__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

WHY EFFECTIVE SCHEDULING IS KEY TO SUCCESSFUL RENOVATIONS

Timothy E. Osiecki, President of Design and Construction. Carl S. Hren, VP Construction & Capital Assets. Concord Hospitality Enterprises, Co.

Partnering

Up

Why Concord’s teamwork approach works Check out our

Kitchens

Magazine and Supplement inside Commercial

Also featuring: Inside the world of ADA

July/August 2015 • www.ccr-mag.com

Official magazine of

Exclusive Inside: Building in the new age of bricks Check out our Flooring & PM guides How biofilters are greening today’s indoor spaces


Advertorial

Who Doesn’t Like The Feeling of a Job Well Done? Johan Bohlmann and Alex Rogers AC•Tech Field Operations

S

pecifier, contractor, architect, installer, project estimator, material purchaser, product manufacturer, building owner. We all feel the satisfaction when a project comes together as planned ... and our reputations go up a notch. That’s why AC•Tech puts so much emphasis on actually, physically “being there” when it counts. It’s one thing to manufacture specialty coatings that have been engineered to perform. It’s quite another to invest in the technical expertise and field experience necessary to make these coatings actually meet the FIELD performance SPECIFIED. It’s one thing to provide a toll-free number to respond to problems and warranty claims after something goes wrong. It’s quite another to work with a specifier to design an appropriate system, to counsel a project manager in the most cost-effective application

protocol, and to train installers to overcome an unexpected concrete slab issue before it cascades into a catastrophic flooring failure. So, we may advertise that AC•Tech “specializes in preventing excessive moisture, alkalinity, and oil contamination from causing commercial flooring failures in renovation, remodeling, and tenant improvement projects.” And we may try to hype our industry awards for product and process innovation in moving moisture mitigation to Division 3 in ground-up, fast-track construction projects. But, our measure lies in our attitude. We believe that helping everyone to do it right the first time is what builds success, reputation, and that “atta boy” feeling when all is said and done. And who doesn’t like that feeling?

AC•Tech | Allied Construction Technologies Inc. team@actechperforms.com • 800-607-5523 • www.actechperforms.com


Self-Perform? Add AC•Tech Innovation to your toolbox.

When performance counts!

Start early. Finish early. Open early. Bank it early.

Prepare contaminated concrete slabs for new flooring.

Eliminate the #1 cause of flooring failures on concrete.

Get Truths from the Sleuths. To anyone. Any time. Free. (SEE PAGE 27 OF THIS CC&R ISSUE!)

www.actechperforms.com | team@actechperforms.com | 1-800-607-5523 AC•Tech Go-Early Technology™ 2015 Experts Choice Award for Most Innovative Products, World of Concrete CIRCLE NO. 1


July/August • 2015 Vol. 14, No.4

66

24

113

Cover and feature photos by: David Williams

FEATURES

24 Partnering up  Why Concord’s teamwork approach works 66  Not your grandfather’s building  Building in the new age of bricks 88  All about timing  Effective scheduling is key to successful renovations

113  The Next Great American Stone  Mining for honeycomb in Utah 134  It’s alives  How biofilters are helping green today’s indoor spaces 138  Eye in sky  Maximizing site efficiency and security with HD video surveillance

134 2

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Building a Strong Foundation for West Michigan

616-949-3360 · www.wolvgroup.com

CIRCLE NO. 2


July/August • 2015 Vol. 14, No.4 SPECIAL COVERAGE

Industry Events 18  Commercial Construction & Renovation People – Los Angeles 22  2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit – Boston

INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

36  Cover me See who’s doing what in flooring

18

22

56  Getting it done Report provides intel on the industry’s leading project managers

SPECIAL SECTION

Commerical Kitchens 71  Game changer  How Burger 21 is helping redefine the fast casual market 80 Operation Resuscitation  Turning a meat processing plant into a food business incubator Federal Construction 119  Let there be light  Illuminating the infamous Lincoln Tunnel

71

112 All hands on deck  The R&D Tax Credit aspects of U.S. cargo handling innovation

DEPARTMENTS 6

Editor’s Note

12 Industry News 144 Legal Ease 146 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 148 Calendar 148 Product Showcase 150 Ad Index 152 Publisher’s Note

119 4

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


The bar’s been set. We don’t blame you for surrendering to a roof-raising frenzy. How could you not when Quality Solutions, Inc. has raised the bar, yet again, to continue providing you unsurpassed value? Our Total Cost of Ownership philosophy pledges all-around excellence in quality, price, service and delivery, so you can set your facility worries aside and give your business the full attention it deserves.

qsifacilities.com 24/7 TOLL-FREE 888.328.2454

CIRCLE NO. 3


EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

Winning the ‘too-much to do’ game “If we did all the things we are capable of, we would literally astound ourselves.” – Thomas A. Edison

O

kay, stop. Now answer this. How many times in the past year have you blankly stared at something on your master project to-do list and saw blank a space next to the entry box? No activity. No notes. No meetings planned (or planned and canceled, for that matter). Nothing.

In the intense race to stay ahead of growing construction landscape, staying focused and staying on task are pretty good tools to have in your toolbox.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

Now, how many times has this caused you to close your door and scream into a desk drawer? You’re good – it happens to all of us (more times than we’d like to admit). In the daily plight to knock everything off of our todo lists, things go untouched. Plans change. Materials are delayed. Deadlines are missed. Mastering the art of the “to-do list” is making sure that projects get started and finished on time. Meetings happen. People get what they need. I know you know what to do. But let’s face, sometimes it gets hard. You win by keeping the list short and manageable. Set weekly goals that can be slotted into daily, realistic agendas. Separate tasks into categories you can attack and achieve (start small and work your way up). If you’re on top of your construction and renovation game, your list is going to grow. That’s a good thing. In the intense race to stay ahead of the growing construction landscape, staying focused and staying on task are pretty good tools to have in your toolbox. As we head into fall, try making that your priority. Try building a to-do list that’s worth looking at every day – one that you can be proud to share with your team. Here’s to a great fall. Michael

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

6

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


CIRCLE NO. 4


• Standard • Vented

F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC

• See-Through

P.O. Box 3908

• Box Style

Suwanee, GA 30024

• Cell Phone Lockers

678.765.6550 • Fax 678.765.6551

• Modular • Wood

EDITORIAL

• Plastic

EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino

• Storage Solutions

678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 772.232.6614 SCC MISSION Create FINAL 5.21:Eagle qrt pg FINAL

5/21/13

10:25 AM

CIRCLE NO. 5

David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com

Create 3

7/16”

x 4 7/8”

ADVERTISING PUBLISHER/EDITOR

SCHIMENTI MISSION

1/4 Page

Page 1

678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 SUMMIT DIRECTOR David Corson • davidc@ccr-mag.com

4/C

678.765.6550 (fax) 678.765.6551 CCRP MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR: Kristen Corson • kristenc@ccr-people.com 770.990.7702

Luxurious design elements of Massimo-Dutti’s first U.S. store and its largest worldwide - include integrated marble floors, highend millwork, custom lighting, fabric wall coverings and even a life-size horse mannequin. These elements all combine to create a luxury retail environment.

LIST RENTAL: Brian Clotworthy • bclotworthy@inforefinery.com

We’re ready to create when you are. Call Joseph Rotondo, Vice President 914.244.9100, x319 or visit www.schimenti.com.

General Contractor. Construction Management. Remodel Program. New York I New Jersey I New England CIRCLE NO. 6

8

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015

800.529.9020 SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES 678.765.6550 corpcirc@ccr-mag.com

F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC


CIRCLE NO. 7


EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Store Planning and Construction DSW Shoes BROOKS HERMAN Project Manager of Construction Academy Sports + Outdoors STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company BRYAN NOVAK Sr. Director of Engin eering, Estimating, Quality Assurance Wal-Mart Stores DAVID OSHINSKI Director of Construction Home Depot JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury JANIS WILLIAMS Director of Store Facilities Tuesday Morning ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design

10

RESTAURANTS MIKE HUDSON Director of Construction CEC Entertainment GREGG LOLLIS Director, Restaurant Development Chick-fil-A BOB WITKEN Director of Construction & Development Rave Restaurant Group DAVID SHOTWELL Director of Construction Bojangles’ Famous Chicken ‘n Biscuits RON BIDINOST Senior Director of Franchise Operations & Administration Marie Callenders Restaurant & Bakery LLC

HOSPITALITY

RICK TAKACH President and CEO Vesta Hospitality PUNIT R. SHAH President Liberty Group of Companies

GENERAL CONTRACTOR MATT SCHIMENTI

President Schimenti Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT

Senior Vice President, DTZ STEVE JONES

International Director JLL

JOHN COOPER Senior Vice President Development RB Hotel Development JOHN LAPINS Vice President, Architecture & Construction Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. DENNIS MCCARTY Vice President, Technical Services, Construction InterContinental Hotels Group, the Americas GARY RALL Vice President, Resort Renovation & Design Wyndham Vacation Ownership RICHARD SENECHAL Executive Vice President, Facilities Loews Hotels ROBERT RAUCH President R.A. Rauch & Assoc. Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University

MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning

LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations & Project Management Interserv Hospitality Solutions JIM SHEUCHENKO

President Property Management Advisors LLC

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS NUNZIO DESANTIS

Executive VP & Director of Hospitality HKS

DON HASULAK

Managing Director Big Red Rooster

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015

TOMMY LINSTROTH

Principal Trident Sustainability Group JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M JIM STAPELTON Vice President FRCH Design Wordwide HUGHES THOMPSON Principal GreenbergFarrow FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Herschman Architects STEVEN MCKAY Senior Principal DLR Group GINA NODA Noda Retail Consultancy

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA MIKE AUTENRIETH Academic Director Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management The International Culinary School at The Art Institute International Minnesot DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


• Construction Manager • General Contractor • Thirty five years of professional and quality construction management services makes us...

“The Customer’s Builder” Specializing in:

Tenant Fit-Outs Remodels

Ground Up Renovation

Retail Hospitality

Big Box Fitness

www.constructionone.com

CIRCLE NO. 8

United States l Canada l Mexico 101 East Town Street - Suite 401 - Columbus, OH 43215 • 614.235.0057


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS

AroundtheIndustry Retail

Dick’s Sporting Goods Dick’s Sporting Goods is launching a new women’s activewear concept called Chelsea Collective, with apparel, footwear and accessories designed to meld function and fashion. The brand, which will open its first two stores in Virginia and Pittsburgh, will compete with category leaders, including Lululemon and Under Armour. Macy’s Macy’s will open four off-price stores in the New York City market this fall called Macy’s Backstage. The stores, which will sell apparel and home goods, are similar to Nordstrom Rack and Saks Off Fifth. Raley’s The Raley’s supermarket chain is exploring various sites in downtown Sacramento, Calif., for smaller-format, farmer’s-market-style stores that would serve the unique needs of urban consumers. The store would be a return to the downtown area for Raley’s, which operated midtown supermarkets during the 1980s. Target Stores Target will open its ninth CityTarget location this summer in Boston’s Fenway neighborhood. With its other urban-format locations operating in California, Illinois, Oregon and Washington, the location, and another slated to open in Brooklyn, N.Y., next year, mark its expansion to the East Coast for smaller stores that feature product selections tailored toward urban neighborhoods. Target also will open a TargetExpress store in Rosslyn, Va., this fall, bringing its small, urban convenience format to

an underserved neighborhood in the Washington, D.C., area. The store, one of eight new TargetExpress formats it plans to open this year, will target daytime customers and commuters, with a Starbucks counter, grab-and-go fresh food options, workout gear for shoppers’ pre- and post-work gym visits and home goods for area apartments and offices. IKEA IKEA will open a 20,000-square-foot store in London, Ontario, this year, where shoppers will be able to browse and make purchases on in-store tablets, pick up online orders and get support for sales, assembly and room planning. It will be the smallest store for the Swedish furniture retailer, whose standard stores can top out at 340,000 square feet. Whole Foods Whole Foods has chosen to name its new smaller-format stores – 365 by Whole Foods Market. The name marks the stores’ emphasis on the retailer’s 365 Everyday Value private-label brand. The new stores, set to start opening next year, are targeted toward Millennials and those looking for a quick and convenient shopping experience. At Home Plano, Texas-based home decor retailer At Home plans to open its first local store in 15 years. It’s also stepping up its product mix after its recent conversion from Garden Ridge. At Home is building a 108,000-square-foot store that will open this fall in far north Fort Worth. The Garden Ridge that opened in 2000 in Grand Prairie was the last store it opened in North Texas.

Restaurants Chick-fil-A In addition to the three-story flagship store, Chick-fil-A has unveiled plans to open a number of new locations in New York City. The chain also is plotting expansion in Seattle, Portland, Ore., Nevada and Michigan. Burger 21 Burger 21 is targeting the eastern seaboard tristate area, including communities in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania, for future expansion. The fast casual concept aims to develop new restaurants in Long Island, the New York City boroughs and northern New Jersey, as well as upstate New York and Pennsylvania.

Cracker Barrel Cracker Barrel will open its new “fusion prototype,” a new-equipment version of its full-service, family-dining restaurant in Morganton, N.C. Checkers Drive-In Restaurants Checkers Drive-In is eyeing Greater Boston for its first Massachusetts location and aims to open up to 50 of its Checkers drive-thru burger joints across the commonwealth. Bennigan’s Bennigan’s, the once-bankrupt casual dining chain, is making a comeback, bringing with it 100 new locations throughout California.

Hospitality Hilton Hilton brand Conrad Hotels & Resorts is planning to open its first property in Mexico in 2016, a 135-room hotel in San Luis Potosi. Best Western International Best Western International’s new lifestyle brand Vib is scheduled to make its U.S. debut in Chicago. The 74-room Vib Chicago, located near Midway Airport, is slated to open by late summer 2016. The 200-room Vib Miami, which will be part of a development near that city’s new

12

Expo Center, will break ground in November and is scheduled to open by the end of next year. Preferred Hotels & Resorts Preferred Hotels & Resorts is rebranding its collection to focus on the distinctive aspects of its properties across 10 categories in a move company officials say take it from being a “house of brands” to a “branded house.” Preferred’s five collections are Connect, Legend, Lifestyle, LVX and Residences.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


AroundtheIndustry – continued Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide has unveiled a five-year, 10-point plan aimed at reviving its Sheraton Hotels and Resorts brand. The Sheraton 2020 vision involves a new marketing initiative, a new tier for the Sheraton Grand brand and opening more than 150 properties by 2020. In addition, it is launching a new brand, Tribute, composed of independent hotels. The company plans to invest $20 million in the venture — its first new brand since 2006 — and hopes to grow its portfolio to 100 properties in five years. The Royal Palm South Beach Miami will be the first Tribute hotel.

Dolce Hotels and Resorts Dolce Hotels and Resorts, owned by the Wyndham Hotel Group, will debut its first Dolce Hotel in Ohio when it is completed in 2017. The 217-room property will include facilities such as a conference center and a rooftop garden. ​ Omni Hotels & Resorts Omni Hotels & Resorts is developing a hotel in partnership with the Atlanta Braves, opening in conjunction with the Major League Baseball team’s new stadium. The Omni Atlanta Hotel at SunTrust Park will have 260 rooms.

New day, new way Department stores explore new models as times change

R

eal estate spinoffs. Omnichannel efforts. Cosmetic partnerships and acquisitions. These are new days for department stores, which continue to seek new avenues for growth thanks to ever-evolving technological advances. Experts say the industry hasn’t seen such transition since big downtown department stores gave way to large enclosed malls a few generations ago. The change can bee seen in things such as Nordstrom’s

launch of TextStyle, a new take on the personalized shopper, where purchasing requires nothing more than sending the word “buy” along with a code. The retail even enabled customer to buy from its Instagram page. Other signs of change include the formation of Sears’ real estate investment trust, which recently bought 235 Sears and Kmart store sites, along with its interest in joint ventures that have 31 more properties.

Pizza (Hut), sports and beer

H

ow’s this for adding a little something to your traditional franchise set up? A Pizza Hut franchisee has opened a branded sports bar in the Harmon Glass Building in downtown Minneapolis. The 152seat eatery features 13 TV screens, a lunch buffet, beer, wine and cocktails. The strategy is the brainchild of Doug Prickett, director of operations for Muy Pizza Minnesota, which opened a similar set up called Davanni’s in Plymouth. The new Minneapolis Pizza Hut is only a few blocks away from Davanni’s downtown location. The Minneapolis restaurant is not the first in Minnesota to use Muy’s new format. The company debuted the sports bar concept in May at a new St. Cloud restaurant. Prickett says Muy plans to build two others in Minnesota – Grand Rapids and Duluth.

Did you

know

To concierge or not to concierge, well, sort of. The Irvine Marriott Hotel, which recently was acquired by CBRE Strategic Partners U.S. Value 7 fund, is featuring a “virtual concierge” program, which debuted last year at the San Jose Marriott. The program allows guests to go directly to their rooms, bypassing front desk check-ins by using a virtual mobile check-in service instead. Every store that we’ve opened has been highly successful any way that you measure it in terms of customer satisfaction, traffic that we’re seeing, sales profitability. The metrics that we’re seeing out of the stores themselves are really on the same level as best-in-class retailers, only rivaled by companies like Tiffany and Apple. – Warby Parker co-founder Dave Gilboa on the eyewear e-commerce pioneer’s expanding retail presences

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

13


INDUSTRY NEWS

INDUSTRY NEWS T his victory is even sweeter than all of the exciting things that are happening now with great ease, because New Orleans is an easy place to do business. The world is now seeing it, and they are investing in us.

Recipe for success? A

unique grocery shopping experience recently opened in Boston’s Brookline neighborhood where customers can buy pre-portioned recipe kits of locally-sourced food that can be prepared in less than 45 minutes. The store, named Pantry, is a brick-and-mortar concept similar to the meal subscription services Plated and Blue Apron. Pantry also wil feature sommelier-recommended wine and beer pairings for each meal, as well as kitchen supplies.

– Councilwoman Stacy Head on the reopening of the New Orleans’ $24.4 million, 106,000-squarefoot Magnolia Marketplace, 10 years after it was destroyed during Hurricane Katrina

7.6

The amount, in trillions, that the travel and leisure industry contributed to the global economy in 2014, according to Statista.com. Among the top destinations for luxury travelers was Hawaii, Italy and Mexico.

EON MODEL EL3 TM

NEW! Three Phase Centralized Emergency Lighting Inverter Full Compliance With NFPA 101 Computer-based, self-testing / self-diagnostic emergency lighting system with data-logging. Reliability, Plus Compatibility Provides reliable, regulated voltage during normal and emergency power modes. Compatible with all lighting fixture types, including LED. Easy Installation & Low Cost of Ownership Requires only (1) battery cabinet for 90 minutes runtime, and only batteries with front-access terminals are used. Single-point operation for all monitoring, testing, data-logging, reporting, and maintenance. Compact, Space-Saving Footprint Physically smaller than comparable three-phase emergency lighting inverter products, without compromising performance or serviceability.

33 kW EON shown

10 kW – 33 kW Download a brochure and specifications today!

www.controlledpwr.com/EON_1

EON Model EL3 Ad_Half Page.indd 1

14

UL 924 Listed C-UL Listed to CSA C22.2 No. 141-10

CIRCLE NO. 9

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015

EON Competitor A Competitor B

Output Rating

Width (in.)

33 kW 32 kW 33 kW

70 130 140

7/19/13 11:34 AM


IS NOW QUIETER NEW FEATURES: Lower decibel level with the new Customize the speed of air flow using the new speed controller. Remove bacteria and dust by using

The NEW XLERATOR eco: Consumes only hands in 15 seconds!

while drying

Learn How Our Restroom Experts Will Save You Money, Time and Energy XLERATOR® Hand Dryers Bathroom Stall Partitions

Plumbing Fixtures Fire Protection

NEWTON DISTRIBUTING COMPANY

Toilet Accessories Drinking Fountains

Call now CIRCLE NO. 10

Lockers & Benches And More...

877-837-7745

sales@newtondistributing.com www.newtondistributing.com


CIRCLE NO. 11


RETAIL

RESTAURANT

SPECIALTY

For more information contact John Stallman at: 262.857.3336 x241 or info@Ivconstruction.com Ivconstruction.com Corporate Office: 10505 Corporate Drive, Suite 200, Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 Phone: 262.857.3336 • Fax: 262.857.3424 Puerto Rico Office: Urb, Velle Arriba Heights, Call 38-B, AY-8, Suite 200 Carolina, Puerto Rico 00983 Phone: 787.257.0123 • Fax: 787.750.7096 Web www.Ivconstruction.com

BIG BOX


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Casting call CCRP returns to LA

B

acklot tours. Food. Games. You name it, and there’s a pretty good chance the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) party in LA delivered. CCRP returned to Los Angeles and Warner Bros. for an evening on the Studio’s Brownstone Street backlot. The event had a neighborhood block party feel with cocktails, food carts, a build-your-own burger grill station, ping pong and a corn hole competition. Guests also were treated to short tours of the shops and exterior sets, and a peek inside the picture car exhibit. Do you want in on the action? Call Kristen Corson today at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristenc@ccr-people.com. REGISTERED COMPANIES: 3M

Five Guys

Kingsman Inter

Porcelanosa USA

ACS

Forman & Associates

Kollin Altomare Architects

RaceTrac

AmGraph

Gensler Glab Maintenance Services

Kornwasser Shopping Center Properties

Ralph Lauren-Creative Services

Annette English Teroor Design Architect

Global Partners Services

LA Dodgers

Armani Design Studio

GUESS?

LaZerCAd

Atlas Sign Industies

H&M

Lemonade Brand

Blaze Pizza

Hekman & Associates

Light Build Design

Bob Evans Restaurants

Hook Burger

LITTLE

Hot Topic

Live Nation

Innovation Design in Architecture

Mats Inc

Innovative Dining Group

Menchies

Tilly’s

JA Carpentry

Morley Builders

Timothy Corrigan

Construction One

JG Construction

Nasty Gal

UGG

Crossville Inc

JLL

National Parks

Vistage

Dior

JMBM

Oakley

Warner Bros. Real Estate

Edwards Technologies Inc

K&L Wine Merchants

Pantera

Warner Bros. Consumer Products

Elro Signs

KB Home

Pattison Sign

WBTVM - Creative

Fandango

Kelly Wearstler

Pizza Studio

Westfield

Boss Facility Services Buffalo Wild Wings Caruso Affiliated Commercial Construction & Rennovation

18

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015

RE-AL Sargenti See’s Skechers Special Occasions The McIntosh Group Thinkwell


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

1. T ony Olson, Warner Bros. Paint; Thor Jonsson, Warner Bros. Real Estate; Elvia Cerda, Warner Bros. Staff Shop 2. R obert Greenfield, Warner Bros. Property; Linda OtheninGirard, K&L Wine Merchants; Alin Othenin-Girard, K&L Wine Merchants; Ed Price, Global Partners Services 3. E than Rosen, Boss Facility Services; Jessica Glab, Glab Maintenance Services; Evan Glab, Glab Maintenance Services; Lance Smith, Dior

6. Michael White, Gensler; Kelly Kane, JLL 7. Aidi and Blake Janesky, LA Dodgers; Erica Janesky, LA Dodgers 8. Jima Agresta, JA Carpentry; Chance Dennis, RaceTrac; Caleb Rodgers, RaceTrac; Jason Parker, Warner Bros. 9. Mike Monzo, Pizza Studio; Kelly O’Brien, Atlas Sign Industry; Maria Torres, Pizza Studio

4. Warner Bros. Photo Lab Team

10. Paul Alarico, RE-Al; Cherisse Regnart, RE-AL; Don Skorupski, Construction One

5. J anelle Norton, Vision Quest Lighting; Dan Belling, ACS; Phil Friedl, JLL; Kelly Kane, JLL; Brian Ellsworth, Forman & Associates; Babs Tankersley, Daisycake

11. Clif Taylor, Ralph Lauren; Norman Barnett, Warner Bros.; Stephen O’Malley, Ralph Lauren 12. John Moran, Pattison Sign; Kevin Horne JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

19


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

1.

4.

2.

3.

5.

7.

6.

8.

9.

1. J oni Jew, See’s Candy; Tim Theroux, Mats Inc; Ron Bidinost, Marie Callender’s 2. J ennifer Brown, Guess?; Diana Tran, Guess?; Babs Tankersley, Daiseycake; Janelle Norton, VQL 3. E rica Rolin, Crossville Inc.; Charlotte Pierce, 3M; Monica Farley, Crossville Inc. 4. M  ichael Armani, Armani Design Studios; Dan Materman, Elro Signs

5. Genevieve Trousdale, Timothy Corrigan Interiors; VemberStewart Lilley, Warner Bros., Warner Bros. Design Studio; Erin Cunningham, Timothy Corrigan Interiors; 6. Jane Cook, AmGraph; Steve Hekman, Kingsman; Wendy Sabine, AmGraph; Shane Hekman, Hekman & Associates 7. Thomas McCarthy, Little; Jenny Diaz, Little; Kelly Nguyen, Little; Brie Jones, Little; Hans Herst, Gensler; Amy Pokawatana, Gensler 8. Westfield Corporate Team 9. LA Dodgers Design Team

20

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


1.

2.

4.

3.

5.

7.

6.

8.

9.

1. Ben Sonne & guest

6. Leon Banks, LA Dodgers; Terrence Murphy, LA Dodgers

2. Mistyka Garcia, Special Occasions; Javier Flores, Special Occasions

7. Sue Jagodzinski, Kornwasser; Joshua Binkley, Kornwasser

3. Johnnie Floes, Porcelanosa USA; Patricia Denia, Porcelanosa USA

8. DeWayne Adamson, Pantera; David Rhodes, ACS

4. C  ass Warner, Warner Bros.; Roberta Perry, Edwards Technologies, Inc.

9. Amanda Cash, Pantera; Stacy Peterson, JG Construction; Stephen Hekman, Kingsman; Shane Hekman, Hekman & Associates; Gary Kramer, National Parks; Karen MacCannell, The McIntosh Group; Valerie Davis, LaZerCad; Diana Rico, LaZerCad

5. Tom Grande, KB Home; Kevin Boyce, Warner Bros.

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR:

Warner Bros. Design Studio Burbank, CA Vember Stuart-Lilley Ph: 818-954-4430 • FAX: 818-954-2806 www.wbsf.com • vember.stuart-lilley@warnerbros.com

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

21


INDUSTRY EVENTS

INDUSTRY EVENTS • CCRP

Boston style CCRP hits the City on the Hill

I

t’s Boston, come on. The Red Sox. The Patriots. That tea party that started everything. If you want history, Boston has some history for you. It was only fitting that the Commercial Construction & Renovation People (CCRP) networkers chose The Blackstone Grill for its night of networking. Blackstone, a local favorite, is housed in a building that dates back to 1822. If you’re looking networking opportunities with a touch of historical significance, CCRP is for you. What are you waiting for? Contact Kristen Corson at 770-990-7702 or via email at kristen@ccr-people.com today. 1. Brad Gaskins, The McIntosh Group; Eric Gelfond, Au Bon Pain; Lori Bowers, Crossville Inc; Jeff Mahler, L2M

REGISTERED COMPANIES: 3M

Cumberland Farms

Learning Express

Signage Solutions

Au Bon Pain

Flash Right Displays

Mats Inc

Southwest Signs

Chain Store Maintenance

Glab Maintenance Services

Commonwealth Builders

Inside Edge

Noda Retail Consultancy

TD Bank

Construction One

Jayeff Construction

Retail Maintenance Specialists

The McIntosh Group

Crossville Inc

L2M

Schimenti Construction

Topco

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR: 22

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015

R

Flash Right Displays 6210 Browns Bridge Road (678) 455-9121 Pete Monti / President info@flashrightdisplays.com www.flashrightdisplays.com


1.

2.

3.

5.

4.

6.

1. Jim Harte, Topco; Deborah Giampolo, 3M

4. David Fields, Southwest Signs, Brian Cartier, Learning Express

2. Don Skorupski, Construction One; Lisa Ploss, ProCoat Products; Aaron Ancello, TD Bank

5. Gina Noda, Noda Retail Consultancy, David Corson, CCR; Kelli Buhay, Retail Maintenance Specialists

3. Larry Schwarz, Inside Edge; Laura Riendeau, Chain Store Maintenance; Tim Theroux, Mats Inc.

6. Rob Lalumia, Au Bon Pain; Michael Morelli, Signage Solutions; Evan Glab, Glab Maintenance Services

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

23


W

hen the management team at Concord Hospitality Enterprises tells you it’s all about teamwork, you listen. The proof rests in its growing partnerships – a team that includes owners, investors and more than 4,000 associates. Together, they set out – every day – to create the best experiences for their guests across an expanding portfolio.

Partnering Why Concord’s teamwork approach works By Michael J. Pallerino The team was started in 1985 by current CEO and founder, Mark Laport, with a small contingent (four people) and a big goal. Nothing major – just 25 hotels. That was the number they chose. Starting from scratch (zero hotels), the Concord mission was to develop and acquire high-quality hotel properties, and to provide dedicated hotel management services to both full-service and upscale select-service properties. Something clicked. Today, Concord has 95 hotels (and counting) throughout the United States and Canada. Marriott. Hilton. Starwood. Hyatt. Choice. InterContinental Hotels. These brands are part of Concord’s expanding line. And it never ends. The Concord team continually works to create value for its partners and associates by leveraging its operations, develop-

24

Up

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Pictured throughout this article are shots of the newly opened (July 2015) Residence Inn in Durham, N.C., near Duke University Medical Center. The 143-room hotel was built on the site of the old McPherson Hospital that opened in 1910. The hotel include a dedication to the history of the hospital in a special room that was saved and incorporated into the new building. The dedication to quality and advanced designs for Concords customers is evident throughout this facility. JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

25


PARTNERING UP ment, sales and marketing, technology, accounting, and operational management expertise to continue to grow the portfolio. Commercial Construction & Renovation sat down with Carl Hren, VP, construction & Capital Assets for Concord Hospitality Enterprises Co., to get his take on the company’s goals moving forward.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list in 2015? The biggest thing on our list right now is hiring quality people to join our development team. The other item is to streamline our development process.

Describe a typical day.

Every day is filled with numerous conference calls. In between, we are constantly reviewing proposals from contractors, examining drawings, and traveling and walking job sites to check the progress of our projects. We also spend time discussing current status, complex challenges and strategies with our development team members.

What are some of Concord’s biggest opportunities moving ahead?

Our biggest opportunity is what we always strive to be, and that is to become the best hotel developer in the nation. That’s made possible

All of the design and construction firms that we work with are very busy and their backlog is jammed. This is a very good sign for the status of our industry. by utilizing the four main cornerstones of our company and expanding our development department. This includes staying on the forefront of design and construction methods, finding the most innovative design and construction companies in the hospitality industry and hiring top tier talent.

Give us a snapshot of today’s hospitality marketplace.

I currently believe that the hospitality market is close to hitting the summit. We are seeing markets that are being flooded with new hotel rooms to the point where people

26

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Renovating a ConCRete Slab? Hardened Concrete Renovating a PRoCeed CautiouSly.

AConCRete Sucker For Moisture By Mac Krauss Slab?

Our data from the past several years shows that our sustainable development projects provide about 24 percent of total energy savings. are now backing out of deals due to the over-supply. That will cause this large influx of new development projects to slowly hit the summit and begin the process of some sort of a correction. I couldn’t speculate on the timeline for that to happen.

PRoCeed CautiouSly. Old timers remember with nostalgia the Silicates are used torainwater good effect concrete cistern that held collected By Mac Krauss in the finishing of hardened at grandmother’s house and perhaps the concrete forthe warehouses, concrete ships floors made in early 20th manufacturing plants, and Silicates are totake good effect century. Today weused simply forother granted commercial, institutional and that concrete structures such as municipal in the finishing of hardened Silicates also waterindustrial tanks andfacilities. our swimming pools hold concrete floors for warehouses, contribute to the “shininess” their liquid contents without leaking. manufacturing plants,systems and other of concrete polishing When properly proportioned, and are sometimes usedmixed, quite commercial, institutional and placed and hardened concrete is naturally liberally. industrial facilities. Silicates also waterproof and will block water in the liquid contribute to “shininess” phase quite effectively. Concrete’s ability However, thethe presence of these toofblock water in the liquid form is so good concrete polishing systems silicates must be carefully that it was used as a replacement for when converting a steel andconsidered are sometimes used quite in shipbuilding during WWI. hardened or polished concrete liberally. floor to a resilient flooring It is not surprising, then,can that most of system. Silicates become us think of concrete as a solid mass; a However, the presence these serious bond breakers forof even waterproof solid mass. the highest adhesive, silicates mustperforming be carefully epoxy, or urethane. considered when converting a Truth is, hardened concrete is literally filled with micropores and micro-capillaries hardened or polished concrete If you’re working with athickness. running throughout its entire floormicro-capillaries to a resilient are flooring Theserenovation formed when the or tenant conversion system. Silicates can become concrete hydrates or cures. hydration project where silicate During use is even orserious curing the concrete mass shrinks forcing bond breakers for remotely suspected, it forming is besteven to trapped water to the surface the highest performing adhesive, take a concrete it “bleed-water” tracks.core Theseand aresend the residual epoxy, urethane.lab for pathways orindependent “micro-straws” thatforensic allow to anor moisture to travel through hardened concrete. testing.

Are you optimistic about what you see out there today?

If you’re working with a To learn more and finish this renovation or tenant conversion article, visit us online at: project where silicate use is even www.actechperforms.com remotely suspected, it is or best to take a concrete core and send it to an independent lab for forensic testing.

What are today’s customers looking for from their hotel experience?

To learn more and finish this article, visit us online at:

What trends and challenges are driving business?

The two biggest trends impacting today’s hospitality market are Millennial travelers and “lifestyle” hotels. We have spent a good deal of time working with some of the best architects and designers in the hospitality sector on the various brands we develop to address the needs of the Millennial generation. Some of the strategies we have implemented include providing more than enough power outlets, bandwidth, complemented by modern designs that energized lobby environments. Yes, very much so. All of the design and construction firms that we work with are very busy and their backlog is jammed. This is a very good sign for the status of our industry. With that said, the over development of most markets will eventually drive a correction or slow down period. As I mentioned before, the Millennials are a new breed of travelers. They want simple, hip designs with technology immersed throughout. That’s why you already see more

www.actechperforms.com or CIRCLE NO. 12

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

27


Advertorial

The light of day

W

Weber Jewelers hits mark with new carpet, lighting options

hen you’re a staple in the community, like Weber Jewelers has been in the Dayton, Ohio, community for over 50 years, your customers get accustomed to the way your brand presents itself in everything it does – from the look and feel of your store, to the way your employees connect with each person. Perhaps nobody knows this better than Fred Weber, one of Dayton’s premier jewelers. A Robert M. Shipley award winner – the American Gem Society’s highest distinction, has spent more than three generations lending his expertise and guidance to his customers’ every need.

I enjoy the challenges that all clients bring to the table and using the knowledge we have here at Storefloors to assist those clients in accomplishing their flooring objectives. – Danny Wilson, National Account Director, Storefloors

Before

Before

28

After When Weber decided it was time to update and make some renovations, he was pleasantly surprised to see that his customers would appreciate the changes. The two biggest parts of Weber Jewelers’ renovation efforts were lighting and carpeting. The first step was the addition of LED lighting throughout the store and showroom. Next was a comAfter plete upgrade of the carpeting, which Weber says adds a whole new look. “We wanted a carpet that would portray an upscale image and exude luxury by the look and the feel from the first step, all without drawing attention to the floor,” Weber says. “We also wanted it to react to the new lighting we put in, so that it would have a brighter feeling when you walked in.” Weber worked closely with Storefloors to be able to cross all the points off of their wish list. The priority was to get a carpet and padding that would not only give the upscale look and feel they wanted, but also not show any signs of traffic patterns. After reviewing a series of samples, they selected the new carpet that would achieve their goals. “I was comfortable with the expertise, so I didn’t try to second guess what they recommended. I listened to their suggestions, and it has worked out beautifully. The feedback that we received from our customers has been quite good.” The changes shifted the focus back on the jewelry rather than the floor. There was no more competition between the two. It was a perfect fit for Weber, which is a high-end, old-fashioned jeweler that carries the kind of exquisite merchandise its customers cannot find anywhere else. “The renovation – the carpet, the lighting – was all a part of this image, the transition we were looking to make,” Weber says. “The dark gray carpet with patterns of white working through it helped lighten up the room. Now, there is a lighter feeling, which really makes a difference.”

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


GAMBLING WITH YOUR FLOORS?

Place your chips on the winning combination EXPERTISE

PERFORMANCE

RELIABILITY

Carpet • Porcelain • Stone • Hardwood • Laminate • LVT • Matting • Specialty & Sustainable Products • Fascia Applications

w w w. s t o r e f l o o r s . c o m

JuliaV@storefloors.com CIRCLE NO. 13

678.638.1611


PARTNERING UP

energy in the lobby, powered by the redesigned and repositioned bar and restaurant, makes people want to be a part of that atmosphere. We also give our guests many different areas to relax and utilize technology. Numerous“zones” throughout the public space help create this opportunity.

In what areas are you seeing the most growth these days?

USB and power outlets throughout our properties. Oversized flat panel televisions with all HD service. Wi-Fi with large bandwidths. To deliver these new and hip designs, we have to utilize the best talent in the industry. That means close collaboration with the various brands, and the experience our entire project teams bring to the table.

How do you incorporate their needs into your strategy?

The best ways is through the use of forward-thinking designers. For example, take our complete renovation of the Renaissance Hotel in the Meadowlands, N.J. This forward thinking design has received rave reviews from the Gen X, Gen Y and Millennial travelers. The

30

Lifestyle brands. The Renaissance Hotel in the Meadowlands is a great example. But the major upscale select service brands are also all thriving. Recent renovations to many of our Courtyards, Hilton Garden Inns, and other products have received fantastic reviews.

What type of renovation plans to have in 2015?

In the fourth quarter 2015, we will start six projects worth 10 million in PIP/renovations. In April 2016, we will begin the $20 million reinvention of the 400-room, full-service Marriott in Dayton, Ohio.

How important is your sustainability initiative?

Every Concord Hospitality development since 2008 has been minimally LEED certified. We are very strong believers in the green building movement. That’s why we are committed to

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


CIRCLE NO. 14


PARTNERING UP

There’s

taking responsibility for our natural resources. In other words, caring for our planet. We are committed to making all new development LEED certified. When we develop LEED-certified hotels, we make sure the development makes both economic and environmental sense. Our data from the past several years shows that our sustainable development projects provide about 24 percent of total energy savings. By providing these savings for years to come, sustainable development is good for everyone.

What do expect to see shake out in the marketplace this year?

What trends are you seeing?

To become the best developer of top brands in North America. Concord is currently approaching $1,000,000,000 in projects under, or in pre-construction. <CCR

Everyone headed toward the “lifestyle” brands. We have numerous lifestyle projects going through our due diligence process.

another one?

What makes the Concord Hospitality brand so unique?

CEO and founder Mark Laport’s dedication to people, quality, and his appetite to continue to develop bigger and better hotels

What should people expect from Concord in 2015 and beyond?

Get to know ... » Carl S. Hren

It’s no secret that FAAST aspirating smoke detectors watch over your important assets and prevent downtime. But here’s something you may not know: FAAST is now available in three different varieties to accommodate any coverage area. Whether you need to protect a small space or a large space, FAAST has a solution for you! Meet the FAAST family of aspirating smoke detectors. With the addition of FAAST XS for smaller applications, our family of aspirating smoke detectors has grown. With the same look, functionality, and technology, FAAST can meet all application needs.

All signs are pointing to another record-breaking year across the board.

VP, Construction & Capital Assets Concord Hospitality Enterprises Co.

What’s the most rewarding part of your job? It’s opening or renovating a project, on time, under budget and with exceptional quality. Then, we like to watch our operations department succeed in running the best hotels in the industry. What was the best advice you ever received? A career is not a job; it’s a way of life. What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? “Carl is one of the most talented construction managers I have ever worked with.” What are the three strongest traits any leader should have? Hard work, always strategize for the future and truly care for the team. What is the true key to success for any manager? A team that is willing to do what it takes for the betterment of everyone.

Meet the new addition, FAAST XS, at:

What’s your favorite vacation spot? I love Europe and all of its history.

go.systemsensor.com/ FAASTXS-CCR

What book are you reading now? “Killing Patton” By Bill O’Reilly.

©2015 System Sensor. All Rights Reserved.

How do you like to spend your down time? I enjoy being involved with my church and boating on Lake Gaston with my wife and two children.

CIRCLE NO. 15

32

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


CONCEPT TO COMPLETION

WE COVER THE DETAILS BBPM has over 20 years of project and construction management experience and has built and renovated over 200 hotels. Our core senior management team members hold professional degrees in Architecture, Engineering, Construction Management, and Finance. This diversity provides our clients with a broad spectrum of expertise in all forms of project management; entitlements, design, construction, financial assessments, and procurement. Some of our satisfied clients are Marriott International, Wyndahm Worldwide, RLJ Lodging Trust, Clarion Partners, and Hospitality Properties Trust. Call (407)636-3232 to learn more. david@bbpm.com

CIRCLE NO. 16

www.bbpm.com


Advertorial

How to Build Your Successful Renovation Project

R

enovation projects are complex by their very nature. Each project usually contains several unique challenges whether it be an office, senior housing, hotel or restaurant. Project proposals must identify precise goals and solutions along with an aggressive disciplined schedule to achieve a successful outcome. Utilizing more than four decades of dedication to the renovation process has enabled Cicero’s Development to establish and test unique processes, as well as enabled us to consistently complete all of our renovation projects on-time, on-budget with a high level of client satisfaction. Team Development with Consistent Communications are two key elements, often overlooked, in this complex undertaking. It’s important for everyone on the team to share all of the same project goals, design intent, budget and time line, early on in the process and share the same clear vision to move forward successfully. Scope Development, another key factor with all of its written assumptions, clarifications and exclusions, ensures that each team member understands and agrees on the objectives, essential elements and deliverables of the project. Once the scope has been determined, understood and agreed upon, the risk of confusion and miscommunication throughout the project can be substantially reduced. This process oftentimes is revised throughout the project. Differences between a client’s expectations and the project team’s designs develop as a project proceeds. As a result, meeting the client’s desires may not be well defined by the initially specified scope of the project. The expectations of both the client and project team should be realigned and integrated throughout the entire project. Proper Project Scheduling is another of the key factors. By developing a realistic schedule with milestone points, the team knows in advance each facet of the job from beginning to completion and exactly where and how the elements fit together from initiation to closeout and additionally, how they impact the project. This process is essential for all parties to understand what area(s) must be shut down and for what period of time. All subcontractors need to be properly scheduled and materials ordered in enough time so that the project schedule is maintained. Also, a fall back/recovery plan must be developed during Risk Management Planning for those “just in case” situations that may occur at key milestone points. Doing this will greatly reduce impact to cost and time, should it occur during the execution phase.This is of great value to help ensure the owner and lender’s comfort level. Budgeting often runs in lock step with scheduling. Once deliverables have been established, we are able to identify the resources and honest budget needed to produce those deliverables. This encompasses the proper people, equipment and materials necessary for your project. Depending on whether or not there are changes to the scope or the schedule, this process too can be revised throughout the project. Communication and feedback is maintained throughout the project. That’s why it’s critical that each phase of the project is documented and communicated with the entire project team by providing status updates in a timely fashion. We hold daily team meetings, schedule regular customer presentations, provide status reports and share an online system for real-time reporting to designated team members. As we mentioned earlier, consistent communication and feedback are critical to keep your renovation project on-time and on-budget.

Building a successful renovation project is a systematic coordinated, step-by-step process and runs parallel with other processes in order to accomplish the project goals and vision. Breaking down and carefully analyzing these processes is what helps to ensure a completely successful renovation outcome. This is why we created and trademarked our Renovationomix® program. Look it up on the internet and you will find us there.

34

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


CIRCLE NO. 17


SPECIAL REPORT

FLOORING

Cover me See who’s doing what in flooring

Y

ou need flooring? Do we have a resource for you. Our annual Flooring guide gives you the insider’s track to the leading companies in the retail, restaurant and hospitality sectors. Our exclusive survey showcases the contact information and contact person for each of the reporting companies. If you’re not listed, contact publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version of this report, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. Aacer Flooring American Biltrite 970 Ogden Rd. Peshtigo, WI 54157 Ph: 715-582-1181 www.aacerflooring.com • sales@aacerflooring.com Product Type: WOOD: Solid, Finished, Unfinished; Markets Served: Sports & Recreation, Residential & Commercial

AC-Tech, Inc.

3302 Croft St. Norfolk, VA 23513 Mac Krauss/VP Marketing Ph: 757-855-5100 • Fax: 757-855-5108 www.actamerican.net • mkrauss@actamerican.net Product Type: CONCRETE: Poured Floors MISC: Moisture mitigation Products Markets Served: Retail, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

200 Bank St. Coaticook, QC, Canada J1H 4K3 Monique Labbe/Administrative Assistant Ph: 819-829-3353 Fax: 819-829-3360 www.american-biltrite.com • mlabbe@american-biltrite.com Product Type: FLOATING FLOORS: Laminate; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, VCT, Rubber; MISC: Polyolefin; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl, Rubber, Polyolefin; Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

American Olean

7834 C F Hawn Fwy. Dallas, TX 75217 Caitlin Haskins/Sr. Account Executive Ph: 214-398-1411 www.americanolean.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

AdvanTech Flooring Amorim Cork Composites

10925 David Taylor Dr., Ste. 300 Charlotte, NC 28262 Jason Darling/General Manager Ph: 800-933-9220 www.advantechperforms.com • jason.darling@huber.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Unfinished; FLOATING FLOORS: Underlayment Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

26112 110th St. Trevor, WI 53179 Larry Lyons/Dir. Of Sales & Marketing - Flooring Ph: 262-862-2311 Fax: 262-862-2500 www.amorimcorkcomposites.com • llyons.acc@amorim.com Product Type: FLOATING FLOORS: Cork; RESILIENT TILE: Cork; RESILIENT SHEET: Recycled Rubber; RESILIENT OTHER: Accessories Markets Served: Healthcare, Education

2840 Atlantic Ave. Brooklyn, NY 10312 Peter Gregor/Vice President Ph: 800-827-5457 Fax: 718-647-2656 www.alliedtile.com • peter@alliedtile.com Product Type: RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl; Markets Served: N/A

Aliquippa, PA 15001 Charlene Frederick/Manager Ph: 724-203-5000 Fax: 724-203-5001 www.ardexamericas.com • marketing@ardexamericas.com Product Type: CONCRETE: Polished, Stained, Topping, Poured Floors; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Other

ARDEX Allied Tile Manufacturing Corp. 400 Ardex Park Dr.

36

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Arizona Tile 8829 S. Priest Dr. Tempe, AZ 85284 Adria Harrison/Director of Marketing Ph: 480-893-9393 • Fax: 480-893-9390 www.arizonatile.com • info@arizonatile.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain, Quartz, Natural Stone (Granite, Marble, etc.); METAL: Stainless Steel; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Brintons

1000 Cobb Place Blvd., Ste #200 Kennesaw, GA 30144 Heather Wood/Marketing Director Ph: 678-594-9300 Fax: 678-594-9301 www.brintons.net • hwood@brintonsusa.com Product Type: CARPET: Broadloom; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Cali Bamboo

6675 Mesa Ridge Rd., Ste. 100

Armstrong World, Ind. San Diego, CA 92121

2500 Columbia Ave. Lancaster, PA 17603 Tricia Fanty/Marketing Manager Ph: 717-396-5772 Fax: 717-396-6334 www.armstrong.com • plfanty@armstrong.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid,; FLOATING FLOORS: Laminate, Wood; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, VCT, Linoleum; MISC: Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin, PVC Free; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl, Linoleum; RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treads, Wall Base, Accessories; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Bellavita Tile, Inc.

113-6951 72nd St. Delta, BC, Canada V4G 0A2 Mike Ward/VP Sales Ph: 604-940-8595 Fax: 604-940-2524 www.bellavitatile.com • project-info@bellavitatile.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Shannon Valdes/PR & Communications Specialist Ph: 858-309-5789 www.calibamboo.com • svaldes@calibamboo.com Product Type: WOOD: Strand Woven Bamboo; Markets Served: N/A

Carlisle Wide Plank Floors

1676 Route 9 Stoddard, NH 03464 Shannon Sterrett/Interactive Marketing Coordinator Ph: 800-595-9663 www.wideplankflooring.com • info@wideplankflooring.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid, Finished, Unfinished, Aged/Reclaimed Markets Served: N/A

Creative Edge Master Shop, Inc.

601 S. 23rd Street Fairfield, IA 52556 Jim Belilove/President Ph: 641-472-8145 • Fax: 641-472-2848 www.cec-waterjet.com • jimb@cec-waterjet.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain, Quartz, Cement, Agglomerates, Terrazzo Tile; METAL: Stainless Steel, Aluminum; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, VCT, Linoleum, Cork, Rubber, Recycled Rubber, Leather; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl, Linoleum, Rubber, Recycled Rubber, Misc (Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin or other PVC Free); CARPET: Carpet Tile; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls The Worlds Best Architectural Flooring Fabricator

BRANDING | WITH TAGLINE

The Worlds Best Architectural Flooring Fabricator

All of the logos with taglines are different than those without taglines as follows: 1. CE is slightly farther away from the letterforms

by creative edge master shop

2. CE is slightly lower relative to the letterforms

3. CE is 10% larger than logos without the tagline

by creative edge master shop

Better Life Technology, LLC 9736 Legler Rd. Lenexa, KS 66219 Bill Rothe/VP Clear Sales Ph: 913-894-0403 Fax: 913-754-0744 www.bltllc.com • brothe@bltllc.com Product Type: RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Bostik

11320 W. Watertown Plank Rd. Wauwatosa, WI 53226 Chris Eichman/Marketing Manager Ph: 414-607-1265 www.bostik-us.com • christopher.eichman@bostik-us.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid, Traditional Bamboo, Strand Woven Bamboo, Other Strand Woven Wood, Finished, Unfinished, Exotics, Aged/ Reclaimed; TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain, Quartz, Cement, Agglomerates, Terrazzo Tile; METAL: Stainless Steel, Aluminum; FLOATING FLOORS: Laminate, Wood, Cork, Linoleum, Leather, Other; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, VCT, Linoleum, Cork, Rubber, Recycled Rubber, Leather; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl, Linoleum, Rubber, Recycled Rubber, Misc (Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin or other PVC Free); RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treads, Wall Base, Accessories; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, A&D

The logos for Hospitality Flooring, Religious Flooring, and Public Art

CE hangs slightly lower than all of the other logos in

by creative edge master shop

this application to visually compensate for the

decenders in the letterforms. Additionally, the tagline hangs slightly lower than the other to provide a little more breathing room for this occurance.

by creative edge master shop

Alternate for Stand Alone Use (Public Art Only). Size use not intended for website

by creative edge master shop

by creative edge master shop

by creative edge master shop

by creative edge master shop

Crossville, Inc.

For Use on <20% Black Tone

by creative edge master shop

369 Sweeney Dr. Crossville, TN 38555 Irene Williams/PR Representative Ph: 931-484-2110 www.crossvilleinc.com • irene@msg2mkt.com Product Type: TILE: Glass, Porcelain; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

CTS Cement Manufacturing Corp.

11065 Knott Ave. Cypress, CA 90630 Joe Zingale/Flooring Group Specialist Ph: 800-929-3030 • Fax: 714-379-8270 www.CTScement.com • jzingale@ctscement.com Product Type: CONCRETE: Polished, Stained, Topping, Poured Floors; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Industrial/Multi-Use

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

37


SPECIAL REPORT

FLOORING Daltile Ege Seramik USA

7834 C F Hawn Freeway Dallas, TX 75217 Sarah Findle/Sr. Account Executive Ph: 214-398-1411 www.daltile.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid, Traditional Bamboo, Strand Woven Bamboo, Other Strand Woven Wood, Finished, Unfinished, Exotics, Aged/ Reclaimed; TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain, Quartz; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Del Conca USA, Inc.

155 Del Conca Way Loudon, TN 37774 Juan Molina/General Manager Ph: 865-657-3550 • Fax: 865-657-3554 www.delconcausa.com • j.molina@delconcausa.com Product Type: TILE: Porcelain; Markets Served: N/A

Designer Tile & Stone, LLC 100 Newfield Ave. Edison, NJ 08837 Nathan Jay/VP Sales & Marketing Ph: 732-225-1877 • Fax: 732-225-0660 www.designertilestone.com • nathan@designertilestone.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain, Quartz; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls

East to West Concepts in Flooring, Inc.

514 Larkfield Rd., Ste 3A E. Northport, NY 11731 Dean Nichol/President Ph: 631-368-2269 • Fax: 631-368-2267 www.easttowestsales.com • dean@easttowestsales.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid, Traditional Bamboo, Strand Woven Bamboo, Other Strand Woven Wood, Finished, Unfinished, Exotics, Aged/ Reclaimed; TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain, Quartz, Cement, Agglomerates, Terrazzo Tile; FLOATING FLOORS: Laminate, Wood, Cork, Linoleum, Leather, Other; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, VCT, Linoleum, Cork, Rubber, Recycled Rubber, Leather; RESILIENT SHEET: LVT; CARPET: Broadloom, Rugs, Sisal, Wool or other Natural Fiber; CONCRETE: Polished, Stained, Topping, Poured Floors; Markets Served: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

1721 Oakbrook Dr. #C Norcross, GA 30093 Semih Susleyen/Sales Manager Ph: 678-291-0888 • Fax: 678-291-0832 www.egeseramik-usa.com • ssusleyen@egeseramik-usa.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, A&D

Electro Plastics/STEP Warmfloor

11147 Dorsell Rd. Maryland Heights, MD 63043 Monica Irgens/President Ph: 314-426-3555 • Fax: 314-426-3556 www.warmfloor.com • sales@warmfloor.com Product Type: Electric Radiant Heat; Markets Served: N/A

Elite Crete Systems

1061 Transport Dr. Valparaiso, IN 46383 Ken Freestone/Marketing Director Ph: 219-465-7671 • Fax: 219-531-0898 www.elitecrete.com • info@elitecrete.com Product Type: MISC: Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin, PVC Free; RESILIENT SHEET: Misc (Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin, PVC Free); CONCRETE: Polished, Stained, Topping, Poured Floors; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Expanko

180 Gordon Dr., Ste. 113 Exton, PA 19341 Randy Gillespie/VP Sales & Marketing Ph: 610-363-0343 • Fax: 610-363-0735 www.expanko.com • sales@expanko.com Product Type: FLOATING FLOORS: Cork; RESILIENT TILE: Cork, Rubber; RESILIENT SHEET: Rubber; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Florim USA 300 International Blvd. Clarksville, TN 37040 Andrea Braglia/Marketing Associate Ph: 931-648-9820 • Fax: 931-647-5974 www.florimusa.com • abraglia@florimusa.com Product Type: TILE: Porcelain; Markets Served: N/A

ECORE Commercial Flooring Forbo Flooring Systems

P.O. Box 4944 Lancaster, PA 17604 Jocelyn Dillman/Sr. Sales Support Manager Ph: 877-258-0843 • Fax: 717-394-1937 www.ecorecommercialflooring.com • sales@ecorecf.com Product Type: RESILIENT TILE: Cork, Recycled Rubber; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl, Rubber, Recycled Rubber; CARPET: Carpet Tile; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

38

8 Maple Wood Dr. Hazleton, PA 18202 Lori Lagana/Marketing Manager Ph: 800-842-7839 • Fax: 570-450-0229 www.forboflooringNA.com • info.na@forbo.com Product Type: RESILIENT SHEET: Linoleum; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


THE MOST POWERFUL CLEANING AGENT COMES DIRECTLY FROM THE TAP.

You expect a clean, healthy workspace. But can you get it without harsh chemicals, noisy scrubbers and high maintenance costs? We don’t think that‘s too much to ask. Next time you talk about long-term facility

plans, meet these issues head-on and ask for unique materials like nora® flooring— which cleans up with little more than water. You deserve a clean environment without all the side effects.

You can make a big difference when people listen. Talk to us at www.nora.com/us/maintenance34 CIRCLE NO. 18


SPECIAL REPORT

FLOORING Fritztile 180 Gordon Dr., Ste. 113 Exton, PA 19341 Randy Gillespie/Sr. VP Sales & Marketing Ph: 610-363-0343 • Fax: 610-363-0735 www.fritztile.com • sales@fritztile.com Product Type: TILE: Terrazzo Tile; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Hacker Industries, Inc. 1600 Newport Center Dr., Ste. 275 Newport Beach, CA 92660 Nick Quercetti, Jr./Sales & Marketing Manager Ph: 949-729-3101 • Fax: 949-729-3108 www.hackerindustries.com • info@hackerindustries.com Product Type: CONCRETE: Poured Floors Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Education

Hardwoods of Wisconsin 500 Nathan Lane Elkhorn, WI 53121 Josh Kahle/Co-Owner Ph: 262-723-4515 • Fax: 262-723-4514 www.hardwoodsofwisconsin.com josh@hardwoodsofwisconsin.com Product Type: WOOD: Solid, Finished, Unfinished, Aged/Reclaimed; Markets Served: N/A

Imagine Tile 150 West 25th St., Ste. 501 New York, NY 10001 Allison Verbovsky/Operations Manager Ph: 800-680-8453 • Fax: 973-473-0983 www.imaginetile.com • allison@imaginetile.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay; Markets Served: N/A

Impact Specialties 4005 Royal Dr., Ste. 300 Kennesaw, GA 30144 Kevin Fitzpatrick/Director of Marketing Ph: 888-424-6287 www.impactspecialties.com Product Type: FLOATING FLOORS: Cork; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, Recycled Rubber; RESILIENT OTHER: Wall Base; CARPET: Carpet Tile CONCRETE: Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants

40

Innovative Building Products, Inc. 3024 Acme Brick Plaza Fort Worth, TX 76109 Steve Weddle/National Sales Manager Ph: 800-932-2263 Fax: 817-332-1406 www.ibpglassblock.com • www.ibpglasswalkfloors.com sweddle@ibpglassblock.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered; TILE: Glass; METAL: Aluminum; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Interface 1503 Orchard Hill Rd. LaGrange, GA 30240 Rhonda Mitchell/Director of Marketing Ph: 706-812-6218 www.interface.com • rhonda.mitchell@interface.com Product Type: CARPET: Carpet Tile, Markets Served: N/A

IVC US 101 IVC Dr. Dalton, GA 30721 Angelina Cebrian/Marketing Communications & Event Manager Ph: 706-529-2600 • Fax: 888-601-8544 www.ivcfloors.com • angelina.cebrian@ivcgroup.com Product Type: FLOATING FLOORS: Laminate, RESILENT TILE: Solid Vinyl; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl; RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treds, Wall Base; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Assisted Living

J+J Flooring Group 818 J+J Drive Dalton, GA 30721 Natalie Faulkner/Director of Marketing Communications Ph: 800-241-4586 www.jj-flooringgroup.com • natalie.faulkner@jjflooringgroup.com Product Type: CARPET: Broadloom, Carpet Tile, Rugs; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

Joy Carpets & Co. 2640 Lafayette Rd. Fort Oglethorpe, GA 30742 Nick Dobosh/President Ph: 800-645-2787 • Fax: 706-866-7928 www.joycarpets.com • ndobosh@joycarpets.com Product Type: CARPET: Broadloom, Carpet Tile, Rugs; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


The owner has settled on this color for the floors.

Gimme a call when the install begins. I can show you how to make sure our color meets the spec across every store.

It is, and the owner loved it.

Floorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s looking good.

At Consolideck, we do a lot more than provide superior colors and dyes for concrete floors. We supply the whole gamut of products for any concrete surface â&#x20AC;&#x201C; guards, prep products, densifiers, maintenance cleaners, you name it. Consolideck products have you covered from start to finish and beyond. And our support staff will be right there with you to ensure your success on every project. CCR July-Aug. 2015.indd 1

You. Us. The project. 800-255-4255 CIRCLE NO. 19

PROSOCO.COM 7/29/2015 2:02:58 PM


SPECIAL REPORT

FLOORING Karndean Design Flooring 1100 Pontiac Court Export, PA 15632 Ben Moriarty/PR & Media Manager Ph: 888-266-4343 • Fax: 800-887-7043 www.karndean.com • info@karndean.com Product Type: RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

KOSTER American Corp. 2585 Aviator Dr. Virginia Beach, VA 23453 Jenilee Lucero/Marketing Director Ph: 757-425-1206 • Fax: 757-425-9951 www.kosterusa.com • info@kosterusa.com Product Type: MISC: Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin or other PVC Free; CONCRETE: Topping; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Industrial Kitchens, Hallways, Hangars, Processing or Packaging Facilities, Showrooms, Atriums/Lobbies, Marinas

LATICRETE International, Inc. 1 Laticrete Park North Bethany, CT 06524 Maria Oliveira/Corporate Marketing Manager Ph: 203-393-0010 • Fax: 203-393-1684 www.laticrete.com • marketing@laticrete.com Product Type: TILE: Cement; CONCRETE: Polished, Stained, Topping, Poured Floors; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

LSI Floors 5230 Finch Ave. E, #5 Toronto, ON Canada M1S 4Z9 Rick Moffatt/Creative Director Ph: 800-449-3916 • Fax: 416-299-0269 www.lsifloors.com • info@lsifloors.com Product Type: RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Maniscalco 2330 Alberta Dr. Dallas, TX 75229 Kieron Wiley/Director Business Development Ph: 650-363-8233 • Fax: 650-363-8283 www.maniscalcostone.com • info@maniscalcostone.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain; METAL: Stainless Steel, Glass Mosaics; Markets Served: N/A

42

Marazzi

7834 C F Hawn Freeway Dallas, TX 75217 Sarah Findle/Sr. Account Executive Ph: 214-398-1411 www.marazzi.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Mats, Inc.

179 Campanelli Pkwy. Stoughton, MA 02072 JoAnn Durette/VP Marketing Ph: 800-628-7462 • Fax: 781-344-1537 www.matsinc.com • info@matsinc.com Product Type: RESILIENT TILE: Recycled Rubber; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl, Rubber, Recycled Rubber, Misc (Botanol Polyeurethane, Terrazzo Tiles; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family, Sports & Fitness

Matting By Design

715 N. Finn Dr. Algona, IA 50511 Debra Wolfe/Marketing Ph: 515-295-3902 • Fax: 515-295-4874 www.mattingbydesign.com • info@mattingbydesign.com Product Type: MISC: Floor Matting; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Mediterranea

3501 NW 115 Ave. Doral, FL 33178 Don Mariutto/VP Marketing Ph: 305-718-5091 • Fax: 305-718-5099 www.mediterranea-usa.com • info@mediterranea-usa.com Product Type: TILE: Porcelain; Markets Served: N/A

Metroflor Corporation

15 Oakwood Ave. Norwalk, CT 06850 Russ Rogg/President & CEO Ph: 855-400-7732 www.aspectaflooring.com Product Type: FLOATING FLOORS: LVT; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Government, Institutional

Metropolitan Ceramics

1201 Millerton St. Canton, OH 44707 Ron Williamson/Marketing Services Director Ph: 800-325-3945 • Fax: 330-484-3584 www.metroceramics.com • rwilliamson@ironrock.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


CIRCLE NO. 20


SPECIAL REPORT

FLOORING Metzger/McGuire

2500 Old Hadar Rd., PO Box 2283 Norfolk, NE 68702-2283 Jack Boesch/Director of Marketing Ph: 888-379-9695 • Fax: 402-379-9737 www.quietwalk.com • jboesch@mpglobalproducts.com Product Type: N/A Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Residential

Milamar Coatings LLC

3200 S. Main St. Akron, OH 44319 Dave Hanna/Marketing Manager Ph: 330-644-3117 • Fax: 330-644-3557 www.nacproducts.com • dhanna@nacproducts.com Product Type: N/A Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

311 NW 122nd St., Ste. 100 Oklahoma City, OK 73114 Alyssa Brackett/Marketing Ph: 405-755-8448 • Fax: 405-755-8450 www.milamar.com • getanswers@casspolymers.com Product Type: Resinous Flooring, Concrete, Laboratories, Bulk Storage Tanks, Industrial Mixers, Vacuum Mixers, Material Handling Equipment, Warehouses, Manufacturing; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Food & Beverage, Chemical, Industrial, Institutional

Milliken 920 Milliken Rd. Spartanburg, SC 29303 Stacy Walker/Global Director of Customer Experience Ph: 800-241-4826 • Fax: 864-503-6154 www.millikenfloors.com • millikencarpet@millikencarpet.com Product Type: RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, LVT; CARPET: Broadloom, Carpet Tile, Rugs; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Mohawk Group 160 S. Industrial Blvd. Calhoun, GA 30701 Merrie Barnett/Director of Marketing Ph: 800-554-6637 www.mohawkgroup.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid, Finished; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, VCT, Rubber; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl, Rubber; CARPET: Broadloom, Carpet Tile, Rugs; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education

Mountain Lumber Co. LLC 6812 Spring Hill Rd. Ruckersville, VA 22968 John Williams/Commercial & International Sales Manager Ph: 800-445-2671 • Fax: 434-985-4105 www.mountainlumber.com • john@mountainlumber.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid, Finished, Unfinished, Aged/Reclaimed; FLOATING FLOORS: Wood; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls

44

MP Global Products

P.O. Box 2217 Concord, NH 03302 Scott Metzger/President Ph: 603-224-6122 • Fax: 603-224-6020 www.metzgermcguire.com • info@metzgermcguire.com Product Type: CONCRETE: Polished, Stained, Topping, Poured Floors; Markets Served: N/A

NAC Products

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association

P.O. Box 2605 Fredericksburg, TX 78624 Sharon Moreno/Marketing Manager Ph: 800-997-3267 Fax: 830-990-0692 www.ntma.com • sharon@ntma.com Product Type: CONCRETE: Poured Floors – Cement or Epoxy (Stairs, Base, Wall, Benches); Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Transportation- Airports/ Bus/Train Terminals, Car Rental Facilities, Government/Civic Buildings

Nora Systems, Inc.

9 Northeastern Blvd. Salem, NH 03079 Carol Fudge/Marketing Research Specialist Ph: 800-332-NORA Fax: 603-894-0637 www.nora.com/us • carol.d.fudge@nora.com Product Type: RESILIENT TILE: Rubber; RESILIENT SHEET: Rubber; RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treads, Wall Base, Accessories; Markets Served: Retail, Healthcare, Education, Life Sciences, Transportation

NorthStar Flooring Designs

601 Callahan Rd. Dalton, GA 30721 Tim Gilmore/VP Sales & Marketing Ph: 888-463-7827 • Fax: 706-277-8703 www.northstarflooring.com • tgilmore@cherokeecarpet.com Product Type: CARPET: Broadloom, Carpet Tile, Rugs; Markets Served: Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education

Nova Distinctive Floors

1710 E. Sepulveda Blvd. Carson, CA 90745 Cheryl Matthews/Manager Ph: 866-576-2458 • Fax: 510-830-9589 www.novafloorings.com • c.matthews@novafloorings.com Product Type: FLOATING FLOORS: Cork, Leather, Stone; RESILIENT TILE: Cork; Markets Served: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


BLENDS NATURALLY WITH TILE NO SEALING REQUIRED

3 DAY WATER EXPOSURE

Dimension

®

RapidCure™

Take your mosaic installation to a new Dimension! Bring a touch of glass to your next tile or stone installation with Dimension™ Rapid Cure™, the world’s first glass-based, pre-mixed grout. Its 60% pre-consumer recycled glass will appeal to today’s green conscious marketplace, while its elegant sparkle offers a unique appearance unseen in the industry today. Mosaic tile provided by

www.bostik-us.com CIRCLE NO. 21

T2310-05.28.2015


CIRCLE NO. 22


SPECIAL REPORT

FLOORING Nydree Flooring 1115 Vista Park Dr., Ste. C Forest, VA 24551 Jason Brubaker/VP Sales & Marketing Ph: 404-409-7768 www.nydreeflooring.com • customerservice@nydree.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Parterre Flooring Systems 500 Research Dr. Wilmington, MA 01887 Liz Sullivan/Marketing Manager Ph: 978-203-5400 • Fax: 978-203-5401 www.parterreflooring.com • info@parterreflooring.com Product Type: RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Sports, Multi-Family

Patterned Concrete Industries 249 Supertest Rd. Toronto, ON Canada M3J 3M4 Joe Guida/President Ph: 416-661-3007 • Fax: 416-661-0010 www.patternedconcrete.com • joeg@patternedconcrete.com Product Type: CONCRETE: Polished, Stained, Poured Floors Markets Served: N/A

Pioneer Millworks 1180 Commercial Dr. Farmington, NY 14425 Ph: 585-924-3860 www.pioneermillworks.com • info@pioneermillworks.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid, Finished, Unfinished, Aged/Reclaimed; Markets Served: N/A

Porcelanosa USA 600 Route 17 North Ramsey, NJ 07446 Andrew Pennington/National Sales Director Ph: 201-995-1310 www.porcelanosa-usa.com • apennington@porcelanosa-usa.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered; TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain; FLOATING FLOORS: Laminate, Wood; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

48

Portico Systems 1680 Hwy. 41 South SE Calhoun, GA 30701 Natacha van Gelder/SVP Creative &Marketing Ph: 706-602-4186 x-203 • Fax: 706-602-4191 www.porticosystems.com • nvangelder@porticosystems.com Product Type: METAL: Aluminum; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, VCT, Rubber, Recycled Rubber; RESILIENT SHEET: Rubber; RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treads, Wall Base, Accessories; CARPET: Broadloom, Carpet Tile, Sisal, Wool or Other (Natural Fiber); Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Prosoco, Inc. 3741 Greenway Circle Lawrence, KS 66046 Darcy Boyle/Corporate Communications Mgr. Ph: 800-255-4255 www.prosoco.com • darcy.boyle@prosoco.com Product Type: CONCRETE: Polished, Stained, Topping, Poured Floors; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Quartz Carpet LLC 7620 Genesis Ct. Las Vegas, NV 89128 Willy Janssens/General Manager Ph: 909-931-0735 • Fax: 909-931-0821 www.quartzcarpet.com • info@quartzcarpet.com Product Type: CONCRETE: Poured Floors; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Reclaimed Designworks 601 S. Broadway, Ste. T Denver, CO 80209 Dan O’Neill/National Sales Director Ph: 303-929-9284 www.ReclaimedDesignWorks.com dan@ReclaimedDesignWorks.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid, Finished, Unfinished, Aged/Reclaimed; RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treads, Wall Base, Accessories; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Senior Living

Red Built 200 E. Mallard Dr. Boise, ID 83706 Cornelia Sprung/Marketing Manager Ph: 208-364-1322 www.redbuilt.com • csprung@redbuilt.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered; Markets Served: N/A

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Tile has never been

Italian Design & Craftsmanship M A D E

I N

U S A

8”x48” rectified color-body porcelain Oyster

Palm

Sand

Pearl

CIRCLE NO. 23

mediterranea-usa.com


SPECIAL REPORT

FLOORING Regupol America

11 Ritter Way Lebanon, PA 17042 John Aten/VP Sales & Marketing Ph: 800-537-8737 • Fax: 717-675-2199 www.regupol.com • sales@regupol.com Product Type: RESILIENT SHEET: Rubber, Recycled Rubber; Markets Served: Education, Sports & Fitness

RetroPlate System/Advanced Floor Products

1203 W. Spring Creek Place Springville, UT 84663 Vernon Talbot/Managing Director Ph: 888-942-3144 Fax: 801-491-4819 www.retroplatesystem.com • vernon@retroplatesystem.com Product Type: CONCRETE: Polished, Stained; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Retrofit

Rikett America

P.O. Box 77 Readington, NJ 08870 Harry Brownett/General Manager Ph & Fax: 855-475-3887 www.rikett.net • hb@rikett.net Product Type: RESILIENT TILE: VCT MISC: Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin, PVC Free; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl, Misc (Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin or other PVC Free); Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Transportation, Industrial, Warehouses

Rockerz, Inc.

100 Commonwealth Dr. Warrendale, PA 15086 Robert Smith/Director of Business Development Ph: 724-553-3854 • Fax: 724-935-4948 www.rockerzinc.com • rsmith@rockerzinc.com Product Type: CONCRETE: Polished, Stained, Topping, Poured Floors; Markets Served: N/A

Schonox HPS North America

511 Wilhite St. Florence, AL 35630 Elizabeth Hughes/Marketing Coordinator Ph: 256-246-0345 • Fax: 256-246-0346 www.hpsubfloors.com • ehughes@hpsubfloors.com Product Type: MISC: Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin or other PVC Free Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

SelecTech, Inc.

33 Wales Ave., Unit F Avon, MA 02322 Tom Ricciardelli/President-CEO Ph: 508-583-3200 • Fax: 508-583-3260 www.selectechinc.com • tricciardelli@selectechinc.com Product Type: FLOATING FLOORS: Other; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, VCT, Linoleum, Cork, Rubber, Recycled Rubber, Leather; MISC: Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin or other PVC Free; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

50

Skudo USA LLC

2330 Alberta Dr. Dallas, TX 75229 Tom Mason/Executive VP Ph: 770-714-0607 www.skudousa.com • tom@skudousa.com Product Type: Flooring Construction Protection, Job Site Safety; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Government

Smith & Fong Co.

475 Sixth St. San Francisco, CA 94103 Angus Stocks/ President Ph: 415-896-0577 www.plyboo.com • sales@plyboo.com Product Type: WOOD: Traditional Bamboo, Strand Woven Bamboo; Markets Served: N/A

Somerset Hardwood Flooring

70 W. Race Track Road Somerset, KY 42502 Paul Stringer, VP Sales and Marketing Ph: 877-404-9663 • Fax: 606-678-0283 www.somersetfloors.com • pauls@somersetwood.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid, Finished, Unfinished; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls

Stonecarpet Flooring

985 Graceland Ave. Des Plaines, Il 60016 Ph: 847-97-0405 • Fax: 847-827-1191 www.stonecarpet.com • solutions@stonecarpet.com Product Type: MISC: Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin, PVC Free, Stone Carpet Flooring; Markets Served: N/A

Stonhard

1000 E. Park Ave. Maple Shade, NJ 08052 Cindy Bovino/Advertising Coordinator Ph: 800-257-7953 • Fax: 856-321-7525 www.stonhard.com • info@stonhard.com Product Type: MISC: Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin, PVC Free; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Storefloors

6480 Roswell Rd. NE Atlanta, GA 30328 Julia Versteegh/Dir. Of Marketing & Business Development Ph: 678-638-1611 www.storefloors.com • juliav@storefloors.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid, Traditional Bamboo, Strand Woven Bamboo, Other Strand Woven Wood, Finished, Unfinished, Exotics, Aged/Reclaimed; TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Glass, Porcelain, Quartz, Cement, Agglomerates, Terrazzo Tile; METAL: Stainless Steel, Aluminum; FLOATING FLOORS: Laminate, Wood, Cork, Linoleum, Leather, Other; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, VCT, Linoleum, Cork, Rubber, Recycled Rubber, Leather; MISC: Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin, PVC Free; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl, Linoleum, Rubber, Recycled Rubber, Misc (Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin, PVC Free); RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treads, Wall Base, Accessories; CARPET: Broadloom, Carpet Tile, Rugs, Sisal, Wool or other Natural Fiber; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Durable, Designable, Vinyl Flooring by Better Life Technology, LLC

G-Floor Graphic is a custom design, polyvinyl commercial flooring material that can be easily tailored to any retail environment. G-Floor’s thickest wear-layer in the world will provide ultimate protection, and widths of up to 10’ will allow for minimal seams and ease of installation.

• Branding & Wayfinding • Free Floating Applications • Wall-To-Wall Installation

© 2015 Better Life Technology | GFCCR0715M

gfloorgraphic.com 877-810-6444 CIRCLE NO. 24

IMAGE CREDIT: Careland Pharmacy Sergio Mannino Studios 2015


SPECIAL REPORT

FLOORING Tarkett 30000 Aurora Rd. Solon, OH 44139 Cindy Mansfield/Communications Manager-Marketing Ph: 440-708-9238 • Fax: 440-708-0953 www.tarkett.com • cynthia.mansfield@tarkett.com Product Type: RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, VCT, Linoleum, Cork, Rubber, Recycled Rubber, Leather, Misc (Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin or other PVC Free); RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl, Linoleum, Rubber, Recycled Rubber, Misc (Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin or other PVC Free); RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treads, Wall Base, Accessories; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Tectura Designs P.O. Box 1520 Wausau, WI 54402 Mark Rounds, Terrazzo division manager Ph: 800-388-8728 • Fax: 715-359-7456 www.tecturadesigns.com • info@tecturadesigns.com Product Type: TILE: Terrazzo Tile; RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treads, Wall Base, Accessories; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Terrazzo & Marble Supply 77 S. Wheeling Rd. Wheeling, IL 60090 Samantha Kinzie/Marketing Supervisor Ph: 877-TM-SLABS • Fax: 847-353-8001 www.tmsupply.com • terrazzoinfo@tmsupply.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid; TILE: Glass, Porcelain, Quartz, Terrazzo Tile; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Tile of Spain www.tileofspainusa.com info@tileofspainusa.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Porcelain; Markets Served: N/A

Trans Ceramica Commercial Flooring 1159 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. Itasca, IL 60143 Joy Klein/Director of Key Accounts Ph: 727-522-6655 • Fax: 727-231-8055 www.transceramica.com • jklein@transceramica.com Product Type: TILE: Ceramic/Clay, Porcelain; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

52

UCoat It 1797 Atlantic Blvd. Auburn Hills, MI 48326 John Carafelly/Marketing Ph: 800-826-2848 www.ucoatit.com • contactus@ucoatit.com Product Type: MISC: Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin or other PVC Free; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Automotive

W.F. Taylor LLC 11545 Pacific Ave. Fontana, CA 92337 Kristine Elledge/Marketing Specialist Ph: 800-397-4583 www.wftaylor.com • info@wftaylor.com Product Type: WOOD: Engineered, Solid, Traditional Bamboo, Strand Woven Bamboo, Other Strand Woven Wood, Finished, Unfinished, Exotics; TILE: Ceramic/ Clay, Terrazzo Tile; FLOATING FLOORS: Laminate, Wood, Cork, Linoleum, Other; RESILIENT TILE: Solid Vinyl, VCT, Linoleum, Cork, Rubber, Recycled Rubber; RESILIENT SHEET: Vinyl, Linoleum, Rubber, Recycled Rubber; RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treads, Wall Base; CARPET: Broadloom, Carpet Tile; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Wagner Meters 326 Pine Grove Rd. Rogue River, OR 97537 Jason Spangler/Flooring Division Sales Manager Ph: 800-634-9961 • Fax: 541-582-4138 www.wagnermeters.com • info@wagnermeters.com Product Type: N/A; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Wooster Products, Inc. 1000 Spruce St. Wooster, OH 44691 Tim Brennan/Sales Manager Ph: 800-321-4936 • Fax: 330-262-4151 www.wooster-products.com • tim@wooster-products.com Product Type: RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treads; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls

Zandur 80 Nottingham Dr. Nottingham, PA 19362 Aubrey Houston/Marketing Assistant & Customer Service Ph: 888-397-2656 • Fax: 610-932-4386 www.zandur.com • ahouston@zandur.com Product Type: RESILIENT TILE: Cork, Rubber; MISC: Polymer, Bio Based, Polyolefin or other PVC Free; RESILIENT OTHER: Stair Treads; Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Corporate, Education, Education, Fitness Centers

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


RETAILERS:

We’re Your Source for Find a Contractor Using Our New Search Functions — retailcontractors.org As part of the RCA membership process, we vet contractors with a

RCA is a national organization of high caliber contractors united to provide a solid foundation of ethics, quality, and professionalism in the retail industry. Retailers look to our members for Integrity, Experience and Stability.

• Excellent reputation in the industry; three letters of recommendation from retailers are required. • Properly licensed in all states where the contractor conducts business. • Insured in accordance with industry standards. • Able to provide Performance and Material Payment Bonds from an AM Best carrier rated A- or better. These rigorous requirements are reviewed annually. CIRCLE NO. 25

Save the Date: March 11-13, 2016 — RCA’s 26th Annual Conference US: 800-847-5085 | Intl: 703-683-5637 | retailcontractors.org


Snap for video

Snap for more information

A-5841-0715 Š2015 LATICRETE International, Inc. All trademarks shown are the intellectual properties of their respective owners.


Your Single Source for Complete Building System Solutions STONETECH

®

Concrete Restoration and Care Systems

Masonry Installation and Care Systems

Resinous/Decorative Finishes

Tile and Stone Installation and Care Systems

LATICRETE SUPERCAP System ®

®

Concrete Construction Chemicals

So much more than tile and stone installation materials www.laticrete.com

l 1.800.243.4788 CIRCLE NO. 26

Globally Proven Globally Proven Construction Solutions Construction Solutions


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT MANAGEMENT/CONSTRUCTION SOFTWARE

Getting it done

Report provides intel on the industry’s leading project managers

W

hen it comes to getting your projects done on time and under budget, it’s always best to have everybody on the same page. If you’re looking for the industry’s best project managers, our annual guide gives you everything you need. Our detailed report provides the contact information and contact person at each of the reporting companies. If you want to be included in next year’s list, email publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. For a digital version of this report, visit us online at www.ccr-mag.com. Assemble Systems

802 Lovett Blvd. Houston, TX 77006 Howard Davis/CEO Phone: 855-646-4868 www.assemblesystems.com • info@assemblesystems.com Project Mgmt. Services: Help PM’s with New Construction & Change Management Project Review; Software Features: Bidding, Budget/ Scheduling Tracking, Estimating, Project Management, BIM Data Management; Business Size: Large Enterprise; Platform: On-Line Intended Users: Architects, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms; Open API: No; Pricing Model: Per Project

Asta Powerproject

5 Goodsons Mews, Wellington St. Oxfordshire, UK OX9 3BX Jim Dawkins/U.S. Sales Manager Ph: +44 (0)1844-261700 • Fax: +44 (0)1844-26131 www.astapowerproject.com • inquiries@astadev.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A; Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Project Management; Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium; Platform: On Premise, Mobile; Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/ Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Single or Concurrent (Shared) Licenses

Autodesk – BIM 360 Field

111 McInnis Pkwy. San Rafael, CA 94903 Ph: 415-507-5000 www.autodesk.com/products/bim-360field/overview Project Mgmt. Services: N/A, Software Features: Document Storage/ Management, Project Management, Field Management, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile; Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per Project - BIM 360 Field is field management software for 2D and 3D environments that combines mobile technologies at the construction site with cloud-based collaboration and reporting. BIM 360 Field puts critical information into the hands of those in the field, helping to improve quality, safety and commissioning for construction and capital projects of all types.

56

Autodesk – BIM 360 Glue 111 McInnis Pkwy. San Rafael, CA 94903 Ph: 415-507-5000 www.autodesk.com/products/bim-360glue/overview Project Mgmt. Services: N/A; Software Features: Project Management, Coordination and Collaboration; Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User, Per Project - BIM 360 Glue is a cloud-based BIM management and collaboration product that connects your entire project team and streamlines BIM project workflows. With virtually anywhere, anytime access to the most recent project models and data throughout the project lifecycle, BIM 360 Glue accelerates project reviews and empowers multidisciplinary teams to quickly identify and resolve coordination issues.

Autodesk – Point Layout 111 McInnis Pkwy. San Rafael, CA 94903 Ph: 415-507-5000 www.autodesk.com/products/point-layout/overview Project Mgmt. Services: N/A; Software Features: Project Management, Field/Construction Layout; Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile; Intended Users: General Contractors, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User, Per Project - Autodesk Point Layout construction layout software enabels construction professionals to use BIM coordinate information in the field. Deliver faster, more accurate layout installation and QA/QC. Directly export/import from AutoCAD, Revit or Navisworks Manage for creation of as-built models. Improve office to field efficiency and productivity.

Autodesk – BIM 60 Plan 111 McInnis Pkwy. San Rafael, CA 94903 Ph: 415-507-5000 www.autodesk.com/products/bim-360-plan/overview Project Mgmt. Services: Supports lean construction practices and more reliable project work plans.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


• The BIM 360 Plan web service for vertical construction contractors supports lean construction practices. • Use BMI 360 Plan Cloud and Mobile Software to help build more reliable project work plans, and to help reduce waste associated with overproduction, excess inventory and task rework. Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Autodesk BIM 360 Plan is currently available via an Enterprise or Project Based subscription and available in English only.

Beacon Bay Project Management

931 South Semoran, Ste. 216 Winter Park, FL 32792 Benjamin Musser/Brand Manager Phone: 407-636-3232 www.bbpm.com • benjamin@bbpm.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance; Software Features: N/A Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On Premise; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/ Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: N/A; Pricing Model: Per Project

Beam Team

1350 Bluegrass Lakes Alpharetta, GA 30004 Rick Hall/President Phone: 678-987-1809 www.thebeamteam.com • rickhall@thebeamteam.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Planned Capital Programs; Software Features: N/A; Business Size: Large Enterprise; Platform: On Premise; Intended Users: Property Owners/Brands; Open API: Per Project; Pricing Model: Yes

The Blue Book Building & Construction Network

800 East Main St., PO Box 500 Jefferson Valley, NY 10535 Marie Angelucci/Technical Sales Supervisor Phone: 855-394-6061 • Fax: 914-962-8412 www.thebluebook.com • info@thebluebook.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Architecture/ Engineering Services, Facility Maintenance; Software Features: Bidding, Document Storage, Service Management, Project Management; Business Size: N/A; Platform: On-Line, Mobile; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: N/A

Bluebeam Software

55 S. Lake Ave., Ste. 900 Pasadena, CA 91101 Alina Ferrell/Communications Strategy Manager Phone: 626-788-4100 www.bluebeam.com • sales@bluebeam.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Architecture/Engineering Services; Software Features: Bidding, Document Storage, Estimating, Project Management; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based

BOSS Facility Services, Inc.

1 Roebling Ct. Ronkonkoma, NY 11779 Keith Keingstein/President Phone: 631-361-7430 • Fax: 631-389-2218 www.bossfacilityservices.com • keith@bossfacilityservices.com Project Mgmt. Services: Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Facility Maintenance, Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile, Intended Users: Property Owners/Brands, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Per Project

BrandPoint Services, Inc.

150 Green Tree Rd, Ste. 1003 Oaks, PA 19456 Dave Knoche/Director of Sales Phone: 800-905-4342 • Fax: 610-650-9997 www.brandpointservices.com • dknoche@brandpointservices.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Due Diligence; Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Service Management, Project Management; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile; Intended Users: Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Per Project

Builder Information System

(MICS) Management Information Control Systems, Inc. 7730 Morro Rd., Ste. 204 Atascadero, CA 93422 Lisa Leutwyler/Office Manager Phone: 800-838-6427 • Fax: 805-534-1595 www.bissoftware.com • lleutwyler@bissoftware.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A; Software Features: Accounting, Budget/ Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Project Management, Job Cost, PR, etc...; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On Premise; Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes & No – Import to & Export from Excel; Pricing Model: Based on the Edition purchased and the amount of users

Carney Contracting Services

97 Ashland Rd, #6B Balacynwyd, PA 19004 Troy Fink, Business Development Team Ph: 215-906-3474 www.carneycontracting.com • info@carneycontracting.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Due Dilligence, Facility Maintenance; Software Features: N/A; Business Size: N/A; Platform: N/A; Intended Users: N/A; Open API: N/A; Pricing Model: N/A;

CDO Group

120 N. Green St. #4F Chicago, IL 60607 Saim Salahuddin/Director of Technology Phone: 312-733-9803 www.cdogroup.com • www.unitepm.com • saims@cdogroup.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, Mobile; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

57


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT SOFTWARE MANAGEMENT Coast 2 Coast Survey Deneb, Inc. 7704 Basswood Dr. Chattanooga, TN 37416 Tim West/Sr. Executive Business Development Phone: 423-710-4714 Fax: 423-826-1372 www.c2csurveys.net • twest@c2csurveys.net Project Mgmt. Services: Site Surveys, Due Diligence; Software Features: N/A; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: N/A; Pricing Model: Per Project

CT Addison Consulting LLC 2230 Flagstick Dr. Matthew, NC 28104 Clay Addison/President Phone: 704-957-1188 caddison85@gmail.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Planned Capital Programs, Construction Audits, Software Features: N/A, Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: N/A, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, Property Owners/ Brands, Open API: No, Pricing Model: N/A

Core States Group 4191 Pleasant Hill Rd., Ste. 400 Duluth, GA 30096 Natalie Rodriguez/Marketing Manager Phone: 813-319-8755 www.core-eng.com • nrodriquez@core-eng.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence; Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based

Davaco, Inc. 6688 N. Central Expwy. Dallas, TX 214-373-4700 Paul Hamer/EVP Sales Phone: 214-373-4700 www.davacoinc.com • info@davacoinc.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Facility Maintenance, Digital Installations/Technology Upgrades; Software Features: Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Logistics, Project Management, Data Collection, Reporting/Data Analysis; Business Size: N/A; Platform: On-Line, Mobile; Intended Users: Property Owners/Brands, Retail, Restaurant, Hospitality Brands; Open API: No; Pricing Model: N/A

58

270 Regency Ridge Dr., Ste. 200 Dayton, OH 45459 Candace Latta/Support Ph: 937-223-4849 Fax: 937-223-1548 www.denebsoftware.com • edenebsales@gmail.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Service Management, Project Management Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, Mobile; Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User, Amount of Data

Dryvit Systems 1 Energy Way W. Warwick, RI 02893 Technical Services Ph: 800-556-7752 x-9 • Fax: 401-823-8820 www.dryvit.com • info@dryvit.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A; Software Features: Product Information Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: Mobile; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Distributors; Open PMI: No; Pricing Model: FREE

Dynamic Systems 15331 NE 90th St. Redmond, WA 98052 Rob Freeman/Vice President Phone: 425-216-1204 www.dynamic-systemsinc.com • robf@dsisales.com Project Mgmt. Services: Barcode Tracking Software, Software Features: Service Management, Tool Tracking, Document Tracking, ID Badge Systems, Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On Premise, Mobile, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Per User

ExakTime 27001 Agoura Rd., Ste #280 Calabasas, CA 91301 Anthony Alexandre/Marketing Development Administrator Ph: 818-222-1836 www.exaktime.com • info@exaktime.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A, Software Features: Accounting, Logistics, Service Management, GPS Enabled, Crew Tracking, Biometrics/ Cloud Based, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile, Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Per Project

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


The Power to See Your Jobsite anywhere, anytime, and from any device

A construction camera provides powerful photography, high-definition time-lapse movies, and intuitive tools to let you monitor progress and manage projects—even when you’re not there. It’s easy because everything comes in one complete package. With an OxBlue construction camera on your jobsite, you can: • Increase efficiency

• Provide a firewall against warranty claims, insurance issues and contract disputes

• Reduce travel costs • Improve communications • Enhance project management • Increase client transparency

• Produce time-lapse movies for marketing and public relations

Visit OxBlue.com to see live demos and time-lapse videos. For a quote, call us at (888) 849-2583. CIRCLE NO. 27


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT SOFTWARE MANAGEMENT GPS Insight

7201 E. Henkel Way, Ste. 400 Scottsdale, AZ 85255 Ryan Driscoll/Marketing Director Phone: 480-663-9463 www.gpsinsight.com • info@gpsinsight.com Project Mgmt. Services: Fleet Management/GPS Vehicle & Asset Tracking; Software Features: Logistics, Service Management, Fleet Management/GPS Vehicle & Asset Tracking; Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, Mobile; Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based

Icon

1418 Elmhurst Rd. Elk Grove Village, IL 60007 Melanee Jech/EVP Program Management Phone: 847-364-2250 Fax: 847-364-1517 www.iconid.com • info@iconid.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance, Software Features: Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management, Business Size: Large Enterprise, Platform: On-Line, Intended Users: Property Owners/Brands, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Per Project

IES

Helix Building, West of Scotland Science Park Glasgow, Scotland G20 0SP Phone: +44 (0)141-945-8500 www.iesve.com • suzanne.wallace@iesve.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A, Software Features: Performance Analysis Modeling Software, Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: On-Line, Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Subscription Based

Interserv Hospitality

775 Woodruff Rd. Ste E Greenville, SC 29615 Ted Kelly Phone: 864-249-1444 www.interservhospitality.com • tkelly@interservhospitality.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Software Features: Project Management, Business Size: Small-Medium, Platform: N/A, Intended Users: Property Owners/Brands, Open API: Yes, Pricing Model: Per User, Per Project

JLL

3344 Peachtree Road, #1200 Atlanta, GA 30305 Phone: 404-995-2126 www.jll.com • steve.jones@am.jll.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planed Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance; Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management; Business Size: Large Enterprise; Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty; Open API: N/A ; Pricing Model: Other

60

JOBPOWER 302 Westfield Rd. Knoxville, TN 37919 Dee Golden/Sales & Support Phone: 800-776-6556 • Fax: 865-588-5379 www.jobpower.com • dee@jobpow.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A; Software Features: Accounting, Budget/ Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Project Management, Payroll; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line; Intended Users: General Contractors, Specialty Contractors; Open API: N/A Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

Jonas Construction Software 8133 Warden Ave., 4th Floor Markham, ON Canada L6G 1B3 Yana Tcharnaia/VP Business Development Ph: 905-470-4600 x-2255 www.jonasconstruction.com yana.tcharnaia@jonasconstruction.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services; Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management; Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

Labor Finders 11426 N. Jog Rd. Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 Celina Klee/Public Relations Manager Phone: 561-273-8226 Fax: 561-273-8167 www.laborfinders.com • Celina.klee@laborfinders.com Project Mgmt. Services: Industrial Staffing for New Construction/ Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance; Software Features: N/A; Business Size: Large Enterprise; Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile; Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: No; Pricing Model: Per Client/Account

LaZerCAD LLC 21550 Oxnard St., 3rd Floor Woodland Hills, CA 91367 Diana Rico/Chief Development Officer Phone: 818-312-8595 www.LaZerCAD.com • drico@lazercad.com Project Mgmt. Services: Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Architectural/ Engineering Services, Cloud Solution; Software Features: N/A; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Per Project

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


CIRCLE NO. 28


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT SOFTWARE MANAGEMENT Nemetschek Vectorworks

7150 Riverwood Dr. Columbia, MD 21046 Lauren Burke/Communications Specialist Phone: 443-542-0294 • Fax: 443-542-0276 www.vectorworks.net • lburke@vectorworks.net Project Mgmt. Services: N/A; Software Features: Materials Takeoffs Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, Mobile Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

Note Vault

6305 Lusk Blvd. San Diego, CA 92121 Rebecca Janzon/VP Marketing & Communications Phone: 858-755-9800 www.notevault.com • support@notevault.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance; Software Features: Project Management, Mobile Daily Reporting; Business Size: N/A; Platform: On-Line, Mobile; Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/ Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: N/A; Pricing Model: Per User

Overview Facility Management

130 East Walnut St., Ste. 415 Green Bay, WI 54301 Evan Glab/Creator Phone: 800-899-3397 x-101 www.overviewfacility.com • ofm@glab.us Project Mgmt. Services: N/A; Software Features: Asset Management Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, Mobile; Intended Users: General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors, Facility Managers; Open API: No; Pricing Model: Subscription Based

OxBlue

814 Bellemeade Ave. NW Atlanta, GA 30318 Sue Silva/Marketing Director Ph: 888-849-2583 Fax: 404-917-0201 www.oxblue.com • ssilva@oxblue.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Software Features: Document Storage, Project Management; Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, Mobile; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per Project, Amount of Data

Pantera Global Technology 10411 Corporate Dr., Ste #208 Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 Justin Dowsett/Marketing Coordinator Ph: 877-219-9777 www.panteratools.com • justin.dowsett@panteratools.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A; Software Features: Bidding, Budget/ Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Project Management, Contact Management, Submittals, Resource Allocation, Change Orders, Reporting, Draw Requests; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line; Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

62

PHG Retail Services

319 Cooper St. Reading, OH 45215 Joelle Gertz/President Phone: 216-447-0831 x-422 • Fax: 866-851-0919 www.phgretailservices.com • jgertz@phgretailservices.com Project Mgmt. Services: Site Surveys; Software Features: N/A Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line; Intended Users: Field Service Staffing for Manufacturers, Retailers and Marketing Companies Open API: No; Pricing Model: Per Project

Poma Retail Development, Inc.

479 W. 6th Street, Ste. 102 San Pedro, CA 90731 Tony Poma/CEO Phone: 310-833-7662 www.pomaretail.com • tonyp@pomaretail.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services; Software Features: Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Project Management; Business Size: SmallMedium; Platform: On-Line; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Property Owners/Brands; Open API: Yes Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User, Per Project, Amount of Data

Prime Retail Services, Inc.

3617 Southland Dr., Ste. A Flowery Branch, GA 30542 Donald Bloom/President & CEO Phone: 866-504-3511 Fax: 866-584-3605 www.primeretailservices.com • dbloom@primeretailservices.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Facility Maintenance, Fixture Installation, Merchandising; Software Features: N/A; Business Size: N/A; Platform: N/A; Intended Users: N/A; Open API: N/A; Pricing Model: N/A

Property Management Advisors, LLC

68 South Service Road Melville, NY 11747 James Sheuchenko, President Phone: 631-577-4069 www.pmaadvisors.co • js@pmadvisors.co Project Mgmt. Services: Planned Capital Programs, Facility Maintenance, Other Facility Management Education; Software Features: N/A; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: N/A; Intended Users: N/A; Open API: N/A; Pricing Model: N/A

(QPM) Quality Project Management

222 Schilling Circle, Ste. 275 Hunt Valley, MA 21031 Sandee Brogan/Marketing Manager Phone: 480-777-1800 Fax: 480-777-5366 www.qpmllc.com • sbrogan@qpmllc.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence, Facility Maintenance; Software Features: Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management; Business Size: Large Enterprise; Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile; Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User, Per Project, Amount of Data

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


The easy-to-use, yet highly powerful construction scheduling software trusted by more than 80,000 users worldwide

CIRCLE NO. 29


SPECIAL REPORT

PROJECT SOFTWARE MANAGEMENT Quantum Hospitality Group, Inc.

4501 N. Winchester Ave. Chicago, IL 60640 Emille Aboona/Managing Partner Phone: 312-248-4501 www.qhgservices.com • info@qhgservices.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Architecture/Engineering Services; Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Estimating, Logistics, Project Management; Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium; Platform: N/A; Intended Users: Construction Management Firms, Property Owners/Brands; Open API: N/A; Pricing Model: N/A

Sierra Monitor Corporation

1991 Tarob Ct. Milpitas, CA 95035 Kelvin Bui/Marketing Associate Phone: 408-262-6611 Fax: 408-262-9042 www.sierramonitor.com • kbui@sierramonitor.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Architecture/ Engineering Services, Facility Maintenance; Software Features: Logistics, Service Management, Project Management; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, Mobile; Intended Users: General Contractors, Specialty Contractors, System Integrators; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Per Project

Solatube International

2210 Oak Ridge Way Vista, CA 92081 Neall Digert/VP of International Market Development Phone: 888-795-2882 www.solatube.com • ndigert@solatube.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations; Software Features: Daylight Planning; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line; Intended Users: Solatube Certified Commercial Distributors Open API: Available for Certified Commercial Distributors at no cost Pricing Model: Available for Certified Commercial Distributors at no cost

State Permits, Inc.

319 Elaines Ct. Dodgeville, WI 53533 Vaun Podlogar/President Phone: 608-407-9080 Fax: 608-319-2011 www.permit.com • vaun@permit.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Due Diligence, Any Permits; Software Features: Document Storage, Project Management; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, Mobile; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors; Open API: N/A; Pricing Model: Per Project

Systemates, Inc.

2435 N. Central Expressway, Ste. 880 Richardson, TX 75080 Kaely Calbertson/Director of Client Services Phone: 214-217-4100 Fax: 866-462-6314 www.projectmates.com • info@systemates.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Planned Capital Programs, Architecture/Engineering Services, Due Diligence; Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/ Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Logistics, Project Management; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Based on Client Needs

64

Tekla 1075 Big Shanty Rd. NW Kennesaw, GA 30144 Carl Taylor Phone: 770-426-5105 • Fax: 770-919-0574 www.tekla.com/us • info.us@tekla.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations; Software Features: Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Estimating, Logistics, Project Management, BIM, Pour Management, Detailing; Business Size: Large Enterprise; Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile; Intended Users: Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes; Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User

The Townson Company 7151 Colleyville Blvd, Ste. 101 Colleyville, TX 76034 Roni Townson/VP Marketing Phone: 817-421-1177 x-4 • Fax: 817-421-1181 www.townsoncompany.com • info@townsoncompany.com Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Site Surveys, Rollout Programs, Due Diligence; Software Features: Project Management; Business Size: Small-Medium; Platform: On Premise; Intended Users: N/A; Open API: N/A; Pricing Model: N/A

Trane 800 Beaty Street Davidson, NC 20836 Al Fullerton/Portfolio Leader, Unitary www.trane.com/trane300 Project Mgmt. Services: New Construction/Renovations, Architecture/ Engineering Services; Software Features: Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management; Business Size: Large Enterprise; Platform: On-Line, Mobile; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: Yes Pricing Model: N/A

Viewpoint Construction Software 1515 SE Water Ave., Ste. 300 Portland, OR 97214 Ann Finlay/PR Manager Phone: 971-255-5313 • Fax: 971-255-4758 www.viewpoint.com • ann.finlay@viewpoint.com Project Mgmt. Services: N/A; Software Features: Accounting, Bidding, Budget/Scheduling Tracking, Document Storage, Estimating, Logistics, Service Management, Project Management; Business Size: Large Enterprise, Small-Medium; Platform: On-Line, On Premise, Mobile; Intended Users: Architects, Design Firms, Construction Management Firms, Engineering Firms, General Contractors, Property Owners/Brands, Specialty Contractors; Open API: No; Pricing Model: Subscription Based, Per User, Per Project

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


by Pantera Global Technology

A nationwide network of highly vetted, independently verified subcontractors with qualifications on-hand, available right in your address book. • Prequalification of all Current Subcontractors • Network of Subs who have been Independently Verified • Substantial Risk Mitigation Benefits • Nationwide Coverage • Significantly Reduced Administrative costs • 1000’s of Additional Subs with Prequals on File

www.panteratools.com CIRCLE NO. 30


Not your

grandfatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s building Building in the new age of bricks By Ron Treister

66

G

lobal historians state that the very first brick was produced in a sun-dried form at least 7,000 years ago, somewhere in Southern Turkey. Several centuries later, the Romans introduced the original brick firing method using mobile kilns. Since those ancient times, brick has been depended upon as an omnipresent, smallish building component in the form of a rectangular block, formed from clay or shale (or mixtures), and then fired in an oven (kiln), a process which produces strength, hardness and heat resistance.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; JULY : AUGUST 2015

Photos courtesy of General Shale


CUSTOM

MODERN FURNITURE MADE IN THE USA

Our furniture is available for QUICK-SHIP -or- CUSTOM ORDER

NORTH AMERICA NEW YORK METRO

ASIA HONG KONG CIRCLE NO. 31

EUROPE POLAND


NOT YOUR GRANDFATHER’S BUILDING For the most part, “good brick earth” contains 5 percent to 7 percent iron oxide. This gives the characteristic red color to the bricks (should the quantity of iron oxide be comparatively less, the brick becomes yellowish in color after firing.) The ancient brickmakers, who were as prophetic as they were pragmatic, believed each actual brick unit should not be larger than what one worker could easily handle. Fast-forward nearly 70 centuries later. Today, the majority of bricks for construction purposes in America are reddish in hue and have dimensions of approximately 2-1/4 inches × 3-3/4 inches × 8 inches. That’s what we see in the buildings around us, that’s what we first think of and, for the most part, what we’ve been specifying as our brick material for commercial building purposes.

Enter the new age of bricks

There are new tricks with new bricks. There are new colors. There are new sizes. There are new shapes. Creative

potential for today’s brick installations is limited only to one’s ultra-fertile imagination. As a result, we’re subject to continual unveilings of new and exciting brick materials and, subsequently, extremely inventive brick applications. Today’s brick palette includes modern hues such as oatmeal, silverstone, graystone, chestnut, cascade white, baystone, tan velour, and more. Other brick color options range from traditional reds and earthtones to pastel pinks, misty grays, browns and deep burgundies. “We’re now producing bricks using white clay, which gives a crisper, cleaner color tone to gray and pastel bricks,” says Matt Mara, senior architectural representative at General Shale, one of our country’s major producers of brick for all building purposes. This is something architects, in particular, always are interested in learning more about.” Dazzling effects by selecting new and exciting shapes on corners, coves, lintels,

Creative potential for today’s brick installations is limited only to one’s ultra-fertile imagination.

Raleigh Convention Center

68

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


arches, sills and soffits are now becoming commonplace. The 21/4 × 33/4 × 8-inch old standard now is being complemented with bullnose internal corners, bullnose header corners, bullnose header inside corners, bullnose “rowlock” corners and flatter external corners, as well. Additionally, major brick manufacturers have the ability to produce custom bricks in sizes, colors and textures, based upon their customers’ very specific requests. Clearly, today’s brick should no longer be considered just as a commodity item, but rather as a major design element.

Andrew Cook, co-owner and partner of William Stone Properties, a leading Florida-based builder of both commercial and residential buildings, grew up in Savannah, Ga., with brick buildings all around him. And while he appreciates the classic red brick look, his company’s growing portfolio includes structures, which are new, different and quite modern. “This has proven to be successful,” Cook says.

There are new designs

More architects are mixing different brick colors and textures and shapes together for their unique building creations. For example, one popular brick design is the “tumbled” or “used effect” brick.” Not surprisingly, bricks with a texture that resembles stucco have been embraced within the marketplace, as well. Pigmented mortars that either match or complement brick colors provide a whole new dimension for aesthetic brick design. When a specific color brick is matched with the same color mortar, more of a monolithic “look” can be achieved. Today’s building designs may very well call for a smooth surfaced brick being installed next to one with a rough textured surface. The possibilities for brick designs within the commercial construction sector can boggle the mind.

Aspirating Smoke Detection

Pipe Network Design

Talk to the

experts.

To have a FAAST Specialist assist with your next design project for free, visit: go.systemsensor.com/design-ccr

©2015 System Sensor. All Rights Reserved.

CIRCLE NO. 32

CIRCLE NO. 33

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

69


NOT YOUR GRANDFATHER’S BUILDING Thin is in

Today’s thin brick veneers provide both beauty and value for either new construction or renovation projects. The look is the same as natural brick, but due to the reduced weight builders no longer have their justified concerns associated with load-bearing walls or having to reinforce subfloors. Jim Riccio, thin veneer product manager for General Shale, says architects have more practical advantages for outdoor and indoor applications today, including thin veneer brick. “It can be used to successfully clad small interiors or large exteriors such as major sports facilities,” Riccio says. “Thin brick veneer

The Raleigh Convention Center in Raleigh, N.C., a LEED Silver building, is an excellent example of designs combining the best in brick. Architects O’Brien/Atkins, in association with Clearscapes and tvsdesign, came up with one of the most advanced treatments ever imagined using this ancient, time-tested material. Bringing together Silverstone Velour with Smoke Grey accent resulted in a state-of-the-art building exterior with a distinctive appearance not unlike an enormous, three-dimensional objet d’art. Using local materials manufactured within a 500-mile radius of the project site, it supported the use of indigenous resources and reduced the environmental impacts resulting from transportation. This added to the project’s LEED scorecard. The colored brick in the building was mined and manufactured by General Shale, less than 200 miles away from the jobsite. “The focus of this project was to create an iconic, contemporary building right in downtown Raleigh,” Mara says. “A building clad with highly durable, attractive finishes that would stay in style for at least 50 years. The architects and our team were all on the same page. We knew we had an exceptional opportunity to do something new and exciting with brick. The results were obviously outstanding.”

The need for brick

can be used in nearly any interior or exterior application including arches, columns, entryways, fireplaces, foundation walls and for specific flooring projects.” Some modern building designs call for a “rock face texture.” This not only gives a building’s exterior a façade, which is less water absorptive than concrete. It also will last the life of that building and never need to be sealed. Using rock face texture within the interior brings the outside indoors (and vice versa) and also, absorbs light. Minimizing glare, especially on indoor surfaces, is another factor considered by designers for their clientele in addition to the obvious aesthetics they’ll gain with this rugged, natural “look.”

Whereas much of the natural stone specified for America’s commercial buildings is non-domestic, the U.S.’ brick industry operates and contributes to the economy on a national scale. In a normally growing economy, the brick industry manufactures approximately 9 billion “standard brick equivalents” per year. Even in a challenging year like 2008, data from the BIA (Brick Industry of America) indicates brick was manufactured in over 160 plants located in 38 states. Even more significant, the brick industry contributed over $8 billion to the economy and helped employ almost 200,000 Americans during that same difficult time period. More than 10,000 Americans worked in brick manufacturing jobs, including union labor, 20,000 in distribution and transportation jobs, and an additional 140,000 skilled masons and contractors helped install brick throughout the country. Now that American business finally is coming back, and more than just a small uptick exists in commercial construction projects nationwide, especially in major marketplaces, doesn’t it make sense to consider making a cogent investment in “today’s brick” materials? <CCR

Ron Treister is president of Communicators International, a Jensen Beach, Fla.-based marketing firm. He can be reached at rlt@communicatorsintl.com.

70

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


LATE SUMMER 2015

www.ccr-mag.com

Kitchens Jim Sullivan, VP, Burger 21

Game

changer How Burger 21 is redefining the fast casual market A special supplement to:

Also Inside: Operation Resuscitation Photography by Stephanie Wilson


Game

changer I

t’s a passion. When you break it all down, that’s what the burger is – a passion. What kind of burger, how it’s prepared, where you eat it, etc., are all passions, too. The burger always has been different things to different people.

72

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015

How Burger 21 is helping redefine the fast casual market By Michael J. Pallerino


JULY : AUGUST 2015 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

73


GAME CHANGER

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

These are all of the things that the owners of The Melting Pot Restaurants took into consideration when they set out to redefine the modern fast casual burger restaurant in 2009. Ever since we entered, what some call, the “Era of Upscale Burgers,” foodies everywhere have been elevating just what the burger should – and could – be. At the time, working with the team at its former restaurant management company Front Burner Brands, Burger 21 President and Founder Mark Johnston and his wife, concept development director, Arlene Johnston, created an entirely new concept that goes “beyond the better burger.” Enter Burger 21, which opened its doors, November 2010, in the Westchase area of Tampa, Florida. You want atmosphere and variety – Burger 21 has you covered. Its always ever-innovative lineup features the best in gourmet burgers, fries, salads, shakes, and more. Yet there’s more – so much more – to the Burger 21 story. As part of its unique culture, the brand is committed to the communities it serves by having each restaurant donate 10 percent of the day’s proceeds to a local charity or school on the 21st of each month. To date, Burger 21 has provided more than $127,000 in contributions to local charities and schools.

74

To get an inside look at the Burger 21 machine, Commercial Kitchen sat down with the Burger 21 team, including Mark Johnston, founder and president, Jim Sullivan, VP, and Ashley Sawyer, director of franchise development.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list for 2015?

Mark Johnston: Along with adding more stores, we’re working to communicate our strengths, and unique qualities and differentiations of what we offer to our guests, so that they understand quicker and easier why Burger 21 is a great choice.

Describe a typical day.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015

Jim Sullivan: My day starts with speaking with various brokers about any pressing issues on the real estate side. We review operational issues for our restaurants and franchisees. We want to make sure that all of our team members are informed on what’s going on. I spend time reviewing Letters of Intent (LOI) and real estate deals, making sure everything stays on track. Johnston: I still work very closely on the food end. At Burger 21,


Hold the Cold with Master-Bilt

Walk-In Doors

Sagging walk-in doors allow cold air to escape resulting in higher energy bills and potential food spoilage. Over time and with frequent usage, any door can get out of square but Master-Bilt doors are designed to be easily realigned. Every Master-Bilt walk-in door is equipped with the unique, Fully-Adjustable Hinge Backing

Plate allowing you to square your door without removal of the door or frame. Doors can also be adjusted in any direction, not just horizontally. For more information on the Fully-Adjustable Hinge Backing Plate or our complete line of walk-in coolers and freezers, contact us today.

» FULLY-ADJUSTABLE HINGE BACKING PLATE FOAMED-IN-PLACE INSIDE DOOR » LOOSENING HINGE BOLTS ALLOWS ADJUSTMENT OF PLATE 3/8” IN ANY DIRECTION

master-bilt.com | 800.647.1284 | CIRCLE NO. 34


GAME CHANGER it’s all about the burgers, shakes and salads, etc. I also work with our design team to review the kitchen for projects under construction. I’ve done this my entire career. Jim and I also focus on the long list of possibilities for future growth. There is great potential for our brand.

What is your growth plan?

Johnston: We are in many cities up and down the eastern seaboard, so it makes sense to grow our restaurant density. We are looking at big cities with great economies in Texas, like Dallas, Houston and Austin. We are also looking at expansion in the Midwest, such as Chicago and Detroit. We would also like to expand into Colorado, more specifically, the Denver area.

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

“Over the past two years, half of our revenues have come from non-beef options. Guests are looking for a burger and maybe a salad they can put it on.” – Ashley Sawyer, Director of Franchise Development

distribution set up all over the country that we can take advantage of. This helped us make the jump from Florida to Arizona and allowed us to open our first restaurant in the Western U.S.. Right now, we’re working with candidates in western markets such as Texas, New Mexico and Colorado and expanding our brand presence westward.

Talk about the models you’ve been concepting.

Sullivan: We have three different models. We have a non-traditional, airport model, which is 2,000 square feet or under. This is a new model for us. Our stores typically have been 2,400 to 3000 square feet, like the mid-size prototype you see today. We have a larger, freestanding model that’s over 4,000 square feet with an outdoor patio, which bumps the square footage up to 5,000 square feet. We plan to open our first freestanding location in Ocala, Fla., where we will introduce a full service bar. This restaurant is right in our backyard. Johnston: It’s exciting to have all of these different models. It allows us to take advantage of different sites – ones that we might not have been able to consider. The idea behind having different models was to fit into these various footprints. Today it’s common for restaurants to have different models, which gives them more options – airports, college campuses [etc.]. Again, in the case of our brand, there were sites we could have gone into, but we hadn’t yet developed a smaller footprint.

Sullivan: Also, part of our focus is to identify areas in markets such as Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey. These are well-populated states with great income levels and really match our brand. Consumers are looking for high quality food in a clean, modern atmosphere with fast, high-touch service, making them ideal markets for us to enter. We’ve made it our focus to let shopping center developers know we are looking for sites in these markets. Ashley Sawyer: We’re looking at adding two to three new markets each year for recruitment efforts. That means finding the right business partners and franchisees. We have experienced greater lead potential in markets where we already have existing restaurants. For example, two years ago or so we opened a location in Buford in the Mall of Georgia. We now have three to four additional units scheduled to open in the Atlanta area. Because we are part of the DMA umbrella (Distribution Market Advantage), we have

76

Give us a rundown of the kitchen operation.

Johnston: We’re allowing for a little more room under the hood. An extra fryer and maybe another. We are going to have some appetizers that might be prepared in a fryer, so having the option for another is good. The cooler and the grill setups are the same throughout the restaurants. We haven’t fully designed what the airport kitchen will look like yet, but it will be smaller. At this point, we will be working closely with our franchisee to develop the restaurant. They (HMSHost) have years of experience doing this, so we’ll combine our talents. Sullivan: HMSHost has an incredible background in operating in high-traffic airports all over the country. It’s a good partner for us. We’re going to work very closely with them to look at different equipment options that will help keep up our high level of food products at a much faster delivery time. In the end, the food quality has to be there.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


“PLUMBING THAT WORKS”

NEW

PowerPulse PRE-RINSE

• Unique pulsing action creates a high pressure stream that powers off dried and baked on food in LESS TIME (as low as 12 seconds) with LESS WATER (up to 26% less vs. competitors) • Easy retrofit to most existing pre-rinses – or available in complete kit • Three year warranty • Patent Pending

THREE HIGH EFFICIENCY MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM Rated Flow (GPM)

Clean Time (Seconds)

Total Water (Gallons)

Reduced Clean Time vs. Top Competitors

Reduced Water Use vs. Top Competitors

KLP50-0220-65

0.67

17

0.19

19% Faster

17% Less Water

KLP50-0220-74

0.74

14

0.17

33% Faster

26% Less Water

KLP50-0220105

1.05

12

0.21

43% Faster

9% Less Water

Encore Model

Top Industry Competitors

Rated Flow (GPM)

Clean Time (Seconds)

Total Water (Gallons)

Competitor A

1.42

20.74

0.49

Competitor A

1.20

22.59

0.45

Competitor A

0.65

21

0.23

Competitor B

1.15

22

0.42

Competitor B

0.70

24

0.28

*All flow rates are @ 60psi

Results provided by The Fisher Nickel, Inc. Food Service Technology Center.

Call or email to arrange a NO RISK TRIAL 800-526-3694 sales@encoreplumbing.com If you aren’t satisfied that PowerPulse is saving water, time and energy, we’ll take it back and refund your purchase price.

PREMIUM PLUMBING PRODUCTS

by Component Hardware

®

Please see our PowerPulse video at

www.encoreplumbing.com/PowerPulse

1890 Swarthmore Avenue, PO Box 2020, Lakewood, NJ 08701 • Tel. 800-526-3694 • 732-363-4700 • Fax 732-364-8110 www.encoreplumbing.com © Copyright 2015, Component Hardware Group, Inc. CIRCLE NO.35


GAME CHANGER

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Sawyer: Everything is made to order. In our traditional locations, we’re seeing eight to ten minute ticket times. The biggest challenge in this conversion from a fast casual restaurant to an airport model is how do we get those ticket times down to three minutes – five minutes max. We’re looking at the various options we have to make this happen. We’re still in the research phase.

Talk about the importance of sustainability.

of doing business. The cost to construct and build a strip center for developers hasn’t gotten any cheaper.

What are today’s customers looking for?

Johnston: They’re looking for fresh food and are more aware of the choices they’re making. They want healthier options and are focused on the quality of food more today than ever before. And they want value.

Sullivan: We have LED lighting and floor tiling that is made of sustainable material. We also use VOC paints. We’re always looking at other ways we can be sustainable and cost effective.

Sullivan: Today’s customers also are looking for a high level of service and people who care about them. That fits Burger 21.

Johnston: This is something we’ll focus on as we move forward. For example, we’re looking at furniture made of recyclable material. We also are looking at getting into recycling across all of our restaurants. On the equipment side, we’re looking at having the most efficient refrigeration and cooking equipment that we can use.

Sawyer: Interestingly enough, the demographic we’re targeting isn’t always looking for beef. Over the past two years, half of our revenues have come from non-beef options. They’re looking for a burger and maybe a salad they can put it on. Chicken and turkey are popular. We’re also seeing more women and families today, especially because of our menu variety.

What’s the biggest issue or trend related to the construction side of the business?

Sullivan: As it relates to the cost of construction, there are good subs out there, but they are in big demand. That’s driving up the cost

What makes Burger 21 so unique?

Johnston: The Shake Bar is a huge point of differentiation for us. The biggest thing that makes us different is the quality and taste of our food. Our corporate chef, Mike Remes, puts together amazing recipes that resonate with our guests. We’ll do anything that our customers want. And that means something. <CK

Get to know ... » Mark Johnston Founder & President, Burger 21 What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

Working with my amazing entrepreneurial team and family members. I love the ability to be creative.

What was the best advice you ever received? “Don’t argue with your partners.” – Frank Lualdi.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? “That was the ‘best burger I have ever had.”

What are the three strongest traits any leader should have?

Ambition, honesty (straightforward communication) and an entrepreneurial spirit and strong team builder.

What’s your favorite vacation spot?

Breckenridge, Colo., with my four boys, Rob, Ryan, Jared and Joseph. Skiing and snowboarding are the best. It’s such a great change of pace from Florida.

What book are you reading now?

“Atlas Shrugged” (reading for the second time) by Ayn Rand and “The Talisman” by Stephen King.

How so you like to spend your down time?

Anything with my boys, i.e., soccer, piano, tennis, reading, water skiing, tennis, watching Tampa Bay Lightning games and dining out.

What is the true key to success for any manager? Hard work and sincere interest in their team.

78

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Craig Weber, Business Strategist, Carney Contracting Services Inc.

The Carney Way Building relationships that last Relationships: Like fishing they need... • Time • Patience • Commitment Understanding our value, communicating that value to our clients, and then demonstrating how that value works as a partnership. That’s the Carney Contracting Services Inc. Way. We are a self-performing general contractor specializing in commercial remodeling, renovating and national rollout projects. Founded on Biblical principles, we provide tightly knit teams in the field and behind the scenes to effectively serve our partners’needs from start to finish. The Carney Way means going that extra mile to accomplish a task. Our creed is built on long-term relationships, multi-state traveling and self-performing, managing budgets, and impeccable communications skills. After discovering what it takes to provide you what you need, our customer-focused strategy enables us to accomplish goals while consistently exceeding expectations. With a commitment to transparency and unparalleled communication, our goal is to build our reputation one project at a time with patience and commitment.

Contracting Services Inc. has been one of our primary contractors “Carney for over two years. Their commitment to quality work, tight time lines and competitive pricing is an asset to our company. ” – Paul Lubking, facilities manager for Mariner Finance, on its partnership with Carney on Mariner’s $1.5-plus million dollar re-image campaign that includes 31 branch remodels and their 70,000-square-foot corporate headquarters CIRCLE NO. 36

1-866-628-9196 • info@carneycontracting.com

John 14:6 “I am the way, the truth, and the life.”


Operation

Resusc The art of turning a meat processing plant into a food business incubator By Barry Markham

80

W

hen people hear about business incubators, they tend to think of high tech companies scrambling to create the next Google or Facebook. But given that the food truck industry has seen annual growth of 9.3 percent over the past five years, business incubators aren’t just for high tech anymore. The Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corp. (DBEDC) spearheaded the $15 million rehabilitation of the vacant former Pearl Meat manufacturing facility and adjacent land in Boston’s Dorchester neighborhood into a 36,000 square foot multitenant, light industrial business center. The Bornstein & Pearl Food Production Center will focus on small-scale food production to meet the needs of both start-up and established food production businesses in the Greater Boston area.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


itation Photo Credit: Brad Stevens/CommonWealth Kitchen

JULY : AUGUST 2015 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

81


OPERATION RESUSCITATION

Photos Credit: Lisa Medici/TriMark United East

The center’s anchor tenant, CommonWealth Kitchen, is Boston’s only non-profit shared commercial kitchen and business incubator. CommonWealth Kitchen is DBEDC’s development partner in the project and the on-site property manager. It will run a multi-functional commercial kitchen that will foster the growth of local food businesses; create employment opportunities for residents, and facilitate improved access to healthy food in the immediate neighborhood. Building on the success of its sister food business incubator in Boston’s Jamaica Plain neighborhood, CommonWealth Kitchen will offer infrastructure and technical support for 40 to 60 small food producers to start and grow their businesses. The facility will provide affordable access to an expanded, fully equipped, licensed commercial kitchen, complete with shared cold storage, prep and packing. Businesses using the facility will have access to on-site technical assistance to help with business planning and recipe development,

82

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Safe-Serv training, and assistance sourcing or marketing products. There also will be a shared meeting room with computers and Wi-Fi available. For early stage and established food businesses, CommonWealth Kitchen will provide multiple options for leasing production space. The 8,000 square foot shared kitchen will offer kitchen rental space on an hourly basis as well as refrigerator and freezer space on a monthly basis. The commissary kitchen will serve the various food preparation needs of food trucks, restaurants and institutions. In addition, industrial kitchens ranging from 1,000 square feet to 4,000 square feet will be available for rent by more established food service operations that are not big enough to operate their own facilities but need more than a shared kitchen space. Food storage rental space is available to tenants and to established food businesses renting their own kitchen space. “There is a huge demand in Boston for small food production spaces, and this will be a big job center,” says Jeanne DuBois, executive director of DBEDC. “By co-locating multiple food producers, we will be able to create opportunities for cross-marketing, bulk purchasing, and sharing of office, staff and expensive equipment like blast freezers, and maximize efficiency across multiple tenant spaces.” The DBEDC selected RODE Architects and Kaplan Construction to build the project based on their extensive experience rehabilitating historic structures in urban areas. “I have built a lot of kitchens over the course of my career and finding the right design and construction team is critical to the success of any project,” says Brad Stevens, executive chef at CommonWealth Kitchen. “I never had a moment where I questioned if we could pull this off.” RODE’s design for the new center creates energy and an environment of interaction for the many small businesses within. Based on a rugged aesthetic that complements the existing industrial structure, RODE used wood siding to create warmth in the interior, installed skylights to introduce natural light into the space, and used specialty fixtures to bring even more brightness into the core of the building. “Our design for the former Pearl Meat property converted old meat smokers into compact conference spaces that add some whimsy to the common space adjacent to the main entrance, as well as an area for tenants to host tastings and events,” says RODE Architects principal Eric Robinson. “These features will cue visitors to the site’s new identity, reflecting the entrepreneurial spirit and fresh food mission of the project.”

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


ImagiLux ULTRA-THIN LED PANELS

Be Creative. Backlight Anything. Bring bright, even light to any translucent material. From onyx and glass tile to graphics, display lighting and more.

Call 541.228.3650 Expert engineers and experienced designers are ready to help you realize your creative vision. Imagilux custom LED panels.

Made in the USA. Quote today. Ship in a week.

ImagiLuxLED.com

A Division of CIRCLE NO. 37


OPERATION RESUSCITATION Getting down to business

The 8,000 square foot shared kitchen will offer kitchen rental space on an hourly basis as well as refrigerator and freezer space on a monthly basis.

Photo Credit: Brad Stevens/CommonWealth Kitchen

Once home to the famous Pearl hot dogs, the building was in very poor condition after having been abandoned for many years. Renovations to the existing 80-year-old single-story masonry building included a new roof and entrance, structural repairs, extensive site work, the addition of a parking lot, and new utilities. All of the spaces offer heating, ventilation, easy-toclean surfaces, floor drains, grease traps and shared loading docks. “We decided to renovate instead of demolishing and building new because the bones of the former factory were good,” Stevens says. “In addition, it was USDA-insulated from its days as a meat processing

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

plant so it saved us a step as we didn’t have to install insulation. However, the roof was completely ruined so it had to be replaced and very few of the original walls are still standing. The floor has to be absolutely level in a commercial kitchen so Kaplan had to re-do two-thirds of the flooring in order to level it out to our specifications.” DuBois says that Kaplan was a true partner throughout this project. “We enjoyed working with them to revitalize a former factory into a light industrial business center with a focus on small scale food production.” Installing kitchen equipment such as blast freezers, walk-in coolers, and ice machines did not come without its challenges. “First, Kaplan had to sturdy up the floor to support such heavy equipment,” says Bob McDuffee, project manager for TriMark United East. “We also used a utility distribution system with multiple ports so that people could just plug in the equipment to cook and roll it in and out as needed.” TriMark provided project design, equipment supply, on-site project management, installation, and smallwares supply for the new CommonWealth facility. The Bornstein & Pearl Food Production Small Business Center project is a key part of a broad community effort that will redevelop more than four acres of blighted land, generate close to 100 jobs in the first three years, and bring more than $70 million of investment in affordable housing, commercial development, job training, and youth arts programming to the area. Over the course of the project, Kaplan employed a significant number of construction workers from the local neighborhood (57 percent) in addition to minority (45 percent) and women-owned (19 percent) sub-contractors from the Greater Boston region. At its peak this summer, when Massachusetts-based food trucks are out in full-force, CommonWealth Kitchen’s two locations will be home to 45 food-related businesses employing about 150 people, says CommonWealth Kitchen executive director Jennifer Faigel. <CK

Barry Markham is a senior project manager at Kaplan Construction, a WBE general contractor and construction management firm providing comprehensive building programs across Greater Boston. For more information, visit www.kaplanconstructs.com. Photo credit: Matthew Guillory Photography

84

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


CIRCLE NO. 38


Advertorial

To understand the complexities of sustainable design, we sat down with HFA who developed, designed, and now works in their new LEED-CI Gold headquarters.

Q: What was the

importance of building a sustainable campus?

A: We urge our clients to

build sustainably so we felt it was necessary to set a good example. Secondly, we wanted an environment that stimulates productivity while encouraging a healthy lifestyle for our staff. For us, the key to an optimal space is purposeful design based on the needs of the end user.

Q: Why did you pick the challenge of adapt-

ing an existing building for your new campus?

A: A major focus of HFA is to help shape our community. This building sat vacant for years and presented a long-term investment opportunity to develop it into our new campus. Reviving this dormant retail space for ourselves also inspired us to imagine future design/build projects focused on preserving community spaces and conserving the environment.


Q: What were the leading

design factors of the campus?

A: In order to achieve

Designing a communal environment was crucial for providing a truly creative space to inspire designers of meaningful places

LEED-CI Gold, the certification process really drove our design initiatives. For instance, the open studio required an outdoor view which led us to design a south-facing wall of windows where a masonry wall originally stood. Our main focus of design was to inspire a collaborative environment for our multi-disciplined staff to enjoy both indoors and out. Q: How has the new campus impacted the Q: How does sustainability workplace culture? impact design decisions? A: It makes it enjoyable to A: Primarily through the spend more time at work! selection of materials, the use I feel like our footprint on of both indirect lighting and the environment is smaller, natural light, and installing and the office is filled with energy efficient equipment plants so it feels more and fixtures. Advanced natural. My personal technology was designed recycling habits have even into our meeting spaces to changed. Now I’m always support a decrease in paper looking for recycle bins as usage. Recycling is now opposed to creating more a part of our company waste. The design of the culture. By centralizing space makes it easier to stay our plotting/printing, in-tuned with my co-workers. our paper waste As an architect, I can turn to has been cut in my engineer neighbor and half! get an immediate response. CIRCLE NO. 39

Q: Describe how the

workplace design has influenced your day?

A: HFA’s lower workstation

design allows me to have enough privacy while providing an open space with a view. I’m able to work effectively while maintaining communication with our team. All of our resources are easily accessible which makes collaboration between teams very simple and convenient for everyone.

hfa-ae.com


All about 88

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; JULY : AUGUST 2015


RTKL renovated 212 guest rooms and 16 suites at the Hotel Valencia-Santana Row, a boutique luxury hotel in San Jose, Calif. (Courtesy of Valencia Group)

T

here is no question that a hotel renovation is among the most challenging projects in the commercial construction and renovation industry. While design, engineering and construction are technically complex, it is rare to see an operational hotel closed for a renovation, no matter how extensive it is. This heightens the technical complexity of a renovation project by several notches: The presence of overnight guests, ongoing meetings and social events, and a busy public restaurant/bar business. In turn, this heightens the pressure on the project team to reduce the impact on revenue by optimizing occupancy, minimizing disruptions and compressing the schedule.

Effective scheduling is key to successful renovations By Jim Suggs

JULY : AUGUST 2015 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

89


ALL ABOUT TIMING

In terms of project scheduling, the toughest hotel renovation project is one involving guest rooms. (Courtesy of Valencia Group) Following is a look at the most significant challenges and critical success factors and some real world solutions:

Lost revenue vs. construction costs

The financial analysis also must factor in the logistical impacts of various constructionphasing options for access, from guest elevators to guest rooms and, more importantly, fire exits.

It’s not surprising that hotel owners are focused on revenue. When it comes to meeting rooms and other public spaces, renovations can be scheduled for slow periods. But unoccupied guest rooms equal lost revenue night after night so, in terms of project scheduling, the toughest hotel renovation project involves guest rooms. Ideally, the hotel would like to schedule the project so that the fewest guest rooms are down for the shortest amount of time. On the surface, that seems logical. But if construction costs double as a result of this scheduling strategy, the increased project capital cost may have a greater impact on the hotel’s profitability than the loss of operating revenue associated with more downtime. The first step toward effective scheduling is a cost-benefit analysis of revenue versus construction costs. According to RTKL and its partners, here are the costs for renovating 212 guest rooms and 16 suites at the Hotel Valencia-Santana Row, a boutique luxury hotel in San Jose, Calif.

90

The project team analyzed three fundamental options: • Fewest guest rooms down for shortest time period (highest construction cost) • Most guest rooms down for longest period of time (lowest construction cost) • A half-floor of guest rooms down for a time period that fell somewhere in between

The general contractor, Bernards, a multidisciplinary commercial builder and construction management company based in Los Angeles, performed the financial analysis based on detailed room rates and occupancy rates provided by the owner. It’s worth noting that this type of analysis not only requires computing power, but also a general contractor (GC) willing to collaborate with the A/E (architects and engineers) to achieve the most successful, cost-effective outcome. Option 3, the final, most cost-effective plan, “takes down” an entire 60-key floor and returns the rooms roughly 20 keys at a time every nine days (i.e., 2.3 guest rooms completed per day). This plan yielded the best financial outcome for the owner – a $175,000 savings versus the least effective plan. Nobody, including the GC, could have predicted the outcome without running the numbers.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Shown: Floor Tiles: Chester Antracita PAR-KER® Wood Porcelain Tile and Dover Topo STON-KER® Porcelain Tile

TILE

MOSAICS

KITCHEN FURNITURE

BATHROOM FURNITURE

HARDWOOD & LAMINATE

Now Available: Complimentary 3D Interior Design Service CALIFORNIA | COLORADO | CONNECTICUT | DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA | FLORIDA | GEORGIA | ILLINOIS MARYLAND | MASSACHUSETTS | NEW JERSEY | NEW YORK | PENNSYLVANIA | TEXAS | WASHINGTON

1.877.PORSA.US | info@porcelanosa-usa.com | www.porcelanosa-usa.com CIRCLE NO. 40


ALL ABOUT TIMING So, nothing is impossible. During a renovation project at the Omaha Hilton and Convention Center in Nebraska, RTKL used that strategy for brief periods during the renovation, with the fire marshal frequently on site

Streamlining permitting

As commercial construction and renovation professionals know, the interpretation of national codes varies from place to place. There are further variations between the local building and fire departments and the length of time to process permits. One thing is consistent: The process always is time consuming. There also is a certain consistency in the project manager-owner dialogue about The schedule of construction on a phased project-specifically if it involves reconfiguring permitting at the start of a project. When bathrooms, moving partitions, or modifying power and lighting-depends on timely inspection at each phase. (Courtesy of Valencia Group) asked if they can approach the building and fire departments early on with schematic drawings to discuss challenges and proposed resolutions, many owners say it only raises issues. Their advice: Complete the construction documents and submit them. I have found that the best way to avoid construction delays is to prepare for, or prevent, certain issues. One way is to establish a strong, honest working relationship with the fire marshal, and building and planning director. Approach them early with schematic drawings. Open a dialogue and start building the relationship. There will be questions and differing interpretations of code. But if the project team can identify these issues early on, they generally can find a way to work with officials toward Ideally, the owner would like to schedule the renovation of guest rooms so that the a timely, successful resolution. Waiting until the fewest rooms are down for the shortest amount of time. (Courtesy of Valencia Group) construction drawings are complete may result in delays in the permitting process; protracted Maintaining guest access and egress negotiations, changed orders and a late start to construction. The financial analysis also must factor in the logistical impacts of Another way to get ahead of the curve is to schedule convarious construction-phasing options for access, from guest elevastruction on a phased project; especially if it involves reconfiguring tors to guest rooms and, more importantly, fire exits. The Valencia’s bathrooms, moving partitions, or modifying power and lighting. This guest room tower surrounds an open, central courtyard, with 60 all depends on timely inspections at each successive phase. If the guest rooms on four corridors and four fire stairs on a typical guest building and fire departments understand the phasing plan ahead of room floor. In this case, the project team maintained safe egress by time, they can schedule inspections. scheduling construction on one corridor per floor at a time (with the Hotel renovation schedules also can be thrown off when an fire marshal’s approval). owner or project team assumes that the building department’s apRTKL has yet to come across a situation in which the best value proval of the plans automatically guarantees the fire department will for the owner in terms of scheduling was impossible to achieve because approve them. They may disagree or have a different interpretation there was no way to maintain safe egress from a guest room floor. of the code, with the fire marshal leaning toward a more literal inIn that case, the project team might consider keeping a corridor terpretation than the building and planning director. The fire marshal clear during the renovation. But unless the scope of work does not and his inspectors have the final word. In fact, even if the plans are extend beyond replacement of soft goods or, perhaps, FF&E, it’s approved by the fire marshal, the inspector can require changes unlikely the fire marshal would approve this approach. during construction.

92

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


When BOSS works for you.

When THEYwork for you.

Services that help keep your business running seamlessly.

Over 14 years of superior service and support.

The services that we provide are crucial to your company’s performance. Even a small problem can interrupt work flow and prove to be very costly. Our menu of services includes all of the important aspects that help keep your businesss running smoothly.

Repair & Maintenance: • Lighting • Electrical • Plumbing • General Repair • HVAC Services

Avoid having to deal with multiple service providers or local field technicians that can take you away from your daily tasks. Instead, hire BOSS to handle all of your repair, maintenance, preventative and special projects needs.

Not just 24/7: 24/7 Nationwide

Preventative & Proactive: • Janitorial • Handyman • HVAC Preventative Services Special Projects: • Rollouts • Refreshes • Rebranding • Re-Imaging • Shop In Shops • Site Closings • Fixtures • Pop-Up Locations

For more information, log onto BossFacilityServices.com or call 1-866-267-7463 today to speak to a representative. CIRCLE NO. 41

BUILT ON SUPERIOR SERVICE


ALL ABOUT TIMING The technical challenges of a vertical configuration

guest rooms, a 150-key addition, and a new junior ballroom addition above the existing hotel kitchen and laundry. Neither the kitchen nor laundry could be closed for any period of time. The hotel had received a proposal from another architect that involved removing the roof from half of the kitchen and the entire laundry, installing additional beams and doubling up the framing structure that supported the roof (and now the floor above). The proposed schedule required the kitchen to be closed for half the renovation period, and the laundry to be closed for the entire project. Their advice: “Outsource your laundry and components of your food service.” Nobody fully analyzed the impact on operations, including costs and staffing. The RTKL project team explored five or six structural alternatives for framing the junior ballroom addition to minimize or avoid putting columns in usable spaces. The selected alternative required one column through a perimeter space of the laundry – otherwise, clear-span beams supported the addition. The renovation was scheduled to occur without closing the kitchen or the laundry, except for a few hours when power had to be shut off or switched over. There were other challenges, too. The junior ballroom could not be situated at the same floor level as the meeting spaces on the second floor. It had to be raised approximately 4 feet to accommodate the supporting structure. The project team turned that challenge into an advantage. The stairs and accessibility ramp that were required to travel from the existing meeting spaces up to the new ballroom provided a great pre-function space at the bottom and a grand entrance to the ballroom at the top. Servicing this ballroom was another challenge, as it now was approximately 4 feet higher than the existing back-of-house corridors. A steep ramp was not an option for fast-moving staff pushing heavy carts. The solution was to hang an inclined service corridor from the exterior of the existing building. While this was a GMP project with a budget that had been established well before RTKL and the GC started the project, it is doubtful this solution cost the owner more than the original proposal, especially if you take into account the impact on the owner’s revenue, operating costs and staffing. This is another instance that required cooperation with a GC who genuinely was willing to collaborate in planning and execution to give the client the best value. It must be noted that both RTKL and the GC did well on the GMP. It often said that teamwork and planning are required for successful commercial Surprise: Not all “standard guest rooms” construction. This is never truer than during the renovation of an operating hotel. are identical.

It’s not only guest access and egress that must be maintained. The service elevators are absolutely keys to maintaining the quality of the hospitality experience throughout the project. Housekeeping, room service and furniture replacements cannot wait while a contractor takes over one of the two service elevators for their exclusive use. At the same time, owners must be educated about the contractors’ need for access to a service elevator. Certainly, it must be carefully scheduled, generally during nighttime hours and slow daytime hours. It also must be avoided during peak times (after checkout). From time to time, a critical situation either for hotel operations or construction may take priority for use of a service elevator. If a large-scale guest room renovation is the toughest project in an operational hotel, a major structural alteration affecting vertically aligned spaces is a close second. Three components were combined in a recent project for the Omaha Hilton Convention Center Hotel: renovation of 450 existing

94

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Feel the returns of going green.

Improve any indoor area with cleaner air and stunning greenery designed exclusively for your space.

Filtered Air

The world’s only living wall biofilter that actively cleanses air and reduces energy costs to pay for itself.

Synthetic Growth Material

Dirty Air

Unlike any other green vertical wall, a Nedlaw living wall biofilter is a biological system that takes the air within a building, removes the pollutants and returns this cleansed air (already at the right temperature). Plus, you get an immediately robust plant wall to improve every occupant’s and visitor’s experience.

Catch Basin

519.648.9779 livingwalls@nedlaw.ca nedlawlivingwalls.com CIRCLE NO. 42

Pump


ALL ABOUT TIMING It is a given that a renovation project a fire at the furniture manufacturing plant will involve unforeseen conditions. The set back production of case goods for three existing drawings supplied to the project months, and the owner’s FF&E purchasing team may not reflect the actual outcome of agent had to find an alternative pronto. A worst-case scenario is a setback that the project. Successive renovations may not have been carefully recorded, or the owner affects a major event that has been scheduled soon after re-opening, such as a large may not have these documents. wedding, conference or corporate event. If The project team proceeds based on the hotel owner’s sales staff assumes the the best information available, but always completion date is set in stone, they may run into unexpected challenges. promote a big event on “re-opening day.” An experienced hospitality design But what if construction is delayed by a and construction team knows that not all It is the rare hotel owner who will close snow or ice storm? “standard” guest rooms are identical. Even an operational hotel for a renovation, Bring the sales staff to the planso, perhaps small variations in a few of the no matter how extensive it is. ning table, too. Educate them about the guest rooms were not significant enough to potential for unforeseen delays in the notice during the walk-through. construction schedule and urge them to For example, one room on each floor make contingency plans. might be 6 inches narrower than the others At Santana Row, a portion of the renbecause they back up to an elevator core. Six ovation was going to affect the part of the inches is a significant enough variation that a courtyard that had been designated by the piece of built-in millwork or case work will not sales staff for a major event for a corporate be exactly like it was depicted in the designs. client. The stakes were too high to cancel Certainly, the idea would be to spend the event. As a result, the renovation work in several weeks and $50,000-$75,000 to that area was delayed for a year due to the document the measurements, take photospring and summer wedding seasons. graphs and conduct electrical surveys of every guest room. That would avoid some of FF&E: ‘Nice guys finish last’ those surprises during construction. But in the author’s experience, Two firms over whom the project team has little control are the it’s probably not worth it because a well-versed project team almost owner’s FF&E purchasing agent and the installer. First, they must can always work around small variations. understand the fast-track nature of the schedule for a hotel guest The ripple effect room renovation project. Otherwise, they may submit a schedule that Nevertheless, hotel renovation schedules are so tight that a day lost demands use of the service elevator for three weeks when, in fact, here or there can create a ripple effect that can build up to a mighty they only have four days to complete the project. big wave. Poor communication with the fire marshal, and building Second, the FF&E firms’ leads must be assertive and insist and planning director is one source of trouble. that their vendors and installers get the job done in a timely manner. Unforeseen conditions are another. Otherwise, FF&E delays can have a disastrous impact on schedule Unexpected long-lead items also rock the boat. For example, a and revenue. piece of hardware, millwork or case work often can turn out to be a In addition to the sales staff, the FF&E leads must be brought long-lead item that was not anticipated in the schedule, sometimes, to the planning table. They must be educated and urged to make because the supplier has not been fully forthcoming about inventory contingency plans. (Then, they should hope for the best.) or shipping logistics. Speaking of contingencies, owners must understand they need Mechanical and electrical subcontractors may be another scheduling and financial contingencies in place. They also must be source of unanticipated delays – either because of hold-ups in flexible and remain open to alternatives. ordering or delivery of equipment, or due to unforeseen conditions It often is said that teamwork and planning are required for sucthat arise during the project. That’s why the prudent project manager cessful commercial construction and renovation. This is never truer summons key vendors and subcontractors to the planning table for a than in renovation of an operating hotel. The owner benefits from major hotel renovation project. hiring a team of people with experience taking on challenges and Sometimes, no amount of planning can avoid a setback in the unafraid of long hours and pressure. It helps to know the benefits of collaborating effectively. <CCR schedule. During a major guest room renovation project for La Quinta,

The first step toward effective scheduling is a cost-benefit analysis of revenue versus construction costs.

James R. Suggs, AIA, LEED AP, is associate VP with RTKL. An expert in the planning and design of hotels, and hotel-driven environments and developments, he has nearly three decades of experience as an architect and as a designer, You can reach him at 214-468-7698 or via email at jsuggs@RTKL.com.

96

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Commercial

JULY/AUGUST, 2015 • VOLUME 1 • ISSUE 1

A McINTOSH GROUP PUBLICATION

Breaking through INSIDE: The time saver

Technology critical for processes in program management

How to bring structure, consistency and accountability to your design process ADA Compliance: Changes on the horizon

ADA Lawsuits:

The rising tide by Brad Gaskins

ADA Q&A

If you have questions, we have answers.


PUBLISHER LETTER

Changing with a changing landscape Thank you for picking up our inaugural edition of Commercial Transformations, which will focus on commercial program management, brand design and accessibility.

Lanny McIntosh

Retailers and restaurateurs alike are constantly searching for ways to create a different experience within their stores – one that keeps its customers coming back time after time. Publisher

The McIntosh Group, LLC

Editor Allison Broyles

Managing Editor

Michael J. Pallerino

Art Direction

Brent Cashman

Editorial & Design by: F&J Publishing 678-765-6550

Commercial Transformations is published by The McIntosh Group, copyright 2015 All rights reserved For more information, contact Karen MacCannell karenm@mcintoshtransforms.com 918-585-8555 www.mcintoshtransforms.com

Commercial real estate is at a critical point. For the first time since 2007, we are seeing substantial improvement. According to Auction. com’s Q1 “2015 Commercial Real Estate (CRE) Market Monitor,” the total CRE deal volume in the first quarter hit a new peak at $124.3 billion, a near 50 percent increase from last year. Part of this growth can be attributed to technology, which continues to change the way businesses work, especially in retail, QSR and fast-casual restaurants. The things that we can streamline – and do online – are affecting the functions we do and don’t need inside a physical store. In order to keep up with these emerging trends, a brick-and-mortar store front may need to alter the way it uses space or even change locations. Retailers and restaurateurs alike are constantly searching for ways to create a different experience within their stores – one that keeps its customers coming back time after time. This focus requires them to reevaluate how their stores present products and to rethink how their brand differs from the competition. What does this mean for the property owner? It’s time to get moving. It’s time to stand out from the crowd through strong branding and design. Commercial Transformations will help you by taking an in depth look at the design elements you need in order to have the most successful

commercial property. It also will help you understand what to expect from your architect. Branding. Space use. Accessibility. It’s all about creating the right experience. Our publication will show you how creative problem solving, customized technology, and an efficient and effective program management plan can give your customers a more memorable experience. This not only will save you time and resources, but also give you the freedom to focus on your core business. In each issue of Commercial Transformations, we’ll show you how emerging trends such as wireless point-of-sale systems, sales kiosks, lounge areas and other customer experience elements can drastically change how a space is designed and utilized. In a world where boutiques are booming, see why retailers are maximizing small spaces for more comfortable customer experiences. In addition, you’ll learn how some retailers are even including higher-end experiences such as beverage service and phone charging stations. From design to program management, we hope this publication will help you discover ways you can transform your business to be more efficient, effective and strategic. Thanks for reading. Lanny McIntosh, AIA, LEEP AP BD+C Founding Principal/CEO

CONTENTS ISSUE 1, 2015 pg 4

ADA Compliance: Changes on the horizon

pg 5

ADA Lawsuits: The rising tide by Brad Gaskins

pg 6

Breaking through

How to bring structure, consistency and accountability to your ADA process

pg 10 The time saver

Technology critical for processes in program management

pg 14 AskBrad

If you have questions, we have answers. AskBrad is an ADA Q&A designed to be your resource for Title III ADA questions.

MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS

99


ADA COMPLIANCE

Changes on the horizon Because the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is can appear vague and open to interpretation, it can feel like a confusing and convoluted road map. Though the ADA was passed more than 25 years ago, many owners, architects and contractors do not give it the attention it requires and, even if they do, it’s hard to keep up because it’s evolving all the time.

Many property owners trust their architects and contractors to keep them in compliance. But this is a risky proposition. Architects often treat ADA as a building code, assuming the rules are black-and-white, when in reality it is a Civil Rights law that is open to subjective interpretation and must be thoughtfully approached. Furthermore, contractors may not know the intricacies of ADA. In the construction world, there often is a mentality of “close enough is good enough.” That just doesn’t cut it when it comes to ADA. When it comes to ADA compliance, don’t let a building permit and a Certificate of Occupancy give you a false sense of security.

ICC Standard Updates The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 117.1 Committee of the The International Code Council (ICC) suggests and interprets accessibility standards that may be adopted by building codes jurisdictions at the national and state level. The new accessibility standards harmonize with ADA. In the near future, the committee is amending standards that will have a major impact on property owners. The biggest impact will be felt in remodels to existing buildings and new construction, as they will be required to make these changes immediately. The two big ticket items being altered for the next code cycle include turning spaces and wheelchair spaces. These and most of the other changes are about allowing more space for maneuvering a scooter. The mentality here is really “the bigger, the better,” but it may pose a big challenge for property owners who need to get remodels and new builds assessed for accessibility.

Though the ADA was passed more than 25 years ago, many owners, architects and contractors do not give it the attention it requires. 100

COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM


ADA LAWSUITS

The rising tide The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) can be a challenging law to follow to the letter because so many parts of it are open to subjective interpretation. As an accessibility consultant, and a member of The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 117.1 Committee of the International Code Council (ICC), I’ve kept my finger on the pulse of ADA as new trends and interpretations evolve. In the coming years, a rise in lawsuits and changes in the ICC’s interpretation of certain rules may present the most challenges to property owners. We are starting to see an influx in ADA-related litigation across the United States, often in places that have not previously had many lawsuits, such as Idaho, Alabama, Utah and Oklahoma. Activists looking to make an example out of noncompliant businesses have educated themselves on quick and easy ways to identify noncompliant facilities.

Number of ADA-related lawsuits per year in the U.S.

“…a dimensional tolerance is a permissible deviation from standards commonly accepted in the construction industry and does not impact accessibility under ADA guidelines.”

by Brad Gaskins

The court went on to state that the plaintiff’s expert was an unqualified consultant, as “only licensed architects are qualified to be experts in disability access standards.” From all the statistics we see, it’s apparent that the ADA-related litigation wave still is on the rise. Keep in mind when hiring accessibility consultants, that based on this precedent, only licensed architects are qualified to be experts in disability access standards. It is yet to be seen whether this will be followed through in other courts, but getting a qualified consultant from the beginning could save you time and resources if faced with a lawsuit.

Number of ADA-related lawsuits per state

As lawsuits increase, property owners must not only be on the lookout for common barriers that lead to litigation, but it is also important to pay attention to the precedents these lawsuits are setting. In November 2014, “Kirola v. City and County of San Francisco,” the plaintiff claimed to have a “real and immediate threat of repeated injury” stemming from 11 policies and procedures, including details as minute as slight variances in the slope of curb ramps. This is one of the first examples of such intricate details as construction tolerances coming to a ruling in a case. The court ruled in favor of the defendant and rejected such claims, stating:

“Federal NOS: Civil Rights: ADA-Other... Court Trends & Analysis.” Monitor Suite®. Web. 29 Jan. <http://www.monitorsuite.com>.

SCALE 07 to 13 13 to 28 28 to 41 41 to 53 53 to 76 76 to 99 99 to 156 156 to 223 223 to 396 396+

Brad Gaskins, AIA, CASp is a partner at The McIntosh Group and a leading expert on accessibility and Title III ADA Standards. He also is a continuing education provider and regularly leads presentations, seminars and webinars for professional groups regarding accessibility nationwide.

MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS

101


Breaking 102

COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM


In business, when something seems to work, we stick with it. Have a strong assumption about how your industry works? Have a tried-and-true process in place? Have great relationships with preferred suppliers and shareholders? All these things that make us successful, can and, under the right conditions, will lead to our downfall. They become blinders and we get caught in routines that maybe were at one time revolutionary, but are no longer serving us. The inability to transform our processes, and the ways we do business as our industries change and as consumerism evolves can be lethal. Over the last 10 years, our retail, restaurant, hospitality and banking clients at The McIntosh Group have experienced a lot of growth – so much so that they can no longer manage their numerous sites across the United States on their own using traditional program management. So we have had to re-evaluate the way By Lanny McIntosh we approach these projects and programs and re-imagine what a smooth remodel, prototype, brand rollout, or ADA survey and barrier removal process looks like. Whether it’s a remodel project across many franchises or ADA compliance surveys at many sites, replicating anything at multiple locations is messy and unpredictable. As not only designers, but also program managers, we see our role as bringing structure, consistency and accountability to the process. We’ve used this approach to manage rollouts of prototype designs, develop ADA compliance programs and brand initiatives, conduct growth analysis of where to add locations, and simply to ensure a new security system was installed at every location in the most economical and efficient way possible.

How to bring structure, consistency and accountability to your franchise design process

through MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS

103


BREAKING THROUGH Simplifying the process Perhaps one of the best examples of an owner making technology work for them in a design project is the notable quick-service restaurant The Wendy’s Corporation. The Problem: Wendy’s had an aggressive timeline to re-image its stores. The company’s in-house engineering team needed someone who could quickly take two existing examples of a new prototype and create drawings for all remodels and new builds. The Solution: The McIntosh Group created 20 highly refined prototypes with integrated technology that we refer to as “Smart Sets.” These Smart Sets increase the productivity and accuracy of the site architects’ drawings by including only the information they need and excluding the rest. Using this technology enabled us to manage 20 templates while being able to extract more than 75,000 unique drawings sets. This translated to fulfilling 480 requests for architectural drawings in five months, an average of over 80 per month.

Whether it’s a remodel project across many franchises or ADA compliance surveys at many sites, replicating anything at multiple locations is messy and unpredictable. By harnessing the technology we have available to create a customized online database, we created a process that streamlined the ordering process for franchisees and their architects that needed equipment and drawings to adhere to their corporate brand standards. How are we able to bring this efficiency to such a complex process? The answer is technology. While we had the right team and the right technology in place, it wasn’t until we reimagined the traditional program management process by identifying the weaknesses and developing new solutions did we arrive at this conclusion. By self-assessing and maximizing the resources we already have at our fingertips, we can create something that truly increases performance and sales. At The McIntosh Group, we develop customized online databases which allow clients to view all their sites, assets, needs, cost estimates and recommendations in one place. Through advanced data reports, they can make timely and strategic decisions about their programs and, through economies of scale, can save a lot of money.

104

Depending on the nature of the project, the data can be used to: • Order new signage for every location or only specific ones • See which features franchisees are utilizing in your prototype design and the ones they are ignoring • Determine the financial risk of not being ADA compliant at a particular location, and then prioritize those issues based on your budget • Budget and prioritize projects to get all locations within brand standards • Spot trends so you can adjust your business plan or set projections All the data our clients need is at their fingertips. The software is web-based, so the client can log in from anywhere in the world. This arms our clients with the ability to make choices that are more economical, more relevant, and better for business. We urge you to consider, what can you re-imagine about your business? Where are the bottlenecks and growing threats, and what assets do you already have that you aren’t using to their potential?

Using Technology to Track Barrier Removals After conducting ADA Compliance surveys for several clients across the nation, we identified three main barriers to accessibility projects: 1. Lack of knowledge of the ADA 2. Lack of knowledge of client’s site compliance 3. Limited budget

COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM


All the data our clients need is at their fingertips. The software is web-based, so the client can log in from anywhere in the world.

Especially among property owners with multiple locations in a wide geographical range, getting an educated and appropriate assessment of how compliant each of their sites are can be daunting. Even if all the general managers understood what ADA barriers are, taking an inventory of every possible barrier and figuring the cost of bringing them into compliance is still a big job. If inadequately done, it’s a job that can lead to serious legal problems, too. From big box retail stores, to hotels and restaurants, we train staff on ADA compliance and conduct site surveys of each location using a customized iPad app. This includes the cost of fixing each barrier and the urgency of the compliance based on risk. This not only arms our clients with the ability to make strategic business decisions, but also gives them printable reports and hard evidence of a thoughtful attempt to be proactive in reaching ADA compliance. This

shows that they have a “pattern and practice” of compliance – a valuable thing to have should a litigation issue arise. The barrier removal data is accessible to the client indefinitely. With it, they are able to plan fixes as they conduct updates and remodels in their one-, five- and 10-year plans. Now that’s using technology to save money while managing risk. Break through your blinders and allow yourself to be truly innovative.

Lanny McIntosh, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, is the founder and CEO of The McIntosh Group, a nationwide architecture firm providing expert accessibility, brand management and program management solutions based in Tulsa, Okla.

MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS

105


The time saver Technology critical for processes in program management Every business faces complex problems that require organization, processes and, sometimes what feels like a bit of magic to pull them off. This could be applied to changes as intricate as major remodel projects, to facility management and the inventory of equipment, to brand management. When you’re working across multiple locations – whether it’s for major remodels, facility management and equipment inventory, or a brand management program – managing a detailed series of projects can be daunting. It’s important to choose the right program manager and the right technology to get the job done right. One client we worked with is a great example of how the right program management technology can help save time, money and resources. A popular retail chain needed to upgrade its in-store equipment systems across hundreds of locations. As a part of the process, each store’s existing equipment type, location and capabilities had to be identified and assessed. Gathering information from each unique location is no small task. By only using a single resource, it would take a considerable amount of time with lots of associated costs. And once it’s all completed and paid for, finding the information once again would be extremely time consuming.

106

COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM


MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS

107


THE TIME SAVER

Maximizing your use of technology could minimize the time, money and headaches spent on managing your program.

108

The retailer already had team members at each location that could budget time into their schedules to help out. The challenge was how to gather the information and photographs of its current equipment and store layouts in a consistent manner and in a format that would enable the information to be easily retrieved. So, what do you do when you have a ton of very detailed data to gather from hundreds of stores? This is a prime example of how harnessing the right technology can make a project more efficient and effective. Sometimes, if the right technology isn’t already there, it’s worth it to create it yourself. That’s what we did. The McIntosh Group developed a software app that enabled the company’s operations personnel to gather the necessary information and photographs from each store using an iPad. The ability to link photos with the data allowed the program managers to make decisions based on both visual and written data. When the data was entered into customized forms, it automatically uploaded to a database that we used to make recommendations and define scopes for each site. Furthermore, the data could be exported to a

COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM


Sometimes, if the right technology isn’t already there, it’s worth it to create it yourself.

simple report or mined for specific information, such as the most common manufacturer or age of a specific piece of equipment in a certain group of locations. Suddenly, creating and executing a strategic plan for the equipment upgrades across each location was a piece of cake. All the information they needed was at their fingertips. The projects could be completed in a short time frame, by existing resources, at no additional cost to the client. Those who best knew the locations gathered the information. Armed with reports and recommendations, the store managers were able to review, adjust and plan for new equipment as needed. Using this collaborative effort between the client and The McIntosh Group program team, we developed a prototype for the installation of the equipment and rolled out a set of construction documents for each store – quickly, accurately and cost-effectively. A mobile app such as this can easily be customized for any program. An easily accessible, program-specific database allows the business owner to make informed and accurate decisions. In any kind of project or program you’re facing, ask yourself if there’s a way to improve the current process to harness the technology you have – or hire someone who can. Maximizing your use of technology could minimize the time, money and headaches spent on managing your program.

MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS

109


ADA Q&A

If you have questions, we have answers. AskBrad is an ADA Q&A designed to be your resource for Title III ADA questions. To submit a question, visit us at www.mcintoshtransforms.com/ask-brad.

What are the minimum size requirements for an ADA bathroom stall? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark D., USA Per the 2010 ADA standards section 604.8.1.1 Size, the minimum size for a toilet compartment for wall hung fixture is 60-inches wide, measured perpendicular to the side wall and 56-inches deep, the minimum measured perpendicular to the rear wall. The minimum size for a toilet compartment for a floor mounted fixture is 60-inches wide, measured perpendicular to the side wall and 59-inches deep, the minimum measured perpendicular to the rear wall.

Is there a maximum length an ADA ramp can be? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed L., Florida There is no maximum length a compliant accessible ramp can be. However, a ramp is limited to a 30 inches maximum rise, and then a level landing must be provided before the rise continues. A ramp can slope no more than 1:12 (8.3 percent) and if the rise is 1:20 (5 percent) or less it is not considered a ramp.

110

COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM


In a high rise building, what’s the ADA requirement for door pressure to open and if door assist is required? — Marvin L., New Jersey Under the ADA, if the door is an “Interior” door, the maximum opening force is 5 pounds (force). If the door is an “exterior” door, there is no opening force requirement. An automatic or assist door is not required in either situation under the ADA, but can be an appropriate accommodation under a request to provide a Title I Employment accommodation. Of course, the owner/operator can at any time decide that the installation is good service for any visitor or user and install a closer.

We’re in the process of doing a tenant improvement in a multi-storied (10) in Jacksonville, Fla. One of the floors being improved doesn’t have an ADA-compliant restroom. Can compliance be satisfied by the floor above and the floor below, both having ADA compliant restrooms? — Paul., Orange Park, Fla.

In my opinion, unless there is a technical infeasibility to doing so, the toilet room on the floor being improved must be made accessible. Also, remember you have an obligation to spend up to an additional 20 percent of the remodel costs to remove barriers that may exist in the “Path of Travel” to the building, entry to the building, “Path of Travel” to the suite in question, “Toilet Rooms” and “Path of Travel” to the “Toilet Rooms.”

What is the maximum & minimum height for an ADA auto door push button? — Chris B., Cockeysville, Md.

Per the 2010 ADA Standards 404.3.5 Controls, manually operated controls shall comply with section 309. In Section 309.3 Height, operable parts shall be placed within one or more of the reach ranges specified in 308. Section 308 Reach Ranges, unobstructed forward and side reach shall be 48 inches maximum and 15 inches minimum.

Brad Gaskins, AIA, CASp is a partner at The McIntosh Group and a leading expert on accessibility and Title III ADA Standards. He also is a continuing education provider and regularly leads presentations, seminars and webinars for professional groups regarding accessibility nationwide.

Disclaimer: “AskBrad” is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It is provided with the understanding that Brad is not an attorney and is not engaged in rendering legal or other professional services. Additionally, the ADA is subject to interpretation of the courts and the Department of Justice. If legal advice or other expert professional assistance is required, you must seek competent legal and professional advice.

MCINTOSHTRANSFORMS.COM JULY/AUGUST 2015 ISSUE 1 COMMERCIAL TRANSFORMATIONS

111


The Next Great American Stone Mining for honeycomb in Utah By Randall Stertmeyer

I

n 1995, in a remote location with an elevation roughly two miles above sea level, in northeast Utahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Uintah mountain range, an

extraordinary geological discovery was made.

Workers discovered an extremely rare, highly valuable 36-carat emerald crystal. Shortly thereafter, the Shamrock Mine was opened. Its focus was to find more of this precious material. After launching a comprehensive exploration program, miners could not find any more mind-blowing emerald deposits.

JULY : AUGUST 2015 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

113


THE NEXT GREAT AMERICAN STONE

Setting the foundation for Honeycomb Onyx

Mine location in Uintah Mountains, Utah.

The first application of Honeycomb Onyx used for a major building by Creative Edge was for the entryway of Utah’s state building in Salt Lake City. The firm replicated the state’s official insignia with hundreds of precision waterjet cut pieces of natural stone perfectly assembled. A featured material of that project was the onyx material from the mines located nearby in the Uinta Mountains. It seems fitting that this magnificent stone production by Creative Edge features Honeycomb Onyx in the scalloped borders as well as in the very center.

114

Fortunately, what they found was quite sweet – an unbelievably beautiful and absolutely unique natural stone. The stone, which featured brilliant colors, translucent properties, possessed excellent performance characteristics. It was given the name “Honeycomb Onyx.” Almost immediately, local stone pundits started whispering that this may be the most stunning new stone found in America in decades. While the whispering continued, no real enthusiastic shouting started until 2014, when a group of four businessmen, operating as the Shamrock Operating Group LLC, purchased the mine. The four principle owners of this firm realized they had something “big” at this secluded, and somewhat inaccessible location. After all, it was quickly ascertained via a cogent “mine plan” that initial operations would allow for excavation of up to 12 million pounds of stone just from this first quarry site. So, the partners made plans to take the company public in the near future, procuring necessary funding to build a national – and possibly global – business around this unique stone. In doing so, they created a program where large quarry blocks of the Honeycomb Onyx material could be extracted from the mountains. There were blocks that would ultimately be sold and subsequently professionally morphed to be used in high-end architectural, construction and landscape applications.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015

The Shamrock Operating Group, which started the process on June 1, 2015, now manages 19 contiguous mining claims across the mountain plateau, incorporating roughly 380 acres. The annual local mining season typically runs from the beginning of June through October, due to the mine’s high elevation and unforgiving mountain weather conditions of northeastern Utah.

Limitless potential

Few people have a better eye for amazingly decorative, high-performance stone material than Jim Belilove, founder and president of Creative Edge Master Shop. The company is one of the world’s leading providers of architectural stone designs, which are precision-cut via the computerized waterjet process, and then assembled into what some have described as a “perfect, giant jigsaw puzzle.” “We’ve been using onyx since our inception over 25 years ago,” Belilove says. “But never have I seen an onyx with not only such a brilliant color offering and so many different veining arrangements but, also, Honeycomb Onyx has got to be one of the sturdiest and most translucent stones I’ve ever come across. The design possibilities that exist with this amazing material are limitless. We intend to use it moving forward for high-end projects worldwide.” There have been a small number of hospitality and other signature architectural


installations of this stone over the last few years in the Southwestern region of the states. But today, Honeycomb Onyx, which some openly refers to as “The Next Great American Stone,” is on the cusp of being specified for more and more key projects. “Just about anything can be done with Honeycomb Onyx,” says Tom Claridge, manager and partner of operations for Shamrock, a mining professional for more than 25 years. “It can be cut into large slabs from which fabricators can craft countertops and other cut-to-size surfaces, and it is an excellent tile material for both floors and walls (imagine an under-lit dance floor at a ritzy nightclub) with sizing potential ranging from large format tiles to small mosaics. Shamrock’s inventory, which Claridge says is extensive, includes large bounders, which also can be polished or sandblasted for various landscaping applications. “We believe the potential for our stone is boundless and, of course, we’re proud to be marketing a natural product coming from the United States.” Claridge says a strong geological surveying program found that there is enough Honeycomb Onyx material in the Utah Mountains to meet huge consumer demands for years to come. For many years, a great percentage of the decorative onyx used for commercial applications in this country has been imported from Pakistan. According to top stone industry sources, “roughly 70 percent of the decorative stone material specified by the architectural and design community is quarried non-domestically. More than 85 percent of the onyx used in these types of projects in non-American quarried.” Matt Barry and Jacob Gallion, partners at the Spokane, Wash., Back-lit Tile Kit firm, both have strong backgrounds in tile and stone retailing and installation. The duo has developed a system that offers ways to backlight translucent tile and stone for both residential and commercial applications. They said they have never seen such a beautiful onyx and look forward to working with it in scenarios when it will be backlit to bring out the true beauty of the stone. Bostik, one of the largest manufacturers and marketers of tile and stone installation systems globally, has not missed the potential of this material. ”We’re currently working on installation specs for the Honeycomb Onyx tile material,” says Scott Banda, director of marketing for Bostik’s consumer and construction business unit. “We see great potential with this product in so many ways.”

“The design possibilities that exist with this amazing material are limitless. We intend to use it moving forward for high-end projects worldwide.” – Jim Belilove, Founder & President, Creative Edge Master Shop

Shamrock Operating Group currently is in the process of putting together a total business plan and will have a highly professional launch of this in the not-so-distant future. The partners know their stone product is not for everybody, but they also know it’s very unique – and American. “We think Honeycomb Onyx is an ideal stone for retail and hospitality rollouts,” Claridge says. “We know due to its translucency that it very well could be the stone material of choice for high-end restaurants and nightclubs. I’m just a mining veteran who basically just knows how to extract certain elements from the earth. But I must say, it’s pretty exciting to think about what can be done with this incredible orange/amber stone after it leaves our mountain ranges! All of us are looking forward to this.” <CCR

Randy Stertmeyer, COO of Communicators International, has extensive background within the building products sector, including stints as president/ CEO, VP/sales, and marketing and national sales manager for many well-known firms.

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

115


MARK IT ON YOUR CALENDAR TO ATTEND THE

Marriott Riverwalk downtown San Antonio, TX January 20-22, 2016. www.ccr-summit.com

Knibbe Ranch

Riverwalk Tour

SPONSORED BY:

WANT TO ATTEND AS AN END-USER OR SPONSOR...

Contact David Corson 678.765.6550 or e-mail davidc@ccr-mag.com End-Users (retailers, hoteliers, restaurateurs, etc.) will receive complimentary hotel, airfare, transportation to and from airport, and food and activities, or contact David Corson for an affordable registration rate. CIRCLE NO. 43


At Marriott Riverwalk January 20-22, 2016 Downtown San Antonio, TX

2016 SEMINARS REGISTER TODAY AT WWW.CCR-SUMMIT.COM JANUARY 21st, 2016 Seminars 9:00 AM - 10:15 AM

Seminars 10:45 AM - Noon

Dawn Hollingsworth Steve Pollard

James Benham

Design Director, BOLD

CEO, JBKnowledge, Inc.

Design is a key component of financial success. Design leadership factors into every aspect of service or products and says everything about your brand. In this seminar we will examine some of the premier leaders in design and be prepared for some surprising information. Why does one hamburger cost $10 when another is $6? It isn’t only in the beef!

Managing Director, JLL

Brand Transformation Panel Discussion. Listen to a panel of industry experts and corporate executives discuss when and why a brand should change. Who should be involved and what distribution channels and brand assets are may be effected. Hear about successful brand transformations and what you can do to make sure your next transformation is a success.

Jim Harkin

James will review a brief history of virtual reality, augmented reality, and wearable devices; explore how drones are introducing builders to data mobility, visualization, access, and efficiency on projects; and analyze case studies of how industry leaders are using innovative technology to inspire collaboration and design.

Senior Vice President, Principal FRCH Design Worldwide

Repurposing Anchor Space: Creating new experiences for Retail, Restaurant, Entertainment or Hospitality. FRCH will share insights and lessons learned from experience and expertise in project work relating to reimaging the use of a shopping center’s anchor space.

Please select one in each time slot: Seminar 1

Seminar 2

Seminar 3

Seminar 4

Breakfast Round Tables and Opening Remarks 8:00 - 8:45 AM

Breakfast Speaker: Grace Daly LIFE REDEFINED: 3 Simple Keys to Life and Business Fulfillment Grace Daly is the Founder and Host of ShopTalk 360, the Industry’s podcast talk show and the Inspiring Leadership book series. These unique platforms spotlight the leaders in our design, construction and facilities brick & mortar world. With more than 20+ years experience building and maintaining properties for national retail chains - Grace’s current independent platform as a bestselling award winning author, certified coach and master interviewer enables her to celebrate the talent in this Industry she grew up in and fondly refers to as her family. Get Ready, Get Inspired!

Luncheon with John Mack

In 1973, John Mack began his love affair with the sport of rodeo by competing in its most extreme event, bullriding. There are many parallels linking the high risk sport of rodeo and the challenges of the workplace; and after 10 years bullriding and over 30 years experience announcing, John Mack has picked up a bucket full of stories and insights into the most extreme sports on the face of the earth. A world where there is a razor-thin line between winning and losing, between success and failure.

All seminars are AIA accredited 1.15 AIA CEUs

Return your Seminar selection to David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com or fax your selections to 678-765-6551

CCRS 2016 Advisory Board members: Anthony Amunategui, CDO Group Grace Daly, ShopTalk 360 David Fields, Southwest Signs Sam Cicero Snr, Cicero’s Development

Erran Zinzer, US Cellular Craig Weber, Carney Contracting Services


2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit End-User Complimentary Registration www.ccr-summit.com

Marriott Riverwalk San Antonio, TX January 20-22nd, 2016 Application Instructions • Please type or print clearly. • Incomplete applications and contracts will not be processed. • A counter-signed copy will be returned to you within 10 business days. Mail completed applications as follows: Attention: David Corson F&J Publications, LLC P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024

2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit Schedule: Wednesday Jan 20th, 2016: • Afternoon check-in and Alamo Tour • 6:30-9:30 PM: Welcome Reception/Table Top Exhibit with Dinner.

END-USER ATTENDEE INFORMATION ______________________________________________________________ Name

Title

______________________________________________________________ Company Name

______________________________________________________________ Street Address

______________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip

E-mail Address (required)

______________________________________________________________ Phone

Fax

Web Site

I would like to receive Commercial Construction & Renovation. YES

No

CCRS 2016 Complimentary Registration includes air fare and transportation to and from Antonio Airport, Hotel Room for two nights, Alamo Tour, Dinner Table Top Exhibit, Breakfast Round Table, Two AIA seminars, Luncheon with Speaker, One-On-One Appointments, Knibbe Ranch and Riverwalk Boat Tour. Any incidentals at hotel are responsibility of attendee. Requirement to receive complimentary credentials: Attendee must meet and have breakfast and lunch with vendor participants of your choice. In addition must agree to meet with six vendor participants of your choice for 15 minute meetings on January 21st in the afternoon.

Thursday, January 21st, 2016: • 7:45 - 8:45 AM: Breakfast buffet with Round Tables discussions & Speaker. • 9:00 - 10:15 AM: AIA Seminars. • 10:15 - 10:45 AM: Coffee Break • 10:45 - Noon: AIA Seminars. • 12:15 - 1:45 PM: Plated Lunch with Speaker • 2:00 - 5:30 PM: One-On-One Appts. • 7:00 - 10:00 PM: Gala Reception at The Knibbe Ranch

PAYMENT: Registration: Complimentary

Friday, January 22nd, 2016: • 8:00- 9:00 Am End User Breakfast Only • Hotel Check out and Riverwalk Boat Tour in 9:30 AM. • Early Afternoon Flight Home.

requirements above and agree to abide by all terms and conditions. I am an authorized

Hotel Room: Complimentary Wednesday Alamo Tour: Complimentary Please check here for Riverwalk Boat Tour: Complimentary

I hereby authorize F&J Publications, LLC to reserve the Summit spots as indicated I acknowledge that I have read the 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit representative of the company named on this Application and have full power and authority to sign this document. I understand that F&J Publications, LLC reserves the right to decline this document.

______________________________________________________________ Signature

CCRS 2016 Advisory Board members: Grace Daly, ShopTalk 360 Sam Cicero Snr, Cicero’s Development Anthony Amunategui, CDO Group David Fields, Southwest Signs Erran Zinzer, US Cellular Craig Weber, Carney Contracting Services

Title

______________________________________________________________ Date

Accepted by:

________________________________________________________

The 2016 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit is owned, managed and produced by: F&J Publications, LLC


LATE SUMMER 2015

ALSO COVERING LOCAL, STATE & REGIONAL PROJECTS AND FACILITIES

SUPPLEMENT

Light’em up Illuminating the infamous Lincoln Tunnel

ALSO:

All hands on deck – Inside U.S. cargo handling innovation

A special supplement to:


Light’em up Illuminating the infamous Lincoln Tunnel By Alfred Heyer

120

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


W

ith nearly 120,000 vehicles travelling through it per day, it’s no wonder The Lincoln Tunnel, one of the world’s most demanding lighting environments, needed to refit and upgrade its lighting fixtures. As an integral conduit in the New York Metropolitan Area, The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey knew the tunnel was in need of a change – a change that would ultimately decrease its energy consumption and costs for many years to come. JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

121


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • LIGHT’EM UP

Designed by Norwegian-born civil engineer Ole Singstad and named after U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, the Lincoln Tunnel connects Weehawken, N.J., and Midtown Manhattan. It opened its first 8,216-foot center tube in 1937, followed by a 7,842-foot north tube in 1945 and an 8,006-foot south tube in 1957. Today, the tunnel is 1.5-miles long and sits under the Hudson River. The Port Authority recognized the tunnel’s obvious need for improvements, so the organization began planning a renovation project that would improve the Lincoln Tunnel both in terms of user experience and sustainability. The primary goals of the project were to save energy costs annually, reduce energy usage and enhance light quality in order to improve safety for thousands of travelers.

The LED lighting solution, which now distributes more light more efficiently and requires less energy, has a minimum operational life of 5.7 years at 24 hours of operation

With the original lighting units mounted in existing metal fixtures on the tunnel’s recessed walls, The Port Authority not only needed to upgrade the tunnel’s lighting fixtures, but also would have to do so in a severely challenging environment. In addition to the difficult-to-access walls, major challenges included: • High vibration from passing traffic • High temperature, limited ventilation • Wet weather conditions • 24-hour operation • Minimize glare, maximize light level • Match the quality of natural exterior light to interior light The key was to maximize driver visibility of the roadway and other vehicles without straining the eye, nor causing temporary visual loss during entrance and exit of the tunnel.

122

In tandem with the organization’s sustainability efforts, The Port Authority was searching for a custom solution that could be designed, manufactured and installed in time for the Super Bowl XLVII, which was scheduled for February 2014 in East Rutherford, N.J. After a thorough and competitive review of multiple general contractors, the $2.1 million lighting upgrade contract was awarded to Constellation, a leading supplier of power, natural gas, renewable energy and energy management products to both residential and businesses sectors. The lighting upgrade was expected to provide more than $283,000 in energy savings annually to the Port Authority. Once selected, Constellation was in need of a partner who could develop a single, custom replacement LED lighting

solution for all of the existing HID fixtures – and fast. With less than a year until the Super Bowl, the clock was ticking and time was limited.

Up for the challenge

Constellation selected Photonic Laboratories, which then was operating under the brand GreenRG, to provide a sustainable solution for converting the tunnel’s HID lighting systems to LED. Photonic Labs is an American engineering company focused on the full cycle of applied photonics, including the development, manufacture and distribution of LED lighting technologies and renewable powered products with integrated battery systems, networking and smart functionality. The company creates LED lighting solutions that are 50 percent to 90 percent more efficient, with superior light quality and increased lifespan. While the organization was selected for a variety of reasons, one of the key differentiators was its ability to produce and assemble

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


CIRCLE NO. 44


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • LIGHT’EM UP

Lowdown on the Lincoln Project: Lincoln Tunnel, Refit

and Upgrade for one of the most demanding lighting environments in New York City. Client: Port Authority of New York & New Jersey GC: Constellation Existing Lighting: 70W Par 38 HPS mounted within existing metal fixtures, within recessed wall, 180 degree light throw Environment: • High vibration • High temperature • Wet Environment • Limited ventilation at fixture • 24-hour operation Goals: • 180 degree coverage •M  aterial decrease in energy consumption • Material decrease in maintenance, replacement of bulbs leading to nightly shut downs of tubes for lamp replacement •U  nification of various expiring technologies into a single solution • Increase in operational life of lamps • Improvement in light output, quality and uniformity • * Adherence to IES Roadway standards to improvement in driver visual adjustment during entrance to and exit from the tunnel, anti-glare Solution: • MHR-45 Tunnel Bulb (2,300 units) • Custom developed and manufactured by Photonic Laboratories (under the former brand GreenRG)

almost all of its products in its North Arlington, N.J. facility, which enables them to produce robust, unique products that include custom settings and controls specific to the Lincoln Tunnel’s requirements. Photonic Labs and Facilities Solution Group (FSG), which was responsible for the installation, initially tested several induction retrofits that included a custom stainless steel door, in wattages ranging from 40-60 watts. While this solution provided the 180-degree spread, it did not provide the required light level and energy savings.

Testing a solution for sustained success

After multiple trials, Photonic Labs designed a 45W screw in LED lamp with a special heat sink that provided both the spread and

since 2012, providing high-quality illumination, substantial energy savings, and virtually an end to tunnel closure due to lamp replacement. The Port Authority and Photonic Labs partnership successfully executed on a project that would impact an average of 42 million drivers traveling through the tunnel each year. This resulted in the successful $2.1 million installation of 2,300 45-watt LED lights, which will reduce electricity use by an estimated 1.2 million kilowatt-hours per year. The LED lighting solution, which now distributes more light more efficiently and requires less energy, has a minimum operational life of 5.7 years at 24 hours of operation, with a potential for a full 15 years of service; a material improvement over the

The Port Authority was searching for a custom solution that could be designed, manufactured and installed in time for the Super Bowl XLVII, which was scheduled for February 2014 in East Rutherford, N.J. the light level the Port Authority needed. The custom LEDs deliver a 50,000-hour life and 50 percent energy savings, the exact type of solution the Port Authority was looking for and in time for the big game. Through several iterations in light characteristics that Photonic Labs produced for the Port Authority, they managed to provide them with the exact light they wanted, while saving money. Photonic Labs Tunnel Lamp MHR-45 carefully was designed to resist vibration and failure, and was fitted with robust thermodynamic dissipation (heat sink). The MHR-45 performed at a less than one percent failure rate in the highly demanding conditions of the Lincoln Tunnel

previous lighting units which had an operational life of 1.4 years. It’s remarkable to see the impact Photonic Labs’ work has made to make the Lincoln Tunnel a safer and more comfortable driving environment. Perhaps someday, all other tunnels will be as well lit as the Lincoln Tunnel. The Port Authority now saves $283,000 annually with the new energy-efficient lights and has significantly reduced its energy consumption in its multiple demanding environments. The success of the Lincoln Tunnel retrofit project led the organization to install more than 3,000 LED lights in the Holland Tunnel, resulting in an annual savings of $250,000. <FC

Alfred Heyer is founder and CEO of Photonic Laboratories.

124

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


An NTMA contractor has the training, skill, and experience to understand that their job is a part of the big pictureâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;bringing your job to a successful completion. Call to find one near you.

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association www.NTMA.com 800.323.9736

Vitae Restaurant, New York, NY I Architect: Niels Guldager I Photographer: David Laudadio CIRCLE NO. 45


All hands

on deck 126

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; JULY : AUGUST 2015


A

failure to invest in innovative infrastructure is

causing congestion and is disadvantaging US ports. As ships grow larger, U.S. ports are strained to accommodate their increasingly large loads. Years of failing to invest in the latest equipment and technology have caused the United States to lag behind its foreign port peers.

The R&D Tax Credit aspects of U.S. cargo handling innovation By Charles R. Goulding, Michael R. Wilshere & Andrea Albanese

The most efficient ports in the United States move about 96 containers per hour, while our Chinese counterparts move about 130. Given this discrepancy, the U.S. container shipment industry is poised to lose market share unless it innovates. Automation, supply-chain analytics, and bigger and faster cranes will drive the industry forward toward efficiency outputs on par with leading worldwide ports. Federal and state R&D tax credits are available to port design firms and other port innovators to help stimulate the efforts and shoulder the costs of research and development activities.

JULY : AUGUST 2015 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

127


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • ALL HANDS ON DECK

Louis Berger, the $1 billion port design firm, says that with the rise in containerized shipping, one of the most important innovations of 20thcentury logistics comes the need for investment in infrastructure and security improvements. The Federal Research & Development Tax Credit

Enacted in 1981, the federal Research and Development (R&D) Tax Credit allows a credit of up to 13 percent of eligible spending for new and improved products and processes. Qualified research must meet the following four criteria: • New or improved products, processes or software • Technological in nature • Elimination of uncertainty • Process of experimentation Eligible costs include employee wages, cost of supplies, cost of testing, contract research expenses, and costs associated with developing a patent. On Dec. 19, 2014, President Obama signed the bill extending the R&D tax credit.

Gridlock at U.S. Ports

The container ships in the main ports around the world are some of the largest ships ever built. The sheer size of the largest vessels has increased maximum carrying capacity from about 4,600 containers in 1988 to over 19,000 in 2015. But the U.S. ports that unload the ships are unable to keep the pace.

128

“Larger container vessels have contributed to much of the congestion,” says Gene Seroka, executive director at the Port of Los Angeles. “More cargo is arriving now than terminals were accustomed to dealing with – and it is less organized on the ships.” In theory, the cranes at the U.S. ports should be able to unload the ships in three or four days and quickly turn them back around to China for another load. In reality, many ships sit portside for a week or more because outdated cranes and dockworkers cannot unload them quickly enough. Because of the backlog, many maritime companies have begun diverting ships to offshore ports. Mark Vitner, a senior economist at Wells Fargo, says the longer we have disruptions at the ports, the more people say this is a reason to do business elsewhere. A recent survey of 138 shippers released by the “Journal of Commerce” showed that 65 percent of surveyed shippers plan to ship less cargo through America’s West Coast in 2016, with a similar percentage planning to permanently reroute a significant amount of cargo. “The terminal is constantly pushing the envelope to improve efficiency,” says Stephen Trombley, managing director of Pier 400 in Los Angeles. “We want to bring big boats in here, also recognized the extent of the problem. But if the cargo doesn’t move, we’re in big trouble.” But American ports are not without a solution. When there is a crisis with a strong economic force, change is only inevitable. During these times, creativity surges and the resistance to change moderates. It is just this type of crises that the industry is facing, setting the stage for widespread technological innovation across US ports. Louis Berger, the $1 billion port design firm, says that with the rise in containerized shipping, one of the most important innovations of 20th-century logistics comes the need for investment in infrastructure and security improvements, as well as the construction of entirely new ports.” Some of the innovative technologies that port developers will utilize in modern port projects are discussed below.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


CIRCLE NO. 46


FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION • ALL HANDS ON DECK

Data Analytics

Data analytics can be used in the shipping industry to unload and stack containers smarter in order to reduce time spent sorting through containers. Many times crane operators spend an enormous amount of time shuffling through piles of containers such as the ones demonstrated on the right in order to find a specific container as the truck arrives for the pick-up. Some innovative technologies aim to remedy this problem. For example, “free flow” loading takes into account the container’s location on the dock before scheduling a truck for pick-up. It then schedules the pick-ups accordingly. Cargomatic Inc., the South California-based trucking company has developed a similar innovative solution. It brands the technology as the “Uber-style app for trucking.” With the Cargomatic app, drivers arrive to the port terminal without an appointment and are given the first container off the top of the “Cargomatic pile.” The container of course is earmarked for a specific customer. The driver simply logs the pickup in the Cargomatic app, which provides instructions on the customer’s location.

The Cargomatic App

According to the Wall Street Journal, “though small, the Cargomatic test proved to be a rare instance where the port’s productivity increased amid the labor strife. The average turn time for Cargomatic truck drivers was 35 minutes, roughly half the time it usually takes under the standard dig out process.”

Most productive ports Container moves per ship, per hour 2013 Asia Tianjin (China) Qingdao (China) Ningbo (China) Yokohama (Japan) Yantian (China)

130 126 120 108 106

Europe and Middle East Jebel Ali (Dubai, UAE) Khor Fakkan (UAE) Salalah (Oman) Bremerhaven (Germany) Mina Khalifa (Abu Dhabi, UAE)

119 119 91 86 86

Americas Balboa (Panama) Long Beach (US) Los Angeles (US) Lázaro Cárdenas (Mexico) New York-New Jersey (US)

Smart Cranes

A smart crane is a crane with advanced features that allows it to operate more autonomously. Innovative features allow crane operators to move containers faster and more safely with pinpoint precision. Some of these features are based on Konecranes’ smart features.

Sway Control

Maneuvering the crane and performing actions to put the container in place takes time. Some crane operators wait several minutes for a load to stop swinging in the air before placing it. Sway control aims to remedy the problem. It effectually stabilizes the load, allowing the operator to accelerate and decelerate the crane quickly. A recent study of crane operator behavior by two industry analysts revealed that cranes with sway control are 60 percent faster than an ordinary crane.

130

91 88 87 82 78

Protected Areas

Inching & Target Positioning

Inching and target positioning allows crane operators to position loads with predictability and precision quickly. Before these features, overhead cranes used a technique called jogging to place the load in position. Jogging involves switching the cranes motion from on to off quickly in order to move in small increments. The amount of containers that could be loaded using this method depends largely on the skill of the operator and load time could vary dramatically between operators. Inching allows the operator to make small movements without turning off the crane. When the inching feature is activated, the movement will stop upon reaching the set inching distance. Target positioning allows the crane operator to preset container positions. The operator simply selects the load’s target position and presses the “target positioning” button. The crane then drives itself toward the selected position. When reached, the crane automatically lowers the load to a pre-defined destination.

Working Limits & Protected Areas

Working limits are essentially virtual walls at which the crane stops automatically if intruded. Working from the controls, the crane operator sets a limit to crane motions thus creating the wall in a vertical or horizontal direction. This feature protects people on a temporary walkway or a truck being loaded.

Protected areas are similar to working limits. They are basically no-go areas that the crane operator cannot override or adjust. Basically an electronic barrier is set to allow crane operators to protect valuable production machinery or busy working areas from possible operator error. The growing size of cargo ships and a failure to invest in innovative infrastructure is causing congestion in many U.S. ports. The problem is causing billions in GDP losses. The industry’s inefficiency and failure to meet demand makes it vulnerable to widespread disruptions. Technological innovation and advancements in cargo methods is needed to bring this industry to pace. Federal and state R&D tax credits are available to support the costs of this innovation and will drive the industry forward into the 21st century. <FC

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to replace the entire door frame anymore Commercial Door Solutions Commercial doors made of aluminum or steel are integral to the security of your business, as well as the appearance you present to the public. Over time, commercial doors can fall prey to corrosion, rust, or impact damage, losing structural integrity. At Door Innovation, we saw that replacing a damaged commercial door was often an excessive expense, and developed products to repair commercial doors at a fraction of the cost of purchasing replacements. Door Innovation's products, the Jamb Anchor and the Jamb Patch, are the cost effective solution to corroded, rusted, and damaged door frames.

Jamb Patch

The Jamb Patch is used to repair steel door frames that have rusted or corroded leaving raw edged openings that allow for rodent infestation, energy loss, contaminant ingression, and even personal injury from the sharp edges. With the Jamb Patch kit, the customer can self-repair the steel frame system, saving money while extending the useful life of the door system.

View our video on how the Jamb Patch is installed: www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tayZ7bMCys

To contact us for more information, please visit our website:

www.doorinnovation.com CIRCLE NO. 47


Perfectly flat floors, delivered.

® SCA-0241-0715 ©2015 LATICRETE A ATICRETE SUPERCAP, LLC. All trademarks shown are the intellectual properties of their respective owners.


Faster, safer, greener. The superior system for new construction or renovations ■ Guaranteed to meet substrate tolerances for all types of floor coverings ■ Reduces build times and carrying costs ■ Industry leading warranties ■

There is nothing like it in the industry. Snap for the video. www.laticretesupercap.com. CIRCLE NO. 48


134

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; JULY : AUGUST 2015


It’s alive

How biofilters are helping purify today’s indoor spaces By Terri Sparks

T

hese are facts: Living wall biofilters not only boost any commercial building’s aesthetics, they also make indoor air quality better and improve building performance. Around them, employees become inspired, more alert and energetic. Consumer appetite for green vertical walls is growing year over year – even basic living walls (plants-ona-wall) offer a type of large-scale artwork that very few dislike: a visual feast of living, growing and changing natural foliage. The ultimate living wall really is a living biofiltration machine, a working technology replicating natural processes. In simple terms, the biofilter uses the complex microbiota associated with the lush, mature plants to produce indoor air as clean as the outdoors. This process yields perhaps the most effective, energy-efficient and aesthetically pleasing interior space imaginable. Of course, the popularity of these natural, green, vertical objets d’art is increasing like wildfire because of their positive impact on building atmosphere. Properly designed and installed, these systems qualify for numerous LEED points. Nowadays, savvy architects, builders, tenants and visitors all know the benefits offered by an eco-friendly building. Studies by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) indicate that the perceived value of a commercial property with LEED points almost always is greatly heightened.

Large-scale living wall biofilters installed in hotel lobbies, corporate reception centers, enclosed shopping centers and more, actually function as natural air-filtering systems, which benefit everyone. By using fans or being connected to the building’s HVAC system, they disseminate cleansed air into the closed environment. They also cut down on noise levels, as they have the natural ability to soften sound waves and absorb harsh acoustics. One company in Canada has taken the living wall experience to this incredibly high level. Headquartered outside of Toronto, Nedlaw Living Wall Biofilters offer a hybridization of three technologies: biofiltration (using nature to break organic pollutants down to their benign constituents), phyto-remediation (the use of green plants to facilitate the remediation or reclamation of contaminated soils or water) and hydroponics.

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

135


IT’S ALIVE The firm repackages these into a system specifically engineered for the indoor environment to deal with the issues of air quality. As a result, this system incorporates nature’s ability to remove contaminants into an aesthetically pleasing format, and adapting it specifically for interior space.

How is this done?

In a nutshell, air naturally is cleaned via a regimen using no artificial chemicals. Other methods of interior air cleaning rely on moving air through filters with various chemicals working not unlike sponges, seizing contaminants from the air. Just like a sponge, these filters become saturated to a point where they can no longer remove any contaminants. These filters then must be disposed of along with all contaminants they harbor – becoming hazardous waste, unsafe to both humans and to the environment. Designer of Nedlaw’s patented systems, Dr. Alan Darlington was part of a research team looking at biological life support for longterm space habitation and has become a world-recognized authority on the use of biological systems to improve indoor air quality.

136

“Living Wall Biofilters are an ecologically friendly green machine in which air pollutants are broken down into their benign constituents,” says Darlington, founder of Nedlaw Living Walls. “Although our living wall biofilters are typically designed to last over twenty years, their biological aspects have the ability to continue with their functions forever. The biological component of active living wall biofilters is self-repairing and self-rejuvenating. Although it is the microbiota (beneficial microbes) in our biofilters that break down the contaminants, the green plants create the environment that maximizes the microbes cleaning ability.” And what an environment the plants create. “Green plants clearly have a great aesthetic value,” Darlington says. “Maintaining an indoor space that is truly green and alive increases worker productivity and lowers absenteeism.” Darlington points out that careful selection of plant species promotes pollutant-degrading microbes and that plants can quickly adapt to growth on vertical surfaces. “Potted plants have very limited impact on cleaning indoor air, it is the incorporation of the biofilter into the air-handling system that maximizes the ability to

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


break down pollutants. Plants can reduce the amount of dust in an enclosed space, as well.” One noteworthy project to incorporate a living wall biofilter, as both a focal component and for air quality effect, is the Dr. David Suzuki Public School in Windsor, Ontario, one of the most energy-efficient schools in Canada and, possibly, all of North America. Named for the country’s foremost environmentalist, the school has earned all 10 LEED energy points, qualifying it to be certified as LEED Platinum. The structure includes wind turbines, display-control monitors, green roofs, solar wall panels, bicycle generators, solar hot-water-heating panels and, a two-story Nedlaw Living Wall Biofilter. Environmental experts throughout North America have

“Clean air can be supplied to building occupants for as little as 24 watts per person or even less.” – Randy Walden, President, Nedlaw Living Walls

stated that the building itself is a veritable “green teaching tool.” How about the cost? To avoid the buildup of harmful pollutants, most buildings are ventilated with new outside air. This air must be heated in the winter and cooled in the summer representing a huge portion of a building’s energy expense. “Our biofilters return cleansed air already at the right temperature, so this stiff energy expense can actually be greatly reduced for building owners,” says Randy Walden, president of Nedlaw Living Walls. “Clean air can be supplied to building occupants for as little as 24 watts per person or even less. You see, we don’t just want to make an indoor environment have a stunning, natural allure, while at the same time be healthier for those within it. We want to make it less expensive to maintain, as well.” <CCR

Terri Sparks is a writer with Communicators. For 10 years, she was advertising/marketing manager of Terrazzo & Marble Supply Co., one of Chicago's largest marketers of stone materials. Prior to that, she worked as an account executive for Treister Inc. in Chicago.

LARGE

doesn’t always mean

Heavy...

Down gauge your sign materials with Makrolon® LD • First choice for oversized or formed letters and cloud signs • Extensive industry standard color palate • Eliminates the need for diffuser films and textures

Get more information at sheffieldplastics.com or call 800.254.1707

A D VA NTA G E 119 Salisbury Road • Sheffield, MA 01257 CIRCLE NO. 49

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

137


Eye in

sky

Maximizing site efficiency and security with HD video surveillance By David Raske

C

ommercial construction managers can benefit immensely by installing video surveillance

cameras along a site’s periphery. Today’s video surveillance technology can help supervisors ensure building activities go as planned, workers are adhering to safety rules, and that equipment and material are protected against theft. Here are five threats facing commercial sites and how video surveillance can improve operations, reinforce safety and deter theft rings from targeting construction sites.

138

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Onsite theft

Construction sites contain thousands of dollars of heavy equipment and building materials, including machinery and copper, all of which are vulnerable to theft and damage. Protecting these items roundthe-clock should be a top priority. Not only are locks and concealment crucial at night, but so are surveillance cameras. Project managers should put a concerted effort into both the security and safety of expensive equipment.

Ensuring safety

Security is not the only concern. Materials and equipment can put workers at risk to injuries and even health ailments from exposure. A high-definition (HD) video surveillance system helps to make sure workers are following safety guidelines and are using equipment properly so they are well protected. The sight of surveillance cameras also can deter dishonest workers from faking injuries, which can lead to fraudulent workers claims (see Workers’ Compensation Video Evidence ) or engaging in dangerous behavior or activity. Supervisors easily can view live video anytime and anywhere from their mobile device to see if workers are following safety rules, using equipment in the correct manner and avoiding dangerous situations.

Building construction

The addition of a multi-camera video surveillance system can assist in maximizing building operations and deterring would-be criminals

A surveillance camera is a necessity for spotting suspicious incidents.

from stealing equipment. Inefficient work practices must first be identified in order to be improved, which is why the installation of a video surveillance camera system is so important. A video surveillance system can provide valuable information on how site operations are flowing and if there is anything that is preventing the daily quota from being achieved, it most likely will be caught on camera. Supervisors also can review video from their smartphones to ensure the day is running as planned and check for any red-flags that might cause problems or slow progress. For example, usually trucks must make a complete stop before entering a construction site. If a camera catches vehicles violating this safety rule, a project manager can intervene before an accident occurs or someone is injured.

Workers’ compensation video evidence

As an employer, you’re responsible for providing workers’ compensation if a worker is injured on the job. Unfortunately, workers’ comp fraud is all too real and, may very well threaten your bottom line. Surveillance cameras strategically placed in areas within the construction site where workers’ comp fraud might occur can provide an unbiased view of a situation and make sure that workers are not out to

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

139


EYE IN SKY scam your operation, especially if there’s no eye-witness. A surveillance camera is a necessity for spotting suspicious incidents.

What to look for in a video surveillance system

Video surveillance systems today now are equipped with mobile surveillance apps to view live and recorded video from a smartphone or tablet

Modern video surveillance solutions offer a surfeit of high-tech features such as HD resolution, wide dynamic range, motion detection, and day and night recording. Full HD video resolution is by far one of the most advantageous features to have if you do decide to invest in a video surveillance system, as it helps capture remarkably clear images that are easy to discern. HD camera sensors make for a wider camera field of view, with images that capture a larger area and typically show more detail than analog (or CCTV) cameras. As a result, clear HD video has strong evidentiary value. Another feature to take advantage of is mobile monitoring. Video surveillance systems today now are equipped with mobile

surveillance apps to view live and recorded video from a smartphone or tablet. This gives managers the ability to monitor operations and activity while off-site, which is ideal when the job shuts down for the day. Mobile surveillance can help determine the cause of a triggered alarm; by tapping into the video stream from a smartphone, the user can determine if it’s a false alarm or if police should be notified. As a site supervisor, your job is to keep the project on schedule and avoid lost time from missing materials, tools and injured workers. When selecting the company you want to work with, make certain it has extensive experience and knowledge improving commercial construction site security to make life easier for supervisors and project managers. You can learn more about our work at www.videosurveillance.com. <CCR

David Raske currently serves as director of marketing and business development at VideoSurveillance.com, with a specialization in wireless and IP camera systems.

EXPERIENCE, FOCUS, RESULTS The Toler Firm LLC is singularly devoted to our clients in the construction industry. Our focus is construction contract dispute resolution. Tim Toler has represented general contractors and subcontractors on commercial and industrial projects for more than thirty years. Construction law is all we do. THE TOLER FIRM LLC | ATLANTA, GEORGIA WWW.TOLERFIRM.COM

CIRCLE NO. 50

140

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015

CIRCLE NO. 51


CIRCLE NO. 52


PERSPECTIVE

PERSPECTIVE

Find the right fit

By Rob Denton & Vince Arnette

Contractors are booming again, but their financing is not

I

n the 20-plus years that we have been advising businesses, we have learned that those in the construction industry often need cash to bridge the next few months or fund expansion so that they can bid on more jobs.

It’s no secret that the Great Recession hit contractors and subcontractors hard. Hundreds of firms went out of business. We know what history shows: The number of construction workers plunged 30 percent nationally to a low of 5.4 million workers in January 2011 from a peak in April 2006, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The industry is recovering. What’s clear to us is that choosing the right funding source is critical, especially for the construction companies that endured the ups and downs of the past decade. With that growth, there is optimism. Sub-contractors are getting more work. They want to hire employees and buy equipment and materials. But they can’t do it with internal cash flow because they typically wait 60 to 90 days to get paid by their general contractors. They need a loan now. But before they apply, owners need to take a step back and develop a plan that solves their problem, and

142

not just puts a Band-Aid on it. They must look at their cash flow, collections, taxes, and so on. When we sit down with a company, we talk about the business first and money second. Often, we give them tough love. We tell them, “Money will not solve your problem,” or “Let’s talk about your business so we can better understand your situation, needs and challenges.” Once they’ve addressed the underlying issues, owners can start their search for financing. Banks always are one of the best choices, and we work with clients to make them creditworthy in the eyes of a loan committee. We know whether a business has a shot at getting a bank loan. If it does, we push the business owner in that direction. But a construction company that has had financial issues in the past typically won’t qualify for a bank or Small Business Administration loan. Oftentimes, a business owner needs financing in the next 24 to 48 hours, and banks cannot move that fast. In that instance, a factoring

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Even though the online world of lending offers potential funding opportunities, it is a good idea to ask trusted friends and advisers such as CPAs, attorneys and even bankers, first. Non-traditional lenders are out there; they just don’t take out full-page ads in the Wall Street Journal. Those alternative lenders, some of which are hedge funds, can provide immediate funding for as little as 60 days based on cash flow and other criteria. Typical documentation requirements include completing an application, providing three months of bank statements and the first page of the most recent federal tax return. Based on that information, funding consultants help qualify the applicant and determine how much they might qualify for. The final step is presenting the package to the most appropriate lenders to see which offers the best deal. Borrowers are typically qualified in 24-72 hours with funding in less than a week. When the right contractor and lender come together, it’s a win-win. In fact, most companies have such a good experience that they come back when they need new funding. It’s a system that can work over and over to everyone’s benefit. <CCR Rob Denton and Vince Arnette, CPA, are the co-founders of Corporate Rescue. Denton is an experienced business executive and entrepreneur with more than 20 years of experience working with small and medium-size businesses. Arnette is a Certified Public Accountant with more than two decades of experience working with businesses, providing tax, finance and business consulting.

LED Panel Lights

High Efficient Lighting Solution for Fluorescent Troffers

company is one option. It can provide cash based on receivables. But factors charge fees in addition to discounting the invoice amount. There’s another consideration: business relationships. The factoring company, not the sub-contractor, will be calling for payment. That could negatively affect how the contractor sees its vendor.

What can you do?

So, what else can a contractor do when it needs between $5,000 and $500,000? For small sums, the business owner can ask friends and family, but the owner should not be too disappointed if they are not enthusiastic about the idea. The owner should not put the debt on his personal balance sheet either; it’s too much of a risk for one individual. The owner should also avoid predatory lenders whose deals are too good to be true. The onerous financing terms can destroy a business.

Replace traditional commercial / residential troffers with LED Panel lights to eliminate hazardous waste from fluorescent bulbs and achieve unmatched energy savings. Equipped with Even-Glow technology offering smooth, uniform LED lighting and long-lasting illumination. 10%-100% Smooth Linear Dimming with 0-10V Dimmer Cool White, Natural White, Warm White, or RGB Brightness Ranges from 400 to 4600 Lumens Sizes Include: 6in x 6in, 1ft x 1ft, 1ft x 2ft, 2ft x 2ft, and 2ft x 4ft Flush, Surface, and Suspended Mounting Options

Short ROI

65% Less Energy

Maintenance Free

Quickly recoup investment with large utility rebates and incentives

Reduce energy cost with greater efficiency than traditional HIDs

No bulbs or ballasts to replace, reducing maintenance time & cost

One source for interior and exterior LED lighting solutions for office, commercial, and industrial. LED Flood Lights

LED Down Lights

Shoebox Lights

Modular LED High Bays

For commercial pricing call 866-590-3533 or email commercial-sales14@superbrightleds.com

CIRCLE NO. 53

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

143


LEGAL EASE

LEGAL EASE

Build the project Why your construction contract matters

By Michael Bosse

N

o construction project goes perfectly. Not a single one. Yet, there are best practices that those in the industry can follow during the course of a project to enhance the quality of the work, create a harmonious working environment, and avoid conflicts and disputes that all too often can lead to litigation, a result that no one desires. The Construction Contract

The worst thing that anyone can do on a project is to execute the construction contract, and then put it on the shelf to gather dust. The construction contract allocates the risks the parties to that contract expected to encounter, whether the topic is scope of work, quality of work, price or something else. As those identified risks occur during the course of a project, the parties have to understand how the contract deals with that particular risk so that they can act appropriately. The contract is written, now you have to live it during the progress of the work.

Notice Provisions

The worst thing that anyone can do on a project is to execute the construction contract, and then put it on the shelf to gather dust.

Hopefully, reasonable notice provisions were negotiated in the contract, but in any case, now that they exist in the executed contract, they must be followed. For every case that a court decides concluding that a notice provision should not be enforced because the late notice did not prejudice the other side, another court will bounce a claimant out of court because it failed to meet a specific notice deadline even in the absence of a lack of prejudice. The best way to avoid this is to know and meet whatever notice provisions exist.

Contemporaneous Documentation

In my almost two decades of being a construction lawyer, I have seen this done very well by contractors, and also very poorly. Making a real-time written record of things that happen on a project matters because those documents may end up as evidence in a trial or arbitration years from now. Creating a written record of conversations that occur that are important during a project is much more credible to a fact-finder

than simply testifying that the conversation occurred. Worse, do not expect that your colleague, who now is your adversary in litigation, is not going to shade his or her memory of the conversation to suit them, or outright lie about it. Parties that timely document claims and responses to claims, changed work or unforeseen conditions, and the like, fare much better in court and arbitration than those who are sloppy record-keepers or rely on verbal evidence.

Peace and Harmony

Can’t we all just get along? Seriously, one large intangible on every project is the people who are working on it. Try to identify problems as they happen, and deal with them quickly and decisively. Is there a lack of coordination because of a subcontractor that is in over its head on a project? Is a project super constantly at odds with the clerk of the works or the designer? Is an owner constantly changing his mind about what it he wants? The best practice is to confront the situation, learn the facts, and then resolve it quickly. Very rarely will avoiding the situation result in it going away. Kicking the can down the road will, more often than not, turn a small problem into a larger one that affects the progress of the work, results in a claim, or quite possibly in litigation. There is no perfect construction project, but that doesn’t mean you can’t try to achieve perfection. I certainly have seen examples of projects where everyone worked together toward a common goal (the completed project), avoided the mines in the minefield, and watched people happily move on to the next job. Implementing some of the best practices will help to increase the number of positive projects, and ward away the bad ones. <CCR

Michael Bosse is a shareholder at Bernstein Shur in Portland, Maine. He is the chair of the firm’s Construction Law Practice Group and recently authored the book, “Building the Construction Case: A Blueprint for Litigators.” You can reach him at mbosse@bernsteinshur.com.

144

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Basaltine Basaltine white 24”x24” white 24”x24” nutnut 12”x24” 12”x24”

CIRCLE NO. 54

discover more discover more www.florimusa.com

www.florimusa.com

An Italian tile made in USA An Italian tile made in USA An Italian tile made in USA An Italian tile made in

An Italian tile made in USA An Italian tile made in USA An Italian tile made in USA An Italian tile made in


PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE: Popeyes Restaurant

Bloomington

$350,000.00

2,200

Renovation/Fit-Out

Q3 2015

White Castle Restaurant

New Albany

$250,000.00

2,600

Renovation/Fit-Out

Q3 2015

Panera Bread

Englewood

$600,000.00

4,200

New Construction

Q3 2015

Longhorn Steakhouse

Terre Haute

$1,000,000.00

6,500

New Construction

Q3 2015

Q3 2015

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS: Whole Foods

Kansas City

$4,000,000.00

30,000

Renovation

National Grocers

Denver

$1,000,000.00

15,000

New Construction

Q4 2015

Kroger

Fairborn

$36,000,000.00

135,000

New Construction

Q3 2015

Overtown Gateway Mixed-Use

Miami

$300,000,000.00

80,000

New Construction

Q1 2015

Machinery Row Mixed-Use

Racine

$65,000,000.00

500,000

Renovation

Q3 2015

Freedom Place South Development

New York

$115,000,000.00

180,000

New Construction

Q3 2015

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY: Army Heritage Center Expansion

Carlisle

$8,400,000.00

370,000

Renovation/Addition

Q4 2015

Off-Track Betting Casino

Medford

$40,000,000.00

100,000

New Construction

Q3 2015

Fire Fighters Museum

Central Islip

$6,000,000.00

34,000

New Construction

Q3 2015

CDB WIU New Performing Arts Center

McComb

$60,000,000.00

127,000

New Construction

Q3 2015

French-American School of NY

White Plains

$14,000,000.00

231,000

New Construction

Q3 2015

UNC Mary Ellen Jones Building

Chapel Hill

$55,000,000

225,000

Renovation

late Q3 2014

LSU Health Sciences Dental School

New Orleans

$3,000,000.00

29,000

Renovation

early Q4 2015

SOWELA LTC Morgan Smith Replacement

Jennings

$8,000,000.00

145,000

New Construction

Q3 2015

Public Libary

Oneida

$6,000,000.00

18,000

New Construction

Q3 2015

Logan International Airport Central Heating Plant Upgrade

East Boston

$1,500,000

Alteration

2016

Track Rehabilitation

Eastport

$40,000,000

Alteration

2016

Northwestern Lake Forest Hospital

Lake Forest

$260,000,000.00

450,000

New Construction

Q4 2015

Spring Branch Medical Office Building II

Clayton

$2,000,000.00

30,000

New Construction

Q4 2015

EDUCATION:

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL:

GYMS/FITNESS CLUBS/SPAS:

146

Cytec Fitness Center

Piedmont

$250,000.00

1,800

Renovation

Q4 2015

Capello Salon & Spa

Buffalo

$250,000.00

4,000

Renovation/Fit 0ut

Q3 2015

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


CIRCLE NO. 55


CALENDAR

CALENDAR • AUGUST - SEPTEMBER AUGUST 20, 2015

Commercial Construction & Renovation People San Fransisco, CA Harringtons Bar & Grill www.ccr-people.com

SAVE YOUR SPOT TODAY Commercial Construction & Renovation Retreat 2015: October 1st-4th Hotel Derek in Houston, TX

SEPTEMBER 10, 2015 Commercial Construction & Renovation People New York City, NY Suite 36 www.ccr-people.com

JANUARY 20th-22nd The Marriott Riverwalk San Antonio, TX www.ccr-summit.com

DECEMBER 3, 2015

PRODUCT SHOWCASE

Commercial Construction & Renovation People Phoenix, AZ Location TBD www.ccr-people.com

Dakota Systems Manufacturing

Metropolitan Ceramics® Canton, OH

Farmingdale, NY

Build Your Store In Hours, Not Days! Drywall, Finished Panels, Mirrors, Cabinets From design to fast, easy installation — Dakota designs and manufactures products that work. Green Perimeter Wall Systems Recessed Standards, custom metal work, post and panel - Fitting room systems, floor fixtures and cash & wrap desks - A sustainable resource manufacturer, our products are green.

Three Flooring Options For Commercial Kitchens Metropolitan Ceramics QUARRYBASICS® Abrasive is a silicon carbide enhanced quarry tile, for added slip resistance. Metropolitan Ceramics METRO TREAD® has nine raised treads across the surface of each quarry tile for added slip resistance. Metropolitan Ceramics also offers QUARRYBASICS® X-Colors with a metallic additive throughout the body of the quarry tile for added slip resistance.

We Stand Behind Your Products With Ours

Use Metropolitan Ceramics® for all of your commercial kitchen needs and anywhere slip resistance is an issue.

877.9.DAKOTA (932.5682)

1-800-325-3945

www.dakotamfg.com

www.metroceramics.com

CIRCLE NO. 56

CIRCLE NO. 57

148

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


July/August 2015 • ccr-mag.com YES I wish to receive a FREE subscription to

P.O. Box 3908, Suwanee, GA 30024 678.765.6550 • 678.765.6551 corpcirc@ccr-mag.com

NO

Commercial Construction & Renovation.

Would you like information on Commercial Construction & Renovation People? Yes No Please check here if you would like to receive the Commercial Construction & Renovation email newsletter. Yes No 1. Please indicate your organization’s primary business: (choose one only)

INQUIRY and SUBSCRIPTION CARD • FAX to 678-765-6551

 (A) Retailer  (N) H  ospitality (Hotel, Motel,

(I) Developer (Q) Management Company

Resort, Cruise Line etc., and Hospitality Management Company)

Signature_____________________________________________________ Date______________ Name (please print)________________________________________________________________

(K) Financial/Purchasing Firm (R) Shopping Center Owner

(C) Restaurant

(S) Healthcare Facility

(O) Architecture Firm

(T) Government

Company_______________________________________________________________________

(G) Design Firm

(L) Manufacturer/Supplier

Address________________________________________________________________________

(P) Engineering Firm

(Z) Other (please specify)

City_____________________________________________ State_________ Zip______________

(H) Contractor/Builder/ Construction

Title___________________________________________________________________________

Phone (

)___________________________ Fax (

)_______________________________

Web site____________________________________ E-mail______________________________

2. Please indicate your primary job function: (choose one only)

 (01) Corporate Management

(Owners, Partners, President, Chairman, Principal, CEO, CFO, COO, etc.)

Please check here if you do not wish to receive third party information on the latest products and services. To receive FREE product information from the individual companies featured in this issue, circle the number below that corresponds to the product number. Valid through January 31, 2016.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75

________________________________

 (02) Senior Management (Executive, Vice President, Director, etc.)

     

(03) Management (04) Facilities (05) Maintenance (06) Construction

       

(09) Design (10) Project Management (11) Estimator (12) Operations (13) Security (14) Purchasing (15) Environmental (16) Real Estate (99) Other

(please specify):

(07) Architect (08) Engineer

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

All information must be provided. The publisher reserves the right to determine qualification for a free subscription.

SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES Call 678.765.6550: Call anytime. If no one answers, leave a detailed message and be sure to include your name, phone number and/or email address so we can contact you if we have any questions. Or write: Commercial Construction & Renovation P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 Moving?: Please let us know eight weeks in advance to make sure you do not have interruption in service. Remember to include both your old and new contact information. Duplicate Issues?: If you are receiving multiple copies of Commercial Construction & Renovation, please let us know. And please include information from both mailing labels. A subscription to Commercial Construction & Renovation is your subscription to better-design, better-built and better-maintained facilities.

Please contact us for all your subscription needs. We’re here to help! How To Reach Us Regarding Your Subscription Visit us online: 24 hours a day at www.ccr-mag.com. All the information you need to take care of your subscription account is right here. Subscription Questions?: Please email corpcirc@ccr-mag.com.

JULY : AUGUST 2015 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

149


AD INDEX

CCR • AD INDEX Advertiser Page

Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page

Reader Service No.

AC•Tech...............................................CVR2-1, 27............1, 12

Laticrete SuperCap................................. 132-133............... 48

Architectural Imports...................................49................... 23

LightBeam...................................................83................... 37

Asta.............................................................63................... 29

Master-Bilt...................................................75................... 34

Atlas Sign Industries....................................85................... 38

Metropolitan Ceramics................................148.................. 57

Bayer MaterialScience................................137.................. 49 Beacon Bay PM...........................................33................... 16 Better Life Tech............................................53................... 25 Boss Facility Services..................................93................... 41 Bostik..........................................................45................... 21 Calpipe Security Bollards............................129.................. 46 Carney Contracting Services........................79................... 36 Commercial Construction & Renovation Summit 2016....................... 116-118............... 43 Construction Data Co. (CDC).......................147.................. 55 Cicero’s Development Corp....................... 34-35................. 17 Component Hardware..................................77................... 35 Controlled Power.........................................14.................... 9 Construction One.........................................11.................... 8 Dakota........................................................148.................. 56 Del Conca USA.......................................... 46-47................. 22 Door Innovation..........................................131.................. 47 East to West.................................................43................... 20 Florim.........................................................145.................. 54 FPL..............................................................31................... 14

Mike Levin..................................................140.................. 51 Modern Line Furniture.................................67................... 31 Nedlaw........................................................95................... 42 Newton........................................................15................... 10 Nora............................................................39................... 18 National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association.......51................... 24 OxBlue.........................................................59................... 27 Pantera........................................................65................... 30 Porcelanosa USA..........................................91................... 40 Prosoco.......................................................40................... 19 Quality Solutions, Inc.....................................5..................... 3 Retail Contractors Association......................125................. 45 Rockerz, Inc..................................................7..................... 4 Salsbury.......................................................8..................... 5 Schimenti Construction............................8, CVR4..............6, 60 Stephen Elliott.............................................69................... 33 Storefloors................................................ 28-29................. 13 Superbrightleds.com...................................143.................. 53

Georgia Printco...........................................123.................. 44

System Sensor.........................................32, 69..............15, 32

Glab............................................................141.................. 52

Systemates..................................................60................... 28

HFA........................................................... 86-87................. 39

Toler Law Firm............................................140.................. 50

IFMA...........................................................151.................. 58

Warner Bros...............................................CVR3................. 59

Lakeview.................................................. 16-17................. 11

Wolverie Buildig Group..................................9..................... 7

Laticrete................................................... 54-55................. 26

WoodWorks..................................................3..................... 2

150

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


The future of the workplace is ours to create.

Experience

Community

Solutions

Facility Tours: See FM innovation in action

Education: Our concerns, our goals, our future

Master Classes: Discuss an FM issue or trend in depth

Networking: Our peers, our friends, our community

The Expo: Relieve facility hiccups & headaches Solution Arenas: Tips for practical product application

The conversation begins at

www.worldworkplace.org

IFMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World Workplace is an interactive learning, networking, idea- and knowledgesharing event for professionals who support all aspects of the work environment. CIRCLE NO. 58


PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

The dog whisperer

W

lifespans than

e’ve always had dogs in our family – for compan-

Just like having children, dogs (any pet) will change your life. You need to worry ionship, enjoyment and protection. Dogs usually about feeding them, letting them go to the restroom, give them a bath once in a while have a short life span. While some have longer and, of course, offering them compassion and attention. And let’s not forget about others, it’s always tough when one of them passes. putting them in the doggy sin bin when they’re naughty. Over the last few years, my wife has been a part of an organization called Angels Among Us, which helps save animals from being put down if a good home cannot be found for them or if they are in a bad situation. We have four dogs – three are rescue dogs. I told my wife no more dogs. These four we have are all getting up there in doggy years and soon we will be dog less. Entering the second half of my life at 52, being able to close the door and not worry about having the house destroyed when I get back has its appeal. Having done our part to help some dogs survive, I feel like we deserve the break. Well, as fate would have it, my wife brought home a small terrier who had been beaten and thrown down a street drain and left to perish. Someone found him and brought him to the animal shelter. It was not a pretty site. His eyes were infected. His fur was matted. His ribs were broken. He was skin and bones. They asked us to try and bring him back to life. The second night we had him, my wife woke up at 3 a.m. and thought he had passed. After nursing him through the night, we decided to make him a member of the pack. While I’ve never been a small dog person, he stole my heart. Animals are just like people. With care, understanding, love, respect and discipline, we all can change for the better. If you ever get a chance to save a rescue dog, I urge you to make it happen. Too many animals need a good home. Stay cool the rest of the Summer. We look forward to seeing many of you at our Summit in San Antonio in January 2016. <CCR

With care, understanding, love, respect and discipline, we all can change for the better.

Commercial Construction & Renovation (ISSN 2329-7441) is published bi-monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Unsolicited materials will only be returned if a self-addressed, postagepaid envelope is included. Articles appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

152

Subscription: 1 year, $50 in U.S., Canada and Mexico; single copies, $10. 1 year, $190 International surface; $290 International air mail; International single copies $25. Printed in U.S.A. Known office of publication: 358 Aviemore Lane, Suwanee, GA. 30024. Periodicals postage paid at Suwanee, GA. 30024, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Commercial Construction & Renovation, P.O. Box 3908, Suwanee, GA 30024.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — JULY : AUGUST 2015


Turning imagination into reality.

Retail. Hospitality. Restaurant. Entertainment. Exhibits. Environments. SIGNS & GRAPHICS • INTERIOR IDENTIFICATION PACKAGES • DIGITAL & FLATBED PRINTING HAND-PAINTED MURALS • FABRICATED SURFACES / ARCHITECTURAL ORNAMENTATION PLASTER & FIBERGLASS FABRICATION • METAL FABRICATION • CUSTOM CABINET & FURNITURE SHOP DRAPERY • UPHOLSTERY • DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SERVICES Vember.Stuart-Lilley@warnerbros.com • 818.954.4430 www.WarnerBrosDesignStudio.com CIRCLE NO. 59


CIRCLE NO. 60

Profile for BOC design Inc

CCR July August 2015  

CCR July August 2015