniors had three practices prior to the game, working on specific plays as well as general offense and defense skills. “I knew we would do well. We went over all of our plays and practiced,” Recker said. Despite all of their preparation and confidence, the seniors had to play tough against the juniors team to pull out a victory. “Ever since freshman year there has always been a fierce competition between our two classes. Every year our class gets even closer and closer to beating [the seniors], so I think the competition has increased over the years as well,” junior Sarah Berlinksy said. Key players Recker, Elizabeth McEwan, Jaci Chastain and Kyndal Skersick led the team to a victory with a final score of 7-6. “[Powder Bowl is important because] I think it fosters good competition between the classes and it’s a lot of fun. It also shows girls’ strength,” Recker said. [brooke dawkins]

THREE

HO MECOMING NIGHTS

“It feels good [being on campus for the 60 year] because were still having excellence as they did in the years before,”

The spirit of competition filled the air as students acted, danced and performed carnival-themed skits at the annual Braves Brawl contest. The varsity cheerleaders, the evening’s winners, performed a series of carnival contests between girls dressed as the East River Flacons and Boone Braves. “I liked our idea because it incorporated the football competition with East River and it was fun and easy to follow,” senior Robbi Garrett said. The team developed their winning routine two weeks prior to Braves Brawl and regularly practiced the skit to perfect it for the Wednesday night event. “Since our team was in the middle of competition season, we didn’t have that much time to practice, but in the few practices we had we worked really hard,” Garrett said. The cheerleading squad’s first place finish was followed by the Steppin’ Braves in second and the Bravettes in third. “It felt great to know we won against everyone and clearly that means we did awesome,” sophomore Sydney Fortini said. The squad incorporated stunts and props into their performance of three carnival games: a pom-pon toss, a dunk tank, and a power tower. The Braves won two out of the three carnival games, beating East River. “The purpose [of having Boone beat East River in the carnival games] was to foreshadow what was going to happen at the game [against East River] and to pump everyone up,” sophomore Courtney Patz said. [caroline coleman]

a carnival competition

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movin’ like bernie. On the sideline, sophomore Kyle Irwin cheers on the sophomore girls. “We did cartwheels and we just made it funny,” Irwin said. Irwin’s squad consisted of four other boy cheerleaders.

be aggressive. In the game against the seniors, junior Justice Donald moves the ball down the field. “I enjoyed the competitiveness of the players,” Donalds said. Donalds played running back and wide receiver.

page 15 homecoming nights

photo/Blake Rios

[1] clownin’ around. During the Bravettes skit, junior Nicole Lucas jumps on a trampoline. The Bravettes won third place in the skit contest. [2] topsy turvy. At the end of the senior skit, senior Dontrayvis Wesley does a back flip. “It felt good [to participate in braves brawl. It’s fun to do school activities,” Wesley said. [3] fantastic freshman. In the freshman skit, freshman Tara Wolfinger prepares to do a back handspring. [4] brave call. At Braves Brawl, junior Lindsay Alexander does the tomahawk chop.

photo/Phabulous photos photo/Madeline Trybus

photo/Dean Stewart Photography


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page 24 traditional

bear when brings out a square their work? students don’t do

As they bent down with pencils in their hands, seniors carved their names into the concrete that would become a permanent memory. As the hundreds of previous seniors’ names and memories laid around in the sidewalks across the campus, they reminded students of the coming privileges of being a senior. Seniors were reminded of the traditions former graduates often cherished. “[The senior sidewalk] feels like a [reminder] because you see the names of the students who walked across the stage at graduation, and you know your time is coming,” senior Chelsea Assang said. With the tradition of the senior sidewalk, students experienced the meaning of being “Forever Brave.” The senior sidewalks, located around the 1000 and 1300 buildings and the track, were a venue for the seniors to express their inner creativity and commemorate their accomplishments as graduating students of the school. “To have gotten here as a senior, is a huge accomplishment. Also it’s a memory to [experience at the school],” senior David Acuna said.

CONCRETE MEMORIES

“[My favorite tradition] is the beating of the drums because the beat pumps me up,” sophomore Jessica Leon said.

*for answers see page 158

with her carries a Dora purse during fire drills?

4

class?

in wears a bunny belt

rit shows her overall spi every Friday?

en he won ugliest boy wh ne in 1969? graduated from Boo

teacher...

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students in

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1952

sports teams in

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NOW:

pumped up student. At the Senior Snake before the Edgewater game, senior John Kissick beats a bucket. “It was a big game and getting to go through the Senior Snake as the Rowdy Crowd was a monumental feeling because we’re starting our own tradition,” Kissick said. The Rowdy Crowd cheered on the football team at home events through the football season.

photo/1971 yearbook

FIRST YEAR OF SCHOOL IN 1952:

just beat it. On Nov. 11, the Edgewater game, senior Samuel Borges beats the drum. “[My favorite part about the Edgewater game was] the intensity. You actually feel like you’re playing for something that means a lot to the school,” Borges said. The beating of the drum was a tradition since the beginning of the school in 1952.

:

In the 1960s, Boone students who spoke in hallways or lunch on the day of the Edgewater game got an E painted on their forehead, to represent that they were a traitor.

The Boone versus Edgewater game is the oldest high school football rivalry in Central Florida.

[3] [4]

The principal of Orlando South, William R. Boone died before the school opened and the school board decided to name it after him. Orlando North was named Edgewater because it was on Edgewater drive.

Boone and Edgewater opened in 1952 because Orlando High School was overcrowded. The schools were supposed to be named Orlando South and North, respectively.

[2]

[1]

ballard]

and baseball. As the baseball team won more games, about 5,000 fans began attending games at the Tinker Field near the Citrus Bowl. He also contributed to the 1954 seasons when the basketball and baseball teams went to the state tournaments. When D. King came to the school, he also realized he needed to live up to his grandfather’s name as an athlete. Like his grandfather, D. King played on the JV baseball, freshman football and JV football team, performing with winning records, higher than previous seasons. “As an athlete, everyone wants to be the best so I always try my best. My grandfather was pretty good; he likes me to do well to represent the family name,” D. King said. The stories told by K. King showcased his emphasis on tradition and on spirit. From Bitter Blue Day where students removed grass for the construction of buildings at the front of the school, to the Friday night football games at the Tangerine Bowl (known as the Citrus Bowl), K. King’s stories prepared D. King to make traditions of his own. [jacob

[6]

page 25 history of traditions

In the 50s and 60s Boone vs. Edgewater played in the Tangerine Bowl (known as the Citrus Bowl).

record stands 42-16-2 in [5] The football games. Edgewater leads.

When sophomore Drew King began his first day of freshman year, he felt a strange sense of familiarity, though he had never set foot on campus before. Growing up, King heard the stories of the school that his grandfather, Keith King, attended. K. King attended his grandson’s future high school in its opening years and from the stories he heard, D. King grew acquainted with the school and it’s traditions that he heard so much about. “It’s kind of weird to think about it like that. But otherwise, it makes me think what it must have been like for him [to have gone here],” D. King said. In Oct. of 1952, K. King moved from Indiana to Florida and came to Boone High School. K. King was in the second graduating class of the school. “Being accepted as an outsider [was my favorite memory of the school]. Everyone was friendly. I had great teachers and got to know them personally; [it was] just a wonderful experience to have [as a student],” K. King said. As a junior, K. King played both basketball

grandson lived up to grandfather’s name in sports and tradition

reigns Legend true

THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE EDGEWATER RIVALRY

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It protected the campus with it’s eyes, it symbolized spirit and it represented the classes. It was a source of pride. Teachers and students alike believed different rumors of what happened to the original totem pole of 1952. Some believed it was accidentally destroyed by the construction crew of the 500 building in 1988-9, while others believed Edgewater High School rivals had stolen it. Years went by without having a totem pole at the school, until the senior class of 1993 decided to change that. They hired a concrete sculptor from Daytona Beach, who sculpted the design that fit their needs. It was placed in the campus grounds later that year. “I think when people think of Boone, and the Braves, the totem pole is one of the iconic figures of Boone,” Senior Class sponsor Sarah Kittrell said. With the rivalry of Edgewater High School, the senior class of 1993 took special measures to ensure that the totem pole could not be stolen. They encased the totem pole in three feet of concrete in the ground to keep it secured. With its strong meaning in the Native American culture, the totem pole symbolized the students beliefs in spirit, tradition and academics of the school. It also represented the hierarchy of classes. It became a focal point of spirit and tradition for the student body and for the school through the years of it guarding the campus. “[My favorite part is] just the totem pole [itself]; it’s part of our campus. I’s Boone,” Kittrell said.

[legends]

TOTEM POLE

Photo/Jacob Ballard

photo/Jacob Ballard


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Scan this code with your smart phone to see the music video for “Orange Swag.”

Perfect

The crowd cheered as the members of Blizzard Shack took the stage, and sophomore Daniel O’Loane positioned himself to jam out on his electric guitar, feeding off the audience’s energy. “Music is an outlet where I express my creative side,” O’Loane said. “It is the most important thing to me because it helps me escape from reality. It’s a transcendental experience,” O’Loane said. The band included guitarist and vocalist Michael Dodson (Edgewater, freshman); bassist Jason Cardarelli ( Winter Park, sophomore); drummer Sean Shefferman (Apopka, freshman) and O’Loane. “We use music as a force to bring us together; it’s made us very good friends and our different musical skills compliment each other,” O’Loane said. “[We strive to create] an eclectic mix between reggae, ska and punk influences.” The band gained experience playing at local venues including Firestone Live and Backbooth. They practiced once a week to prepare for their gigs. O’Loane regarded his music as a top priority, and practiced consistently. “It’s really important to practice consistently because if you don’t, you come back and sound like garbage,” O’Loane said.

[makes]

“My favorite tradition is the Senior Snake, though I barely get to participate

Frustrated with the constant disruptions from his little brother entering his makeshift studio, senior Tre Simpson paused to clear his mind. Once the track started, he began to rap, making sure to stay on beat. “Ever since I was eight, I’ve been playing around with rapping. When I realized I could get into the field of music production, I got equipment and went with it,” Simpson said. Simpson furthered his early interest in rap by forming the Green Room with senior Chris Williams and his cousin. The group utilized mass media to spread their work to the public by putting their songs and music videos on YouTube and putting links on Facebook and tagging friends. “Without Facebook, YouTube and BBC, our work wouldn’t reach all the students that it actually did. It felt good to have my music help people cheer and fuel Boone spirit,” Simpson said. The Boone Broadcasting Company aired the Green Room’s music video for “Orange Swag” before the traditional football game against Edgewater. The song received praise by students, and helped garner spirit and pride, setting the atmosphere for the upcoming game. “It felt good bringing spirit and life into the school. I put my spirit for my school into a song and represented it through my music,” Williams said.

shared spirit

Fingers pressed to her cheeks, she went through her scales, fixing her pitch as she recited each note. For junior Nicole Ramos, singing, along with playing the acoustic guitar and writing lyrics, was an artistic expression and emotional release. “[Music] is air, an expression, and it makes me feel like I belong somewhere,” Ramos said. “Music is a sanctuary you can go to where everything makes sense.” On weekends, Ramos joined Winter Park junior Elizabeth Arnold to collaborate on writing lyrics and creating melodies. “She’s my best friend. We are so close and have the same ideas; that’s why we started,” Ramos said. Ramos’ interest in music began with listening rather than playing. Inspired by the influence it had on her life, she was determined to learn the guitar in eighth grade. “I am inspired by the music I listen to. To be able to do the same thing they have done is incredible; I want to inspire people and affect them in the same way,” Ramos said.

LYRICAL

want MORE?

photo/Carly Burton

Practice

Burton photo/Ca rly

photos/Y outube photos/Y outube

because I leave early,” senior Randy Pena said.

on

ROCK

Students used music as a creative outlet and as a means of better knowing themselves and each other. Regardless of genre, they relied on music as an honest collaboration of ideas and emotions, and as a reflection of their identities. [carly burton and sehar noor]

As they experimented with melodies and beats, and fused lyrics with instrumentals, members of Above the Scene began a practice session. “Our songs are inspired by basically anything: a conversation, memories, anything. Someone will have a melody in mind and we build off that,” junior Cole Furth said. The band included drummer, Furth; bassist, junior Nicholas DeAngelis; and guitarists and vocalists junior James Colson and senior Randy Pena. “[My band mates] are my best friends; they’re literally like my brothers,” DeAngelis said. The band worked on recording their first album and hoped to play gigs to establish themselves in the Orlando music scene. They practiced at least three times a week to perfect their songs and create a cohesive sound. “The more experience we get, [the more] we keep getting better and the more people appreciate the music,” DeAngelis said.

band of brothers

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Thomas and his brothers brought back the afro.

NOW

[junior]

Thomas

Devin

THEN NOW Riser wears spectators and a cardigan paired with a skirt much like women in the 50s. She also incorporated tights into her outfit.

THEN Young women in the 50s wore spectators and cardigans with long skirts.

“My favorite tradition at Boone is our school spirit because we take pride in our school,” sophomore

The 70s was a “groovy” time period. Bell bottom pants, floral prints and afros were popular.

Magazine pages filled her closet walls and Tumblr remained open on her laptop as she searched through the website’s countless fashion blogs. High school students relied on each other to stay on top of the newest trends, but junior Madison Riser’s inspiration lay in previous eras. From the sparkle and shine of the 80s to the flattering silhouettes of the 40s, Riser owed the influence of past trends to establish her individuality. “I don’t really like modern day fashion. I usually look at past trends to inspire me,” Riser said. “Fashion sparks my creativity and imagination.”

Madison Riser

[junior]

Not only did Garcia find inspiration from current fashion icons and magazines, she also looked to previous decades for more ideas. Without limiting herself to a single decade, she was able to create a timeless look. “I like to learn of new trends and find ways to incorporate them into my personal style,” Garcia said. “I also like to take influences from many trends, eras and styles and not limit myself to ‘one look’. I then like to bring many different looks together that are unique to me.” Garcia also recognized the importance of switching things up and daring to be different. “There have been many trends that have come and gone, some lasting longer than others,” Garcia said. “Although I appreciate new trends, I don’t follow all of them. I prefer evolving my fashion taste over time to reflect my personality and who I am.”

All eyes watched him and his brother as they walked onto campus day after day. Their bold fashion choices inspired students around them. Peers and teachers took notice to their big hair, colored clothes and unique accessories. “[Past fashions influence me when] I look at old things and I’m like ‘I want to bring that back’,” junior Devin Thomas said. “Because [old fashion] is different.” The Thomas brothers, Devin and Deion, have not only bonded over their abilities in dance, but also their interests in fashion and appearance.

She stepped onto campus for the first time with high hopes of finding herself and reinventing how people saw her. Every day, she watched as people confidently strutted down the halls showing off their latest fashion favorite. Freshman Lauren Garcia not only saw clothes and accessories, she also saw personalities shining through her peers’ fashion choices. “I love fashion and appreciate how clothing, shoes and accessories help to express my personality and individual style,” Garcia said. “I also respect and appreciate that others have their own personal style and it’s fun to see how people express themselves through fashion.” Individuals used fashion as an outlet. Expression and attitude were prevalent in designers’ inspiration. This was especially important for teens who struggled with expressing their emotions and figuring out who they wanted to become in the future. “I value fashion because it is one way that people have the freedom to be themselves and make a personal choice as to how they want to look and feel,” Garcia said. “Fashion lets you change how you express yourself to the world and is something you can have fun with.”

[of]

photo/Legend 1974

Flare

photo/Madeline Trybus

[madeline trybus]

page 35 fashion

Beach Party. All of these trends made a fierce comeback in the 21st century. In the 70s, mini dresses continued to be a popular trend, while maxi dresses and hot pants also filled the streets; it was a time for expression in the world of fashion. These style choices and personalities have been prevalent in fashion since that time and became increasingly popular again in today’s society. Those who grew up in the 80s say this decade was a time in which people were searching for themselves and craved finding an identity. Bright and bold colors were also in demand. During the spring season of 2011, these color palettes reappeared. The unkempt, grunge look became popular in the 90s when women chose rock t-shirts, flannels and acid wash jeans over a nicely ironed dress. Body branding and piercing also became more popular with men and women. These trends died out, but were revived again in the fall of 2011 and remained popular with students, especially into 2012. The best of these trends became timeless. From past decades or not, fashion is best represented in those who aren’t afraid to be daring and take risks. “My favorite thing [about fashion and kids] is the ones who don’t care; the ones who aren’t afraid to fly their freak flag,” Gonzalez said.

throughout the years, fashion traveled in a never ending cycle

Students entered her classroom every 50 minutes, five days a week, 10 months a year for 17 years. She saw every kind of teenager, like the individuals who paraded themselves down the hall as if they were strutting down the runway, and the crowd-followers who blended in as they strolled together in packs. “[I feel that fashion is important for teens] because I think it is a big part of pop-culture,” reading teacher Kyle Gonzalez said. “American teens live in such a visual society today.” Throughout the years, changes occurred in fashion trends. Gonzalez, however, noticed reoccuring trend with her students. There were always the kids who wanted to stand out and the ones who craved fitting in; the kids who dressed like they belonged in a different era and ones who couldn’t fit the mold of today’s standards any better. “I think [the change in fashion] isn’t just with the kids,” Gonzalez said. “It’s a cycle. Fashion always comes back around.” Students were always looking for inspiration, which was more often than not, found in past fashion icons and magazines. The 50s emphasized narrowness of the waist, and cat-eye glasses became popular. The 60s transformed the fashion world by going from conservative and respectable dresses to ‘minis’ and the bikini became a popular trend after making its appearance in the musical Taylor Keefer said.

zip. While getting ready, senior Griselda Gamez finishes her look with a pair of riding boots. “[I value fashion because] I just like feeling put together,” Gamez said. Her favorite fashion trend was flats.

goes around around

What comes

dressed to a tee. At lunch, sophomore Eric Winspare shows off his fashion. “I’m not a ‘follower’, but if I see someone wearing something I like, I go get it,” Winspare said. One of his favorite stores was Hollister.

photo/Stephanie Nebeker photo/Legend 1953


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didn’t receive proper treatment for recovery. However, Doe was treated for three days and every day she worked towards her release. Ultimately, her motivation to get better was to see her parents again, who were 30 minutes away from the hospital and weren’t allowed to see her during treatment. Doe began reading her Bible while she was in the hospital and after she was released, she became involved in the Howard Outreach Ministry, a youth group that became a positive distraction. “The kids were so loving. I was looking for love in the wrong place, but they showed me that the most important love is unconditional,” Doe said. After being released from the hospital, Doe had one relapse. An intimate relationship with her boyfriend added to the pressure of sports and school and when they broke up, she broke down. “I was in a pretty physical relationship with an experienced guy and I just wanted to impress him. [After we broke up] I ended up in my room cutting myself again,” Doe said. To prevent another slip up, she saw a therapist every week and did exercises like 10 minutes of silence to keep her urges under control. “I have become very strong and in order to feel positively in my mind and my heart. Every time I look in the mirror I try to think positive over negative,” Doe said. Doe also put notes on her mirror with Bible verses to remind her to be positive. Whenever she didn’t want to eat, she told her mom who monitored her eating habits. A report by the South Carolina Department of Mental Health (2006) claimed as many as 8 million people of all ages and genders in the United States are currently fighting a life and death battle with an eating disorder. With only one in 10 of them receiving treatment, this number is increasing. “[My eating disorder has gotten] tremendously better by controlling my emotions, keeping perspective, seeing a therapist and investing myself in other people and their lives,” Doe said. To also help with a full recovery, Doe stopped weighing herself. This kept her from obsessing over her weight everyday as she once did. “It was like a drug before; I was addicted. Now, if I feel good about myself, then I’m happy,” Doe said. [taylor keefer] *name witheld

“My favorite tradition at Boone is our rivalry against Edgewater,” sophomore Dakota Lewis said.

As she looked down at the scale, senior Jane Doe* let out a heavy sigh of relief, realizing her extreme diet had worked and another five pounds were shed. A distorted body image became fairly common in teens, and while it was just an insecurity to some, it caused issues for others. According to the Obstetricians and Gynecologists (2009), one third of high school students think they are overweight when, in reality, they have a healthy body weight. Doe’s distorted body image controlled her life and became a constant, everyday struggle. It all began in seventh grade when Doe started cheerleading. At first, Doe didn’t even notice it was happening, but as the weight fell off from stress and anxiety, she liked what she saw. Doe started to compare herself to other girls on the cheer team and her perfectionist attitude towards everything escalated the problem. “I just wanted to be pretty and accepted. I felt very insecure and I had to get approval and be better than my friends. I also wanted attention from guys,” Doe said. Seeming normal from the outside, Doe was involved in multiple athletic teams and maintained good grades while participating in a variety of clubs and activities in and out of school. According to the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine (2004), elite athletes had significantly higher rates of eating disorders. Only taking in liquids, Doe developed a routine, starving herself for three to seven days at a time. Afterwards, she would binge and take laxatives. The laxatives emptied her stomach and drained all the liquids from her body, causing weakness and pain. “It began to be painful but I didn’t care; I was so skinny,” Doe said. The routine of binge eating caused her to lose weight but also led to depression. She started cutting herself frequently and wrote a suicide note in her journal. The Stanford University School of Medicine (2010) found that nearly 41 percent of eating disorder patients between 10 and 21 years of age intentionally harm themselves, mostly by burning or cutting. Eventually, her parents found the suicide note and admitted Doe to the Central Florida Mental Health Hospital where her disease started to improve. “I got major perspective from just being in the waiting room. I took all the classes and seminars that I could and tried to stay positive,” Doe said. The South Carolina Department of Mental Health (2006) revealed that 80 percent of eating disorders

a distorted body image caused an obsession that consumed a senior’s life

PERFECTION has a price

1

Medical Review Board.

The average model today is 25 percent thinner than the average American woman, according to the

25

of all teenage girls have unhealthy weight control behaviors, according to mental health doctor Neumark-Sztainer.

1/2

Almost 50 percent of people with eating disorders meet the criteria for depression, according to the American Journal of Psychiatry.

FIFTY PERCENT

According to the Renfew Center Foundation for Eating Disorders, one in 20 of all dieters will regain their lost weight within 5 years.

An estimated 10 to 15 percent of people with anorexia or bulimia are male.

women and girls have eating disorders that harm their health.

5-10 million

According to Dr. Greta Noordenbox, International Journal of Eating Disorders.

1 in 10 men and women with eating disorders receive treatment

percent of girls 5th to 12th grade reported wanting to lose weight because of magazine pictures.

15%

34%

Excessive exercising

page 43 issues-body image

228 students polled on Jan. 23

39%

6%

Binge and purge (bulimia)

6%

Healthy dieting

Taking pills to help with weight loss

Don’t eat (anorexia)

58 percent of all grades and genders have admitted to being dissatisfied with the way their body looks. Students rank the top ways in which they’ve attempted to lose weight.

body image effects

percent of American girls and women aged 12 to 23 years old are unhappy with their bodies, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

According to USA Today,

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According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, one-third of high school students thought they were over weight when they had a healthy body weight.

Body image affects both genders at any age throughout the world, with differing causes. The following is an indepth look at body image statistics.

1/3 10-15%

ONE THIRD

BODY IMAGE

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3

fingerprint please. As people walk into SeaWorld, senior Megan Bigelow watches them scan their tickets and index finger. “I’ve learned how to deal with hard situations when you need a quick answer,” Bigelow said.

“I feel great to be a part of history in the making [of the 60th year at Boone],” junior Daniel Paz said.

[1] my pleasure. Taking a customer’s order, junior Stephanie Dawson enters it into the register. “[My favorite part of my job is] seeing all the people because it shows me different personalities,” Dawson said. [2] nighty night. Dressed as a cow, senior Tyler Conrady greets customers on a family night. “It’s a great place to work; they’re good to their employees. They’re caring and generous,” Conrady said. [3] your change is. After completing an order, junior Joseph Onderick hands a customer his change. “[My favorite part of my job is] getting extra money because I don’t like asking my parents for money,” Onderick said.

1

2

STUDENTS “EAT MOR CHIKIN”

On her way to Epcot for the day, senior Sharibel Monegro received a phone call. Frantically speaking on the other line was a friend begging Monegro to cover her spot as a belly dancer at Taverna Opa for the night. After contemplating what to do, Monegro decided there was nothing to lose from the experience and took the job for the night. Little did she know, doing her friend that favor would turn into a career. “The manager asked me to come in two more times, then told me I had a job,” Monegro said. The timing was perfect for Monegro. A few weeks prior, Monegro lost her job at the Moroccan restaurant Falafel, where she was a belly dancer. Monegro was ready for her new job; she loved dancing. On occasion, Monegro opened the show by doing a solo dance around the restaurant. “[My favorite part is] getting the shy person up to dance and getting laughs out of people,” Monegro said. “I get paid to party. It’s better than having to do the same thing day by day. [At] Opa it’s never the same thing everyday.” A usual night for Monegro was dancing around the restaurant with her co-worker’s trying to get people up and dancing. On some occasions she danced for private parties. She wore a traditional Bedleh, meaning suit in Arabic, consisting of a bra, skirt and belt. This job was another step towards Monegro’s career path. She hoped to have a career in performing arts. “I want to still be in performing arts and still do dance in some form,” Monegro said. “All the different scenarios and different people you meet [prepares you for future jobs].”

Career gives photos/Lindsey Wilhite

After a six hour shift at Finish Line, he stopped by the bank to deposit his check. As the bank teller handed him his deposit receipt, senior Bladimir Fabian felt a sense of accomplishment as his hours of commitment translated into hard earned cash. That was the feeling, along with responsibility, of students with jobs. “[Working has taught me about] being more responsible with money,” Fabian said. “You’re going to be responsible and you’ll have a work ethic.” As well as working three days a week at Finish Line and four days a week at Guess, Fabian attended six classes on campus, leaving after sixth period. Although he had to balance his time, Fabian enjoyed the independence that came with his jobs and not having to rely on his parents for money. “People think it’s hard [to manage time] but it’s not,” Fabian said. Students who relied on their paychecks for their expenses often had to adjust school work and social lives around their work schedule. Through early release and late arrival, students were able to better balance time. When the bell signaling sixth period sounded, senior Jarrett Stalvey also made his way home. With an hour until his shift started, Stalvey tried to squeeze in homework and a nap. He worked shifts from 2 p.m. -7 p.m. weekdays and 6 a.m.- 7 p.m. on Saturdays.

page 39 jobs

jobs prepared students for the real world “I knew I couldn’t do really hard classes and work at the same time,” Stalvey said. “It’s pretty hard [balancing social life, school and work]; I have late nights.” Stalvey used the money he made to pay for his car and spent any extra money he made to pay for social activities. “It’s teaching me responsibility at an early age,” Stalvey said. For junior Jensen Zannini, the paycheck she earned went toward her college fund. Zannini worked as a soccer referee for the Central Florida Catholic Youth League from September to November (soccer season). “I really only referee on weekends, so I don’t have to worry about homework, which I usually finish before weekends,” Zannini said. “Since I pick when I work, if I have plans for the weekend or homework I usually won’t schedule myself to referee.” Though working could be a challenge for students, it was also beneficial and gave them a taste of what the real world would be like with budgeting their time and money. “At a certain age in high school it’s good to have a job because it gives you money and teaches you responsibility and confidence,” Zannini said. [lindsey wilhite]

responsibility

JOBS teach

get ‘em hot. In Suessland at Islands of Adventure, senior Alexis Olijnyk gets a churro for a customer. “[My favorite part of my job is that] I get to see celebrities and sometimes meet them. Any day there could be someone famous walking around,” Olijnyk said. Islands of Adventure was her first job.


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the new clothes he wanted when he didn’t have any money. His shoplifting, which lasted a year, began with Smith stealing small amounts of clothes, and eventually escalated to hundreds of dollars worth of items at a time. Both Doe and Smith’s actions contributed to the $13 billion worth of goods stolen from retailers each year in the nation (NASP). “I never felt guilty [for stealing]. I loved getting something for nothing,” Smith said. Periodic shoplifting once every few weeks transformed into stealing a couple times a week. The rush of shoplifting motivated him to do it consistently, and his addiction began to form. “I’m an adrenaline junkie so I enjoy the rush and [the feeling when] you have to act very calm and collected,” Smith said. Several studies found diagnosed depression to exist in approximately one-third of the shoplifters studied. Though Smith was not depressed, his emotional state drove his addiction to new heights, and he noticed an increase in his shoplifting habits when he was feeling angry or upset. “If I [was] mad I [would] normally steal, or if I’ve had a bad day and wanted to release some of my steam,” Smith said. Though Smith was well aware of his growing addiction, he didn’t stop; this was his outlet. It was his way of dealing with his stress and emotion, and he didn’t know any other way to manage his problems as effectively as stealing did. “Once you start, it’s hard to stop,” Smith said. “It’s like a drug. I knew it wasn’t right, but I kept going regardless.” To eliminate suspicion, Smith stole by himself. He felt it was easier to get away with and he could keep his shoplifting habit discrete without telling anybody he was breaking the law. “I really didn’t want anyone knowing that I stole because I didn’t want that reputation. I’m not a bad kid,” Smith said. When he was finally caught by a store employee, Smith was arrested and banned from the store. Studies show shoplifters are caught an average of once for every 48 times they steal. They are then turned over to the police only 50 percent of the time (NASP). “[Being caught] was hard to believe and I was afraid it would ruin my life,” Smith said. “It was my realization that what I was doing was stupid.” [brittany hope] names withheld*

“My favorite tradition is Braves Brawl because i love watching the skits,” sophomore Megan rushlow said.

She approached the exit, and adrenaline raced through her body. Purse in hand, junior Jane Doe* managed to leave the store without paying a penny. Shoplifting was often initiated as a way to save money, but it quickly accelerated to become an obsession. According to the National Association for Shoplifting Prevention, there are currently approximately 27 million shoplifters in the nation. In recent years, shoplifting became increasingly common among teens and adults alike. For Doe, it was simply something to do to pass the time with friends. Shoplifters described the feeling of getting away with it as a “rush” or “high.” Successful steals produced a chemical reaction, also known as adrenaline. These feelings, common to a shoplifter, caused Doe to continue to steal, and form an addiction. “I felt euphoric [when I shoplifted] because I could get away with it and I kept going because it’s such a rush you feel like it’s worth it,” Doe said. Doe began shoplifting with her friends when she was under the influence, but it quickly turned into an addiction. At first shoplifting was a way for Doe to test her limits, and see how much she could get away with. Doe continued to push farther with each steal, when finally, she was caught by a security guard stealing a pair of flip flops from a Victoria’s Secret store in the mall. Doe was one in 10 million people that have been caught shoplifting in the last five years (NASP). “When I got caught I was mostly worried about how mad my mom would be and how much trouble I would be in,” Doe said. “The cops also scared me because they were really mean to me and I didn’t want to go to juvie.” She was arrested and was required to attend Teen Court. Her consequences for stealing included 30 hours of community service and jury duty. She also had to write essays about the consequences of shoplifting. For Doe, her repercussions were enough to end her shoplifting habits. “Doing all that work and having to tell people what I did was hard and embarrassing. I never want to be that disappointed in myself again,” Doe said. “My mom was also really disappointed in me, and that was the worst part.” About 33 percent of juveniles say it is hard for them to stop shoplifting even after getting caught (NASP). Contrary to the statistic, habitual shoplifter junior John Smith* gave up shoplifting for good after he was caught stealing $120 worth of clothes from Old Navy. For Smith, stealing from stores was a way to get

shoplifting habits transformed into obsessions that dominated students’ lives

compulsive addiction

AdrenAline drives

1/4

*all statistics from the National Association for Shoplifting Prevention.

who shoplift.

they know other kids

89 percent of kids say

89

1/3

of all shoplifters are diagnosed with depression.

Approximately three percent of shoplifters are “professionals” who steal solely for resale.

three PERCENT

Approximately 55 percent of adult shoplifters say they started shoplifting in their teens.

dollars worth of goods are stolen from retailers every day.

35 million

That is equivalent to 27 million shoplifters total.

N E

Approximately 1 in 11 people are shoplifters in the United states.

percent of juvenile shoplifters don’t plan to steal in advance.

72

Jewelry

Other

Clothing

page 47 issues-shoplifting

227 students polled on Jan. 23

electronics

8%

27%

29% 24% 24% 12%

Food

25 percent of all grades and genders have admitted to shoplifiting before. Students list the items that they have stolen.

five finger discount

percent of shoplifters caught for the first time have already developed a shoplifting habit or addiction.

27

An estimated two to 200 dollars are stolen per incident.

$2-200

shoplifting has become a common form of “retail therapy” for people across the nation. The following is an in-depth look at shoplifting.

of shoplifters are juveniles.

One FOrTH

55O

sHOPliFTinG

An in-dePTH lOOK


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2000

page 36 student life

photo/Carly Burton

3 4

The audience grew quiet and waited in anticipation for sophomore Kristian Velazquez to beat box. He took a sip of water, cleared his throat and began performing songs with his beats. “I heard my cousin and taught myself when I was 6-years-old. [When I heard my cousin] it gave me a feeling of amazement I wanted to give to other people,” Velazquez said. Coming from a family with multiple beat boxers, Velazquez learned at a young age not to show his nerves while performing in front of others. “I get nervous in front of small audiences; not as much [with] bigger [audiences]. When people go along with it and cheer, it calms me down,” Velazquez said. Velazquez beat boxed wherever he went, whether he was at home or walking through the halls on his way to class. The covers that he performed at the show included “Gold Digger” and different types of Dubstep style songs, as well as some of his own original freestyle. “I think I did pretty good [at Brave Aid]. It seems like beat boxing was new to a lot of people; something they never heard before,” Velazquez said.

HARMONY

beats make

1 3 photo/Carly Burton

“[My favorite tradition is the] powder puff football because it’s funny to watch the guys dressed up and acting like

2003

As a senior, Ericka Dunlap sang at Brave Aid. Dunlap was crowned Miss America in 2004.

PAST

blasts

FROM THE

Senior John Bulford III performed at Brave Aid. Bulford has released multiple albums and has worked with the top people in country music.

2

[1] red, white and blue. At the beginning of Brave Aid, senior Angel Lozada sings the national anthem. “I’m not nervous when performing. When I get on stage I feel in my element,” Lozada said. [2] shake your booty. In Rated Rrrr’s dance, senior May Niu sword-fights with junior Jonathan Colon-Gonzalez. “The image we wanted to generate to the audience was the same as the movie of Pirates of the Caribbean. Fighting choreography was necessary and pirates have to have swords,” Niu said. Niu choreographed the dance herself. [3] jam. In the second of his two acts, senior Tyler Colick plays the guitar. “Having previous stage performance [experience] , I wasn’t stage shy. Having two acts allowed me to participate in two completely different [things],” Colick said. Colick played over 15 instruments. [4] prancer. Sophomore Tyler Cook burlesque dances to “I’m A Good Girl.” “[My favorite part of Brave Aid was] getting to get all dressed up in nice costumes and getting to perform Burlesque,” Cook said. Cook also performed with the Bravettes.

cheerleaders,” sophomore Foster Zannini said.

As students and parents filled the auditorium and found their seats, performers calmed their nerves back stage, went over dances and fixed their costumes before Brave Aid XXVII on Jan. 27. The Student Government Association dedicated the show to Laura Grant and Eddie Culberhouse. The Always Wear Your Seatbelt Foundation received the money raised from the show in their honor. Before the show, senior Angel Lozada sang the national anthem. The night then kicked off with a video presentation by Grant and Culberhouse’s families about the importance of buckling up which reminded the audience of the tragic car accident. “[The AWYS Foundation] is important because you really should be safe on the road and the club makes sure that never happens again. It raises awareness because not everyone always thinks about putting on their seat belt,” junior Christian Drayton, who performed with Rechorded, said. Drayton and 19 other acts showcased their individual talents through choreographed dances, musical ensembles, stand-up comedy and original song performances. The performers, such as freshman Ericka Creager who sang “Beautiful” by Christina Aguilera, had

page 37 brave aid

different methods of preparing for the show. “I rehearsed every night with my sister [Katlyn Stewart] for a week [before the show],” Creager said. “I wasn’t as prepared as I should have been and got nervous at the last second.” Despite the different types of acts, the performers came together as a show. After Creager’s duet with Stewart, the band Rahman and the Noodles performed their original song “Let Go.” “I get nervous right before I go on to perform,” senior Easah Rahman said. “As the song goes on, it just becomes a jam in my practice room. Everyone else disappears except for my band.” Senior Madison Lumbert and junior Taylor Wood also sang and performed their original song, “Hemiola Heartbeats.” The night ended with Stixx, the drum line’s glow-in-the-dark performance. Through the sold-out show, SGA raised $5,550 from the ticket and custom designed T-shirt sales for the AWYS Foundation. “I think it’s great [that all the proceeds went to the AWYS Foundation]. We had so much fun doing it and all the money that went to it is great,” junior Jessica Hill said. [olivia rees and blake waranch]

talent show proceeds benefited Always Wear Your Seatbelt Foundation

AIDcharity Braves

black magic. Playing the drums, senior Geoffrey Kirchoff performs “Voodoo Child” by Jimi Hendrix. “[I like] the individuality and [how] everyone brings their own personal talents to the show,” Kirchoff said. Kirchoff began playing with his friend, senior Tyler Colick, in eighth grade.

photo/Carly Burton

photo/Carly Burton photo/Blake Waranch


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*names witheld

[chantelle cade and monique soriano]

problems; you have to face it even though it’s hard,” Smith said. For months, she battled with depression and grief. Only through the realization that she had family and friends who loved her could she make a change in attitude about her life and depression. “[Making a change was] a slow process; it happened over the last four months. It’s cliché, but life is short so why would you want to spend the best years of your life in that state,” Smith said. The struggle towards recovery proved more successful for Smith and Doe than for senior John Lee*. A positive outlook was difficult for Lee to grasp as he felt overwhelmed with feelings of hopelessness and lack of worth. He was Baker Acted twice for attempted suicides. When Baker Acted, he was detained in a behavioral facility for 72 hours where he could not physically harm himself . “I never wanted to go anywhere or do anything in the morning. Feelings of strong dissatisfaction and worthlessness tied me to the bed every morning, and if there was ever any reason important enough to overcome the feelings keeping me down, I rarely looked for it,” Lee said. Local health clinics offered free or discounted treatment for teens with depression but some teens did not know about these venues. Less than 33 percent of teens with depression received help, yet 80 percent of teens with depression could have been successfully treated if they sought help from a doctor or therapist, according to Teenage Depression Statistics (2012). Lee, however, sought help to little avail. Neither therapy nor medication aided him to recover from depression. “I saw doctors and therapists for a few years. I was given medication, but all of the advice I was given did not help as much as I hoped it would. Looking back, the advice wasn’t bad; I think I just wasn’t willing to except it,” Lee said. Depression was, in cases, linked to suicide. It affected Doe, Smith and Lee, and continued to affect people throughout everyday life. “It doesn’t help to tell people not to be depressed so you shouldn’t go out there and tell them not to be because it is an internal battle. They have to realize it themselves,” Smith said. If you or someone you know suffers from depression, and is having suicidal thoughts, do not hesitate to call 1-800 -SUICIDE.

“[Being on campus the 60th year] feels like I’m part of something bigger, something historic; a legacy that

With trembling hands, she opened the pill bottle. The childproof cap fell straight to the tiled floor. She poured a hand full of pills into the palm of her hand, not bothering to count them. Junior Jane Doe* swallowed all the pills and hoped that by ending her life, the pain and depression would end with it. Every day there were approximately 11 youth suicides, according to Teacher Vision.com (2012). Hundreds of teens each day were diagnosed with major depression, a leading cause to a suicide, yet many others were not aware that they had depression, a form of mental illness. For Doe, depression consumed her life early on. In grade school, she was picked on and made fun of because of her mixed race of Hispanic and African American. “I was very emotional at that age. I guess as I got older, I became somewhat introverted. I never felt as if I belonged,” Doe said. To deal with the harassment, Doe began to cut, punch and physically harm herself. In seventh grade, when the pressure and insults got to be too much, she attempted suicide by climbing onto a ledge of a second story window in her science class. Doe was stopped when her teacher spotted her and sent her to a SAFE counselor. “I was really going to do it. The pressure started to build up and I felt so useless, so empty, that I just wanted to free myself from everything,” Doe said. According to Depression Symptoms 101, a survey of high-school students found that almost 1 in 5 teens had seriously considered suicide (2012). Up to that point, Doe had not received the necessary treatment and tried to end her life once again her freshman year of high school when she almost overdosed on unprescribed medication. This incident pushed her to seek help from a therapist soon after. While depression affected Doe directly, some were affected indirectly. Senior Annie Smith* was shaken last July when her father committed suicide. “[The biggest challenge I faced was] coming to realize that I’ll never see him again; I still have to grasp that,” Smith said. Smith’s father had attempted to commit suicide before, in the spring of her sixth grade year. The day he committed suicide, Smith’s mother discovered her husband at home with his wrists slit. Smith never thought that he would do it because he seemed to have been improving. Proceeding his death, Smith became deeply depressed and didn’t know how to cope. “At first I didn’t know how to deal with my depression. I thought, ‘what do I do now?’ Slowly you have to fix the

three students struggled to overcome illness

emotional stress

TEENS BATTLE photo illustrations

will always live on,” junior Kyra Kemp said.

32, 000

More than 32,000 people die from suicide each year in the United States. That means that there are about 80 suicides per day.

of all people who complete suicide were depressed at the time of their deaths.

2/3

of people who attempt or commit suicide suffer from a mental illness, according to Teen Depression.org.

NINETY PERCENT

people worldwide commit suicide each year according to an article about suicide on MedicineNet.com

one million

According to the American Association of Suicidology

I X

Each suicide affects at least six other people immediately

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

2

largest killer after heart disease by 2020.

nd

no

yes

70 no

117

page 41 issues-suicide

187 students polled on Jan. 23

have ever experienced suicidal thoughts

friends/family have attempted or commited suicide

yes

72

115

Students tell whether they or people they know have been involved with suicide.

students and suicide

to 80 percent of the time, treatment of depression is effective. However, less than 25% of people with depression receive adequate treatment.

60

According to the Uplift Program Studies, depression will become the

Teenage boys 15 to 19 years old are likely to commit suicide five times as often as girls their age.

8/10 15-19

Teen suicide is a serious issue that both males and females of all ages face, yet many do not realize how severe it is. The following is an indepth look at suicide facts and statistics.

teens who commit suicide try to ask for help in some way before committing suicide.

3S Suicide is the third-leading cause of death for 15 to 24 year-olds after homicide and accidents, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

SUICIDE

AN IN-DEPTH LOOK


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macy dye] *names witheld

“[I’m never embarrassed because] I think it’s a lot different for guys,” Smith said. “It’s very much voluntary. I think in most situations it’s the guy pressuring the girl to send pictures.” For Smith, sending the pictures was a thrill. According to the Teen Online and Wireless Safety Survey, 40 percent of all sexters send promiscuous messages and pictures for entertainment. “A picture is worth a thousand words and it’s worth a lot of messages. It’s like you get to share a secret with someone that hopefully no one else ever sees,” Smith said. Rather than feeling embarrassed by the texts, Smith enjoyed it and said it made him feel ‘alive’. “It’s just a part of my body. I don’t see why it’s such a big deal,” Smith said. Unlike Smith, junior Sally Walker* looked back at her sexting experience with regret and discomfort. Walker first sent pictures her sophomore year when she was 16 to add excitement to the conversation with a boy she liked. He asked for the pictures and she sent them to him multiple times. “It wasn’t my idea. I thought it would make him like me more,” Walker said. “It was scary, especially the first time.” For Walker, the regret of sending nude pictures was based off her fear of getting caught rather than losing the boy she sent them to. “[I’m afraid of getting caught] because it’s illegal and I don’t want to go to jail. It was a bad decision on my part,” Walker said. “I felt self-conscious. What if he didn’t like what he saw?” Sending nude photos for anyone under 18 years of age is considered child pornography and is punishable by law. The sentence for this crime can be as severe as life in prison. Anyone caught receiving the pictures, can be registered as a sex offender, stipulating where they can live, go or work for the rest of their life. Overall, Walker regretted her decision to sext and would do anything to take it all back. More than 50 percent of all sexters regret what they did and wish they could take it back. “He liked me for a while, but when I stopped he was over me,” Walker said. One sext can change someone’s entire life and a picture, sent or received, can cause a lifetime of problems and ridicule. [taylor keefer and

“My favorite tradition at Boone is Chugapalooza because it isn’t a school tradition, it’s a student tradition,” senior Joel Simons said.

Forcing her way down the hall with a fake smile, senior Jane Doe’s* heart dropped at the judging stares and disheartening whispers of her peers. Entering her freshman year, Doe started an open relationship with a senior. Mesmerized by his age and experience, Doe was willing to do anything to keep him interested. When he began pressuring her to send pictures, she felt obligated to say yes. “[Looking back now, I sent promiscuous pictures] so he would like me more,” Doe said. “I think I liked doing it because I thought it made him happy.” Doe declined several times, but eventually gave in. According to The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancies, 51 percent of girls say pressure from a guy is a reason they sexted. “The first time I was so nervous, but he consoled me and told me he’d never show anyone because my body was for him and he wouldn’t want anyone else [to see],” Doe said. It started with pictures in her bathing suit, then in a bra and eventually nothing. When school started in the fall, Doe was stunned to see her guy hand in hand with another girl. Initially she was upset, but he talked her into continuing their secret relationship. Even though there was another girl in his life, Doe continued to send him nude pictures until his girlfriend found them. Approximately 14 percent of sexters get caught, reported the Teen Online and Wireless Safety Survey. When his girlfriend found the pictures, she immediately sent them to her phone. Outraged, she took them into the guidance office and showed them to a counselor who called Doe’s parents immediately. “The worst part about it was my parents finding out. They wanted me to switch schools and talked about home school. I was grounded for a while and I couldn’t get my permit, but it wasn’t too bad. It was understandable,” Doe said. “[I regret it] more than anything. That’s the biggest mistake I’ve made. It was just for a stupid boy I don’t even talk to anymore. If I could take one thing back it would definitely be that.” Doe tried to deal with the effects of what happened but ultimately, the embarrassment forced her to change schools. Even after switching, people still stared. “[I am embarrassed] to know that people still talk about it,” Doe said. “When I switched schools I didn’t think people would know about it.” On the other hand, no one ever had to pressure senior John Smith* into sending pictures and he was never afraid of getting caught.

students sent and passed provocative messages

tantalize teens

tex ts

photo illustrations

1

and Unplanned Pregnancy.

Campaign to Prevent Teen

by the 2011 National

messages, as reported

sexually suggestive

teenagers sent or posted

Thirty-nine percent of all

39

of all sexters sent the messages for fun, according to Teen Online and Wireless Safety Survey in 2011.

2/5

of people that sext send them to their significant other, according to the Teen Online and Wireless Safety Survey in 2011.

SIXTY PERCENT

According to the Teen Summit survey in 2011, one in five teens have engaged in sexting.

of sexters are never caught, according to Teen Online and Wireless Safety Survey in 2011.

86%

didn’t know the person they sent the messages or pictures to, according to the Teen Summit survey of 2011.

1 in 10 sexters

According to the National Campaign poll in 2011.

1 in 10 men and women have shared a naked image of themselves.

percent of teen boys have sent or posted nude or semi-nude pictures or videos of themselves.

0

30

60

90

120

150

no

yes

54 no

134

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188 students polled on Jan. 23

sent provocative message to someone

sent provocative picture to someone

yes

40

148

Students answer whether they have ever sent a provocative picture or message to another person.

Student sexters

percent of teen girls sent or posted nude or seminude pictures or videos of themselves according to the National Campaign survey in 2011.

According to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy 2011,

O 22 18 N E

According to the Teen Summit survey in 2011, over one-third of all teens know of a friend that has sent and/or received a sext message.

This digital action has affected students of all ages and genders with varying causes. The following is an in-depth look at sexting statistics.

1/3

SEXTING

AN IN-DEPTH LOOK


MA

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SS ME DIA

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da BR w OO ki K ns E

portflio

two thousand and twelve

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