{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

P R O F E S S I O N A L W O M E N I N H E A LT H C A R E ® • W E C R E AT E L E A D E R S

Dannellia (Danni) Green, PhD

INSIDE: p.7 p.8

Paying It Forward Spotlight on Katarina Ivkovic DEVOUR: Welcome to Minneapolis Let’s Eat!

Applying a Team-Based p.10 Approach to Customer Care p.14 HIDA Legislative Update

Director for Economic Inclusion and Social Responsibility, Owens & Minor Cultivating Inclusion and Social Responsibility

p.5

www.mypwh.org Issue 2 • Summer 2019


PROFESSIONAL WOMEN IN HEALTHCARE®

CONTENTS LETTER FROM OUR CHAIR: PWH® CULTURE – Be a Champion of People

pg. 3

PWH® DISTANCE LEARNING COURSES

pg. 4

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT Dannellia Green, PhD, Owens & Minor

pg. 5

WELLNESS: PERFORM BETTER Avoid Being ‘In a Hurry’

pg. 6

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT Katarina Ivkovic, Brasseler USA Medical

pg. 7

DEVOUR Welcome to Minneapolis – Let’s Eat!

pg. 8-9

COACH’S CORNER: APPLYING THE ADA’S RECOMMENDED TEAM-BASED APPROACH TO CUSTOMER CARE

pg. 10

CORPORATE PARTNER SPOTLIGHT Premier, Inc.

pg. 11

PWH® BOARD MEMBER RECOGNITION

pg. 12-13

HIDA LEGISLATIVE UPDATE HIDA Advocacy Efforts Focus on Three Priority Areas

pg. 14-15

PWH® NEW MEMBERS

pg. 15

THANK YOU 2019 PWH® CORPORATE PARTNERS

pg. 16

Connect Staff and Volunteers CHAIR & VICE CHAIR OF PWH® MARKETING COMMITTEE Natalie Martin, Director, Creative Services, NDC nmartin@ndc-inc.com Eryn Marx, Senior Marketing Manager, DUKAL emarx@dukal.com EDITOR Rachel Bailey Penwan Communication Inc. rachel@penwancomm.com

ART DIRECTOR Brent Cashman Graphics Manager, BOCdesign, Inc. brent@bocdesigninc.com EDITORIAL & CIRCULATION MANAGER Michelle Rydberg Executive Director, PWH® mrydberg@mypwh.org

CHAIR of PWH® PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Susan Kaiser, Media and Communications Manager, Corporate Communications, Midmark skaiser@midmark.com FOOD & TRAVEL EDITOR Jackie Jones Director of Dental Sales & Marketing, NDC jjones@ndc-inc.com

PWH® MISSION & PURPOSE PWH® is an organization dedicated to ongoing professional leadership development for women and men in healthcare businesses. We are a member organization providing a national voice and progressive leadership for women in healthcare. Our goal is to reach all women in our industry and empower them in their personal and professional lives. We are also committed to integrated leadership development and gender equity for all individuals within the industries we serve. Our mission is to empower women to lead and succeed. Our vision is a health care industry equally led by women.

2

Summer 2019 • Issue 2 • www.mypwh.org


LETTER FROM OUR CHAIR

PWH® CULTURE Be a Champion of People Spring has sprung and travel season is in full swing! Whether you’ve had an opportunity to visit an interesting city on holiday, or attend an off-site partner meeting or conference, it can be a lot of fun to explore that area’s culture and see what it represents. My recent journeys got me thinking about the culture of PWH® , how we are perceived and what it takes to foster a culture that attracts and retains top leaders. Since you – our members – are the most important asset to PWH® , I felt it was important to address this topic because you help define our culture and enhance it. Culture can’t be a fancy buzzword floating throughout Corporate America. It’s how an organization views itself and wants to be viewed by the outside world. So, you may ask – what is the culture of PWH®, and how do we want to be perceived? PWH® Core Values were established 15 years ago by a group of visionaries who had a dream to empower women, provide growth opportunities and achieve gender partnership. An unspoken culture naturally developed from the beginning. There was a relentless desire to champion one another and create a safe place for career development while mentoring each other along the way. We could have simply plastered our core values across the website, but in order to create a lasting culture, we put our values into action. PWH® members learn from the beginning how to take care of one another and the importance of being present for coaching, mentoring and friendship. Culture also constantly changes because and leadership experiences with one another. I people change. This is not a bad thing as it fosters would love to hear from you. Set a goal to lift up PWH® CORE growth and creativity. New faces and diverse another person to help them move forward. If we VALUES member groups are joining our organization right all remember to be a champion of people, serve • Inclusion and Diversity ® now - and they will make PWH even stronger! one another and put these things into action, we •S  upport and Members, you are part of the fabric that will constantly be on an inspirational learning and Promotion of Others • Compassion weaves together our culture. I am asking each leadership track – and our purpose will be much • Respect and every one of you TODAY to contribute to higher. These actions will enhance our culture. • Commitment to Education ® this building effort, for PWH and our industry, Building the PWH® culture requires us as • Leading by Example by finding one person – female or male – to leaders to motivate, engage and inspire one empower. Your contribution can be demonstrated another versus just putting the words out there. in an informal manner, such as giving someone else the floor to Let’s keep empowering and inspiring each other today! speak on a call or at a company meeting. Brag about one of your Cheers, co-workers. Or, take the time to ask someone, “How can I help?” Rachelle Ferrara This building work can occur at home by empowering our children PWH® Chair 2019-2020 and family members too. Share your development, best practices

June 3–5, 2020 | Minneapolis, MN

Save the Date: June 3-5, 2020 PWH® Leadership Summit returns to the Hyatt Regency Minneapolis, MN www.mypwh.org • Issue 2 • Summer 2019 3


LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT CURRICULUM 2019 Leadership program for developing your skills and furthering your influence PWH® has partnered with Katie Snapp, Founder, Better-Leadership.com to offer distance learning courses with an opportunity for participants to earn Certificates in Leadership Development, or a Master Certificate in Leadership Development by completing all three courses. Each course provides: • Three lessons delivered online over five weeks or less • Three group coaching sessions • One personal coaching session

COURSE #1

COURSE #2

YOUR LEADERSHIP STORY:

INTERACTING WITH OTHERS:

Both women & men welcome! COURSE #3

SEASONS OF CHANGE:

ROOTING YOUR STRENGTHS & NATURAL SKILLS

ENGAGING WITH THE ENVIRONMENT AROUND YOU

A PERENNIAL VIEW OF RESILIENCY & PRODUCTIVITY

Achieve results while honoring your uniqueness in a gender-balanced workplace.

Great leaders sense their surroundings and build productive environments.

Adjust to ups and downs by understanding the organic cycle of change.

In this course you will:

In this course you will:

In this course you will:

• Understand the difference between a leader and a manager • Assess the cultural challenges in the healthcare industry that affect you • Determine where your confidence stumbles so you can tackle fear and self-doubt • Discover your intuitive leadership style, its assets and liabilities (includes a self-assessment of the Intuition Model) • Leverage your genuine strengths as a woman OR a man so that you can find comfort in leading • Set a plan for a stellar career

• Build the collaborative relationships in the workplace that you see as crucial • Review how the concepts of power & influence can work • Study emotional intelligence in a way that is easy to grasp and build upon • Reinforce your personal bio to take it from drab to fab! • Find out how to Role Model others and become a Role Model FOR others • Other skill-building includes putting your best face forward, and listening openly

Course 1 begins: August 9, 2019 Deadline to register: July 26, 2019

Course 2 begins: September 20, 2019 Deadline to register: September 6, 2019

Member Non-Member

Single Course

All Three Courses

$349

$947

$399

$1,097

SAVE $100 when registering for all 3 courses!

• Realize the challenge of managing your self-confidence in critical situations • Gracefully accept criticism from others • Learn to coach others to success and deliver positive feedback • Discover personal productivity techniques for efficiency and sanity • Other specific skill-building includes translating loss into forward progress, sensing and managing conflict, and initiating difficult conversations

Course 3 begins: November 1, 2019 Deadline to register: October 18, 2019

REGISTER TODAY at www.mypwh.org


MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

Cultivating Inclusion and Social Responsibility How long have you been a member of PWH® ? I have been a member for three years.

Why did you choose to join PWH® ? I joined PWH® because of the compelling mission and the talented women with whom I worked who are also PWH® members.

What is your current PWH® role and what would you like to bring to the organization this year? I see my emerging role within PWH® as 1) an advocating member, 2) a contributing PWH® Board Member, and 3) as a Vice Chair of our PWH® Committee on Inclusion & Diversity. This year, I would like to be a catalyst for a heightened awareness of creative membership opportunities that enhance our inclusiveness and celebrate our diversity. Member

What is your current title and role at your organization? At Owens & Minor, I am the Director for Economic Inclusion and Social Responsibility. Within my scope are our corporate initiatives for a diverse healthcare supply chain and the work we do to leave our communities and our planet better than it would be had we not set intentional objectives for doing so.

Spotlight:

Dannellia (Danni) Green, PhD Director for Economic Inclusion and Social Responsibility, Owens & Minor

What is your favorite moment about your career so far?

What advice do you have for someone just starting in the Healthcare Industry and new to PWH® ?

My favorite moment thus far would have to be being part of an effort that is currently underway to recognize one of our provider-customers for their collaborative efforts to make a meaningful economic impact through supplier diversity. It truly represents a model for being “Better Together” as we help healing happen.

I am not one to offer advice and yet I am very comfortable sharing my story in the hope that it might resonate with others. I started in the healthcare industry, formally, in 2015. I found and aligned with others who were very knowledgeable and connected with influential colleagues who embraced me and significantly shorted my learning curve. This integration model is similar to my experience in joining PWH® . I believe that the three most important elements of my ability to get connected and to contribute are projecting an authentic open and friendly persona and then courageously reaching out to contacts.

What was your dream job as a child? My dream job as a child was to be a sports writer, editor or to have my own periodical similar to Sports Illustrated.

www.mypwh.org • Issue 2 • Summer 2019 5


WELLNESS

Perform Better Avoid Being ‘In a Hurry’ By Dr. Eileen O’Grady

Sometimes, traveling and attending professional conferences can provide the illusion that time has stopped. Removed as you are from your daily routine of answering calls, putting out various fires and managing emergencies, you may find yourself aware of how hurried your usual schedule makes you feel. Or, you might find yourself in an even greater rush, trying to handle emerging situations while also engaging in the extra activities your travel requires, such as attending evening networking events. If you are attending the PWH® Leadership Summit, we sincerely hope you can make the most of your time in Minneapolis and meet and learn from people across our industry. But, either way, we have a message about urgency we hope you’ll take to heart. An interesting study at the Princeton Theological Seminary tells a troubling story about how well-intentioned humans can behave when we are in a rush. The students were given a lecture on the parable of “The Good Samaritan,” and then they were told to give their own sermon on the topic across campus, on which they would be evaluated. One group of students were told they were already late (this was labeled the “high hurry” group). Others were told they had a few minutes before they had to head over (this was the “low hurry” group). At the same time, an actor in distress was staged in a deserted alleyway on campus so that each student would come across the person in distress. The

6

summer 2019 • Issue 2 • www.mypwh.org

researchers wanted to see if learning about “The Good Samaritan” led to acting on it, offering these seminarians a chance to practice what they were about to preach. The stunning findings revealed that those in a “big hurry” only stopped to help the stranger in distress 10 percent of the time, after just having a lecture on the topic. Some even stepped over the victim on their way to the next building. The people in the “low-hurry” group stopped 63 percent of the time. This study suggests that time pressure resulted in behaviors incongruent to their education and their devotion to help others. The weight of a being in a rush caused the students to put their immediate concern of being on time before the wellbeing of someone in need. Perhaps the hurriedness narrowed their ability to think clearly. When we are in a hurry, no matter the cause, it can create a mismatch between who we want to be and what we do. It is a conflict, not a callousness, that leads us to behave contrary to our true selves. What can you do to remove all unnecessary urgency from your life? What can you do to eliminate hurry even with the most mundane tasks? Reducing urgency can be applied to tasks large and small in life. I started with getting to airports 45 minutes earlier and going to the grocery store only when unbound from a time constraint, early in the morning or late at night.


MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

Paying It Forward How long have you been a member of PWH® ? I became a PWH® member in July of 2018. In 2019, I was appointed to be a Vice Chair on the Membership Committee. The organization is well respected within the healthcare industry, and I look forward to developing as a leader with the support of strong women and men.

Why did you choose to join PWH® ? I was introduced to PWH® by Rachelle Ferrara who is currently the Chair. Rachelle is an inspiring mentor of mine and led me to join PWH® to better my leadership skills, grow my professional network and expand my knowledge of the industry. Since I was new to leadership, having access to the tools that PWH® Member provides was crucial for me. From the Caliper classes Spotlight: to webinars, I learned different communication styles Katarina Ivkovic that enhanced my delivery of messages to my team. I’m Customer excited and look forward to giving back to our industry Support and and growing along the way. International

What is your current PWH® role and what would you like to bring to the organization this year?

Distribution Team Lead, Brasseler USA Medical

My current role is Vice Chair, Membership Experience, on the Membership Committee. I’d like to make our new members more interactive by providing more access to engage. Being a new member myself, I have an understanding of how overwhelming it can be to be involved in a prestigious organization without the proper guidance. I was at an advantage of knowing enough people within PWH® , but most members do not have that privilege.

What is your current title and role at your organization? I am the Customer Support and International Distribution Team Lead for Brasseler USA Medical. My responsibilities include managing and strategizing for the Customer Support Team, while supporting the outside sales force. In addition, I maintain current international relationships by working alongside distributors to meet our mutual customers’ needs.

What is your favorite moment about your career so far? It’s difficult to narrow down to one moment because for me I have enjoyed my entire career. However, with my newly appointed position, I enjoy being capable of passing on to my team the knowledge and grooming that was invested in me.

What was your dream job as a child? As a child I aspired to be a lawyer. I enjoyed debating and always challenged others as well as myself. The different points of view that came from those discussions were always fascinating to me. I remember going to the city library at seven years old and researching proper contract writing techniques. With this knowledge, I made a set of contracts for my parents to sign, not only with their name, but also with their fingerprints. Until this day, my family and I still look at the contracts and have a good laugh.

What advice do you have for someone just starting in the Healthcare Industry and new to PWH® ? My advice is to join with an open mind. Do not be afraid of networking and building lifelong relationships. When I attended my first networking event, I couldn’t believe how much honest advice I received. Putting yourself out there and being personal and relatable is how you’re going to build your network. PWH® has members at every level of the healthcare industry, and they all genuinely want to see you succeed and reach your goals.

www.mypwh.org • Issue 2 • Summer 2019 7


By Jackie Jones

Welcome to Minneapolis – Let’s Eat! If you’re attending the 2nd Professional Women in Healthcare® Leadership Summit – come early or stay late – Minneapolis has a lot to offer, including flavorful options for brunch, lunch and dinner. Pam Wedow, Minnesota native, introduced me to her friend Diane Sterner, a hospital and healthcare professional living in Minneapolis. Pam and Diane were college roommates and have remained good friends. Whenever Pam “comes home” to Minnesota, she can count on Diane to plan a fun get together at a great venue, even though Pam’s favorite is a homemade Bloody Mary served in Diane’s beautiful backyard. Here are a few of Diane’s suggestions downtown and in the surrounding suburbs. Enjoy!

Butcher & The Boar www.butcherandtheboar.com Butcher & The Boar opened in 2012 in Minneapolis with a simple idea: create a festive and communal dining experience with American craft food, beer and bourbon. If you like steak and smoked meat, this is your place. Voted one of the top 100 steakhouses in America, they believe that top notch ingredients sourced from local farms and premium purveyors, prepared with superior culinary technique is the secret to great food. Visit for lunch, happy hour or dinner. The casual, come-as-you-are outdoor patio “Beer Garden” is perfect for a June afternoon. Butcher & The Boar is located downtown, near the Hyatt on the corner of 12th St. and Hennepin Ave.

8

summer 2019 • Issue 2 • www.mypwh.org

Spoon and Stable www.spoonandstable.com For a slightly fancier vibe, try the Spoon and Stable. James Beard, award-winning chef, and owner Gavin Kaysen opened this restaurant in a building constructed circa 1906 that was once a horse stable. Kaysen grew up in Minneapolis and focuses his menu on the seasonality of the Midwest. The dinner menu features seafood, heritage grain pasta dishes, and various meat and vegetable choices. The French-trained pastry chefs stay true to their craft with artisanal cheeses, chocolates and sorbets. Sunday brunch is served 10:00 am – 2:00 pm, and the casual lounge/bar is open until midnight during the week and until 1:00 am on weekends. The Spoon and Stable is located at 211 North First St.


The Bachelor Farmer www.thebachelorfarmer.com I’m writing this column on the eve of the Game of Thrones final season, premier episode, and when I pull up the restaurant’s website I see: “Welcome to the North.” This is my kinda place! An exploration of northern food paired with a commitment to stewardship – The Bachelor Farmer is run on 100 percent Minnesota wind energy, harvested from their rooftop farm. The restaurant is committed to locally ground flour, emphasis on biodynamic winemakers and the whole animal butchery program. The second-floor dining areas provide dining experiences: The Afghan Room (walls covered with blankets), The Library, The Living Room (fireplace and paneling!), and The Rec Room. The Bachelor Farmer is at 50 North 2nd Ave.

Explore these other Minneapolis downtown spots near the Hyatt: • Parlour – great burgers! 730 N Washington www.parlourbar.com

• Hewing Hotel – hip hotel bar and fun patio at 300 N Washington www.hewinghotel.com

• Zelo – fresh Italian at 831 Nicollet Mall www.zelomn.com

• Bar LaGrassa, 800 Washington Ave., N www.barlagrassa.com

• Nico’s Tequila Bar, 2516 Hennepin Ave. www.nicostacobar.com

• Burch Restaurant, 1933 Colfax Ave., S www.burchrestaurant.com

Explore these in uptown Minneapolis, near unique shops: • Stella’s Oyster Bar, 1400 W Lake St. www.stellasfishcafe.com

• Chino Latino, 2916 Hennepin Ave. www.chinolatino.com

Grab an Uber and explore these local favorites: • Surly Brewery, the city’s best brewery plus atmosphere, 520 Malcom Ave., SE www.surlybrewing.com

• Keg and Case, indoor culinary and retail marketplace at the iconic Schmidt Brewery 928 7th St., W (St. Paul) www.kegandcase.com

• St. Paul’s Can Can Wonderland, an old factory repurposed! Entertainment = Putt-putt golf, Ping-pong, Arcade and Shows. Food and boozy milkshakes too! 755 Prior Ave., N #004 (St. Paul) www.cancanwonderland.com

www.mypwh.org • Issue 2 • Summer 2019 9


COACH’S CORNER

Applying the ADA’s Recommended Team-Based Approach to Customer Care By Rachel Bailey The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA’s) Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes—2019 Abridged for Primary Care Doctors recommends, that “Care systems should facilitate team-based care.” Such team-based care, particularly in the treatment of patients with chronic conditions, demonstrates high-quality outcomes. If this holds true for treating patients, how can we apply these findings in the

1. Delivery system design The ADA’s Professional Practice Committee (PPC) recommends “moving from a reactive to a proactive care delivery system where planned visits are coordinated through a team-based approach.” We all know that functioning from a proactive position saves time. It also means that we make better use of our resources and attend to our customers in a more careful way. We know ahead of time what could go wrong in most situations. If we prepare ahead of time for those mishaps, we’ll more likely be prepared with solutions. Plus, these solutions will be more wellthought out. For example, we know that our customer will have several questions for us after our meeting. Given all that may come up in a live meeting, she might not think to ask those specific questions during the meeting, and we might not think to bring them up. Approaching this proactively, we can send her a nicely formatted list of FAQs as follow up after our meeting rather than wait for her to ask. Murphy’s Law says she’ll send us an urgent request for clarification the day we are flying to see another customer and heading into security. Rather then sending her a hasty response typed on our phone,

10

context of serving our customers? Our customers represent for us people with whom we have chronic or longtime relationships and frequently recurring (and hopefully positive) encounters. To help us apply these healthcare findings in the context of the healthcare supply chain, let’s consider the six core elements of “The Chronic Care Model (CCM)” in the context of customer service.

misspellings and all, we can text or email her the FAQs, which of course we have made easily accessible from our phone because we planned ahead.

those FAQs and SOWs for our customers, we do it in an evidence-based manner. Make evaluation of customer engagement part of a proactive customer care protocol.

2. Self-management support

4. Clinical information systems

A team-based approach means that customers are a part of the team. We need to help them realize that in a way that makes them want to participate. That may mean finding out who our customer’s team members are AND developing relationships with them. This way we can go to those persons directly to get the deliverables we need to keep the project on course. At the same time, we can make sure members of our team develop appropriate relationships with our customer’s team. Also, in addition to those FAQs, we can create visually optimized statements of work (SOW) that detail timelines and actions. Visual optimization, rather than long lines of text, can encourage our customer to review the SOW and take ownership of their position on the team.

The ADA PPC recommends “using registries that can provide patient-specific and population-based support to the care team.” Applied in a customer service context, this means getting serious about program and process evaluation. Measure what works, increase capacity and store that data so that members of your team can access it appropriately.

3. Decision support

Finally, the ADA PPC reports that health systems should “create a quality-oriented culture” to ensure best outcomes. We should of course do the same with our organizations and teams.

The ADA’s PPC recommends providing decision support by “basing care on evidence-based, effective care guidelines.” For us, that means that when we create

summer 2019 • Issue 2 • www.mypwh.org

5. Community resources and policies The ADA PPC also recommends “identifying or developing resources to support healthy lifestyles.” This means making sure we do the same for our team members. The more we enable and cultivate our team, the more productive and effective they can be.

6. Health systems


CORPORATE PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

Company Name: Premier, Inc. Headquarters: Charlotte, NC Number of Employees: 2,400 Number of PWH Members: 18 Leadership: Susan DeVore, CEO Mike Alkire, President Craig McKasson, CFO & CAO David Hargraves, SVP, Supply Chain

Leigh Anderson, President – Performance Services Andy Brailo, SVP, Member Field Services John Sganga, SVP, Premier Alternate Site Programs (non-acute GPO) Blair Childs SVP, Public Affairs David Klatsky, General Counsel Mike Moloney, Group VP of Integrated Pharmacy Kelli Price, SVP, People

Internal PWH Champion: Lindsay Powers, VP – HRBP & Organizational Development and Pam Daigle, VP – Strategic Sourcing Mission: To improve the health of communities Vision: Through the collaborative power of the Premier alliance, we will lead transformation to high-quality, cost-effective healthcare. Tell us about your products and services? Our exceptional insights are delivered across five key service lines: 1 - Group Purchasing (GPO) – Collective purchasing power, lowering costs. 2 - Technology – Intelligence plus unparalleled analytics equals data-driven solutions. 3 - Consulting – Named best in KLAS overall Healthcare Management Consulting firm. 4 - Collaboratives – Work with Premier members to lower costs, improve quality and safety, and succeed in value-based care. 5 - Advocacy – Our experts educate and influence policymakers by advocating on behalf of your organization. Providing your voice on the frontline in Washington.

What kind of succession planning initiatives has Premier implemented, and how has PWH® supported these efforts? Premier is consistently evaluating our ability to have the right people, in the right place, at the right time. Through an annual talent planning practice, we are able to identify the health of our talent in critical places. While we seek to provide development opportunities for our entire population to take part in, we also create opportunities for development in areas of specific needs, like growing our pipeline of women in leadership roles. We saw a great opportunity to supplement our internal development with PWH®, an organization with which we had already formed a partnership. Through collaboration with the PWH® team, we were able to imagine a more robust experience for our rising female leaders. At Premier, our talent management philosophy is employee driven, manger supported and company enabled. With this in mind, we sought to identify the women in our organization at manager and individual contributor levels who had the desire and drive to enrich their development. We were able to capture this through an application process internally, helping identify the talent best-suited for the company sponsored PWH® membership. We were blown away by the response and were excited to select 30 women that are dedicated to a focus on their development, increasing their business acumen and continuing to contribute at a high-level to improving healthcare. Through this journey, in partnership with PWH®, we will continue to build the pipeline of female leaders in healthcare with greater intentionality and precision.

www.mypwh.org • Issue 2 • Summer 2019 11


BOARD MEMBER RECOGNITION

® PWH EXECUTIVE BOARD, 2019 2018 ® PWH EXECUTIVE PWH ® EXECUTIVE 2018BOARD, PWH ®BOARD, EXECUTIVE BOARD, 2018

RACHELLE FERRARA

PWH Chair JULEE PREFER JULEE JULEE PREFER PREFER

ODRA ANDERSON ASHLEIGH MCLAUGHLIN ODRA ANDERSON ODRA ANDERSON

Instrumentation, Inc. Healthcare Healthcare Solutions Group Solutions Healthcare Solutions Group Group President Senior Director, Global Enterprise President President

B.IMCO, Braun Medical, Inc. Inc. (Aesculap) (Aesculap) B. Braun Medical, Inc. (Aesculap) B. Braun Medical, Inc. Product Manager Manager || Surgical Surgical Product Manager | Surgical Product Chief Financial Officer Specialty Products Products Specialty Products Specialty

®

® PWH Brasseler PWH ChairUSA Surgical PWH® Chair Chair

®

® International Sales PWHand EXECUTIVE PWH ® EXECUTIVE BOARD, 2018 BOARD, 2018

HEATHER LLORCA-KROPP ODRA ANDERSON HEATHER LLORCA-KROPP HEATHER LLORCA-KROPP JULEE PREFER JULEE PREFER JULEE PREFER ® PWH®® Past Chair PWH Past Membership Committee Chair ® ® ChairChair PWH PastChair ChairPWH® Past PWH Chair

DUKAL Corporation B. BraunCorporation Medical, Inc. (Aesculap) DUKAL Corporation Group DUKAL Healthcare Healthcare Solutions Group Healthcare Solutions GroupSolutions Vice President, Marketing Product Manager | Surgical Vice President, Marketing Vice President, Marketing President President & Specialty & Channel Channel Management Management & President ChannelProducts Management

p

ROPP

Operating VP, Service Line Strategy Operating VP, Service Line Strategy Midmark Corporation Midmark Corporation Midmark Corporation Midmark Corporation Media and and Communications Manager Manager Media Media and Communications Manager Media andCommunications Communications Manager

Treasurer

President

ELIZABETH DAY-CURI ELIZABETH DAY-CURI HEATHER DAVIS ALLISON THERWHANGER ALLISON THERWHANGER ELIZABETH DAY-CURI Corporate Partnership Corporate Partnership

Mentoring Chair Professional Development Mentoring Committee Chair Committee Professional Development Professional Development Professional Development Committee Chair Committee Chair Owens & Minor Owens & Minor Committee Chair Committee Chair

SUSAN KAISER HEATHER SUSAN KAISER DAVIS HEATHER DAVIS DAVIS HEATHER DAVISHEATHER

Professional Development Professional Development Regional Connections RegionalConnections Connections Regional Regional Connections Committee Chair Committee Committee Chair Chair Chair Committee Committee Chair Committee Chair

Midmark Corporation HealthFirst Midmark Corporation HealthFirst HealthFirst HealthFirst Media and Communications Manager Media and Communications National Account Manager Manager National National Account Manager NationalAccount AccountManager Manager

HEATHER DAVIS SUZANNE HEATHER DAVIS LORD SUZANNE LORD Regional Connections

SUE HULSMEYER

CorporateConnections Partnership Regional Treasurer Treasurer Chair Corporate Partnership Committee Committee Chair Committee Chair Committee Chair Shippert Medical Technologies

Regional Connections Strategic Oversight Strategic Oversight Strategic Chair Oversight Committee Committee Chair Strategic Oversight Committee Chair Committee Chair Committee Chair

ELIZABETH DAY-CURI ELIZABETH DAY-CURI SUZANNEPartnership LORD Corporate Partnership Corporate

SUZANNE LORD SUZANNE LORD

Committee ChairShippert Medical Technologies President HealthFirst Presidentof Sales, Director Director of Sales, Georgia Pacific Director of Sales, National Account Manager National Distribution/Medical National Distribution/Medical National MarketDistribution/Medical Sales Director, Great Lakes

NATALIE MARTIN

Strategic Oversight Committee Chair Committee Chair Committee Marketing Chair Committee Chair

Director offor Sales, Coalition Independent Care Director of Sales, NDC, Inc. National Distribution/Medical COO National Director, Creative Services Distribution/Medical

12

B. Inc.Inc. (Aesculap) B.Braun Braun Medical, (Aesculap) Owens & Medical, Minor B. Owens Braun Medical, (Aesculap) & Minor Inc.Owens & Minor Product Manager | Surgical Operating VP, Service Line Strategy Product Manager | Surgical Product Manager Operating VP, Service| Surgical Line Strategy Operating VP, Service Line Strategy Specialty Products Specialty Products Specialties (Neurosurgery Division)

DUKAL Corporation DUKAL Corporation Owens & Minor Brasseler Medical Medical Brasseler Medical Brasseler Vice Marketing Vice President, Marketing Owens & Minor Senior Director, Operating VP, Service LinePresident, Strategy Senior Director, Marketing Marketing Senior Director, Marketing & Channel Management & Channel Management and Enterprise Sales Operating VP,Sales Service Line Strategy and Enterprise Sales and Enterprise

Treasurer

al

Mentoring Committee Chair Membership Committee Chair Mentoring Committee Chair Membership Committee Chair Mentoring Chair Mentoring Committee Chair Committee

SUSAN KAISER VICKY LYLE VICKY LYLE SUSAN KAISER KAISER SUSAN KAISER SUSAN

® ® PWHChair PWH Chair PWH ® Past ChairChair Elect Mentoring Committee PWH®Past PWH®Chair ChairElect ElectPWH Chair Elect

TreasurerMedical Treasurer Brasseler Medical Committee Chair Brasseler Shippert Medical Shippert Medical Technologies Senior Director, Marketing Shippert Medical Technologies Senior Director, Marketing Shippert Medical Technologies Midmark Corporation President and Enterprise Sales President (An Innovia Medical Company) and Enterprise Sales President Media and Communications Manager

gies

ODRA ANDERSON ODRA ANDERSON VICKY LYLE ODRA ANDERSON VICKY LYLE VICKY LYLE

HEATHER LLORCA-KROPP HEATHER LLORCA-KROPP RACHELLE FERRARA VICKY LYLE RACHELLE FERRARA RACHELLE FERRARA ® VICKY LYLE

RACHELLE FERRARA RACHELLE FERRARA SUSAN KAISER ALLISON THERWHANGER ® ALLISON THERWHANGER ® ALLISON THERWHANGER PWH Chair Elect PWH Chair Elect ALLISON THERWHANGER Professional Development

GER

Membership Committee Chair Membership CommitteeChair Chair Membership Committee Chair Committee Membership

summer 2019 • Issue 2 • www.mypwh.org

HealthFirst HealthFirst Coalition forCorporation Independent Care Care Midmark Coalition for Independent Coalition for Independent Care National Account Manager National Account Manager COO COO Senior Director, Human Resources COO

Strategic Oversight Strategic Oversight Committee Chair Committee Chair

Coalition for Independent Care Coalition for Independent Care COO COO


PWH ADVISORY BOARD, 2018 CATHY DENNING

PWH® Board Advisor

PWH ADVISORY BOARD, PWH ® ADVISORY BOARD, 2019 2018 ®

CATHY DENNING CATHY DENNING JANIS DEZSO

® ® PWH Board Advisor ® Board PWH Advisor PWH Board Advisor Vizient Vizient Bovie Medical Senior Vice President, Senior Vice President, Vice President of Sales Sourcing Operations Sourcing Operations

ODRA ANDERSON

JOAN ELIASEK JOAN ELIASEK Membership Committee Chair JANIS DEZSO

® ® PWH Board Advisor PWH Board Advisor B. Braun ® Medical, Inc. (Aesculap) PWH Board Advisor Product Manager | Surgical McKesson Medical-Surgical McKesson Bovie Medical Specialty Products President, President, Vice President of Sales Extended Care Sales Extended Care Sales

up

JOAN ELIASEK SHARYL GARDNER SHARYL GARDNER

ROPP

GER

gies

I

cal

Vizient Senior Vice President, Sourcing Operations

® LYLE ® ® VICKY PWH Board Advisor PWH Board Advisor PWH Board Advisor Mentoring Committee Chair Midmark Corporation McKesson Midmark Corporation Owens & Minor Officer Chief Administrative President, Operating VP, Service Extended Care SalesLine Strategy

CINDY JUHAS CINDY JUHAS SHARYL GARDNER ® PWH Board Advisor ® ® Board Advisor PWH EXECUTIVE BOARD, 2018 PWH PWH Board Advisor ®

CME CME Midmark Corporation SUSAN KAISER Chief Strategy Officer Professional Development Committee Chair

JULEE PREFER Midmark Corporation PWH®and Chair Media Communications Manager ANNE EITING KLAMAR ® CINDY JUHAS Healthcare Solutions Group PWH Board Advisor ® ® Board Advisor PWH PWH Board Advisor President Midmark Corporation

ANNE EITING KLAMAR Midmark CME BoardCorporation Chair, of Directors Chair, Board of Directors

HEATHER DAVIS

Regional Connections

HEATHER CommitteeLLORCA-KROPP Chair

® HEATHER LLORCA-KROPP PWH Board Advisor ANNE EITING KLAMAR HealthFirst ® PWH Chair ® Past PAMELA WEDOW PWH Board DUKAL Corporation National AccountAdvisor Manager ® DUKAL Corporation PWH Board Advisor Vice President, Marketing Midmark Corporation Vice President, Marketing &Chair, Channel Management Board of Directors

& Channel Management

SUZANNE LORD SUZANNE LORD

® PWH BoardOversight Advisor Strategic Committee Chair PAMELA WEDOW Coalition for Independent Care ® RACHELLE FERRARA Chief Operating Officer PWH Board Advisor Care Coalition for Independent PWH® Chair Elect COO

Brasseler Medical Senior Director, Marketing and Enterprise Sales

PWH LEADERSHIP ROSTER, 2018 STRATEGIC OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE Suzanne Lord, Strategic Oversight Chair Sue Hulsmeyer, Vice Chair Organizational ® Leadership Development

PWH LEADERSHIP ROSTER, ROSTER,2018 2019 PWH ® LEADERSHIP Natalie Martin, Vice Chair Marketing Strategy & Brand Guidelines

Amy Swift, Vice Chair Committee Liaison CORPORATE PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE STRATEGIC OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE

Elizabeth Day-Curi, Corporate Oversight Partners Committee Suzanne Lord, Strategic Chair Chair Jennifer Ramthun, ViceCOMMITTEE Chair Strategic Partners MEMBERSHIP Sue Hulsmeyer, Vice Chair Organizational Jennifer O’Reilly, Vice Chair Sales Distribution Odra Anderson, Membership Committee Chair Leadership Development Laura Reline,McLaughlin, Vice Chair Sales Manufacturing Ashleigh Vice Chair Member Engagement Natalie Martin, Vice Chair Marketing Strategy Carmel Veron, Vice Chair Sales GPO & Brand Guidelines Shannon Trahan, Vice Chair Market Intelligence Amy Swift, Committee Liaison Eryn Marx, Vice Chair PR & Marketing MARKETING COMMITTEE

Natalie Martin, Marketing Committee Chair MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE REGIONAL CONNECTIONS COMMITTEE Eryn Marx, Vice Chair Summit Marketing Odra Anderson, Membership Committee Chair Heather Davis, Regional Connections Committee Chair Open, Vice Chair PWH Marketing Ashleigh McLaughlin, Vice Chair Member Geri Lamano, Vice Chair Regional Events Engagement Open, Vice Chair Content Strategy Shannon Trahan, OPEN, Vice Chair Vice PDC Chair LiasonMarket Intelligence

MEMBERSHIP Eryn Marx, Vice COMMITTEE Chair PR & Marketing

Ashleigh McLaughlin, Membership Committee Chair CORPORATE PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE Amy Denny, Vice Chair New Member Outreach REGIONAL CONNECTIONS COMMITTEE Elizabeth Day-Curi, Corporate Partners Committee Chair Katarina Ivkovic, Vice Chair New Member Experience Heather Regional Connections Committee Jennifer Davis, Ramthun, Vice Chair Strategic Partners Chair Jessica Wells, Vice Chair Member Experience Geri Lamano, ViceVice Chair Regional Jennifer O’Reilly, Chair Sales Events Distribution Amber Alexander, Vice Chair Market Intelligence OPEN, Vice Chair PDC Liason Laura Reline, Vice Chair Sales Manufacturing Carmel Veron,COMMITTEE Vice Chair Sales GPO MENTORING

Odra Anderson, Committee Chair CORPORATE PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE Suzy Carlino,Mentoring Vice Chair PR & Marketing Khaki Weber, Day-Curi, Vice Chair Mentor Support Elizabeth Corporate Partners Committee Chair Open, Vice Chair Mentee Support Jennifer Ramthun, Vice Chair Strategic Partners PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE ODRA ANDERSON Selena Culpepper, Vice Chair Technology Jennifer O’Reilly, Vice Chair Sales Distribution Susan Kaiser, Professional Development Committee Chair Membership Committee Chair Laura Reline, Vice Manufacturing Enid Oquendo, ViceChair ChairSales Summit Programming PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE B. Braun Medical, Inc. (Aesculap) Carmel Veron, Vice Chair Sales GPO Tania Steinbruegge, Vice Chair Webinars Product Manager | Surgical Chair Susan Kaiser, Professional Development Committee Specialty Suzy Carlino, Vice Chair PRProducts &Programming OPEN, ViceVice Chair Education &Marketing Innovation Enid Oquendo, Chair Summit Tania Steinbruegge, Vice Chair Webinars PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE MENTORING COMMITTEE Jessica Lucio, Vice Chair Education & Innovation SusanLyle, Kaiser, Professional Development Vicky Mentoring Committee Chair Committee Chair

REGIONAL CONNECTIONS COMMITTEE Enid Oquendo, Vice Chair Summit Programming Susan Hunter-Vinson, Vice Chair Individual Mentoring LYLECommittee Chair Heather Davis, RegionalVICKY Connections Tania Steinbruegge, Vice Chair Webinars Mentoring Committee Chair Jen Nicholson, Vice Chair Group Mentoring Geri Lamano, Vice Chair Regional Events OPEN, Vice Chair Education & Innovation Owens Minor Shelley Bache, Vice Chair &PR Marketing Open, Vice Chair Public Relations to&Corporate Partners Operating VP, Service Line Strategy Open, Vice Chair of Event Content

MENTORING COMMITTEE

Vicky Lyle, Mentoring Committee Chair STRATEGIC OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE

Sue Hulsmeyer, Chair Susan Hunter-Vinson, Vice Chair Individual Mentoring Amy Swift, Vice Chair Committee Liaison Jen Nicholson, Vice Chair Group Mentoring Danni Green, PhD, Vice SUSAN Chair Inclusion & Diversity KAISER Shelley Bache, Vice Chair PR & Marketing Professional Development Committee Chair Midmark Corporation

Media and Communications Manager2019 13 www.mypwh.org • Issue 2 • Summer


HIDA LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

HIDA Advocacy Efforts Focus on Three Priority Areas By Linda Rouse O’Neill, Vice President, HIDA HIDA has been working diligently to address key issues of concern in the policy arena with a keen focus on the medical device tax, tariffs and national preparedness for public health events.

1. Medical Device Tax The House and Senate are considering companion bills that would eliminate the medical device tax completely. The 2.3 percent tax took effect in 2013 as part of the Affordable Care Act. However, after two years Congress put a stop to it, with the latest moratorium due to expire at the end of this year. Because of the moratorium, the medical device tax doesn’t apply to the sale of taxable medical devices by the manufacturer, producer or importer of the device until January 1, 2020. The tax applies to all regulated Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Class I, Class II and Class III medical devices with some exceptions. The FDA classifies medical devices based on the level of risk with their use. For example, Class I includes elastic bandages, and Class II includes powered wheelchairs and pregnancy test kits. Class III products usually sustain or support life and are often implantable, such as a pacemaker. There is a medical device tax exemption for products generally available for consumer retail purchase such as eye glasses, contacts and hearing aids. HIDA supports the full and permanent repeal of the medical device tax through the passage of the Protect Medical Innovation Act of 2019, which enjoys strong bipartisan support. Failure to repeal this tax ultimately will cause a ripple effect in the medicalsurgical supply chain from manufacturers to providers – and most importantly, the patients who need these products the most.

2. Tariffs HIDA opposes placing tariffs on medical products as they will increase the cost of delivering quality and efficient healthcare throughout the United States. Tariffs hinder the nation’s ability to prepare and respond to public health events such as natural

14

summer 2019 • Issue 2 • www.mypwh.org

disasters, pandemics like the Zika virus, and man-made emergencies. Additionally, disruption in the supply chain of imported products affects the nation’s prevention capabilities via products such as vaccines and flu kits and puts the nation – especially our most vulnerable populations – at risk. HIDA has testified before the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) multiple times on this issue, and HIDA members sent nearly 200 letters to the USTR opposing tariffs on healthcare products. Our message focused on educating policy makers to help make them aware of the complexities of the U.S. healthcare supply chain so that tariffs don’t create unintentional supply chain disruptions and product shortages affecting patient care. Thanks to HIDA’s work and the willingness of HIDA members to be proactive, progress has been made; the USTR removed 120 products from its list of Chinese goods that could have been subjected to additional tariffs.

3. Public Health Preparedness The U.S. House earlier this year passed a bill giving the Department of Health and Human Services the authority to join other national security agencies when health issues are involved. The Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparation Act Reauthorization Act (PAHPRA) aims to streamline the process for various government agencies responsible for assisting each other during disasters. The bill has stalled in the Senate due to matters unrelated to the bill’s content. HIDA’s Government Affairs team successfully worked with congressional champions to include language on key policy principles: formalizing public/private partnerships to ensure continuity during times of disaster, creating a system allowing the supply chain to divert product where it’s most needed, and developing strong communication pathways between public and private partners. Public health events—both natural and manmade—occur regularly. It is important that the country have consistent and sufficient funding for public health surveillance efforts, training


and protection of healthcare workers and patients, vaccine and diagnostic development and investment in the healthcare supply chain supporting these initiatives. I invite all members of PWH® to remain actively involved in HIDA’s advocacy efforts. Your participation assists our outreach on Capitol Hill and helps us educate policymakers about the critical

role of the supply chain. To become more involved in HIDA’s advocacy priorities, please email me at Rouse@HIDA.org or HIDA’s Government Affairs team at HIDAGovAffairs@HIDA.org. I hope to connect with you in the future to share more insights and updates on these and other key issues facing healthcare advocates. For more information, visit HIDA.org.

Welcome New Members* Katie Acker Premier Libby Aldridge Midmark Laura Amirales McKesson Kelly Antekeier Labcorp Danielle Avery S2S Global, Priscilla Ayerite NAO Global Health Nicole Barker Medpricer Kimberly Barnhardt Midmark Emily Barnhart Cardinal Zoe Beck Premier Denise Becker Owens & Minor Stephanie Bertschy Midmark Danielle Binda Proximity Systems Stephanie Bradford Premier Shannon Brennan Premier Kimberly Broadneax Vizient Rebecca Bushy Amsino Hillary Caton NDC Donna Cella Premier Linda Clement Vizient Judy Coake McKesson Kellie Coffey Premier Sharon Cohen HIDA Shay Damaske Vizient

Lesley Dixson Metrex Theresa Dyer Vizient Kelsey Ellender Premier Andrea Ellis Premier Jessica Ezykowsky Premier Morgan Fox Premier Sharyon Gardiner Vizient Ivey Gay Graham Field Brent Gee Vizient David Gillan Vizient Kelsey Glisson Premier Lacy Gosnell Premier Tammy Gunnerson Midmark Susan Harvey Premier Dianne Heckler Metrex Julie Heinrichs Midmark Daphne Henderson Achilles Alliance Partners Melissa Henninger Sekisui Lisa Houck Owens & Minor Bri Huedepohl Vizient Christina Hunt Premier Niccole Indish Midmark Brooke Jackson Premier Sonam Jaiswal Premier

Ashley Johnson Healthfirst Jenna Johnson Premier Hilari Jones Premier Alicia Jutte Midmark Harleen Kaur Henry Schein Teresa Kelsey Petersburg Home for Ladies Annie Kerr Midmark Erin Klotzbach Hyatt Midmark Jeanne Kraimer Midmark Emily Kunz Premier Ericka Labedz TIDI Melissa Lane NDC Kelly Larson Premier Jennifer Lehr BBraun Birdie Loeffler NDC Amanda Macchio Premier Liz MacManus Midmark Michelle Mangini Henry Schein Karen Masterson Premier Sue Matarieh Innovatix Raquel Mathis NDC Carissa Mckinney Premier Melanie Miller Silver Lining Apparel Staci Miller Medine

Cindy Montgomery Premier Heather orris Healthfirst Alexandra Mracna NDC Lucy Newton Air Methods Corporation Jada Nichols Premier Healthcare Alliance Leigh Nickens BBraun Chandra Niekamp Midmark Nadia Nyer Vizient Niamh O’Hara Symmetry Surgical Theresa O’Neal Premier Hope Olsen Midmark Anna Ormiston Medpricer Mary Heather Parch McKesson Christine Peggau TIDI Cristopher Pellegrino Metrex Mia Pelosci Premier Janelle Powers Premier Ishtar Purohit McKesson Jennifer Ramsey Midmark Krista Redick Premier Sheri Rensberger Premier Julia Ribeiro Premier Monique Robbins Premier Delana Roperto Vizient

Tracie Schmidt Graham Field Kelsey Schmiesing Midmark Lindsey Sheeran Mayo Clinic April Shomper Vizient Theresa Smith Premier Adrienne Smith Brasseler Leigh Smith Premier Jennifer Stevenson Premier Tanya Stratford Midmark Beth Telesz Pocket Nurse Kelley Terrell Encompass Group Tonya Turner NCD Jennie Vanderpool Midmark Sara Victory Owens & Minor Stacey Waweru Cardinal Katie Werner McKesson Alice Williams Vizient Eva Willis CME Lindsay Wise Medpricer Kerrie Wisvari Premier Stephanie Woeste Midmark Kristi Woodall Premier Meg Wyatt Premier Kalyani Yerra Premier

*From January 25, 2019 through April 22, 2019 www.mypwh.org • Issue 2 • Summer 2019 15


2019 CORPORATE PARTNERS

Diamond Partners

PWH Patrons

Emerald Partners

Ruby Partners

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT: WWW.MYPWH.ORG

®

Profile for BOC design Inc

PWH Q2 2019  

PWH Q2 2019