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portfolio 2012 amelia cheatham


cover letter


(407) 484-8818 l amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l 1 126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806

amelia c. cheatham

April 25, 2012 Renee’ Burke Journalism Adviser, NBCT, MJE 200 S. Mills Ave. Orlando, FL 32806 Dear Mrs. Burke, I understand that several editorial positions on your Legend yearbook staff will soon be vacated; I feel that I am capable of assuming one of those positions because of my organization, dedication and enthusiasm for the field of journalism. Please accept my accompanying resume’ for consideration for an editorial position. As I have worked as a yearbook staff member this past school year, I possess the tools necessary to confront the challenges that an editorial position offers. I have experience in writing, photography and the use of design tools such as Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop, which would allow me to meet the designing demands of being an editor. Additionally, I am capable of working on deadlines, a quality I think is vital to being a successful editor. I also enjoy working cooperatively with other staff members to create a superior product. I feel these qualities would help me to succeed, should I be chosen for an editorial position for the Legend yearbook. Thank you for your time in reading this letter; I hope you will also take the time to review my resume’. However, I believe the best way for you to understand my passion for journalism would be through a formal interview. Thank you very much for your consideration of me during this process. I look forward to hearing from you. Respectfully yours,

Amelia C. Cheatham Enclosed: resume’


resume’


amelia c. cheatham

(407) 484-8818 l amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l 1 126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806

objective: To gain experience in the field of journalism, chiefly in the writing, editing and printing processes, through an editorial position on the Legend yearbook staff.

education: 3 years at William R. Boone High School Graduation: June 2014 Unweighted G.P.A.--4.0 Weighted G.P.A.--4.67

experience: Legend Yearbook staff member l Aug. 2011-present. Staff member l Conducted interviews, wrote copy, photographed events, completed spreads and utilized design programs such as Adobe InDesign and Adobe Photoshop. Published in Orlando Sentinel l March 10, 2012. New Voices Column: “We’ve become a generation of smiley faces and ‘likes’” Lifeguard for Orange County Parks and Recreation l May 2012-present. l Supervised aquatic activity participants, conducted pool maintenance and provided first aid, when necessary. First aid and CPR-certfied by the American Red Cross.

high school experience: Completed Journalism I, English I Honors/Gifted

honors and involvement: l Varsity Swimming. Aug, 2010-present. l Most Improved Player. Fall 2011 season. l Journalism Honor Roll. 2012. l Spanish Honor Society. Member spring 2012-present. l Spanish Club. Member fall 2010-present. l Math Club. Member fall 2010-present. l Best Buddies. Member fall 2010-present. l International Thespian Society. Member spring 2011-present. l Spanish II Student of the Year. May 2012 l English I Student of the Year. May 2011. l Spanish I Student of the Year. May 2011. l Latin I Student of the Year. May 2010.

references: Suzanne Unger, AP Human Geography teacher, William R. Boone High School. l suzanne.unger@ocps.net Jennifer Hilley, Enlish 2 Honors/Gifted teacher, William R. Boone High School. l jennifer.hilley@ocps.net Lisa Shackleford, family friend and previous informal employer. l (407) 857-1943


business cards


amelia c. cheatham

amelia c. cheatham

1126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806 (407) 484-8818

1126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806 (407) 484-8818

amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l fb: Amelia Claire Cheatham

amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l fb: Amelia Claire Cheatham

amelia c. cheatham

amelia c. cheatham

1126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806 (407) 484-8818

1126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806 (407) 484-8818

amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l fb: Amelia Claire Cheatham

amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l fb: Amelia Claire Cheatham

amelia c. cheatham

amelia c. cheatham

1126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806 (407) 484-8818

1126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806 (407) 484-8818

amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l fb: Amelia Claire Cheatham

amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l fb: Amelia Claire Cheatham

amelia c. cheatham

amelia c. cheatham

1126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806 (407) 484-8818

1126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806 (407) 484-8818

amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l fb: Amelia Claire Cheatham

amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l fb: Amelia Claire Cheatham

amelia c. cheatham

amelia c. cheatham

1126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806 (407) 484-8818

1126 Buckwood Dr., Orlando, FL 32806 (407) 484-8818

amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l fb: Amelia Claire Cheatham

amelia.cheatham@gmail.com l fb: Amelia Claire Cheatham

staffer, Legend yearbook

staffer, Legend yearbook

staffer, Legend yearbook

staffer, Legend yearbook

staffer, Legend yearbook

staffer, Legend yearbook

staffer, Legend yearbook

staffer, Legend yearbook

staffer, Legend yearbook

staffer, Legend yearbook


personal essay


Journalism.

I have been aware of the dictionary definition of this noun since I was little, but participating

in Boone publications this year taught me the truest meaning of this word. This year has instilled in me a passion for journalism unlike anything I have ever felt participating in swimming, drama or anything else.

I first became exposed to journalism at an early age, as my grandfather is a retired reporter and would often

recount tales of his adventures in the Middle East to my sisters and me. However, taking Journalism I my freshman year truly exposed me to the ethics, functions and practices of the media for the first time. I had never before used programs such as In Design, Photoshop and Bridge, and learning to use these tools opened doors for me. I finally realized the time required in creating a layout for TIME, The New York Times or any other professional publication. I now no longer see designs in terms of colors and pictures but as collections of cobs, copy and secondary coverage.

Reaching my current position journalistically has been a little bit of a struggle, but I believe that if I had not

had to endure lost pages, elusive interviewees and other issues, I would not have been able to garner the knowledge I have gained so far. My participation in Boone publications, and journalism in general, initially seemed doomed when I got placed in Beginning Volleyball/TV Production my freshman year, instead of Journalism I. However, my guidance counselor soon altered my schedule so that it included Journalism I. I cannot express how glad I am that I did not continue with Beginning Volleyball! This year, I struggled significantly with losing pages, usually close to or on the day of the deadline. In all, I lost four of my seven deadlines. However, I honestly believe that this helped me to grow incredibly as a journalist. This difficulty improved my efficiency in creating pages and my overall computer skills; it also taught me how to deal with the pressure that is inevitable in the field of journalism.

The stories and pages that the rest of the yearbook staff and I wrote and created will exist for posterity.

They will be sources for information about living in 2012, about the Boone community and about the students who are featured in them. I consider this my biggest contribution to journalism thus far. Since we pulled information from old yearbooks to incorporate in the book this year, I grasped a sense of how important the book is in terms of record-keeping. We don’t know, but maybe the 120th book will pull inspiration from what we accomplished this year.

This year has shaped my life more than any other year.

I now cannot imagine my life without

journalism. Because of what I have learned this year, I want to major in either Journalism or Communications in college, attend a journalism program for graduate school and pursue journalism as a career.

Eventually,

I would love to be working in New York City or Washington, D.C., covering social issues or authoring a column.


self-analytical essay


I can honestly say that Journalism I and II taught me more than I learned in any other two classes in high

school. I could never include everything that I have learned in this one essay, but through taking Yearbook this past year, I have learned many skills that will aid me professionally someday, including meeting deadlines, teamwork, and dedication. Prior to joining the yearbook staff, I did not have any experience with meeting deadlines that were as extensive as yearbook deadlines are. Over the year, I have learned to deal with and make deadlines. Because of this, I feel I am more adept at accomplishing other activities (such as schoolwork) in a timely manner. Being on the yearbook staff has also taught me valuable lessons about teamwork and dedication. The entire staff is so devoted to what we do, and this pushes me to try my hardest, as well. Additionally, the staff is always there to offer help whenever it is needed. I initially did not understand exactly how much teamwork putting together a yearbook requires, but the truth is that no one page can be completed by a single person. Without every person doing his or her job, the amazing feat we perform cannot be accomplished. As I stated in my midterm, when we are facing tough deadlines or when a teacher is a “never� for interviews, we can’t just give up. I think this is one of the most important lessons to be learned from yearbook. I am incredibly proud of the book we put together this year! I will always treasure it, not only because of the how much time it took us to complete or how good our spreads were, but because we completed it as a team. This year, I came to absolutely love yearbook! This staff and opportunity are truly blessings, and I am so grateful I helped complete this amazing project!


ref lection one


I consider my deadline four page on the Health Care Academy and magnet programs to be my

best piece of individual work this year.

I especially enjoyed this deadline because it was interesting to watch

the page evolve from its initial state to its final form and because I learned information I did not know about the two academic programs my page covers. In creating this page, I wanted to provide knowledge about the Health Care Academy and magnet programs that the average student does not know and demonstrate the myriad of interesting opportunities students in these programs receive. Once I located usable pictures, the actual creation of this page proved to be relatively simple. However, I think this page took me more time than any other, as it has two different stories (one for health care academy and one for magnet) and thus a number of interviews. Additionally, this page changed significantly from the start of the deadline to the end. The layout underwent complete redesigning. The first draft seemed cramped, and a block of captions remained trapped between secondary coverage and a picture. After Mrs. Burke changed the layout, it appeared more spacious and allowed the dominant picture to command the attention of the viewer. It also meshed well with the look of the remainder of the book. While making these improvements required additional time, I am so glad that the page evolved; I am particularly drawn to this page, in part because of the open design and the impact of the dominant photo. I also think that the variety of pictures depict how involving the two academic programs are. Additionally, I am extremely proud of the body copy on this page. Initially, the idea of writing two different stories frightened me, but I like that doing so allowed me to devote significant space on the page to both activities. My favorite of the two stories is the copy about the Magnet program, as I think the lead grabs the reader and the general story is concise and informative.

I also received wonderful

interviews, particularly from Mr. Vernon and Ms. Smith, which helped both of the stories on this page immensely.


ref lection one


ref lection one


page 70 driven

“The new people I meet in magnet from other [magnet programs beside finance].”

9

BRANDON COOK

11

“Learning about all the diseases and gross things.”

BOBBI HILL

“[My favorite tradition is] going to football games because the Rowdy Crowd is fun to watch,” sophomore Olivia Rees said.

“Probably the computers [we use] because we get to learn a different way.”

KIERNAN MEHAN

10

favorite part of your program?

What is your

She slipped the thermometer under her patient’s tongue and received a grateful glance. Surrounded by monitors and smells of a hospital environment, unaccustomed students felt misplaced, but this professional atmosphere allowed Healthcare Academy students to explore careers. Students with an interest in helping others entered the Healthcare Academy by taking Health Science I. After gaining an understanding of anatomy in Health Science I, they practiced nursing skills on one another in Health Science II. They could earn a nursing assistant degree by continuing through Health Science III, and gain experience with patients at Westminster Towers and Orlando Regional Medical Center. “[My favorite part of the occupation is] just helping people. I think it is a growing experience; you’re always learning new things,” sophomore Delaney Hoevenaar said. Before they could volunteer with patients, students needed to be CPR-certified. In the facilities where they worked, students performed tasks such as bathing, feeding and dressing patients, making beds and checking vitals. The students learned the basics of health care from active professionals in the field, such as teacher Elisabeth Smith, a registered nurse with 30 years of experience. This helped students determine if they wished to pursue medicine as a career. “[These classes] give them a chance to really see what it’s like to be in a health care field and if they really like it before they go and spend all that money on college. Students that have gone into a whole bunch of health careers said that what really made a difference was the time they spent in class,” Smith said. Healthcare Academy graduates entered fields such as respiratory therapy, registered nursing and electrocardiogram technology. In addition to launching them into the medical field, being in the Healthcare Academy affected how students interacted with others. “You’re always thinking of how to help someone. [You think of] their priorities instead of your own,” senior Anna Rymer said. The Healthcare Academy prepared students with an interest in medicine for their careers. Yet even if they decided to pursue other goals, students graduated from the academy with a knowledge of medicine, practical experience and a heightened sense of compassion for those around them.

health care academy applied knowledge to future

CAREER skills

what a blast. During a fire safety unit in Health Science II, junior Kiran Shaikh learns how to operate a fire extinguisher. “[My favorite part of the lesson] was using the fire extinguisher,” Shaikh said. The Healthcare Academy students learned lessons on practical skills necessary in healthcare facilities, such as fire safety.

1

2

3

[1] resuscitation station. In Health Science III, senior Diamond Pulgarin practices CPR. “[Healthcare Academy teaches] me to be a better person and to help others,” Pulgarin said. Pulgarin applied the knowledge she gained by helping friends and family recover from illnesses. [2] cookie monster. At the magnet holiday luncheon, parent volunteer Monica Soriano serves freshman Austin Garcia dessert. “I like law because I like arguing with people,” Garcia said. Garcia hoped to attend law school. [3] making bank. During third period in the credit union, sophomore Daniel Hurtado consults the computer. “People look up to me as a smart person since I’m in magnet. I help them with their school work if they have trouble with it,” Hurtado said. Hurtado’s favorite part was making close friends.

Whether they go into CJ or not, they’ll have a better understanding of how our system works,” Vernon, former police officer, said. The skills taught by the instructors gave students insight into possible career paths that included activism in the community. “A lot of the professions are about protecting and serving the people in the community. [We practice this by] teaching awareness to younger kids [through community service],” junior Christian Rydstrand, criminal justice magnet, said. Magnet teachers encouraged their students to formulate their opinions through selfevaluation, not just to accept the information to which their teachers exposed them. “I don’t see my job as teaching them what to think; hopefully just teaching them to think,” Vernon said.

page 71 health care academy/magnet

“Guilty!” The verdict resounded through the silent courtroom. Then, the officials cracked smiles and the defendant sauntered out from behind the stand, unshackled. Through experiences such as mock trials, mock crime scenes and working in the credit union, magnet students learned the basics of the law, criminal justice and finance fields. “[Magnet] helps you [get] a better understanding of the topic you’re in. It prepares you for your future,” law magnet student Alexandra Nagle, freshman, said. Admitted students prepared for their future careers by taking specialized courses. Teachers, such as criminal justice teacher David Vernon, had experience in the fields that the students wished to pursue. “I felt like I had real life experience [in law enforcement] to share and that the magnet would provide [interested] students.

students gained knowledge in finance, law and criminal jus-

ASPIRING professionals

Magnet

[compiled by amelia cheatam]

photo/Emily Nusbickel photo/Karina Flores

Students

photo/stephanie Nebeker

photo/Alexis Martinez


ref lection two


The piece I completed this year that I feel could still use work is the TMH/DHH/ELL page.

This is

because this page contains several errors, of which I am not proud. I also feel as though the copy could have more accurately reflected how students in TMH, DHH and ELL participate in school and campus activities. First, in my opinion, my attempt to efficiently recreate this page after it crashed on the day of the deadline resulted in the two errors I have so far identified on this page. I am in no way proud of either of them, and I believe the page contained correct information until it crashed. First, I misidentified a quote, attributing it to another student in a picture, rather than the student who authored it. I am extremely disappointed that this happened, as I realize the student who actually shared his opinion did not receive credit for doing so. Second, there is an incorrect photo credit, which attributes a photo I did not take to me. This occurred when I was rebuilding this page from an earlier copy of it. In the earlier copy, the dominant picture was taken by me, so when I replaced this picture and forgot to change the photo credit, it remained attributed to me. Lastly, I would have liked to incorporate a student from TMH in my body copy in order to present a more rounded view of the specialized education programs; however, because the teachers needed to be inherently involved in TMH interviews, I chose to simply include these students in pictures, as I did not wish to disrupt their classes more than necessary. If I were to re-create this page, I would like to include a TMH student as a substantial part of the copy to provide a more accurate portrait of his school experiences.

While it in no way validates the mistakes on this page, this deadline posed the greatest challenges for me.

Interviewing students through translators and teachers took an incredible amount of time and pre-planning, so time management proved especially crucial. Thankfully, all of the adult staff members greatly helped me in this regard. Obtaining pictures proved another challenge, as the TMH students are only at school one day per week during third period and there were no existing pictures of the kids in TMH, DHH and ELL when I began working on the page. Additionally, my page crashed on the day of the deadline during third period; I believe the stress of this event caused my errors. While I wish that I could have the opportunity to correct my mistakes, I am so glad that I had the chance to profile the experiences of the TMH, DHH and ELL students; they are all incredible people who demonstrate admirable school spirit.


ref lection two


ref lection two


page 56 grounded

take note. In his ELL class, sophomore William Lin smiles while Rosa Camacho reviews essay writing. “[I will be able to use] English [in my future job]. [I moved here] for a better living,” Lin said. Lin moved to the U.S. from China when he was nine.

[amelia cheatham]

and sophomore Arif Bepery, also attended select core classes with the rest of the student body. “[My most difficult subject is] math. I don’t understand a lot of it. I always need help. The classes are harder [here than in Bangladesh],” Bepery said. Bepery moved from Bangladesh in March 2010 because of the opportunities available in the United States. His parents stayed behind and he lived with his sister and friends. In addition, the students in DHH, TMH and ELL maintained goals like those of their peers. Bepery planned on attending college and becoming a law enforcement officer and Oquendo hoped to graduate from law school. “I [need] a good GPA and seven [years of college]. That’s going to drive me crazy, but I can do it,” Oquendo signed. Teacher Denise Scott taught the TMH students skills with professional applications. They made beds and cooked meals in their classes on campus. They also created buttons to advertise for the yearbook and the homecoming dance. “I [feel] like the students need to have all the opportunities regular students have and that the kids have a lot to offer within the community, and I want them to be good members of the community,” Scott said. Even though students in the DHH, TMH and ELL classes required unique accommodations, these needs did not define the students’ personalities or lives. “They’re just like any other class. You have the jokester and the ones that are more serious; you have the ones who are more shy. They’re very much like typical teenagers; they just have a different way of learning,” Scott said.

“[My favorite tradition is going to] football games. It shows a lot of school spirit as a school,” sophomore Adismary Salinas said.

A+ paper. After completing a class assignment, sophomore Jamie Whaley turns her work in to teacher Ron Borgon. “Mr. Borgon’s very funny and makes us laugh,” Whaley said. Whaley hoped to work in a veterinarian’s office when she grew up.

The students trudged sleepily through campus to their first period classes. They paused to joke with friends and swap books at their lockers, and they slid into class just as the tardy bell rang. Their unique needs were not apparent, even to them, until a translator materialized or the teacher began speaking a language they struggled to understand. While the students in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Trainably Mentally Handicapped and English Language Learners programs formed a minority, they strove to prove that they were the norm and not the exception. Other students noticed the differences that existed between themselves and students in separate learning programs, but the similarities were just as distinguishable. The groups shared school experiences and extra-curricular interests such as sports and clubs. “We are all Boone students. I’ve been involved in spring football [and] Brave Aid,” junior Jonathan Oquendo signed. Though it was difficult for program participants to communicate, they enjoyed interacting with other students. Some required hearing aids, while others used interpreters, writing or texting to communicate. Translators helped DHH students understand the material when their teachers did not know sign language, but students still struggled with communicating and learning efficiently in classes. “I can’t take notes, so the teacher has to print them out for me so I can pay attention to the interpreter,” Oquendo signed. All the students in the programs attended at least one class tailored to their needs. A portion of them, like Oquendo

despite their unique needs, special education participants enjoyed lives similar to those of other students

Students defy disabilities

photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo/Amelia Cheatham

photos/Amelia Cheatham

strike it out. At the Best Buddies bowling event, freshman Alec Schmidt throws the ball. “My favorite part of school is that I can always trust somebody because my teachers are kind to me,” Schmidt said. Schmidt played video games in his spare time.

page 57 dhh/ell/tmh

Sophomore Vinh Tran demonstrates common American Sign Language signs that could be used to discuss the school day. Starting from the left, he signed “school,” “class,” “work” and “lunch.”

time to sign

WATCH&LEARN

box it up. Senior Heather Oliver helps SGA prepare Thanksgiving boxes for community families. “[My favorite things are] the activities we do because they are fun,” Oliver said. Oliver’s favorite part at school was seeing her teachers.

pb&j. To practice life skills, seniors Matthew Muragin and Zachariah Palmer make sandwiches for lunch. “[My favorite subject is] cooking. [I] get to eat good stuff and it is fun. [My favorite thing to make is] spaghetti,” Palmer said. The students in TMH also prepared a Thanksgiving meal in class.

photo courtesy/Denise Scott photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo/Amelia Cheatham


ref lection three


I took this photo on Nov. 11 during half time of the varsity football game against Edgewater

High School. The color guard’s commitment, poise and finesse have always fascinated me, and I feel this picture captures these qualities. This picture does have depth of field, as smaller, secondary figures are clearly visible in the background. The girl’s arm is also somewhat parallel to her rifle. However, I do not think that elements of composition are what make this photo particularly interesting. I think the concentration demonstrated on the girl’s face and the obvious rippling of her muscles depict accurately the heart she is contributing to the performance. Lastly, I love how this photo captures a distinct moment in time, right after she tossed the rifle. colorguard11-11_cheatham0019.jpg


ref lection three


I took this picture at the varsity softball game against Winter Park High School on March 5.

This picture is aesthetically pleasing to me for a variety of reasons. It demonstrates depth of field well, as Sarah Hayes (waiting to catch the ball) and the player looking on are slightly blurred and are smaller than coach Robin Bradford (in the foreground). I believe this photo also follows the rule of thirds, as Bradford is placed off-center and there is no one object that is directly in the center of the picture. The outline of Bradford and her bat in the foreground also fills the frame. Even more than I appreciate the picture for its elements of composition, I like it because of the distinct moment it captures, right before Bradford hits the ball to be fielded by Hayes. I took this picture as the team warmed up for the game, and I like how it demonstrates that Bradford is truly involved in helping her team to grow, since she is personally working to help them prepare. To me, this picture also captures a sense of tradition, as Bradford used to play softball for Boone and now she coaches it here. This picture demonstrates how different generations of Boone are still one community. Softball3-5_cheatham0120.jpg


ref lection three


This photo was also taken at the Nov. 11 varsity football game against Edgewater. It

demonstrates depth of field, as the crowd can be seen behind the players. The center of visual interest is obviously the two players in the semi-center of the frame. However, the players are off-center enough that rule of thirds could be applied. The shadows below the players create additional visual interest. I also like how the colors of the players’ uniforms are in stark contrast with the sky. This photo attracts me because of what it represents. Even though we were crushed by Edgewater in this game, the pride of the players to be playing for Boone is evident in their chest bump and in their facial expressions. I also like this photo because this chest bump was the only one the entire game. I was excited that I happened to be ready to take this picture when it occurred. football11-11_cheatham0122.jpg


ref lection f our


I feel that I was a valuable asset to this year’s Legend staff.

Several characteristics that I

think contributed to me making an impact were my dedication to publications, my ability to meet deadlines, my enthusiasm for the project and my ability to produce quality work, for the most part. First, I think that my commitment to publications can be measured both in the amount of time that I spent working on my deadlines and in how far I will go to get elements for my pages. I spent over an hour and forty-five minutes with Mrs. Spinelli, discussing the history of Boone crew, which helped a lot in completing the page. I also ended up calling a student for an interview by finding his mother’s cell phone number on her work’s website; I am not sure I would do this again, though, as I now realize this might have been a little strange. Second, I made all of my deadlines this year, which I think helped the editors, as they did not have to complete my pages for me. Third, I love being a part of creating something as special as the yearbook. I have never enjoyed any activity as much as I love being on staff, and I hope that my enthusiasm for the project encouraged my fellow staff members when they were having difficulties with their own pages. Lastly, with the exception of the TMH/DHH/ELL page, I feel all of my pages were good quality and accurately reflected the topics they covered. I think this accuracy and quality held true to the rest of the pages in the book and helped to create the amazing product we produced.


ref lection f ive


The most signif icant issue I dealt with this year came from losing my pages.

I lost four out of my seven

deadlines, typically in the days immediately prior to a deadline or, on one occasion, the day of the deadline. The first time this happened, I completely stressed out and couldn’t concentrate on rebuilding my page. However, I learned from this and chose to confront subsequent page losses as calmly and efficiently as possible. Overall, losing my pages continually proved important to my growth this year and taught me the importance of saving often and closing pages; I also became more adept at completing pages in a timely manner. If this problem happened to me again next year, I would make every effort to approach it calmly and cheerfully, as this type of situation can only help one to grow journalistically. Additionally, there is little value in concentrating on a page that cannot be recovered when you can rather easily recreate it. I feel that I handled the situation relatively well; initially, I was overcome by the idea of having to recreate a page I had labored on for weeks in a few hours. Evidently, however, I learned not to let this faze me. By deadline five, I think I handled this type of situation calmly and efficiently.


ref lection six


In the midterm, I stated that my greatest weakness was taking impactful photos.

Although I

did not have as many opportunities to take pictures second semester as I did first semester (due to less photodays and deadlines), I think the photos I took of crew, softball and the fine arts students and the pictures I took in New York demonstrate an increased ability to take photos from creative angles that capture definite moments. For example, I practiced getting on the same level as the rowers and softball players when photographing them, resulting in the erging pictures used in the secondary coverage on the crew page. The softball picture I chose to use as one of my three best pictures also demonstrates an effort to shoot from creative angles and an increased interest in capturing moments using elements of good composition. Similarly, when Carly and I shot fine arts students for newspaper, I tried to enter the action as much as possible without disturbing the students. Carly helped me incredibly in this, as she suggested creative angles and gave me tips on what would make a good shot. Overall, I think that once I began to focus on my photography, I saw some improvement. I would like to continue working to gain knowledge in this aspect of journalism, even though my focus next year will be on copy.


ref lection seven


go figure Other

What was your

batter up. In the game against Winter Park, junior Elizabeth Cargo swings to hit the ball. “I prefer fielding. I believe it comes more naturally and [it is] less pressure,” Cargo said. Cargo had a batting average of .288.

most memorable varsity softball game?

14 Varsity softball players polled, April 9, 2012

Colonial

[28%]

wind up. Before the March 5 game, senior Laura Gavern warms up. “I feel like I always have to do my best [when I am pitching] because if I don’t, I feel I let my team down,” Gavern said. Gavern had a fielding average of .923. photo/Blake Waranch

[22%] University

[14%]

Hagerty

[22%]

East River

[14%]

illustration/Amelia Cheatham and Blake Waranch

“[The Hagerty game was most memorable] because ,” of the long innings. We had to freshman Sara Galvis said. photo/Blake Waranch

FIGHT

ballin’: sophomore Brianna Cameron, junior varsity first base; junior Sarah Hayes, varsity third and first bases; senior Katelyn Schettino, varsity outfield; sophomore Samantha O’Born, junior varsity first base; senior Marissa Edwards, varsity catcher and first base.

Girls

field tough victory

varsity softball team pitched winning effort

meet

the girls

KAYLEIGH SHUMSKY

HANNA SEKENSKI

Catcher, freshman

Center Field, sophomore

Best game, personally? The St. Cloud game. I played three innings. Why did you join softball? I played travel ball recently and set this goal. Freshman on varsity? I feel accomplished and proud.

page 10 fierce

Favorite part? Being able to get away from stress. Person who inspired you? My dad. He’s a baseball coach; he helps me. What does softball mean to you? [It is] a sport I love to have fun in.

LESLIE CINTOLO Third Base, sophomore Most difficult game? West Orange. It didn’t seem we were focused. Word association: Softball? Hard-work. Describe the team in one word. Family.

“Boone being 60 is cool because I can sit down with relatives who are graduates from Boone

The team gazed from the scoreboard to its final hitters in desperation, willing them to break the seemingly indestructible tie. The batter’s hands clenched the bat tightly and swung, finally producing the satisfying cracking sound as the bat smacked the ball. “[The game against University High School was] a real nail biter and great game. University wanted to beat us and they came out and played outstanding. We matched them throughout. Our defense and pitching were outstanding,” coach Robin Bradford said. Matched in skill level, the teams remained scoreless during the typical seven innings of the game, ultimately forcing the game into

overtime. Ten innings after the game began, it was the girls’ final chance at bat. At last, both senior Katelyn Schettino and junior Sarah Hayes made hits. Schettino hit a double, which Hayes followed with her own double to get Schettino home. The girls won, 1-0. The game against University on Feb. 23, demonstrated the team’s ability to perform against fierce opponents. Despite losses, such as the close defeat by Hagerty, 5-4, on Feb. 7, the girls remained confident and continued to attain their goals. “Even though our record doesn’t show how strong of a team we are, I think we have a really strong team this year; we have great chemistry,”

senior third baseman Brandy Eaton said. On Feb. 24, Eaton scored her second high school career home run during the Lake Nona game to help the team win, 6-0. Additionally, the Feb. 9 game against Ocoee resulted in freshman pitcher Chase Cassady’s first ever shutout. The girls won, 12-0. “I can’t really describe that feeling. It was all good emotions. There was a peace,” Cassady said. With their overall record of 16-6 and their win against University, the girls demonstrated their proficiency and ability to field challenging victories as a team. [amelia cheatham and blake waranch]

and talk to them about how their school days were and compare them to mine,” sophomore Kathleen Nelson said.

photo/Amelia Cheatham

Students defy disabilities despite their unique needs, special education participants enjoyed lives similar to those of other students

pb&j. To practice life skills, seniors Matthew Muragin and Zachariah Palmer make sandwiches for lunch. “[My favorite subject is] cooking. [I] get to eat good stuff and it is fun. [My favorite thing to make is] spaghetti,” Palmer said. The students in TMH also prepared a Thanksgiving meal in class.

photo courtesy/Denise Scott photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo/Amelia Cheatham

[amelia cheatham]

WATCH&LEARN

photos/Amelia Cheatham

time to sign

Sophomore Vinh Tran demonstrates common American Sign Language signs that could be used to discuss the school day. Starting from the left, he signed “school,” “class,” “work” and “lunch.”

page 56 grounded

take note. In his ELL class, sophomore William Lin smiles while Rosa Camacho reviews essay writing. “[I will be able to use] English [in my future job]. [I moved here] for a better living,” Lin said. Lin moved to the U.S. from China when he was nine.

strike it out. At the Best Buddies bowling event, freshman Alec Schmidt throws the ball. “My favorite part of school is that I can always trust somebody because my teachers are kind to me,” Schmidt said. Schmidt played video games in his spare time.

page 57 dhh/ell/tmh

photo/Alexis Martinez

photo/Emily Nusbickel

“[My favorite tradition is going to] football games. It shows a lot of school spirit as a school,” sophomore Adismary Salinas said.

Students

CAREER skills health care academy applied knowledge to future

10

9

11

BRANDON COOK

BOBBI HILL

“The new people I meet in magnet from other [magnet programs beside finance].”

“Learning about all the diseases and gross things.”

page 70 driven

“[My favorite tradition is] going to football games because the Rowdy Crowd is fun to watch,” sophomore Olivia Rees said.

3

2

Magnet

ASPIRING professionals students gained knowledge in finance, law and criminal jus-

favorite part of your program?

“Probably the computers [we use] because we get to learn a different way.”

[1] resuscitation station. In Health Science III, senior Diamond Pulgarin practices CPR. “[Healthcare Academy teaches] me to be a better person and to help others,” Pulgarin said. Pulgarin applied the knowledge she gained by helping friends and family recover from illnesses. [2] cookie monster. At the magnet holiday luncheon, parent volunteer Monica Soriano serves freshman Austin Garcia dessert. “I like law because I like arguing with people,” Garcia said. Garcia hoped to attend law school. [3] making bank. During third period in the credit union, sophomore Daniel Hurtado consults the computer. “People look up to me as a smart person since I’m in magnet. I help them with their school work if they have trouble with it,” Hurtado said. Hurtado’s favorite part was making close friends.

[compiled by amelia cheatam]

What is your

KIERNAN MEHAN

photo/Karina Flores

1

She slipped the thermometer under her patient’s tongue and received a grateful glance. Surrounded by monitors and smells of a hospital environment, unaccustomed students felt misplaced, but this professional atmosphere allowed Healthcare Academy students to explore careers. Students with an interest in helping others entered the Healthcare Academy by taking Health Science I. After gaining an understanding of anatomy in Health Science I, they practiced nursing skills on one another in Health Science II. They could earn a nursing assistant degree by continuing through Health Science III, and gain experience with patients at Westminster Towers and Orlando Regional Medical Center. “[My favorite part of the occupation is] just helping people. I think it is a growing experience; you’re always learning new things,” sophomore Delaney Hoevenaar said. Before they could volunteer with patients, students needed to be CPR-certified. In the facilities where they worked, students performed tasks such as bathing, feeding and dressing patients, making beds and checking vitals. The students learned the basics of health care from active professionals in the field, such as teacher Elisabeth Smith, a registered nurse with 30 years of experience. This helped students determine if they wished to pursue medicine as a career. “[These classes] give them a chance to really see what it’s like to be in a health care field and if they really like it before they go and spend all that money on college. Students that have gone into a whole bunch of health careers said that what really made a difference was the time they spent in class,” Smith said. Healthcare Academy graduates entered fields such as respiratory therapy, registered nursing and electrocardiogram technology. In addition to launching them into the medical field, being in the Healthcare Academy affected how students interacted with others. “You’re always thinking of how to help someone. [You think of] their priorities instead of your own,” senior Anna Rymer said. The Healthcare Academy prepared students with an interest in medicine for their careers. Yet even if they decided to pursue other goals, students graduated from the academy with a knowledge of medicine, practical experience and a heightened sense of compassion for those around them.

Y4. Academic Writing. I feel the story I wrote about the students in DHH, TMH and ELL (page 56) provides other students insight into what attending school is like for students in these programs, including the difficulties that they face. I like that the copy covers all three programs in some way and that it focuses on how the kids in DHH, TMH and ELL are the same as the rest of Boone’s students.

photo/stephanie Nebeker

A+ paper. After completing a class assignment, sophomore Jamie Whaley turns her work in to teacher Ron Borgon. “Mr. Borgon’s very funny and makes us laugh,” Whaley said. Whaley hoped to work in a veterinarian’s office when she grew up.

I would like the copy covering the varsity softball team (on page 11 of the spring supplement) to represent my work. I feel that this story accurately depicts the team and its season and provides insight into one of the season’s most difficult games.

box it up. Senior Heather Oliver helps SGA prepare Thanksgiving boxes for community families. “[My favorite things are] the activities we do because they are fun,” Oliver said. Oliver’s favorite part at school was seeing her teachers.

and sophomore Arif Bepery, also attended select core classes with the rest of the student body. “[My most difficult subject is] math. I don’t understand a lot of it. I always need help. The classes are harder [here than in Bangladesh],” Bepery said. Bepery moved from Bangladesh in March 2010 because of the opportunities available in the United States. His parents stayed behind and he lived with his sister and friends. In addition, the students in DHH, TMH and ELL maintained goals like those of their peers. Bepery planned on attending college and becoming a law enforcement officer and Oquendo hoped to graduate from law school. “I [need] a good GPA and seven [years of college]. That’s going to drive me crazy, but I can do it,” Oquendo signed. Teacher Denise Scott taught the TMH students skills with professional applications. They made beds and cooked meals in their classes on campus. They also created buttons to advertise for the yearbook and the homecoming dance. “I [feel] like the students need to have all the opportunities regular students have and that the kids have a lot to offer within the community, and I want them to be good members of the community,” Scott said. Even though students in the DHH, TMH and ELL classes required unique accommodations, these needs did not define the students’ personalities or lives. “They’re just like any other class. You have the jokester and the ones that are more serious; you have the ones who are more shy. They’re very much like typical teenagers; they just have a different way of learning,” Scott said. photo/Amelia Cheatham

The students trudged sleepily through campus to their first period classes. They paused to joke with friends and swap books at their lockers, and they slid into class just as the tardy bell rang. Their unique needs were not apparent, even to them, until a translator materialized or the teacher began speaking a language they struggled to understand. While the students in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Trainably Mentally Handicapped and English Language Learners programs formed a minority, they strove to prove that they were the norm and not the exception. Other students noticed the differences that existed between themselves and students in separate learning programs, but the similarities were just as distinguishable. The groups shared school experiences and extra-curricular interests such as sports and clubs. “We are all Boone students. I’ve been involved in spring football [and] Brave Aid,” junior Jonathan Oquendo signed. Though it was difficult for program participants to communicate, they enjoyed interacting with other students. Some required hearing aids, while others used interpreters, writing or texting to communicate. Translators helped DHH students understand the material when their teachers did not know sign language, but students still struggled with communicating and learning efficiently in classes. “I can’t take notes, so the teacher has to print them out for me so I can pay attention to the interpreter,” Oquendo signed. All the students in the programs attended at least one class tailored to their needs. A portion of them, like Oquendo

page 11 sof tball

Y2. Sports Reporting.

what a blast. During a fire safety unit in Health Science II, junior Kiran Shaikh learns how to operate a fire extinguisher. “[My favorite part of the lesson] was using the fire extinguisher,” Shaikh said. The Healthcare Academy students learned lessons on practical skills necessary in healthcare facilities, such as fire safety.

“Guilty!” The verdict resounded through the silent courtroom. Then, the officials cracked smiles and the defendant sauntered out from behind the stand, unshackled. Through experiences such as mock trials, mock crime scenes and working in the credit union, magnet students learned the basics of the law, criminal justice and finance fields. “[Magnet] helps you [get] a better understanding of the topic you’re in. It prepares you for your future,” law magnet student Alexandra Nagle, freshman, said. Admitted students prepared for their future careers by taking specialized courses. Teachers, such as criminal justice teacher David Vernon, had experience in the fields that the students wished to pursue. “I felt like I had real life experience [in law enforcement] to share and that the magnet would provide [interested] students.

Whether they go into CJ or not, they’ll have a better understanding of how our system works,” Vernon, former police officer, said. The skills taught by the instructors gave students insight into possible career paths that included activism in the community. “A lot of the professions are about protecting and serving the people in the community. [We practice this by] teaching awareness to younger kids [through community service],” junior Christian Rydstrand, criminal justice magnet, said. Magnet teachers encouraged their students to formulate their opinions through selfevaluation, not just to accept the information to which their teachers exposed them. “I don’t see my job as teaching them what to think; hopefully just teaching them to think,” Vernon said.

page 71 health care academy/magnet

Y4. Academic Writing. I like the copy for the Health Care Academy page because it is informative, yet personal. The quotes and conclusion of the story support the latter statement. In my opinion, this copy is concise and interesting. I feel the reader is able to grasp an understanding of the Health Care Academy program.


design one


002 people

Aximagnatias experru ptatet peritat laborest ipicid qui andi sus alitintotas sedis dolupta speleni magnihi litio. Nequide lluptas mo magnime id modit, voluptae. Nam, sequia doluptiae ipici omnis audi occum quam aut asim volor ma nus ium sum aut alitati officab oribusdae. Nequi od ut aspidel eliquae omnis debis aut plabore miliaes erunt optaturio dolendae venducient et at. Aximagnatias experru ptatet peritat laborest ipicid qui andi sus alitintotas sedis dolupta speleni magnihi litio. Nequide lluptas mo magnime

amelia cheatham

subhead here 18 pt. subhead here

Aximagnatias experru ptatet peritat laborest ipicid qui andi sus alitintotas sedis dolupta speleni magnihi litio. Nequide lluptas mo magnime id modit, voluptae. Nam, sequia doluptiae ipici omnis audi occum quam aut asim volor ma nus ium sum aut alitati officab oribusdae. Nequi od ut aspidel eliquae omnis debis aut plabore miliaes erunt optaturio dolendae venducient et at. Aximagnatias experru ptatet peritat laborest ipicid qui andi sus alitintotas sedis dolupta speleni magnihi litio. Nequide lluptas mo magnime id modit, voluptae. Nam, sequia doluptiae ipici omnis audi occum quam aut asim volor ma nus ium sum aut alitati officab

HEADLINE HERE 48 pt.

photo/Amelia Cheatham

I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen. lead in. I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen.

Aximagnatias experru ptatet peritat laborest ipicid qui andi sus alitintotas sedis dolupta speleni magnihi litio. Nequide lluptas mo magnime id modit, voluptae. Nam, sequia doluptiae ipici omnis audi occum quam aut asim volor ma nus ium sum aut alitati officab oribusdae. Nequi od ut aspidel eliquae omnis debis aut plabore miliaes erunt optaturio dolendae venducient et at. Aximagnatias experru ptatet peritat laborest ipicid qui andi sus alitintotas sedis dolupta speleni magnihi litio. Nequide lluptas mo magnime id modit, voluptae. Nam, sequia doluptiae ipici omnis audi occum quam aut asim volor ma nus ium sum aut alitati officab oribusdae. Nequi od ut aspidel eliquae omnis debis aut plabore miliaes erunt optaturio dolendae venducient et at. Aximagnatias experru ptatet

1)Statue of Liberty

2) Ground Zero

oh, the places we went!

photo/Amelia Cheatham

lead in.

photo/Amelia Cheatham photo/Amelia Cheatham

bubbly 003

I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen. lead in. I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen.

lead in.

I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen. lead in. I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen.

lead in.

photo/Amelia Cheatham photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo/Amelia Cheatham


design two


002 people

I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen. lead in. I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen.

lead in.

To be a Christian pirate and a puppy masseuse.

Describe your aspiration in life?

My dog, Lucy, because she just runs around all day.

If you could trade places with anyone for one day, who would it be and why?

Melinda Cheatham

with

Q&A

photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo/Amelia Cheatham photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo/Amelia Cheatham

I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen.

lead in.

amelia cheatham

subhead here 18 pt. subhead here

bubbly 003

I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen. lead in. I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen.

lead in.

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HEADLINE HERE 48 pt.

photo/Amelia Cheatham

I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen. lead in. I am a present tense sentence telling who or what is happening in the photo. “I am a very good quotable quote,” Burke said. I am a past tense sentence telling something that cannot be seen.

lead in.

photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo/Amelia Cheatham


deadline one


photo/Brittany Hope

MONEY

$how them the

parking spot picasso. On Sept. 7, senior Bianca Oliveira paints the totem pole in her parking spot. “It was worth buying because I get to park closer than everyone else,” Oliveira said. SGA sold parking spaces for $65 or $80 for customized spaces.

Senior year was commonly idealized by students as the end of late night studying and stress over grades. However, the processes of applying to college and planning for life after high school outweighed the relief that came with a lighter workload. Students faced the costs of applications, graduation supplies, standardized tests, yearbook ads, senior portraits, parking spots and various social functions such as prom and homecoming. [amelia cheatham]

how are you

budgeting for senior expenses?

Expect the

Expenses

One-Way Flights for College Visits

$139-$431 mICHEllE TOnGuE

juSTIn FuSIlIER

SARAH HunTE

“I love quote pages because I love so see all the funny thins kids say about things in our school. Like why are we so crazy?”

“My parents and I fundraise [for activities like band] and I chip in on my own. My parents normally spot me $20 here or there.”

“My parents. [The costs] make me ask myself ‘do I really need this and [is it] something I can use long-term?’”

“I got a job. I started a savings account and I put aside every paycheck. [I’m] overwhelmed at times, but it makes me feel more independent.”

photo/Amelia Cheatham

AnGElICA SASSnAn DuBOIS

Thayer Kolbo

page 144 unique

overcome

Senior Yearbook Ad

$75-$325 SAT/ACT

$34-$92 Senior Portraits/Panorama

$20-$75

Students application costs

Prom/Homecoming

While seniors looked forward to the end of high school, they were also forced to consider their college options. With thousands of schools across the country from which to decide, students strove to choose a school that would fit their personal needs and accommodate their financial situations. On Oct. 13, senior Thayer Kolbo listened to a UCF representative to consider if the school was the right match for him. College and Career adviser Ann Cadman helped students choose where to apply and plan for the processes’ expenses. However, there was little students could do to alleviate costs, unless they qualified for waivers through free and reduced lunch. College applications cost $30 to $75 per school and transcripts cost $5, or were free if sent electronically. “The only way that students could take care of [expenses would be] to not apply to so many colleges and universities. By the time they’re ready to apply they should have the number down to three to five,” Cadman said.

Cap & Gown

$70 $45 “If I want to do every single senior activity, then I’ll use some of my money from work, but my parents will take care of all the typical things,” senior Patrick Collins said.

“Polyester Paradise [is my favorite tradition] because it’s a fun event where we all come together,” senior Dan Rivera said.


deadline two


Color Page

page 170 fierce

race through the rain. Sophomore Alexandria Meneses races at the Hagerty Invitational. “[My ideal race would have] good weather conditions. And if it’s raining it’s a little bit more fun, just because it adds a whole other obstacle,” Meneses said. Meneses’ best time was 20:53.10.

[amelia cheatham]

“She’s continuing to become a stronger, more mature runner. She’s gained confidence over the past three years,” coach Paul Katauskas said. Along with Ketchum and Classe, seniors Caroline Coleman, Olivia Swartwood, Margaret Dukes and Katherine Burns pushed the team to perform. “[This team is] the reason I came back to coach cross country one more year. They’re very coach able, disciplined and they don’t complain,” Katauskas said. Their training paid off, with the team placing first at the Metro Championships on Oct. 26 and third in the District Championships on Nov. 5. At the Regional Championships on Nov. 5, the girls placed fifth, earning the opportunity to compete at states and fulfilling their dream. “[I want to encourage the girls] to keep trying and not let anything get in the way of what you’re trying to do. I have fun with them, but when it comes time to work hard I take it seriously and I think it shows because I’ve performed better than before,” Classe said. Armed with their trusty capes, the girls placed 11th out of 24 teams at the State Championships, with Classe placing 9th in the state at 18:57.88.

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

“[My favorite part of Boone is] the family feel of it. Everyone’s together and all the teachers work

run for her money. With a competitor in sight, senior Margaret Dukes races to catch up. “[My favorite race was] the UF Invite. Everyone usually hates that race because it’s really hilly, but I remember enjoying that race,” Dukes said. Dukes ran 20:59.62 at the District 3 meet on Nov. 5.

The super heroes sprinted past, their ponytails dancing through the air and their capes billowing behind them as they trained to capture their elusive goal: to race at the State meet. Sporting their capes made by sophomore Alexandria Meneses’ grandmother, the girls team started the season with confidence and a renewed goal to attend the state meet, which they missed the past two seasons. “To make it to states as a team is my first [goal]. As a single runner it would be cool, too. We want to make Coach K’s last year special,” freshman Cassandra Ketchum said. Although new to Boone, Ketchum joined the team with prior cross country experience, running for Circle Christian in middle school. Ketchum was the number two runner and ran a season best of 19:41.50. Senior Heather Classe led the team as top scorer, placing fourth overall at the District 3 meet on Nov. 4 with a personal record of 18:36.98. Though she ran since ninth grade, Classe missed all but three races of her junior year after contracting mononucleosis. She returned her senior year stronger and with a better mentality.

cross country team soared through season with a mission

championship

Girls chase state

photo/Dean Stewart Photography

together,” junior Jenna Hines said.

just breathe. At the FLRunners.com Invitational, senior Katherine Burns paces herself. “[My favorite race was] Hagerty. It was really cold and rainy so nobody got hot and we all ran really well,” Burns said. Burns’ best time was 20:59.23 at the Metro East Championships on Oct. 26.

photo/Caroline Coleman

1

2

ten

runners on varsity team

photo/Caroline Coleman

page 171 girls cross country

miles ran per week

25-30

days in Colorado at running camp

meets in the cross country season

five

girls on the cross country team

8 9

coaches for boys and girls

20

did you know?

[1] eyes on the prize. Nearing the end of the DeLand Invitational, senior Olivia Swartwood focuses on the course. “[The best part is] staying in shape [and] running with some of my best friends,” Swartwood said. Swartwood’s personal best was 20:06.4. [2] dynamic duo. At the DeLand meet, freshmen Mary Burkett and Leah Sikes race together. “[Running with Mary] helps, because if I’m tired she’ll push me and if she’s tired I’ll push her. We motivate each other,” Sikes said. Sikes ran JV and varsity.

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

photo/Caroline Coleman

Color - Size 9 - 0-03445: Boone HS

Color Page


deadline two


YEAR IN NUMBERS

Deja Vu DeLand Invite U of F Invite FLRunners.com Hagerty Invite Metro East Meet District Meet Regional Meet State Meet

7th 4th 10th 5th 3rd 1st 3rd 5th 11th

Deja Vu Deland Invite U of F Invite FL Runners.com Hagerty Invite Metro East Meet District Meet Regional Meet

page 198 fierce

NOW:

THEN:

9/9/11 9/17/11 9/24/11 9/30/11 10/8/11 10/26/11 11/5/11 11/12/11

10th 7th 30th 4th 7th 2nd 2nd 12th

boys cross country

9/9/11 9/17/11 9/24/11 9/30/11 10/8/11 10/26/11 11/5/11 11/12/11 11/19/11

girls cross country

THE

[more coverage on pages 170-173]

boys on cross country, 2011

28

boys on cross country, 1961

18 3.1

miles girls race length, 2011

2

miles girls race length, 1985

at regionals, 2011

12th place

at regionals, 1998

13th place

“My favorite Boone tradition is] wearing the letterman jackets or wearing orange on Friday,”

girls on cross country, 2011

20

girls on cross country, 1976

5

boys. front: Preston Taylor, Charles Collins, Jordan Bohannon. row 2: Christopher Slason, Bryan Capps, Adam Laxton, Nathaniel Reiff, Anthony Coscia. row 3: Dustin Driskell, James Dawson, Christopher Caplan, Davis Coleman, Burkhardt Helfrich, Parker Bell, Luke Smith, Brandon Kruppenbacher. row 4: Brandon Ryan, Chase Harris, Graham Pittenger, Cody Tipping, Dylan Bunch, Daniel O’Loane, Austin Mcfarlin back: coach Paul Katauskas, Cameron Stewartson, Ryan Harding, Andrew Tormanen.

photo/Channa Harrington

photo/Channa Harrington

girls. front: Maergrethe Box, Heather Classe, Katherine Burns, Margaret Dukes, Caroline Coleman. row 2: Kelsey Matteson, Michelle Duncan, Emily Collins, Jenna Hines, Rachel Burkett, Alexandria Meneses. row 3: Leah Sikes, Claire Collins, Cassandra Ketchum, Mary Burkett, Rachel Goldenberg, Mykayla James. back: coach Rene Mayer, coach Paul Katauskas, coach Darcy Jeffers.

Cross Country [more coverage on pages 176-177]

Cullen Landis 46 at Edge

Tyler Marshall 43 at LHP/CC

45

freshman Jonathan Bedward said.

girls. Erin Welsh, Taylor Porter, Lori Iacone, Katherine Rohe, coach Cathy Rohe.

boys front: Joshua Maldonado, Christopher White. back: Tyler Stokes, Joseph Johnson, Thomas Green-Seall.

Joshua Halloran 54 at LHP/CC

50

Christopher White 45 at Hagerty

Thomas Green-Seall 41 at Lake Nona/BM

55

Kyle Leveille 39 at Apopka

40

David O’Dell 51 at Edge

Joshua Maldonado 44 at Lake Nona/BM

tee time A quick look at the boys varsity golfers’ best 9 hole scores from the season.

Golf

photo/Caroline Coleman photo/Caroline Coleman

Tyler Stokes 44 at LHP/CC

35

Clinton Nickerson 42 at Hagerty

Apopka Olympia Wekiva Hagerty Apopka Lake Nona Bishop Moore Lake Nona Winter Park West Orange

West Orange Timber Creek Wekiva Colonial University Cypress Creek East River

192-274 94-114 325-321 178-200 200-198 256-257 257-264

81-85 85-95 193-194 153-174 181-179 153-171 147-171 155-178 176-193 296-339

page 199 sports reference

9/12/11 9/14/11 9/15/11 9/20/11 9/27/11 9/28/11 10/4/11

girls golf [2-7]

8/30/11 8/30/11 9/1/11 9/6/11 9/7/11 9/14/11 9/14/11 10/4/11 10/10/11 10/12/11

boys golf [1-9]

YEAR IN NUMBERS THE


deadline three


page 56 grounded

take note. In his ELL class, sophomore William Lin smiles while Rosa Camacho reviews essay writing. “[I will be able to use] English [in my future job]. [I moved here] for a better living,” Lin said. Lin moved to the U.S. from China when he was nine.

[amelia cheatham]

and sophomore Arif Bepery, also attended select core classes with the rest of the student body. “[My most difficult subject is] math. I don’t understand a lot of it. I always need help. The classes are harder [here than in Bangladesh],” Bepery said. Bepery moved from Bangladesh in March 2010 because of the opportunities available in the United States. His parents stayed behind and he lived with his sister and friends. In addition, the students in DHH, TMH and ELL maintained goals like those of their peers. Bepery planned on attending college and becoming a law enforcement officer and Oquendo hoped to graduate from law school. “I [need] a good GPA and seven [years of college]. That’s going to drive me crazy, but I can do it,” Oquendo signed. Teacher Denise Scott taught the TMH students skills with professional applications. They made beds and cooked meals in their classes on campus. They also created buttons to advertise for the yearbook and the homecoming dance. “I [feel] like the students need to have all the opportunities regular students have and that the kids have a lot to offer within the community, and I want them to be good members of the community,” Scott said. Even though students in the DHH, TMH and ELL classes required unique accommodations, these needs did not define the students’ personalities or lives. “They’re just like any other class. You have the jokester and the ones that are more serious; you have the ones who are more shy. They’re very much like typical teenagers; they just have a different way of learning,” Scott said.

“[My favorite tradition is going to] football games. It shows a lot of school spirit as a school,” sophomore Adismary Salinas said.

A+ paper. After completing a class assignment, sophomore Jamie Whaley turns her work in to teacher Ron Borgon. “Mr. Borgon’s very funny and makes us laugh,” Whaley said. Whaley hoped to work in a veterinarian’s office when she grew up.

The students trudged sleepily through campus to their first period classes. They paused to joke with friends and swap books at their lockers, and they slid into class just as the tardy bell rang. Their unique needs were not apparent, even to them, until a translator materialized or the teacher began speaking a language they struggled to understand. While the students in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Trainably Mentally Handicapped and English Language Learners programs formed a minority, they strove to prove that they were the norm and not the exception. Other students noticed the differences that existed between themselves and students in separate learning programs, but the similarities were just as distinguishable. The groups shared school experiences and extra-curricular interests such as sports and clubs. “We are all Boone students. I’ve been involved in spring football [and] Brave Aid,” junior Jonathan Oquendo signed. Though it was difficult for program participants to communicate, they enjoyed interacting with other students. Some required hearing aids, while others used interpreters, writing or texting to communicate. Translators helped DHH students understand the material when their teachers did not know sign language, but students still struggled with communicating and learning efficiently in classes. “I can’t take notes, so the teacher has to print them out for me so I can pay attention to the interpreter,” Oquendo signed. All the students in the programs attended at least one class tailored to their needs. A portion of them, like Oquendo

despite their unique needs, special education participants enjoyed lives similar to those of other students

Students defy disabilities

photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo/Amelia Cheatham

photos/Amelia Cheatham

strike it out. At the Best Buddies bowling event, freshman Alec Schmidt throws the ball. “My favorite part of school is that I can always trust somebody because my teachers are kind to me,” Schmidt said. Schmidt played video games in his spare time.

page 57 dhh/ell/tmh

Sophomore Vinh Tran demonstrates common American Sign Language signs that could be used to discuss the school day. Starting from the left, he signed “school,” “class,” “work” and “lunch.”

time to sign

WATCH&LEARN

box it up. Senior Heather Oliver helps SGA prepare Thanksgiving boxes for community families. “[My favorite things are] the activities we do because they are fun,” Oliver said. Oliver’s favorite part at school was seeing her teachers.

pb&j. To practice life skills, seniors Matthew Muragin and Zachariah Palmer make sandwiches for lunch. “[My favorite subject is] cooking. [I] get to eat good stuff and it is fun. [My favorite thing to make is] spaghetti,” Palmer said. The students in TMH also prepared a Thanksgiving meal in class.

photo courtesy/Denise Scott photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo/Amelia Cheatham


deadline four


page 70 driven

“The new people I meet in magnet from other [magnet programs beside finance].”

9

BRANDON COOK

11

“Learning about all the diseases and gross things.”

BOBBI HILL

“[My favorite tradition is] going to football games because the Rowdy Crowd is fun to watch,” sophomore Olivia Rees said.

“Probably the computers [we use] because we get to learn a different way.”

KIERNAN MEHAN

10

favorite part of your program?

What is your

She slipped the thermometer under her patient’s tongue and received a grateful glance. Surrounded by monitors and smells of a hospital environment, unaccustomed students felt misplaced, but this professional atmosphere allowed Healthcare Academy students to explore careers. Students with an interest in helping others entered the Healthcare Academy by taking Health Science I. After gaining an understanding of anatomy in Health Science I, they practiced nursing skills on one another in Health Science II. They could earn a nursing assistant degree by continuing through Health Science III, and gain experience with patients at Westminster Towers and Orlando Regional Medical Center. “[My favorite part of the occupation is] just helping people. I think it is a growing experience; you’re always learning new things,” sophomore Delaney Hoevenaar said. Before they could volunteer with patients, students needed to be CPR-certified. In the facilities where they worked, students performed tasks such as bathing, feeding and dressing patients, making beds and checking vitals. The students learned the basics of health care from active professionals in the field, such as teacher Elisabeth Smith, a registered nurse with 30 years of experience. This helped students determine if they wished to pursue medicine as a career. “[These classes] give them a chance to really see what it’s like to be in a health care field and if they really like it before they go and spend all that money on college. Students that have gone into a whole bunch of health careers said that what really made a difference was the time they spent in class,” Smith said. Healthcare Academy graduates entered fields such as respiratory therapy, registered nursing and electrocardiogram technology. In addition to launching them into the medical field, being in the Healthcare Academy affected how students interacted with others. “You’re always thinking of how to help someone. [You think of] their priorities instead of your own,” senior Anna Rymer said. The Healthcare Academy prepared students with an interest in medicine for their careers. Yet even if they decided to pursue other goals, students graduated from the academy with a knowledge of medicine, practical experience and a heightened sense of compassion for those around them.

health care academy applied knowledge to future

CAREER skills

what a blast. During a fire safety unit in Health Science II, junior Kiran Shaikh learns how to operate a fire extinguisher. “[My favorite part of the lesson] was using the fire extinguisher,” Shaikh said. The Healthcare Academy students learned lessons on practical skills necessary in healthcare facilities, such as fire safety.

1

2

3

Whether they go into CJ or not, they’ll have a better understanding of how our system works,” Vernon, former police officer, said. The skills taught by the instructors gave students insight into possible career paths that included activism in the community. “A lot of the professions are about protecting and serving the people in the community. [We practice this by] teaching awareness to younger kids [through community service],” junior Christian Rydstrand, criminal justice magnet, said. Magnet teachers encouraged their students to formulate their opinions through selfevaluation, not just to accept the information to which their teachers exposed them. “I don’t see my job as teaching them what to think; hopefully just teaching them to think,” Vernon said.

page 71 health care academy/magnet

“Guilty!” The verdict resounded through the silent courtroom. Then, the officials cracked smiles and the defendant sauntered out from behind the stand, unshackled. Through experiences such as mock trials, mock crime scenes and working in the credit union, magnet students learned the basics of the law, criminal justice and finance fields. “[Magnet] helps you [get] a better understanding of the topic you’re in. It prepares you for your future,” law magnet student Alexandra Nagle, freshman, said. Admitted students prepared for their future careers by taking specialized courses. Teachers, such as criminal justice teacher David Vernon, had experience in the fields that the students wished to pursue. “I felt like I had real life experience [in law enforcement] to share and that the magnet would provide [interested] students.

students gained knowledge in finance, law and criminal jus-

ASPIRING professionals

Magnet

[compiled by amelia cheatam]

photo/Emily Nusbickel photo/Karina Flores

Students

[1] resuscitation station. In Health Science III, senior Diamond Pulgarin practices CPR. “[Healthcare Academy teaches] me to be a better person and to help others,” Pulgarin said. Pulgarin applied the knowledge she gained by helping friends and family recover from illnesses. [2] cookie monster. At the magnet holiday luncheon, parent volunteer Monica Soriano serves freshman Austin Garcia dessert. “I like law because I like arguing with people,” Garcia said. Garcia hoped to attend law school. [3] making bank. During third period in the credit union, sophomore Daniel Hurtado consults the computer. “People look up to me as a smart person since I’m in magnet. I help them with their school work if they have trouble with it,” Hurtado said. Hurtado’s favorite part was making close friends.

photo/stephanie Nebeker

photo/Alexis Martinez


deadline f ive


page 234 grounded

Parent and artist Ron Hawkins designed the team logo: a brave head atop two crossed oars.

2002

The team began practicing on Turkey Lake.

2001

The crew team built its first boathouse on Lake Conway, on land donated by a rower’s parents.

1991-1992

The first female coxswains, Cassandra Witty, Leslie Caruso and Elizabeth Gianini, joined crew.

1985-1986

Frank Anderson, Garrett Swartwood, and Jamie Brown began the boys crew team, using a wooden boat nicknamed “The Salad Bar.”

Fall of 1985

PAST

FROM THE

blast

3

3

photo/Emily Nusbickel

[1] push, pull. Junior Dimitri Tsirigotis practices his stroke at Turkey Lake. “[When I row] I feel accomplished. [The feeling is] powerful and I have fun doing it,” Tsirigotis said. This was Tsirigotis’s first year rowing with the team. [2] game plan. Before the Men’s Lightweight Double at the Halloween Regatta, senior Michael Merwin discusses strategy with coach Daniel Vanegas. “[Crew] teaches us time management, teamwork skills and respect,” Merwin said. The team had two other coaches, John Holiday and Trey Poole. [3] smooth cruise. Oar in hand, sophomore Meghan Asbury propels her boat. “[My favorite moment of the season was when] we went out and the water was perfect. Everyone was together and it was a really good practice day,” Asbury said. Asbury rowed in the Women’s Varsity 4. [4] one stroke at a time. In the Florida Straits Regatta, coxswain sophomore Joan Marie Spinelli leads, freshmans Lea Warren and Lindsay Merwin, sophomore Gabrielle Yordan and freshman Rachel Hewitt in the Novice Women’s 4+ boat. “[When I’m rowing I think about how] we’re a team and we’re doing this for each other,” Yordan said. The team won second place in the regatta.

1

to erg

photo/Emily Nusbickel photo/Amelia Cheatham

2

photo/Amelia Cheatham

photo courtesy/Maggie Merwin photo courtesy/Maggie Merwin

“We have drums that we beat halfway through sprints, so it gets people

When he felt the burn travel through his tired legs up to his throbbing arms, sophomore Jacob Sondel pushed himself through the pain to complete his time on the erg machine. “[After being on the erg] I’m exhausted, but it feels great, especially if I beat a personal record,” Sondel said. An erg is a machine used to simulate the action of watercraft rowing for the purpose of exercise or training for rowing. Rowers were able to measure the amount of energy generated through a device called an ergometer. “[To get through practicing on the erg, I think] that I just need to give it my all,” Sondel said.

urge

just breathe. Due to inclement water conditions, freshman Peyton Tholl practices on an ergometer. “[My least favorite part of erging is the] point that you hit [when you’re erging a] 2K and it feels like it’s never going to be over,” Tholl said. Tholl finished 11th in her skill and weight class at the Erg Sprints Championships on Feb. 4.

4

board members, directing publicity for the team and driving the rowers to competitions. In addition, former rowers returned to aid the team, including club sponsor Margaret Ramis. “We’re a pretty close team and it’s pretty much like a family atmosphere,” junior Kasee Kickery said. The dedication and efforts of both the team members and their supporters led to numerous victories on the water. The team began the fall season competing in the Halloween Regatta in Tampa on Oct. 29. They then traveled to Chattanooga on Nov. 5, where they participated in the Head of the Hooch Regatta, the second largest race in the nation. The team defeated clubs and schools motivated at the time they need it most,” sophomore Jesse Pollard said.

Their muscles rippled as they catapulted forward, then backward. Sweat glistened on their foreheads and they gasped for breath. In front, the coxswain encouraged them on. Crew required cooperation between rowers; however, the team developed deeper bonds that ultimately led them to excel in the sport. These relationships developed during the hours the team spent traveling to and attending practices and regattas. “[The team’s strengths are it’s] loyalty and camaraderie. They’re committed to succeeding and doing it the right way,” head coach John Holiday said. The rowers’ families were also valued members of the team, volunteering time as

Rowers achieved recognition through cooperation and support

page 235 crew

from across the country, including Edgewater, South Orlando Rowing Association and Lake Brantley. On Dec. 3, the team attended the FL Straits Regatta in Palm Bay, where Novice Women’s 4+ earned silver medals, and the Novice Men’s 8+ won bronze medals. “[To me] crew means teamwork and how everyone works together and is in synchronization. If one person messes up, the whole team could lose the competition,” freshman Tristan Garalde said. The members of the crew team worked together, encouraged by each other and their supporters, to achieve recognition and to examine the very tenets of their sport. [amelia cheatham and emily nusbickel]

Team STROKES towards

push it to the limit. Gliding across the water, junior Madison Lennon pushes to the finish. “It’s a very unique feeling [to row], but only a rower would really know,” Lennon said. The team practiced four days a week at Turkey Lake and one day on campus.

photo/Emily Nusbickel


deadline seven


East River

[14%]

page 10 fierce

Favorite part? Being able to get away from stress. Person who inspired you? My dad. He’s a baseball coach; he helps me. What does softball mean to you? [It is] a sport I love to have fun in.

Best game, personally? The St. Cloud game. I played three innings. Why did you join softball? I played travel ball recently and set this goal. Freshman on varsity? I feel accomplished and proud.

Most difficult game? West Orange. It didn’t seem we were focused. Word association: Softball? Hard-work. Describe the team in one word. Family.

Third Base, sophomore

“Boone being 60 is cool because I can sit down with relatives who are graduates from Boone

Center Field, sophomore

wind up. Before the March 5 game, senior Laura Gavern warms up. “I feel like I always have to do my best [when I am pitching] because if I don’t, I feel I let my team down,” Gavern said. Gavern had a fielding average of .923.

LESLIE CINTOLO

batter up. In the game against Winter Park, junior Elizabeth Cargo swings to hit the ball. “I prefer fielding. I believe it comes more naturally and [it is] less pressure,” Cargo said. Cargo had a batting average of .288.

HANNA SEKENSKI

photo/Blake Waranch

Catcher, freshman

KAYLEIGH SHUMSKY

the girls

meet

FIGHT

[14%]

University

[22%]

Colonial

14 Varsity softball players polled, April 9, 2012

“[The Hagerty game was most memorable] because ,” of the long innings. We had to freshman Sara Galvis said.

[22%]

Hagerty

[28%]

Other

varsity softball game?

most memorable

What was your

photo/Blake Waranch

go figure

field tough victory The team gazed from the scoreboard to its final hitters in desperation, willing them to break the seemingly indestructible tie. The batter’s hands clenched the bat tightly and swung, finally producing the satisfying cracking sound as the bat smacked the ball. “[The game against University High School was] a real nail biter and great game. University wanted to beat us and they came out and played outstanding. We matched them throughout. Our defense and pitching were outstanding,” coach Robin Bradford said. Matched in skill level, the teams remained scoreless during the typical seven innings of the game, ultimately forcing the game into

overtime. Ten innings after the game began, it was the girls’ final chance at bat. At last, both senior Katelyn Schettino and junior Sarah Hayes made hits. Schettino hit a double, which Hayes followed with her own double to get Schettino home. The girls won, 1-0. The game against University on Feb. 23, demonstrated the team’s ability to perform against fierce opponents. Despite losses, such as the close defeat by Hagerty, 5-4, on Feb. 7, the girls remained confident and continued to attain their goals. “Even though our record doesn’t show how strong of a team we are, I think we have a really strong team this year; we have great chemistry,”

page 11 sof tball

senior third baseman Brandy Eaton said. On Feb. 24, Eaton scored her second high school career home run during the Lake Nona game to help the team win, 6-0. Additionally, the Feb. 9 game against Ocoee resulted in freshman pitcher Chase Cassady’s first ever shutout. The girls won, 12-0. “I can’t really describe that feeling. It was all good emotions. There was a peace,” Cassady said. With their overall record of 16-6 and their win against University, the girls demonstrated their proficiency and ability to field challenging victories as a team. [amelia cheatham and blake waranch]

varsity softball team pitched winning effort

Girls

ballin’: sophomore Brianna Cameron, junior varsity first base; junior Sarah Hayes, varsity third and first bases; senior Katelyn Schettino, varsity outfield; sophomore Samantha O’Born, junior varsity first base; senior Marissa Edwards, varsity catcher and first base.

and talk to them about how their school days were and compare them to mine,” sophomore Kathleen Nelson said.

illustration/Amelia Cheatham and Blake Waranch


deadline seven


Softball

[more coverage on pages 10-11] varsity. front: Coach Robin Bradford, Elizabeth Cargo, Kayleigh Shumsky, Sara Galvis, Chase Cassady, Sarah Hayes, Ciara McCoy, coach Kenny Miller. row 2: Coach Bill Bergdoll, Kristi Creel, Laura Gavern, Marissa Edwards, Katelyn Schettino, Brandy Eaton, Leslie Cintolo, coach Todd Craver.

THE

photo/Karen Shumsky

YEARIN NUMBERS varsity softball [16-6] Hagerty Ocoee Harmony Winter Park University Lake Nona Pine Castle Dr. Phillips Cypress Creek Winter Park Freedom Timber Creek Cypress Creek Freedom Apopka St. Cloud East River Colonial Oviedo South Lake Lake Mary West Orange

4-5 12-0 5-2 8-1 1-0 5-0 0-1 2-0 0-3 3-1 10-0 0-3 0-1 11-0 1-2 8-0 7-1 12-0 5-0 14-2 8-7 5-1

photo/Karen Shumsky

2/7/12 2/9/12 2/14/12 2/17/12 2/23/12 2/24/12 2/28/12 2/29/12 3/2/12 3/5/12 3/7/12 3/12/12 3/14/12 3/16/12 3/20/12 3/21/12 4/3/12 4/4/12 4/6/12 4/9/12 4/12/12 4/13/12

junior varsity softball [16-2] 2/6/12 2/7/12 2/9/12 2/14/12 2/17/12 2/23/12 2/24/12 2/28/12 2/29/12 3/2/12 3/5/12 3/7/12 3/12/12 3/14/12 3/15/12 3/19/12 3/20/12 3/21/12

Lake Highland 17-5 Hagerty 5-2 Ocoee 15-0 Harmony 3-2 Winter Park 11-6 University 10-2 Lake Nona 19-2 Pine Castle 7-5 Dr. Phillips 10-0 Cypress Creek 15-0 Winter Park 14-4 Freedom 9-1 Timber Creek 5-4 Cypress Creek 14-4 Lake Highland 11-1 West Orange 5-11 Apopka 6-3 St. Cloud 6-9

junior varsity. front: Mackenzie Castor, Hanna Sekenski, Reagan Robins, Jennifer Alvarez, Mary Dusing, Samantha O’Born, Summer Douglas, Karina Ramirez, Sidney Suggs. back: Kaitlyn Darrow, Abigail Hooven, Brianna Cameron, Jennifer Dunn, Kathleen Nelson, Sarah Redd, coach Todd Craver.

meet

the girls MARY DUSING

REAGAN ROBINS

Shortstop, sophomore

Pitcher, freshman

Favorite position to play? Shortstop. Pre-game rituals? We goof around to calm our nerves. Favorite: hitting or fielding? Fielding. I like making good plays.

page 26 fierce

Most memorable moment? I did a toe touch and fell [during practice]. Why do you play softball? I love it and find it enjoyable. Favorite practice technique? Pitching drills. It’s my favorite position to play.

“[My favorite tradition is] Braves Brawl; [it] is pretty fun to go to. I like bonfires,” sophomore


portfolio 2012 amelia cheatham


Amelia Cheatham Portfolio 2012